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Daily Toreador The

WEDNESDAY, AUG. 28, 2013 VOLUME 88 ■ ISSUE 3

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Tapsoba returns from competition Texas Tech forward Kader Tapsoba’s time with the Burkina Faso National Team has run its course as the Stallions lost to Ivory Coast, 100-60, in round 16 of the FIBA African Championships on Monday. Tapsoba led the team with 13 points and seven rebounds. He was six of 10 from the field and also contributed two assists and three blocks in the losing effort. In his four games at the African Championships, Tapsoba averaged 4.8 points, 3.8 rebounds, 1.3 assists and 1.8 blocks per game. Tapsoba will return to Lubbock to begin work on a master’s degree and play out his final season of eligibility for the Red Raiders. ➤➤sports@dailytoreador.com

Tech soccer rises in recent rankings Texas Tech’s soccer program earned its highest ranking in program history after beginning its season with consecutive wins. The Red Raiders moved up one spot to No. 23 in the National Soccer Coaches Association of America rankings released Tuesday afternoon. The new ranking was an effect of Tech’s victories against New Mexico and Colorado State to begin the 2013 season. The Red Raiders defeated the Lobos, 1-0, in their season opener before routing the Rams, 6-0, in their home opener Sunday at the John Walker Soccer Complex. Tech continues its season-long, five-match home stand this weekend. The Red Raiders will host Idaho State at 7 p.m. Friday before facing Long Beach State at 6:30 p.m. Sunday. Both matches will be at John Walker Soccer Complex where Tech has won 12 of its last 13 matches. ➤➤sports@dailytoreador.com

OPINIONS, Pg. 4

Reynolds: U.S. should avoid involvement in Syria

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Students outnumber bed spaces By CARSON WILSON Staff Writer

Strips of black paper are taped to the windows to limit sunlight, four beds are pushed against each wall, two cardboard boxes are used as a trashcan and one TV sits in a corner on the fifth floor study lounge of Weymouth Residence Hall. This is Jose Figueroa’s new short-term home. The junior mechanical engineering major from Houston shares the former lounge with three other Texas Tech students because of the residential overflow happening around campus. “I get a bed that I can sleep in,” he said. “It doesn’t matter. It could be worse.” Jose Valenciano, the assistant director of the Welcome Center said there are currently 102 students who are oversubscribed, meaning there were more housing applications than rooms. Some students were placed in over-

flow areas created in lounges and others were assigned to stay with community advisers, he said. When Figueroa arrived on campus, he wasn’t aware he would be staying in a study room, but said he likes the lounge better than a normal residence hall room. “I didn’t know what to expect,” he said. “When I walked in, I saw how big it was and I said, ‘I can work with this. It’s better than a room.’” Aurelio Vargas, a sophomore biochemistry major from El Paso, and a CA said the CAs usually are not required to have a roommate, but because residence halls are overpopulated, he now shares his room. “I think it was the best option,” he said. “I think they handled it well. It just means the university is growing.” Like Figueroa, Vargas is looking at the positive aspects of the situation. HOUSING continued on Page 2 ➤➤

PHOTO BY LAUREN PAPE/The Daily Toreador

JOSE FIGUEROA, A junior mechanical engineering major from Houston, works on his computer in his temporary room, a Weymouth Residence Hall study room, which he shares with three other students because of a shortage of rooms.

Tech student stands up for beliefs IT updates Blackboard By LIANA SOLIS Staff Writer

Citizens of the U.S. and across the globe use multitudes of ways to express their personal beliefs, ideas and religions. Eddie Castillo, a senior psychology major from Dallas, is part of the Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster, or the religion of Pastafarianism. Castillo said a man named Bobby Henderson first created the religion in 2005. “It was created at first as a protest because of the Kansas state board decision to allow the teaching of intelligent design and creationism in public school biology classes,” Castillo said. “He started that with the idea that if other religious ideals can be used in the classrooms, then all the other religions and ideals should be taught as creationism as well.” The religion was originally made as a form of satire because Kansas, along with other states, wouldn’t accept it as a real religion, he said. “What was done was Bobby Henderson created stories and gospels so it can almost be in a level playing field with popular religions,” Castillo said. “There are the evangelical or liberal interpretations of the gospel and then there’s the one that I — along with thousands of other people — choose to follow, which is the more metaphorical way to look at it.” One significant detail about the religion is the followers’ choice to wear a pasta strainer or pot on their head, Castillo said. “It’s kind of a metaphor or symbol that ties into the spaghetti monster, I mean what other type of headwear would you wear to represent it?” he said. BELIEFS continued on Page 5 ➤➤

By TYLER DORNER Staff Writer

PORTRAIT BY LAUREN PAPE/The Daily Toreador

EDDIE CASTILLO, A junior psycology major from Dallas, was the first person in the United States to wear a pasta strainer on his head in his driver’s license photo last week to represent the Pastafarian religion, which celebrates the Flying Spaghetti Monster.

When logging onto the Blackboard system this year, students, faculty and staff can expect to see new technology and an updated interface. According to Blackboard’s website, the Blackboard system 9.1, nicknamed “learn,” will help student learning be more efficient and effective. “This will deliver a higher level of service and performance,” said Sam Segran, chief information officer and associate vice president for information technology. The transition from 8.6 to 9.1 occurred during the summer, and the fall semester will feature about 2,000 courses in the new system. “It’s a virtual or online classroom,” said Katherine Austin, the assistant vice president for IT. “In a traditional classroom you have the chalkboard or projector ... Blackboard is a way to recreate that classroom environment virtually.” For both Segran and Austin, the biggest change will be in the accessibility of the new system for all students. The “learn” 9.1 version has an easier interface as compared to the 8.6, which Austin said was clunky. However, some students said they felt the old operating system was not that bad. “I’ve never had any real problems with it,” said Laurie Appling, a junior psychology major from Crosbyton. The new system will benefit all students, Segran said, even those who have impairments. BLACKBOARD continued on Page 2 ➤➤

College of Media, Communication hosts new student reception By MIKAEL GONZALES Staff Writer

Ball Security-- SPORTS, Page 8

INDEX Crossword.....................8 Classifieds................7 L a Vi d a . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Opinions.....................4 Sports.......................7 Sudoku.......................5 EDITORIAL: 806-742-3393

Students and faculty came together as the College of Media and Communication hosted a new student reception at 4 p.m. Tuesday on the third floor of the CoMC building. Student organizations lined the room to inform students about the opportunities the college has to offer. The organizations included Texas Tech PR, Tech Advertising Federation, The Hub@TTU, Society of Professional Journalists and Double T Insider. Also at the event was 88.1 FM, handing out T-shirts and informing students about working at a radio station. The goal of these organizations, said ADVERTISING: 806-742-3384

‘‘

David Peveto, a Seize the senior public relaopportunity. tions major from Austin, is to get We have a students involved lot of access in activities outside points to get the classroom. involved.” “Student organizations like these Todd Chambers are a great way to Chairman for the t a k e w h a t t h e y Department of learn in the class- Journalism and rooms and apply it Electronic Media in a real world setting and apply it in a fun or interesting way,” he said. As its director, Peveto also represented Raider Comm. Raider Comm is a student

BUSINESS: 806-742-3388

public relations firm based out of Tech. The event, he said, was mainly for freshmen who want to improve their communications skills. The most important piece of advice, Peveto said, is to follow passions while in college and get involved with as many organizations as possible. One of the organizers of the event was Todd Chambers, chairman for the Department of Journalism and Electronic Media. Chambers said the purpose of the event was to expose new students at Tech to the organizations and opportunities around campus. “Seize the opportunity,” he said. “We have a lot of access points to get involved. And I think what we’re trying to do is

FAX: 806-742-2434

do a better job at communicating those opportunities.” Chambers was able to network with many students and approach freshmen who were surrounded by older students, faculty and staff. Samantha Lahey, a freshman electronic media and communications major from Austin, was among the students hoping to learn more about the college. She described the event as friendly and comfortable. “I thought it would be a really good opportunity to get to know what organizations are like within this college,” Lahey said.

CIRCULATION: 806-742-3388

COMC continued on Page 3 ➤➤ EMAIL: news@dailytoreador.com


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NEWS

AUG. 28, 2013

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Board of Regents approve bigger budget By DAWIT HAILE Staff Writer

Today Poster Sale Time: 9 a.m. – 6 p.m. Friday Where: SUB Ballroom So, what is it? Come and buy posters of all sizes. TAB Recruitment Social Time: 6 p.m. – 7 p.m. Where: Red Raider Lounge at the SUB So, what is it? Stop by and see what TAB is all about. TAB Free Movie Night Time: 7 p.m. – 9 p.m. Where: Allen Theater So, what is it? Come and enjoy The Great Gatsby for free.

Tuesday Kaplan College Lubbock Of-

fers Free CPR Courses Time: 8 a.m. Where: Kaplan College So, what is it? Come and get certified to do CPR for free. TAB Free Movie Matinee Time: 4 p.m. – 6 p.m. Where: Allen Theater So, what is it? Come enjoy The Great Gatsby. TAB Recruitment Social Time: 6 p.m. – 7 p.m. Where: Red Raider Lounge at the SUB So, what is it? Stop by and see what TAB is all about. Alternative Fuels Improv Comedy Show Time: 8 p.m. – 9 p.m. Where: Escondido Theatre, SUB So, what is it? Enjoy an evening watching Tech’s only improv comedy group for free.

To make a calendar submission email dailytoreador@ttu.edu. Events will be published either the day or the day before they take place. Submissions must be sent in by 4 p.m. on the preceding publication date.

The Texas Tech System Board of Regents approved the 2014 operating budget, which totaled more than $1.7 billion on Aug. 9. This is a 7.9 percent increase over last year’s budget, according to a news release. Regent John Steinmetz said the increase was because of enrollment growth and additional appropriation. Direct appropriation is a fixed amount of money from the state while formula funding is an amount of money determined by the number of students enrolled. This resulted in the largest budget the Tech System has had, Steinmetz said. The budget allocated $18 million to the Tech administration, $106 million to Angelo State, $780 million to the Health Sciences Cen-

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“For those students with visual impairment they will be able to use those tools,” Segran said. The text synthesizes so students can hear the words. The tool, he said, also will be helpful at the beginning of the semester when students add or drop classes.

Housing↵

ter and $783 million for Tech. Jim Brunjes, chief financial officer, said there was an increase in monies provided through appropriation and formula funding. However, the reductions that applied to the past budgets assisted to this year’s budget increase. “Going into 2012 and ‘13 fiscal years, the last two years preceding this, we had some major reductions in the budget,” he said. “Those reductions were really quite significant, and what this 7.9 percent increase did was really just get us back to where we were.” Although a bigger budget was approved, Brunjes said it is not the reason tuition, fees, and room and board prices stayed the same. “Well, we actually set tuition and fees prior to receiving the final budget numbers,” he said. “That was a conscious decision on the part of

the Board of Regents, the chancellor, and the presidents to hold our tuition and fees, as well as room and board flat from 2013 to 2014 fiscal year.” Steinmetz said Tech is the only university in the state to pass a budget with no increase in tuition, fees and room and board. The joint effort of faculty, staff, student leaders and Board of Regents members brought about this achievement, he said. The Board felt keeping Tech a student-focused institution was important, Steinmetz said. There was a $15 million increase for undergraduate retention and graduation, new faculty hires and enrollment growth. Tech also was able to get an increase from the Fund Balance Utilization and the National Research University Fund for strategic research initiatives, Steinmetz said. This is to position Tech as a tier-one research facility.

The budget did not take care of everything, Brunjes said. Lower priority matters will be taken care of in later budgets. Brunjes said his concern for scholarships and fellowships remains even though money was set aside for them this fiscal year. The enhancement of presidential scholarships, graduate fellowships and faculty hires, Steinmetz said, will help Tech join the Association of American Universities. However, the financial forecast is a constant consideration anytime the long-term goals of the institution are viewed, Steinmetz said. “This budget represents our continued commitment to educating generations of leaders,” Steinmetz said, “and enhancing the state of Texas in an efficient and fiscally responsible manner.”

This is because the system will update itself when a change is made. Even though a new system was just implemented, Segran said he is still looking into future versions. Although about 2,000 courses are available on Blackboard, many Texas Tech courses are not yet on the system. This is why Segran and Austin both said they hope to see more training avail-

able for teachers. “Learn” also will feature more mobile accessibility. Now students can check on quiz grades and comments among other things on the go, Segran said. So far, he said reviews of the new system have been high. “Faculty love it, it’s easier, it’s more streamlined,” Austin said. When 8.6 was in use, Segran said the help desk received many

calls from students having issues, such as browser-related trouble. Now with 9.1, he said they are receiving fewer calls from students having trouble. “This will deliver a higher level of service and performance,” Segran said. The 8.6 system will be available for some time for any lingering grade disputes.

in overflow areas will be able to move into a residence hall room when other students cancel or do CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 not show up, he said. Construction of a new resi“I don’t mind it all,” he said, “especially since he’s a freshman. dence hall began on Aug. 8, acHe gets to see what I’m doing cording to a previous The Daily and I can advise him on certain Toreador article. The hall will add 455 beds for the university, things.” Tech requires students with and it is expected to be finished fewer than 30 credit hours to in time for Fall 2014. live on campus. According to Valenciano said he is confithe University Student Housing dent this will be the answer for website, the residence hall sys- the fast-growing population. “We are only subscribed by tem houses approximately 7,200 students in 13 residence halls, a little over a hundred, and the three suite-style halls and one new residence hall is going to apartment complex. However, bring us a little over 500 beds,” the number of beds provided is he said. Until then, as he awaits a not enough for Tech’s populamore permanent room, Figueroa tion. “We guarantee housing for all is content with his temporary freshmen, and we will continue home. to do that as long as we possibly “It’s roomy. It’s nice. It’s 40 degrees, and I love it,” he said. “I can,” Valenciano said. From today until the 20th don’t even want to leave.” class day, students who are placed ➤➤cwilson@dailytoreador.com

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Some school districts quit healthier lunch program After just one year, some schools around the country are dropping out of the healthier new federal lunch program, complaining that so many students turned up their noses at meals packed with whole grains, fruits and vegetables that the cafeterias were losing money. Federal officials say they don’t have exact numbers but have seen isolated reports of schools cutting ties with the $11 billion National School Lunch Program, which reimburses schools for meals served and gives them access to lowerpriced food. Districts that rejected the program say the reimbursement was not enough to offset losses from students who began avoiding the lunch line and bringing food from home or, in some cases, going hungry. “Some of the stuff we had to offer, they wouldn’t eat,” said Catlin, Ill., Superintendent Gary Lewis, whose district saw a 10 to 12 percent drop in lunch sales, translating to $30,000 lost under the program last year. “So you sit there and watch the kids, and you know they’re hungry at the end of the day, and that led to some behavior and some lack of attentiveness.”

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In upstate New York, a few districts have quit the program, including the Schenectady-area Burnt Hills Ballston Lake system, whose five lunchrooms ended the year $100,000 in the red. Near Albany, Voorheesville Superintendent Teresa Thayer Snyder said her district lost $30,000 in the first three months. The program didn’t even make it through the school year after students repeatedly complained about the small portions and apples and pears went from the tray to the trash untouched. Districts that leave the program are free to develop their own guidelines. Voorheesville’s chef began serving such dishes as salad topped with flank steak and crumbled cheese, pasta with chicken and mushrooms, and a panini with chicken, red peppers and cheese. In Catlin, soups and fish sticks will return to the menu this year, and the hamburger lunch will come with yogurt and a banana — not one or the other, like last year. Nationally, about 31 million students participated in the guidelines that took effect last fall under the 2010 Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act.


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CoMC↵

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She said she plans to take this year to see what Tech has to offer and get a better idea of what she plans to do in the future. After the crowd settled in a bit, David Perlmutter, dean of the college, gave a small speech to the crowd about the college and the event. Perlmutter described the college as one that gets to know the students on a personal level.

AUG. 28, 2013

NEWS

US readies rationale for possible Syria strike

“This is a place where everybody knows your name,” he said. Perlmutter gave a short anecdote about one of his students’ experiences after graduating and joining the professional world before giving a few words of advice to younger students. “Take every opportunity,” he said. “Whether it’s an internship or it’s working at the various campus media, especially the ones that we have here producing professional work that they can look at.”

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Obama administration tried to bolster its case Tuesday for possible military action against Syria within days, with intelligence agencies preparing to release intercepted communications aimed at proving Bashar Assad perpetrated a largescale chemical weapons attack on civilians. “There’s no doubt who is responsible for this heinous use of chemical weapons in Syria: the

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MEDIA MOMENT

Syrian regime,” Vice President Joe Biden said. The U.S. and international partners were unlikely to undertake military action before Thursday. That’s when British Prime Minister David Cameron will convene an emergency meeting of Parliament where lawmakers are expected to vote on a motion clearing the way for a British response to the alleged chemical weapons attack.

Obama and Cameron conferred on response plans Tuesday, their second known conversation in recent days. Administration officials argued that Assad’s actions posed a direct threat to U.S. national security, providing President Barack Obama with a potential legal justification for launching a strike without authorization from the United Nations or Congress. However, of-

POLICE BLOTTER Monday 1 1 : 4 3 a . m . — A Te x a s Te c h o f f i c e r i n v e s t i g a t e d a traffic accident without injuries, which occurred in the 1700 block of Texas Tech Parkway. 12:36 p.m. — A Tech officer responded to a medical

PHOTO BY CASEY HITCHCOCK/The DailyToreador

OUTSIDE HITTER BREEANN David answers questions during media availability Tuesday in United Spirit Arena.

Ability, confidence propel career for first female Air Force superintendent for the superintendent’s job. She became superintendent on Aug. 12 at a time the military is under increasing pressure from Congress and the president to prevent sexual assaults. The Pentagon estimated in May that up to 26,000 military members may have been sexually assaulted last year. A series of sexual assault scandals made clear how serious the problem is, including allegations of misconduct against officers who led sexual assault prevention programs and a commander overturning a sexual assault conviction. Johnson acknowledged she suffered sexual harassment but didn’t provide specifics.

“It’s not been a systematic thing,” she said. Her response was along the lines of “Knock it off,” she said. Johnson brushed aside questions about whether the military as a whole is improving and whether changes proposed by Congress would help, but she said the academy is making progress. The number of sexual assault victims at the academy who are willing to provide information to investigators and prosecutors has risen about 50 percent in the past six months, she said, although the overall numbers are small. An academy spokesman said later that specific numbers on recent months weren’t available yet.

Labor rules to boost employment for vets, disabled WASHINGTON (AP) — Veterans and disabled workers who often struggle to find work could have an easier time landing a job under new federal regulations. The rules, announced Tuesday by the Labor Department, will require most government contractors to set a goal of having disabled workers make up at least 7 percent of their employees. The benchmark for veterans would be 8 percent, a rate that could change from year to year depending on the overall number of former military members in the workforce. The new requirements could have a major impact on hiring since federal contractors and subcontractors account for about 16 million workers — more than 20 percent of the nation’s workforce. But some business groups have threatened legal action, complaining that the rules conflict with federal laws that discourage employers from asking about a job applicant’s disability status. Labor Secretary Thomas Perez called the new policy a “win-win” that will benefit workers “who be-

long in the economic mainstream and deserve a chance to work and opportunity to succeed.” He said it also would benefit employers by increasing their access to a diverse pool of new workers. “To create opportunity, we need to strengthen our civil rights laws and make sure they have the intended effect,” Perez told reporters in a conference call announcing the rules. The unemployment rate for disabled workers is a staggering 14.7 percent, nearly twice the rate of 7.4 percent for the general population. The jobless rate for all veterans is 7.3 percent, but for veterans who served in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars it’s 9.9 percent, according to the most recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The rules are expected to affect about 171,000 companies doing business with the federal government, said Patricia A. Shiu, director of the Labor Department’s Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs. Generally, the rules affect those contractors with at least 50 employees and $50,000 in govern-

ment contracts. Shiu estimated as many as 585,000 disabled workers more than 200,000 veterans could get new jobs if all the companies meet the hiring goals within the first year of compliance. Labor officials say the new benchmarks are only goals and not specific hiring quotas. But companies that can’t provide documents showing they tried to meet the goal could risk having their federal contracts revoked. If a company can’t immediately meet the new goals, it is required to examine recruitment or outreach practices to decide how to improve. No fine, penalty or sanction would be imposed solely for failing to meet the goal, Shiu said. The new metrics for the disabled and veterans are similar to those contractors have long used for women and minorities. They will take effect six months from now to give contractors enough time to process them. Under the rules, companies must keep detailed records of recruitment and hiring efforts taken to meet the new goals.

ficials did not detail how the U.S. was directly threatened by an attack contained within Syria’s borders. Nor did they present concrete proof that Assad was responsible. “Allowing the use of chemical weapons on a significant scale to take place without a response would present a significant challenge to, threat to the United States’ national security,” White House spokesman Jay Carney said.

Obama taps former aides for intel review panel WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama on Tuesday named the members of a new intelligence review panel aimed at boosting public confidence in U.S. surveillance programs, tapping a group of former White House officials and academics with close current and past ties to his administration. Michael Morrell, Obama’s former CIA deputy director, will serve on the panel, the White House said. Morrell temporarily ran the agency after former CIA Director David Petraeus resigned, but was passed over to be his replacement. Morrell stepped down from the CIA on Aug. 9, the same day Obama announced he would create the review panel. The White House unveiled the new members Tuesday with little fanfare in a statement announcing that Obama had held a meeting with the group. The meeting was not included on Obama’s public schedule.

AIR FORCE ACADEMY, Colo. (AP) — The first woman to lead the Air Force Academy says she faced resistance and sexual harassment in her career, but competence and confidence helped her push through the ranks to one of the top jobs in the service. Lt. Gen. Michelle Johnson said in an interview Tuesday she isn’t surprised that 32 years passed between her graduation from the academy in 1981 — in the second class to include women — and her appointment as its first female superintendent. “It takes 32 years to make a lieutenant general,” she said referring to the experience and training it takes to reach the three-star rank required

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The idea behind the appointments is for an outside group of experts in national security, privacy and civil liberties to review U.S. surveillance and communications technologies with an eye toward the proper balance between protecting national security and preserving domestic and foreign trust in how the U.S. government operates. It’s one of a series of reforms Obama promised earlier this month to allay concerns over programs exposed by National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden. “It’s not enough for me, as president, to have confidence in these programs. The American people need to have confidence in them as well,” Obama had said earlier. He subsequently signed a memorandum that entrusted National Intelligence Director James Clapper to establish the panel. Also on the panel is Cass Sunstein, a former Obama

administration official who is married to Obama’s new U.N. ambassador, Samantha Power. Richard Clarke, a former White House cybersecurity adviser during the Clinton administration who campaigned for Obama, is another member. Peter Swire, a professor who worked on privacy issues in the Clinton administration and economic issues early in the Obama administration, will also serve on the panel. The fifth member is Geoffrey Stone, who taught law with Obama at the University of Chicago. A longtime Obama supporter and self-described informal adviser to Obama’s 2008 campaign, Stone later criticized the president for failing to scale back Bush-era policies on government transparency. After reviewing U.S. policies, the group will brief Obama on its findings within 60 days, the White House said. A final report and recommendations are due in mid-December.

emergency, which occurred at the Market at Stangel/Murdough Residence Complex. A student had a seizure and hit his head. Emergency Medical Services transported him to University Medical Center Emergency Room. 8:02 p.m. — A Tech offi-

cer issued a student a criminal trespass warning for the Robert H. Ewalt Student Recreation Center following a request from its staff about suspicious activity. Information provided by B.J. Watson of the Texas Tech Police Department.


Opinions

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Feral cat population dangerous for Tech By JON MCROBERTS I applaud Texas Tech’s goal of reducing the feral cat population on campus as described in Monday’s issue of The Daily Toreador. Such a goal is a step in the right direction, but more action is needed. A cat colony on campus offers few benefits to the Tech community. Feral cats are documented vectors of toxoplasmosis, hookworm and rabies, among other diseases. The health risks posed by the cats are as real as they are preventable. Further, feral cats are efficient predators and research has shown they feed on wildlife even while being fed by humans. A recent report by The Wildlife Society states cats are responsible for the localized extinction of mammal, bird and reptile species. I am a cat owner. Cats have been family pets for much of my life. A marked difference between most family pets and the cat colonies of Tech is that the latter

imposes real ecological and health risks. Our university has limited feral cat management options and such an emotionally charged issue offers no solution that will be unilaterally supported. The time has come to evaluate solutions rationally, not emotionally. Eliminating the “return” in the current trap, neuter and return policy would be a responsible and beneficial change. Captured cats should be taken to animal shelters and made available for adoption by individuals who value their companionship. Lauren Sanderson of the Feral Cat Student Association suggested contacting Chancellor Kent Hance and President M. Duane Nellis if something should be done. This letter is just that: an appeal to dismiss emotional biases and accept the realization that feral cats have no place on campus. McRoberts is a Natural Resources Management doctoral student from Lubbock.

US should avoid involvement in Syria U

.S. Secretary of State John Kerry toughened President Barack Obama’s criticism of the regime of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad in a statement to reporters at the State Department on Monday. Kerry stated there was “undeniable” evidence of the large-scale use of chemical weapons last week, which he described as a moral obscenity and indicated there may very well be U.S. military action against the Syrian military in the near future. Indeed, the U.S. already has cruise missile-equipped warships in the Mediterranean Sea capable of acting as platforms from which to target Syrian military command centers, airstrips and other military facilities. The U.S. has been providing training and small arms to Syrian rebel forces throughout the course of the civil war. President Obama has been busy attempting to rally support for an American attack on Assad’s regime from the U.K., France, NATO and the Arab League. Assad’s use of chemical weapons against rebels and civilians is inexcusable and should certainly be addressed internationally. However, we as Americans really should be asking ourselves a few questions before we make what certainly looks to be an emotional decision in reaction to last week’s incident.

First, how much are we willing to commit to military intervention in Syria? Military analysts at the Center for Strategic and International Studies have described the U.S.’s support for the resistance as “supplying too few arms with too little lethality” to give the resistance an advantage over Assad’s mili tary, according to an article in Foreign Policy magazine. Anthony Cordesman of the CSIS stated anything less than a fully established nofly zone that grounds the Syrian Air Force would be a costly and time-consuming undertaking and would be just as pointless. Other military analysts, such as Christopher Harmer of the Institute for the Study of War, say cheaper

and easier methods of grounding the Syrian Air Force include precision-cruise missile strikes to all but eliminate the Syrian Air Force altogether. Such an operation would cost American taxpayers $352.5 million for the missiles alone, not including the warships and personnel to carry it out. Moreover, such military action is sure to escalate the conflict in Syria and is likely to result in retaliation against the U.S. and its allies in the Middle East, if not by Assad, then by his allies in the region. If past invasions of Middle Eastern countries by the U.S. to overthrow regimes that don’t share American interests are any comparison, a military intervention by the U.S. in Syria could have our troops over there another 10 years. Are we really prepared for another war like that in the Middle East? Another question we should be asking ourselves is what exactly we plan to accomplish by giving substantial military aid to the Syrian resistance. It is a fairly well-known

fact that Islamist organizations, alQaida and other groups unfriendly to the U.S. hold significant power in the Free-Syrian Army. Providing small arms and military training to such groups to topple administrations we don’t like hasn’t exactly worked out for us in the past. It doesn’t take a dissertation’s worth of research to conclude trading one undesirable, unfriendly Syrian regime for another still leaves us with no friends in that country and no amount of sweet talk or surgical missile strikes is going to change that. The Syrian military’s alleged use of chemical weapons and violation of human rights does pose a serious moral dilemma to world leaders that should not be ignored. However, as former Secretary of State and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Colin Powell pointed out Sunday on “Face the Nation,” “(The U.S.) can be ready to help people when problems have been resolved or one side has prevailed over the other... but to think that we can change things immediately (in Syria) just because we’re America — that’s not necessarily the case.” The conflict in Syria simply isn’t our fight and not one in which we should be quick to involve ourselves.

fast-paced lives of students on the go, or of working people who crash on the couch after a long day. In 2010, the average shot length in a movie was five seconds, according to “Film through the Human Visual System,” written by Jordan E. DeLong, Kaitlin L. Brunick and James E. Cutting from Cornell University. This means that the viewer never looks at the same angle for more than five seconds. Evenings should be a time for relaxation, so our bodies have the chance to recharge. The only devices that are the exception to the rules are e-readers. Most e-readers use what is called e-paper, which mimics the look of print books. This technology makes it easier on the eyes when reading from an electronic device. However, a device like the iPad does not have this technology, mostly because it is designed for more than just reading. The liquid crystal display on the iPad is highly luminescent and has the same effect on melatonin in the body as do TV and computer screens. E-readers devoted exclusively to

reading use what is called Electrophoretic Ink (or E Ink). This type of screen technology is often referred to as “bistable,” because it doesn’t require a power source to be visible on the screen. The display only requires power when “turning” pages or sending some other command. This power conservation accounts for e-readers’ comparably longer battery life. E-readers that utilize E Ink and e-paper require a light source, giving an even more convincing illusion of a print book. Even though e-readers are better for your eyes and have a better effect on sleep patterns than iPads, they still can’t quite match up to a good oldfashioned book. Whether it’s from an e-reader or a hardcover book, the benefits of reading go beyond bodily health. Picking up a good book also broadens one’s vocabulary. It’s one of the few pastimes to introduce the onlooker to a new perspective, idea, word or phrase. It instills the information in the reader’s mind by giving these new things deep

and meaningful context. The information and experiences gleaned from reading are what inspire readers to pursue dreams and broaden their horizons. When was the last time a prime-time TV show did that for you? Yes, you may have found out that being a spy with exaggerated skills is your calling in life, or that winning a million dollars by singing really is possible, but movies and TV shows can only get you so far in the inspirational process. Charles William Eliot said it best: “Books are the quietest and most constant of friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counselors, and the most patient of teachers.” But by all means, if you’re reading for pleasure and a book is not grabbing your attention or making you grow, don’t feel the need to stick with it. Life is short. Give it the old college try and if that doesn’t work, move on! My advice is to devote yourself to a new book for at least 70 or 80 pages. But if it still hasn’t inspired by then, leave it be and move on to something better.

Jakob Reynolds

Trading one undesirable, unfriendly Syrian regime for another still leaves us with no friends in that country.

Page 4 Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2013

Reynolds is a senior music major from Lubbock. ➤➤ jreynolds@dailytoreador.com

American news media undervalue serious issues Reading for pleasure beneficial, healthy for all American news outlets have turned to increasingly elaborate measures to grab viewer attention. At any given point during a particular story’s lifespan, journalism can assume many forms — a television commentary, a feature in a newspaper or a radio broadcast detailing developing stories, and the intricacy of the coverage is generally a byproduct of its popularity. This tenuous relationship between popularity and coverage creates an inherent dilemma of priorities driven by a business model of freemarket journalism that favors larger audiences for the sake of revenue over notoriety for journalistic integrity. “Around the World,” a CNN news segment, sent an American reporter halfway across the world for in-depth coverage of Kate Middleton’s developing fetus. The same channel spent approximately two to three minutes discussing a mass food poisoning in India that has so far cost the lives of 22 malnourished children. Middleton’s nursery was given a 20-minute spotlight following a lavish, world-class VIP tour while news anchors briefly discussed the inevitabilities of food contamination in third-world countries. It’s not a difficult concept to grasp — news is to sensationalism as a fly is to a fresh piece of dung, clinging to whatever bit of information can sustain its viewership, and thus its profitability. Most often it’s celebrity gossip, while other times it can be punditry and political contention — in any case, it’s whatever sort of flashy, raw bit of material can stir the pot. It would seem logical that an institution nourished in such environments would produce content to

fit its needs, but there is, and always has been, evidence to the contrary. A 2007 poll by the Pew Research Center found that viewers believed media gave far too much attention to celebrity gossip and too little appeal to issues such as education, poverty, economic decline and global warming. That same study found the percentage of news coverage often underscored the percentage of individuals that followed the news. In that same year, another Pew poll indicated 87 percent of Americans polled believed news outlets spend too much time covering celebrity scandals, 54 percent of those respondents blamed news organizations for the unwanted surplus and 32 percent imputed the American public for paying attention. This establishes, with a moderate degree of credibility, that news reporting isn’t always in touch with public sentiment and that Americans to a sizable extent, do crave news coverage about serious issues that are less apt to being charged or dramatized, revealing an often overlooked component of the media marketplace dynamic: A considerable chunk of viewership and revenue can be a result of broadcasting pertinent news — the type that actually has an impact on world affairs and citizens. This trend is not only limited to television programming — global Internet traffic rankings compiled by Alexa Internet, a web information company, consistently place news organizations, such as the British Broadcasting Company (BBC), that focus on real issues above news outlets that favor spin and commentary. A profit-driven information paradigm is compatible with coverage of legitimate events concerning issues that humanity faces on a daily basis and, based on plausible evidence, can compete with the luridness of

Let us know what you think. Check out The DT online at www.dailytoreador.com Blogs, polls, video, slideshows, article comments and more. All available online now.

By GABI SCOTTALINE

the daily Barometer (oregon state U.)

In our era of advanced entertainment, we have forgotten about the joys and benefits of reading for pleasure. Unlike reading textbooks for a class, reading for pleasure can be a way to de-stress. Settling down with a good book before bed is an excellent way to unwind after a full day. But popular methods of winding down — watching TV shows and movies, or playing videos games — actually hinder a good night’s sleep. Exposure to harsh light depletes the amount of melatonin produced by the body. Melatonin is a hormone that helps regulate sleep. Many watch TV before bed, but what may seem like an easy path to a restful night’s sleep might actually turn into a fitful struggle to maintain a regular sleep schedule. Reading before bed with a soft light shining on the book from behind the reader creates an environment that is far less over-stimulating. TV, movies and other similar forms of media cater to the

Marijuana has health benefits, should be legalized By ANURAG MUTHYAM Kansas state Collegian (Kansas state U.)

Many people are beginning to ask whether marijuana should remain an illegal drug – and many are coming to the conclusion that it should not. I agree that not all drugs are safe; many have negative effects on health. But according to researchers, marijuana’s effect is largely positive. According to a study published in Journal of the American Medical Association, marijuana doesn’t harm lungs and can even increase lung capacity. Researchers looking for risk factors of heart disease tested the lung function of five thousand

EDITORIAL BOARD

By KONSTANTIN RAVVIN

the oraCle (U. of soUth florida)

Editor-in-Chief Kassidy Ketron editor@dailytoreador.com Managing Editor Paige Skinner managing@dailytoreador.com News Editor Catherine McKee news@dailytoreador.com La Vida Editor Chantal Espinoza features@dailytoreador.com Opinions Editor Andrew Gleinser opinions@dailytoreador.com Sports Editor Michael DuPont II sports@dailytoreador.com

young adults for 20 years. Tobacco smokers lost lung function over time, but pot users developed increased lung capacity. One chemical found in marijuana, called cannabidiol, prevents cancer, according to a 2007 California Pacific Medical Center report. Many believe that those who smoke weed die younger due to lung cancer. This is probably true, as smoking is bad for the lungs whether it comes from a cigarette or marijuana. However smoking cigarettes is more likely to give you lung cancer: they are made with harmful chemicals like acetone, cyanide, arsenic, etc., causing greater

health risk. Marijuana is safer by comparison. On the other hand, studies show that marijuana leads to a lack of concentration, an increased heart rate and other short term neurological effects. But long term effects occur much less often. Inhaling combustion byproducts from any plant material is not good for one’s health, but marijuana is relatively safe. Both Colorado and Washington have legalized marijuana. Why not the remaining states? People have been using marijuana for medical reasons for more than a thousand years. Today, some people are addicted to legal drugs like caffeine, Copyright © 2013 Texas Tech University Student Media/The Daily Toreador. All DT articles, photographs and artwork are the property of The DT and Student Media and may not be reproduced or published without permission. The Daily Toreador is a designated public forum. Student editors have the authority to make all content decisions without censorship or advance approval.

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nicotine, tobacco and alcohol. While we rely on these drugs in our everyday lives, they are also harmful. I am not trying to dishearten those people who are addicted to legalized drugs, but legalizing marijuana would do little to make things worse. The U.S. has been called the land of the free. In fact, it has a larger prison population than any other country on the globe. Many prisoners are arrested for nonviolent crimes like the possession of drugs, primarily pot. This is clearly a poor way to treat people with drug problems, and those people who commit nonviolent crimes don’t deserve to be imprisoned. Toreador, Box 43081 Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409. Letters The Daily Toreador welcomes letters from readers. Letters must be no longer than 300 words and must include the author’s name, signature, phone number, Social Security number and a description of university affiliation. Students should include year in school, major and hometown. We reserve the right to edit letters. Anonymous letters will not be accepted for publication. All letters will be verified before they are published. Letters can be emailed to dailytoreador@ttu.edu or brought to 180 Media and Communication. Letters should be sent in before 3 p.m. to ensure the editors have enough time to verify and edit the submission. Guest Columns The Daily Toreador accepts submissions of unsolicited guest columns. While we cannot acknowledge receipt of all columns, the authors of those selected for publication will be notified. Guest columns should be no longer than 650 words in length and on a topic of relevance to the university community. Guest columns are also edited and follow the same guidelines for letters as far as identification and submittal. Unsigned Editorials appearing on this page represent the opinion of The Daily Toreador. All other columns, letters and artwork represent the opinions of their authors and are not necessarily representative of the editorial board, Texas Tech University, its employees, its student body or the Board of Regents. The Daily Toreador is independent of the College of Mass Communications. Responsibility for the editorial content of the newspaper lies with the student editors.


La Vida

Page 5 Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2013

Beliefs↵

BLING RING

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

PHOTO BY LAUREN PAPE/The Daily Toreador

RANSON FOWLER, A freshman mechanical engineering major from Katy, gets his name stamped into a ring during the Tech Activities Board's Stamp-A-Ring event Tuesday in the Student Union Building.

Schools quit healthy lunch program (AP) —After just one year, some schools around the country are dropping out of the healthier new federal lunch program, complaining that so many students turned up their noses at meals packed with whole grains, fruits and vegetables that the cafeterias were losing money. Federal officials say they don’t have exact numbers but have seen isolated reports of schools cutting ties with the $11 billion National School Lunch Program, which reimburses schools for meals served and gives them access to lower-priced food. Districts that rejected the program say the reimbursement was not enough to offset losses from students who began avoiding the lunch line and bringing food from home or, in some cases, going hungry. “Some of the stuff we had to offer, they wouldn’t eat,” said Catlin, Ill., Superintendent Gary Lewis, whose district saw a 10 to 12 percent drop in lunch sales, translating to $30,000 lost under the program last year. “So you sit there and watch the kids, and you know they’re hungry

at the end of the day, and that led to some behavior and some lack of attentiveness.” In upstate New York, a few districts have quit the program, including the Schenectady-area Burnt Hills Ballston Lake system, whose five lunchrooms ended the year $100,000 in the red. Near Albany, Voorheesville Superintendent Teresa Thayer Snyder said her district lost $30,000 in the first three months. The program didn’t even make it through the school year after students repeatedly complained about the small portions and apples and pears went from the tray to the trash untouched. Districts that leave the program are free to develop their own guidelines. Voorheesville’s chef began serving such dishes as salad topped with flank steak and crumbled cheese, pasta with chicken and mushrooms, and a panini with chicken, red peppers and cheese. In Catlin, soups and fish sticks will return to the menu this year, and the hamburger lunch will come with

yogurt and a banana — not one or the other, like last year. Nationally, about 31 million students participated in the guidelines that took effect last fall under the 2010 Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act. Dr. Janey Thornton, deputy undersecretary for USDA’s Food, Nutrition and Consumer Services, which oversees the program, said she is aware of reports of districts quitting but is still optimistic about the program’s long-term prospects. “The vast majority of schools across the country are meeting the updated meal standards successfully, which is so important to help all our nation’s children lead healthier lives,” Thornton said. “Many of these children have never seen or tasted some of the fruits and vegetables that are being served before, and it takes a while to adapt and learn,” she said. The agency had not determined how many districts have dropped out, Thornton said, cautioning that “the numbers that have threatened

to drop and the ones that actually have dropped are quite different.” The School Nutrition Association found that 1 percent of 521 district nutrition directors surveyed over the summer planned to drop out of the program in the 2013-14 school year and about 3 percent were considering the move. Not every district can afford to quit. The National School Lunch Program provides cash reimbursements for each meal served: about $2.50 to $3 for free and reducedpriced meals and about 30 cents for full-price meals. That takes the option of quitting off the table for schools with large numbers of poor youngsters. The new guidelines set limits on calories and salt, phase in more whole grains and require that fruit and vegetables be served daily. A typical elementary school meal under the program consisted of whole-wheat cheese pizza, baked sweet potato fries, grape tomatoes with low-fat ranch dip, applesauce and 1 percent milk.

Robinson pays tribute to Motown’s chief of charm DETROIT (AP) — She didn’t sing a note or write a lick of a lyric, but Smokey Robinson contends that Maxine Powell was as essential to Motown Records’ operation as the legendary label’s songwriters, producers and musicians. Powell was in charge of the artists’ personal development. And Robinson, a bard of the American romantic songbook and one of the chief architects of “the Motown sound” produced in Detroit from the late 1950s to the early ‘70s, paid tribute to Powell on Monday night during an invitation-only event at the former Hitsville, U.S.A., studio in Detroit that now serves as the Motown Historical Museum.

“She was such an important, integral part of what we were doing here at Motown,” said Robinson, who has upcoming Michigan gigs in the Detroit area and Grand Rapids and is working on an album of duets with various artists due out next year. “It didn’t matter who you became during the course of your career — how many hits you had, how well your name was known around the world,” Robinson said. “Two days a week when you were back in Detroit you had to go to artists’ development. It was mandatory. You went there and learned so many things about being in show businesses.” Powell directed the label’s Artists Development Department,

also known as “Motown’s Finishing School.” She guided many, including Robinson’s Miracles, the Jackson Five and the Supremes. She emphasized how artists should carry themselves, treat people and dress. And the training school was the only one of its kind offered at any record label, according to Powell and Motown founder Berry Gordy Jr., who paid tribute to her via videotape. Gordy joked that he still remembers many of Powell’s aphorisms, including “Do not protrude the buttocks,” and “Do not confuse me with your parents — they’re stuck with you. I’m not.” “You had style,” Gordy said. “You gave them class.”

Powell came to Detroit from her native Chicago, where she had been an actress and dramatic reader. She opened a finishing and modeling school in Detroit, believing, as she says, she “could offer some class and style to Detroit.” The lessons have long since stuck with singer Martha Reeves, who said she retained Powell during her four-year term on the Detroit City Council that ended in 2009. Powell visited schools and retirement homes to develop poise and pride in students and residents, Reeves said. Reeves remembered going through those lessons with her group, The Vandellas, alongside the Supremes and others.

‘Girls Gone Wild’ creator gets 270 days in jail LOS ANGELES (AP) — “Girls Gone Wild” creator Joe Francis was sentenced Tuesday to 270 days in jail and three years’ probation for assaulting a woman at his Los Angeles mansion in 2011. Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Nancy L. Newman also ordered the 40-year-old Francis to complete an anger management course and attend 52 sessions of psychological counseling, according to Deputy City Attorney Mitchell Fox. A jury in May convicted Francis of five misdemeanor charges — three counts of false imprisonment, one count of assault by means likely to cause great bodily injury, and one count of dissuading a witness from reporting a crime. Francis’ attorney Steve Levine said key details of the case were proven to be false in court, and he is appealing

the decision. “Joe has always maintained his innocence,” Levine said. He added that the judge “still came to a very fair and measured decision.” According to Fox, Francis met three women on Jan. 29, 2011, at a college graduation party at the Supper Club in Hollywood. He grabbed the arm of one of the girls and took her to his limo, and the two others followed, believing they’d be taken to their car. Instead, they ended up in a gated area of Francis’ Bel Air home. Francis appeared to be interested in one of the women and tried to lead her away, but her friend pulled back, Fox said. Francis then “jumped on the friend, took her to the ground, choked her, slammed her head against the ground, dragged her across the ground, and when she got back up, did it several more times,” Fox said.

Bobby Henderson was allowed to wear his pasta strainer on his head for his driver’s license photo, Castillo said, and many others have tried to do the same. “In the Czech Republic there was a man admitted to the mental institution for three months who attempted to do the same thing Bobby did,” Castillo said. “It took him three years to be able to get the driver’s license photo taken. It was such a big milestone not only because he was able to get his photo taken with the pasta strainer on his head, but because he was able to get the country to recognize the Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster as a credible religion.” Castillo said others in the U.S. in, such as New Jersey and Ohio also have tried to do the same and were arrested. “When I first read these stories and decided that I wanted to do the same, I sort of wanted to do it a more logical and reasonable way without placing myself in trouble or being put into a mental asylum,” he said.

LONDON (AP) — Gilbert Taylor was a master of black and white and a master of different universes. Taylor, the influential “Star Wars” cinematographer who worked on a number of stellar films alongside some of the world’s most famous directors, died on Friday at the age of 99, according to the British Society of Cinematographers. Dee Taylor, his wife, told the BBC News that her husband died at their home on the Isle of Wight off the south coast of England. Born in Bushey Heath, a small town 20 miles (32 kilometers) north of London, Taylor entered the British film industry as a teenager against the wishes of his father, who warned him that the movie business was full of ne’er-do-wells, according to a 2006 biographical sketch posted to the American Society of Cinematographers’ website. Taylor joined the movie industry at the tail end of the silent film era, running errands and occasionally acting. Within a year, Taylor said he was hooked,” captivated by the magic smells of film stock, acetone, and makeup.” He

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spent the next few years doing stints behind the camera before joining the war effort in 1930s, putting his film skills to use by capturing footage of nighttime bombing raids over Germany — films which he said were sent directly to Winston Churchill’s No. 10 Downing Street office. After the allies invaded France, Taylor followed with a unit of cameramen, filming the liberation of Nazi concentration camps and the signing of the armistice. “You may ask how these experiences helped to prepare me for my film career,” he was quoted as saying in the sketch. “Well, they certainly made me tougher.” Taylor caught his break while working for John and Roy Boulting — the brothers were a powerful force in postwar British cinema — and went on to make seven more features for the pair, including “Seven Hours to Noon,” a thriller whose atomic age paranoia would prefigure his work on Stanley Kubrick’s “Dr. Strangelove, or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb.”

Today’s

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1 9 5

6 7

6

3

7

2 3 7 8 4

1

In Sudoku, all the numbers 1 to 9 must be in every row, column and 3 x 3 box. Use logic to define the answers.

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After contacting the state DPS and showing them a copy of a 58-page manual on what religious headwear is allowed to be worn in photos, Castillo said he was given permission by the state to wear the strainer in his license photo. “When I went in at first they told me that I had to have a cover letter signed by a congressional leader and they just sort of made me go through loops and jump through rings of fire to actually get the photo taken,” he said. “The state triumphs over local DPS though, so when I went in there again I really didn’t have a problem — it was almost like VIP treatment.” Castillo said although it is viewed as a parody religion from anyone outside the organization, it is still a real religion. “I would see it in this sense as well: If my family grew up in classical Greece and I choose to believe in those gods then no one can really count me out on that,” Castillo said. “If they would consider it as a joke because it isn’t popular by media or by chosen faith, then I would just consider them as sort of disrespectful.”

1

9 8 6 2

5 2

4 2

7 1 9

8 5 6 1 4 3 2 9 7 3 2 9 8 6 7 1 5 4 1 4 7 2 5 9 6 3 8 5 6 2 3 8 4 9 7 1 7 1 8 6 9 5 3 4 2 9 3 4 7 2 1 5 8 6 6 9 3 4 7 2 8 1 5 4 8 5 9 1 6 7 2 3 2 7 1 5 3 8 4 6 9 Solution to yesterday’s puzzle

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Sports

Defense emphasizes turnovers By EVERETT CORDER

understand that and they push everybody on defense to get better.” Bullitt sa i d Brian Duncan was KINGSBURY a guy who showed him the way when he got to Tech as a freshman, and he’s trying to do the same thing with the younger guys this year, saying he wants to keep the standard up. Among the freshmen that Bullitt and the other seniors are trying to lead this season, there are a couple performing at a higher level than the others, Mike Smith said. “I think the two names that come to mind are Zach Barnes, a guy that just goes at full speed all the time, and Malik Jenkins. He’s tall, has long arms, and I think that guy has a bright future,” he said. Bullitt and the other seniors had a big job in camp, with co-defensive coordinator Matt Wallerstedt putting in a new scheme during the offseason emphasizing more zone coverage than the past two seasons. “This defense really fits my style more,” Will Smith said.

Staff WritEr

Last year, the Texas Tech defense ended its season with a streak of five games without a turnover. This year, the defensive coaching staff is working hard to ensure that doesn’t happen again. “We run a turnover circuit every single day, and we stress it on the field, off the field and in all of our meetings,” co-defensive coordinator Mike Smith said. “In the Big 12, I think with all the spread stuff, teams are going to get their yards, but we’ve got to be great at turnovers, red zone defense and tackling and we’ll be successful.” Defensive line coach John Scott, Jr. said besides the turnover circuit the team works in practice, if the defense doesn’t get enough turnovers in practice, they do up-downs. The Red Raiders defense will be led this year by a group of experienced seniors including defensive lineman Kerry Hyder and linebackers Will Smith and Terrence Bullitt, Mike Smith said. “These guys that it’s their senior year, and this is it for them. They know that there’s a certain way we’re going to be on defense,” Mike Smith said. “They

Kingsbury ready for Raiders to steal show By MIKE DUPONT II

“It’s a lot more aggressive. We aren’t sitting back as much and there’s a lot of things coming from every direction.” Along with the new defense Wallerstedt brought, he also put out a challenge to his group of players, and said they would get a sack within the first two minutes of Friday night’s game against Southern Methodist University. Mike Smith said he doesn’t exactly want to predict a sack, but he did believe the defense would play hard, get after the quarterback and create havoc in the backfield. Hyder disagrees with his coach. “We’re actually pretty excited about it,” he said. “Like (Coach Wallerstedt) said, we’ll have people coming from all different directions, and if he thinks we can get a sack in the first two minutes, I believe we can do it.” With SMU being led by coach June Jones and passing game coordinator Hal Mumme, Tech’s defense will face a challenge in its first game Friday night. “I think we have a good group that’s all coming together, and we’re getting really excited for the game,” Hyder said.

SportS Editor

There are only three days remaining until the Red Raiders kick off their season opener against Southern Methodist University in Dallas. For Texas Tech coach Kliff Kingsbury, that means three days until the attention surrounding Tech football is in the right place — on the field. The first-year Tech coach has avoided and dismissed questions regarding who will start at quarterback for the Red Raiders and when he plans to name a starter. After Friday, those questions will slowly begin to fade. Kingsbury remains adamant that an internal game-time decision will be made regarding the quarterback vacancy and even the players involved will not know until then. “That’s an internal answer there,” he said. “So they’ll know when they trot out there.” Junior receiver Bradley Marquez echoed his coaches’ sentiments when asked if he knew who the quarterback would be. Marquez said he had no idea who will take the reigns of the Tech offense, which finished second last season in passing offense and No. 13 in total offense among all Division I Football Bowl Subdivision teams. “(I) have no idea as of now,” he said. “Coach Kingsbury has been working everybody, so we’ll just see what happens Friday. Everybody has been getting enough reps to be able to take that No.

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Doughnuts is hiring. Looking for morning and evening positions. Must be punctual, hard working and available weekends. Come by to fill out an ap‑ plication 4301 S. Loop 289. LOCAL REAL Estate Firm Looking for Assistant $9/hour 15‑20 hours per week, flexible schedule. Call Mark at 806‑831‑8436 LOOKING FOR a fun job? YWCA hiring for after‑ school positions. 3 p.m ‑ 6 p.m M‑F. Apply now at 35th & Flint, or call Carolyn at 806‑792‑2723, ext. 3217. MR. AQUARIUM accepting applications. All posi‑ tions. 2523 34th. NOW ACCEPTING applications for PT Teacher’s Assistants. Must be available 12:00 ‑ 6:30 M‑F or 2:30 ‑ 6:30 M‑F. Must have HS Diploma and be able to pass background. Experience is preferred Please apply at 2434 27th Street M‑F 9am ‑ 4pm. PART TIME babysitter/ nanny needed. 330pm‑ 6pm. 698‑0818. 790‑8446. PART TIME help needed for small construction company. 781‑4195 PART‑TIME COMPUTER TECHNICIAN. Help with computer repair, answer phones, retail sales. Email resume to fastteks@texasots.com PART‑TIME/FULL‑Time evening house keepers. 5127 34th. Apply in person. No phone calls. Paid weekly.

RETAIL SALES HELP

SALES ASSISTANTS NEEDED

Get your foot in the door of an industry‑leading group travel company! Those successful will be considered for full‑time Sales positions upon gradu‑ ation. Flexible and consistent schedule. Position will actively call potential clients and assist Sales team. Pay starts at $8/hr, increasing stepwise to $10/hr after 90 days. Additional DAILY INCEN‑ TIVES are awarded based on performance. E‑mail resumes to zac@directorschoice.travel SMOOTHIE KING now accepting applications. Early afternoon and morning availability preferred. Please apply in person at 3723 19th street.

STELLA’S NOW HIRING

*Servers (1 years’ + experience a plus), *Hostess (1 years’ experience), *Line Cooks (1 years’ experi‑ ence), *Bussers. Apply in person @ Stella’s 50th & Utica or E‑Mail Resume to: billy@stellas.us

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CAGLE STEAKS

is now hiring all positions. Apply Monday‑Friday at 118 Inler Ave. (West 4th street and Inler)

COPPER CABOOSE

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DOCTORS OFFICE HELP

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HIRING FOR wait staff and cooks. Must be TABC certified. Fun place to work at. Come in and apply at Skooners. 1617 University.

IT INTERN NEEDED

Payments

Deadlines

Classified Line Ads: Placed and paid for by 11 a.m. one day in advance. Classified Display Ads: 4 p.m. three days in advance. Please call for rates for display advertising.

HELP WANTED

needed at the Outdoorsman: Full and part time po‑ sitions available. Flexible Hours, will work with school schedules. Responsible , hardworking peo‑ ple, that enjoy working with the public, with the de‑ sire to learn about the outdoor clothing industry. Retail sales experience is a plus, but not required. Must be willing to work weekends and holiday hours. Apply in person at the Outdoorsman, 6602 Slide Rd.

But I appreciate how hard our kids worked and adjusted to new coaching. (I’m) so excited to see how they’ll react when we get out there.” Tech defensive lineman Kerry Hyder said the student body has reciprocated the mood of the team entering Friday’s game. “It’s exciting, man. You can feel it around campus,” he said. “Everyone’s excited, the fans, the players, the coaches. Everyone’s looking forward to the game at SMU.” Hyder was the only member of Tech’s defense named to the Media Preseason All-Big 12 Conference Team, joining sophomore Le’Raven Clark, junior Jace Amaro and senior Eric Ward. The senior reiterated Kingsbury’s point of anticipation about finally being able to get physical with another team. “We’re excited,” he said. “We’re tired of beating up on each other. We’re ready to get started and get the season going. We put a lot of work in this off season. We’ve got 12 games to show it, starting with SMU.” Tech will face SMU on Friday and Kingsbury attributes the agreement for playing a day earlier than most college football programs to the national stage, which ESPN will provide. “I think being able to be seen by a national TV audience is huge for the program, that was kind of the agreement in doing that,” he said. “So our kids will be excited to play in front of all those fans, and I’m sure there will be a great Tech contingent in attendance.” ➤➤mdupont@dailytoreador.com

www.dailytoreador.com

HELP WANTED

Hiring ‑ Servers, Bartenders, Hosts. Wednesday college night. $12 buckets, $3 You‑call‑it, free pong tournament, cash prizes, 1/2 price appetizers 3‑6pm Monday‑Friday. 5027 50th Street 796‑2240

1 spot come Friday night. So whoever it is, we’re behind it 100 percent and go from there.” Kingsbury has fielded questions regarding his gunslinger dating back to Michael Brewer’s aggravated back injury. He said Brewer’s status remains day to day but would not rule the quarterback out of Friday’s game. “He’s been working hard at it, but he’s still day to day,” Kingsbury said. “We’ll see. Like I said, when they trot out there, you’ll know.” Kingsbury said practice reps will be split fairly equally among true freshmen Davis Webb and Baker Mayfield and both quarterbacks would be ready to go, if needed. Kingsbury also spoke about his approach to the Red Raiders’ offensive attack. He said the goal is to have players so well-equipped they are confident in what the offense is trying to accomplish rather than reacting to what the defense gives them. “We’re trying to avoid the whole paralysis by analysis, and that’s what we want,” he said. Kingsbury said he is excited to see how the Red Raiders will react taking the field for the first time against another team after the diligent work they’ve put into the spring, summer and fall workouts. “I’m concerned about all of it,” he said. “You know, it’s the first game, so until you get out there under the lights, you really don’t know what you have.

Placing Your Ad

HELP WANTED 50TH STREET CABOOSE

Page 7 Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2013

All classifieds ads must be prepaid prior to publication by credit card, cash or personal check. Checks should be made payable to The Daily Toreador.

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For the fastest and easiest service, place and pay for your ad online! Click on the “Classifieds” link on our Web site to get started! E-mail: dawn.zuerker@ttu.edu Remember to include a contact number!

Phone: 806.742.3384

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UNFURNISHED

1, 2 & 3 bedroom residential homes in Tech Ter‑ race. Close to Campus. Reasonable rents. Pets al‑ lowed at most properties. Available now. Short leases available. Call Ann or BJ today for an ap‑ pointment and update 806‑795‑2011.

HELP WANTED

Local travel company looking for an IT Intern. Mac experience highly desired. Pay begins at $9/hr. Send resumes to trey@directorschoice.travel

KRISPY KREME

CLOTHING/JEWELRY TEXAS TECH

Officially licensed rings. Men’s from $845. Women’s from $495. Varsity Jewelers. 1311 University.

SERVICES

$5,500‑$10,000 PAID EGG DONORS for up to 6 donations. All races needed. N/Smokers, ages 18‑ 27, SAT>1100/ACT>24/GPA>3.0 Reply to: in‑ fo@eggdonorcenter.com if qualified.

10% OFF TO ALL TECH STUDENTS!

Doughnuts is hiring. Looking for morning and evening positions. Must be punctual, hard working and available weekends. Come by to fill out an ap‑ plication 4301 S. Loop 289.

Eyebrow Threading ($8), Facials, Pedicure, Mani‑ cure, Nails & Haircut. Om Threading, Nails & Spa. 4505 34th St. (806)771‑0160.

LOCAL REAL Estate Firm Looking for Assistant $9/hour 15‑20 hours per week, flexible schedule. Call Mark at 806‑831‑8436

Rates $10 and up. Free truck. 24/7 Rental station. Clean. 5839‑49th 792‑6464

LOOKING FOR a fun job? YWCA hiring for after‑ school positions. 3 p.m ‑ 6 p.m M‑F. Apply now at 35th & Flint, or call Carolyn at 806‑792‑2723, ext. 3217.

Affordable professional computer repair and virus removal. Home services offered. Call 830‑563‑ 7302 www.RaiderRepair.com

MR. AQUARIUM accepting applications. All posi‑ tions. 2523 34th. NOW ACCEPTING applications for PT Teacher’s Assistants. Must be available 12:00 ‑ 6:30 M‑F or 2:30 ‑ 6:30 M‑F. Must have HS Diploma and be able to pass background. Experience is preferred Please apply at 2434 27th Street M‑F 9am ‑ 4pm.

ALLAMERICANSTORAGE.COM

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FURNISHED $510/MONTH ONE bedroom suite in four bedroom apt. Lease takeover. All deposits paid. 817‑395‑ 3569

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PART‑TIME COMPUTER TECHNICIAN. Help with computer repair, answer phones, retail sales. Email resume to fastteks@texasots.com

$510/MONTH ONE bedroom suite in four bedroom apt. Lease takeover. All deposits paid. 817‑395‑ 3569

PART‑TIME/FULL‑Time evening house keepers. 5127 34th. Apply in person. No phone calls. Paid weekly.

APARTMENT FOR sublease. 4 BD or 2 BD fully furnished. Pet friendly. Includes free wi‑fi and tan‑ ning. Gym, pool and sand volleyball. $464 per month but will negotiate monthly price. Call Kaitlin at 903‑517‑3967.

PART TIME babysitter/ nanny needed. 330pm‑ 6pm. 698‑0818. 790‑8446.

PERFECT FOR college student! Beverage distribu‑ tor now hiring dependable individual to check in de‑ livery drivers. Part‑time position from 1pm to 8pm, 2 to 4 days a week Monday ‑ Friday. Basic account‑ ing and computer skills needed. $9/hour. Please apply at Great Plains Distributors 5701 E. Hwy 84. Fax 745‑8193, or call 745‑3661.

RETAIL SALES HELP

needed at the Outdoorsman: Full and part time po‑ sitions available. Flexible Hours, will work with school schedules. Responsible , hardworking peo‑ ple, that enjoy working with the public, with the de‑ sire to learn about the outdoor clothing industry. Retail sales experience is a plus, but not required. Must be willing to work weekends and holiday hours. Apply in person at the Outdoorsman, 6602 Slide Rd.

SALES ASSISTANTS NEEDED

Get your foot in the door of an industry‑leading group travel company! Those successful will be considered for full‑time Sales positions upon gradu‑ ation. Flexible and consistent schedule. Position will actively call potential clients and assist Sales team. Pay starts at $8/hr, increasing stepwise to $10/hr after 90 days. Additional DAILY INCEN‑ TIVES are awarded based on performance. E‑mail resumes to zac@directorschoice.travel SMOOTHIE KING now accepting applications. Early afternoon and morning availability preferred. Please apply in person at 3723 19th street.

STELLA’S NOW HIRING

*Servers (1 years’ + experience a plus), *Hostess (1 years’ experience), *Line Cooks (1 years’ experi‑ ence), *Bussers. Apply in person @ Stella’s 50th & Utica or E‑Mail Resume to: billy@stellas.us

UNFURNISHED

1, 2 & 3 bedroom residential homes in Tech Ter‑ race. Close to Campus. Reasonable rents. Pets al‑ lowed at most properties. Available now. Short leases available. Call Ann or BJ today for an ap‑ pointment and update 806‑795‑2011. 2/1. 2603 24th St. $850. Hard wood floors, fire place. Move in special. 806‑789‑8184. 806‑559‑ 6413. BACKYARD APARTMENT near Tech. Resonable rent. No pets. Quiet neighborhood. 741‑1800. CLOSE TO Campus. One bath. 2 bedroom back house. Fenced. $655. Call Ann or BJ 795‑2011.

CLOSE TO CAMPUS:

Efficiency. Semester lease. Move in today. Size of dorm room and bath. $300. Call Ann or BJ at 795‑ 2011.

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Reduced rent. Move in today. Lovely 2 bedroom house. 2 bath. Near 24th and Boston. Fenced yard. Nice appliances + Washer/Dryer + Security + hardwood. $655. Call Ann or BJ at 795‑2011.

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2/1. 2603 24th St. $850. Hard wood floors, fire place. Move in special. 806‑789‑8184. 806‑559‑ 6413. BACKYARD APARTMENT near Tech. Resonable rent. No pets. Quiet neighborhood. 741‑1800. CLOSE TO Campus. One bath. 2 bedroom back house. Fenced. $655. Call Ann or BJ 795‑2011.

CLOSE TO CAMPUS:

Efficiency. Semester lease. Move in today. Size of dorm room and bath. $300. Call Ann or BJ at 795‑ 2011.

CLOSE TO CAMPUS:

Reduced rent. Move in today. Lovely 2 bedroom house. 2 bath. Near 24th and Boston. Fenced yard. Nice appliances + Washer/Dryer + Security + hardwood. $655. Call Ann or BJ at 795‑2011.

CLOSE TO CAMPUS:

Reduced rent .Move in today. 3 bedroom house. 3 bath. 3520 32nd st. $825. Open house August 27th & 28th from 1:00‑1:30. Call Ann or BJ at 795‑2011.

EZ DEFENSIVE DRIVING.

Free chicken fried steak included Super Cheapest :) Cell 781‑2931. More Information www.LubbockClass.com.

WAXING

Brazillian, $55. Lip & brow, $15. Camille, 797‑ 9777 x245, @ Lindsey’s 3307 83rd. Best of Lub‑ bock. Like me on FaceBook, Camille Wax Queen. $5,500‑$10,000 PAID EGG DONORS for up to 6 donations. All races needed. N/Smokers, ages 18‑ 27, SAT>1100/ACT>24/GPA>3.0 Reply to: in‑ fo@eggdonorcenter.com if qualified.

10% OFF TO ALL TECH STUDENTS! Eyebrow Threading ($8), Facials, Pedicure, Mani‑ cure, Nails & Haircut. Om Threading, Nails & Spa. 4505 34th St. (806)771‑0160.

ALLAMERICANSTORAGE.COM

Rates $10 and up. Free truck. 24/7 Rental station. Clean. 5839‑49th 792‑6464

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FOR SALE

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MATTRESS SALE

Mattress, Furniture. Student discounts. 5127 34th Street (34th & Slide). 785‑7253.

MATTRESS SALE

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CLOTHING/JEWELRY NEED CASH

Buying any gold/silver jewelry. Any condition. Avery and others. Varsity Jewelers 1311 University.

TEXAS TECH

Officially licensed rings. Men’s from $845. Women’s from $495. Varsity Jewelers. 1311 University.

NEED CASH

Buying any gold/silver jewelry. Any condition. Avery and others. Varsity Jewelers 1311 University.

EZ DEFENSIVE DRIVING.

WAXING

Brazillian, $55. Lip & brow, $15. Camille, 797‑ 9777 x245, @ Lindsey’s 3307 83rd. Best of Lub‑ bock. Like me on FaceBook, Camille Wax Queen.

TRAVEL


8

SPORTS

AUG. 28, 2013

No. 7 Texas A&M mum about Manziel’s status

COLLEGE STATION (AP) — Johnny Football was the elephant in the room Tuesday at Texas A&M. The seventh-ranked Aggies head into Saturday’s home opener against Rice with questions still swirling about whether Heisman Trophy-winning quarterback Johnny Manziel will play against the Owls. The NCAA is investigating whether he was paid for his autograph, a potential violation of amateurism rules that could threaten his eligibility. It was the only thing anyone really wanted to talk about on Tuesday when the Aggies addressed the media. The topic, however, was off limits. Athletic director Eric Hyman said Monday night that he’d instructed everyone in the program not to talk about Manziel. And if that wasn’t clear enough, a member of the sports information department slowly and sternly read the statement, not once, but twice during the session.

Reporters asked anyway, and coach Kevin Sumlin did what Hyman asked. “We’re not discussing that,” he said. “I thought we went over that right from the beginning.” He later added that they have a plan for any number of situations that could happen with their players and team, and that they plan for the possible absence of players every week. ESPN, citing an anonymous source, reported that Manziel met with NCAA investigators over the weekend. CBSSports.com, also citing anonymous sources, reported that Manziel told the investigators he didn’t take money for his autograph. While Sumlin wouldn’t discuss Manziel’s availability for Week 1, he had no problem talking about whether football has helped the quarterback deal with everything going on off the field. “I know he likes to play football,”

Sumlin said. “I think the structure that he has had since Aug. 4 has been nothing but helpful.” If Manziel doesn’t play against the Owls, the Aggies will use either junior Matt Joeckel or freshman Kenny Hill. Joeckel is more of a pocket passer and Hill is a dual-threat quarterback. Joeckel has thrown just 11 passes in his college career. Hill, who starred at Texas high school powerhouse Southlake Carroll, threw for 2,291 yards and 20 TDs and ran for 905 yards and 22 more scores as a senior last season. Sumlin said the competition between the two is ongoing, and that he’s been pleased with the progress of both players. He said it helps his team because they’ve always allowed all quarterbacks to get work with the first team. “Anybody who has been around knows that we rotate players with the first team, has seen us rotate snaps with the first team and because of that I

WWW.DAILYTOREADOR.COM

BALL SECURITY

think it gives your team a chance to develop a relationship or camaraderie with that first team if something happens,” Sumlin said. Sumlin is confident that Texas A&M’s offense will be OK no matter who’s running the show because of his offensive line. The group, led by left tackle Jake Matthews, is expected to be a strength despite losing Matt’s twin brother, Luke Joeckel, when he was selected second overall in the draft. Matthews, the son of NFL Hall of Famer Bruce Matthews, will be joined on the line this season by little brother Mike Matthews at center. “We’ve got a really solid offensive line which takes a little bit of the pressure off Matt and Kenny,” Sumlin said. “When Johnny’s taking snaps, when he’s in there he’s really trying to help the perimeter guys. Our offensive line gives us an opportunity to rotate those quarterbacks and have them be successful.”

FOR RELEASE AUGUST 28, 2013

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

Pierzynski homers as Rangers beat Mariners 8-3

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

ACROSS 1 Stockpile 6 A.L. West player 11 Place to see reeds 14 Like some trains and anesthetics 15 “Gigi” star Leslie 16 Pollution-policing org. 17 Put down toddlers? 19 It’s in many poems 20 Wirehair of whodunits 21 Start of a morning diner order 22 Hunt illegally 24 Petty of “A League of Their Own” 26 Sediment 28 Put down formal education? 33 Handle the helm 35 They’re not from around here, briefly 36 Ship of Greek myth 37 Rand who created Dagny Taggart 38 Went by 42 The Matterhorn, e.g. 43 Plumbing concern 45 GI entertainers 46 British __ 48 Put down thoroughfares? 52 Hook’s sidekick 53 Caesarean rebuke 54 “Me too!” 57 Pay, as expenses 59 Russian assembly 63 Fuss 64 Put down a rock genre? 67 Spruce cousin 68 Soothing application 69 Cockamamie 70 Comics cry 71 Ancestral diagrams 72 Dumas swordsman DOWN 1 “The West Wing” Emmy winner

8/28/13

By Pancho Harrison

2 Homer’s hangout 3 IRA part: Abbr. 4 Big name in frozen desserts 5 Crafty 6 Thorny shrub 7 “Elephant Boy” actor 8 Rare sights in nurseries 9 Lobster eggs 10 How many writers work 11 Greek salad topper 12 Larger-than-life 13 1950s Rambler maker 18 Virologist who worked with Epstein 23 Worker protection agcy. 25 Storybook baddie 27 To be, to Brutus 28 Wrangler material 29 Station 30 47-Downs have to talk their way out of them 31 Look at lecherously 32 Cuts off 33 H.S. sobriety crusaders

Tuesday’s Puzzle Solved

(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

34 Spare, in Soho 39 Moon over Marseille 40 Put together 41 Waist management 44 Cuban cabbage? 47 Loan recipient, often 49 In the center of 50 Popular pieces 51 Rock follower? 54 Sound partner

8/28/13

55 Drooling comics dog 56 Idiot 58 Water-draining aid 60 Canyonlands National Park locale 61 Hand, to Jorge 62 Pub server’s trayful 65 Tuner’s asset 66 “Mamma __!”

A safe place to bring concerns and find solutions.

Welcome New and Returning Students! We’re a great place to ask questions and find solutions. Call us at 742-SAFE 232 E SUB • 806.742.SAFE • www.safeplace.ttu.edu

SEATTLE (AP) — When August started, Travis Blackley was a reliever on the worst team in the majors. Now he’s starting for the AL West leaders. Blackley pitched six effective innings and A.J. Pierzynski hit a three-run homer, leading the Texas Rangers to an 8-3 victory over the Seattle Mariners on Monday night. It was Blackley’s first win since he was acquired in a trade with Houston on Aug. 14. “It’s a good feeling,” Blackley said. “I’m really excited about the rest of the way.” Alex Rios had two hits and two RBIs as the Rangers picked up their fifth win in seven games. Elvis Andrus celebrated his 25th birthday with three hits and an RBI. It was more than enough run support for Blackley (2-1), who allowed three runs and five hits in his second start of the season. “With all the injuries we’ve had, especially pitching injuries, anyone we can get that can come in and give us six innings and a quality start and give us a chance, that’s an added bonus,” Pierzynski said. “We’ve had a bunch of guys step in kind of from out of nowhere and done some good things for us.” Kyle Seager hit his 20th home run of the season for the Mariners, who have lost four in a row. It was Blackley’s longest outing since Oct. 2, 2012, after making 42 relief appearances for Houston this season. He had a similar experience last year, when he joined Oakland mid-season and made 15 starts for the A’s during their playoff run. “Coming back here with another chase and another go at the postseason,

We’re Kind of a

a little older and I’ve been through it — it’s really not as hard when you’ve got this team behind you,” Blackley said. “They play so well and they score a lot of runs most of the time.” Blackley was designated for assignment by Houston on Aug. 9. He was sent to Triple-A Round Rock after the trade, but he came up when right-hander Alexi Ogando went on the disabled list. “I don’t know what the Astros were thinking, I think they just wanted to try out young guys. I wasn’t having the best season in that role, but it was a blessing in disguise,” Blackley said. “I wanted to start all year and they didn’t have a spot for me to do that, and a spot opened up here, picked me up and I’m trying to run with it.” It was a much different night for Seattle starter Joe Saunders (10-13), who turned in another sluggish outing. The left-hander allowed seven runs and nine hits in seven innings to fall to 1-5 with a 7.71 ERA in his last seven starts. “It was one of those weird nights where I thought I pitched better than the results,” Saunders said. “I’ve just been having some bad luck.” The Rangers led 4-3 before Pierzynski hit a drive to right after Adrian Beltre was intentionally walked with two out and a runner on second in the seventh. It was Pierzynski’s 15th homer in his first season with Texas. Mitch Moreland added his 19th homer in the eighth, giving the Rangers an 8-3 lead. Saunders got off to a slow start, and the Rangers took advantage. Saunders hit Craig Gentry leading off the game and Andrus followed with a single. The runners moved up on Ian Kinsler’s sacrifice before Beltre was walked intentionally to load the bases.

PHOTO BY DANIELLE ZARAGOZA/The Daily Toreador

EVAN ESTES, A freshman energy commerce major from Longview, tries to stop Donny Dondeo, a senior media strategies major from Arlington from catching the football during practice for their intramural team Tuesday outside the Robert H. Ewalt Student Recreation Center.

Tadlock completes spring coaching staff Texas Tech baseball coach Tim Tadlock made a new addition to his 2013-2014 coaching staff Tuesday with the hiring of Matt Gardner as volunteer assistant coach. Tadlock said Gardner’s experience in the Big 12 Conference as a coach and tutoring the Cape Cod League Pitcher of the Year, Lukas Schiraldi, were factors in his decision. Gardner will assist with the Tech pitchers and catchers and also will serve as the team’s outfield instructor. He began his collegiate career playing for Tadlock at Grayson County College in 2004-2005 and spent the previous two seasons as pitching coach at Lubbock Christian University (2012-2013) following three seasons as both a graduate assistant coach and volunteer assistant at his alma mater, Oklahoma State University. Gardner coached 21 picks from the Major League Baseball Draft while at Oklahoma State — 10 of which were pitchers. Five of the OSU players were selected in the top-10 rounds of

the MLB First-Year Player Draft. In addition to coaching numerous draft picks at his alma mater, Gardner mentored 18 All-Big 12 selections, 21 Academic All-Big 12 honorees, two Big 12 Pitchers of the Week and one All-American. Prior to arriving at Tech, Gardner served as pitching coach for the Chatham Anglers in the Cape Cod League during Summer 2013. He helped lead the Anglers to the President’s Trophy, which is awarded annually to the team with the best overall record (26-17). Gardner coached several Red Raiders during his year in the Cape Cod League, including outfielder Brett Bell, catcher Hunter Redman and right-handed pitcher Dominic Moreno. Gardner said he is excited about the opportunity to be part of Tech’s baseball program and is fortunate to join Tadlock’s staff. Gardner replaces Russell Raley who now works as an assistant coach at Incarnate Word. ➤➤sports@dailytoreador.com

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