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REGIONAL LOOKBOOK

Tools of the trade. LIttle King Goods

09

HANDCRAFT ISSUE

TOQUEMAGAZINE.COM


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09.

R e le ase d N O V . 2019

a new publication by TOQUE

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2O2O CHRIS TIESSEN, partner writin g & phot ography For advertising opportunities, contact chris@toque.ltd Contributors: Alanna Gurr, Christina Mann, Sonia Preisler, Gary Rhijnsburger & Jarrett Woof

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Printed on 100% post-consumer ROLLAND ENVIRO paper. This print run saved:

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‘OFTEN THE HANDS WILL SOLVE A MYSTERY THAT THE INTELLECT HAS STRUGGLED WITH IN VAIN.’ – CARL JUNG HANDS. YOU COULD SAY WE’VE GOT A THING FOR THEM. AND, BY EXTENSION, FOR THE REMARKABLE THINGS THEY CREATE. DEXTEROUS FINGERS CRAFTING THE MOST WONDERFUL STUFF - FROM (INSTAGRAM-WORTHY) CULINARY EXTRAVAGANCES TO (PRINT-WORTHY) ARTISANAL WARES. WOODWORK. METALWORK. NEEDLEWORK. LEATHERWORK. ANY WORK, REALLY, SO LONG AS IT’S BEEN SHAPED AND REFINED BY OUR REGIONAL MAKERS’ MOST BEAUTIFUL AND FLEXIBLE DIGITS. INDEED, OUR MAGAZINE HAS ALWAYS BEEN AN ODE TO HANDS. WE OFFER DESCRIPTIONS OF THEM IN THE STORIES WE WRITE. AND PORTRAITS OF THEM, TOO: HANDS CRAFTING DESIRABLE THINGS OR, IN (SEEMINGLY) JUST AS MANY CASES, HANDS HOLDING THESE SAME DESIRABLE ITEMS. LIFTING. CARESSING. CONTROLLING. DIRECTING. APPRECIATING WONDERFUL OBJECTS. WHETHER FURNITURE OR JEWELLERY. BEERS, BIKES OR BURGERS. FROM BROOKLYN TO BERLIN. AND OUR FETISH FOR THESE EXTREMITIES EXTENDS EVEN TO OUR READERS’ HANDS. TO BE SURE, WE HAVE SPENT MANY A SLEEPLESS NIGHT MULLING OVER THE PERFECT PAPER STOCK FOR YOUR ULTIMATE PLEASURE. FEEL. TEXTURE. TACTILITY. AFTER ALL, THIS MAGAZINE IS OUR WAY OF REACHING OUT AND TOUCHING YOUR LIVES. TANGIBLY. A CEREMONIAL OBJECT. A THING TO HOLD. COLLECT. AND KEEP BY YOUR BEDSIDE OR ON YOUR COFFEE TABLE. A ‘LIFESTYLE BIBLE’ TO WHICH YOU CAN ALWAYS RETURN, TIME AND AGAIN. FOR DISCOVERING MAKERS. CREATORS. CRAFTSFOLK WHOSE WORN AND WEATHERED HANDS TELL THE STORIES OF THEIR LIVES. AND OF THE PLACES WE LIVE AND MOVE, TOO. WELCOME TO OUR ANNUAL ‘HANDCRAFT ISSUE’ – CELEBRATING A HANDFUL OF OUR REGION’S WONDERFUL MAKERS. JOIN US IN GIVING THEM ALL A HAND.

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CONTENTS 9. EDITOR’S LETTER: THE HANDCRAFT ISSUE 14. L EATHER OBSESSIONS: LITTLE KING GOODS 24. DAYTRIPPIN’ WITH ALANNA GURR & JARRETT WOOF 26. MEET YOUR MAKER: WOLF DOTTIR 28. T  HE FRIENDLY SOCIETY: A NEIGHBOURHOOD GASTROPUB WITH POLISH 38. #  PHOTOSPREAD: FINDING SPACE: CELEBRATING OUR COMMUNITIES’ (COZY) ALTARS OF CREATIVITY 48. I NVITING PERSPECTIVES: THE MESMERIZING WORLD OF ARTIST HEATHER KOCSIS 56. #  PHOTOSPREAD: ON POINT: DISCOVERING THE CREATIVE CHARM OF DOWNTOWN CAMBRIDGE 64. AN EXCURSION INTO FALL: SPIRIT TREE CIDERY 74. #  PHOTOSPREAD: COCKTAIL CRAWL: WETTING OUR WHISTLES IN UPTOWN WATERLOO 80. UNCOVERING WELLINGTON COUNTY: CASSOULET CATERING 86. GETTING TO KNOW: POD 88. T  IM MURTON: PORTRAIT OF AN ARTIST 96. MEET YOUR MAKER: GILLIAN WILSON, TRIANGLE TREES 98. #PHOTOSPREAD: GEAR UP 104. M  ULBERRY STREET COFFEEHOUSE: HAND-CRAFTING AN AUTHENTIC SPACE 112. #PHOTOSPREAD: JAM SESSION 114. A  NATOMY OF A BRAND: ARCH TOTE BAGS 116. STARTING WITH ‘WHAT IF’: THE OAK TREE PROJECT 122. E  XPERT OPINION (INVESTMENT): MIKE HRYN 126. ANATOMY OF A BRAND: GRAND RIVER GROWN 128. THE YETI CAFÉ: GETTING ACQUAINTED WITH THE FAMILIAR 134. MEET YOUR MAKER: JETPACKS AND ROLLERSKATES 140. #FOODPORN: MEATLESS MARVELS 146. GETTING TO KNOW: FRAN ROBINSON MORTGAGES 152. C  RAFTING NOSTALGIA: SEAN KANE AND HIS PAINTED GLOVES 160. COMIC: GOOSE 162. COCKTAIL HOUR WITH SPRING MILL DISTILLERY


illustration: MIchael Byers,

michaelbyers


photos by Chris Tiessen

14

LE AT H ER OBS E S S I O N S :

LITTLE KING GOODS BY CHRIS TIESSEN ‘Let me get this straight,’ I exclaim to Ryan

across his face. ‘And you’ve gone from trying

James over americanos in the small hamlet

to attract your first customers to a nine-week

of Morriston, at The Folklore Barber &

waiting list for your products?’ He puts the

Company – Nathaniel Shields’ booming

mug down and meets my gaze. ‘What can I

business offering classic men’s grooming

say?,’ he says. ‘I’m obsessed with leather.’

services fueled by coffee and conversation. I continue: ‘You’re telling me that just over

And I, in turn, am obsessed with Ryan’s leather

three years ago you’d never even worked with

goods. Little King Goods. (It’s an eponymous

leather?’ Ryan picks up the steaming baby

name, reflecting a popular belief that the

blue mug set in front of him, rolls it back and

name Ryan is derived from an Old Irish term

forth in the palms of his hands and, after a

denoting ‘a little king’.)

few seconds of pondering my query, nods affirmatively. ‘And,’ I add – my tone revealing

Duffels. Wallets. Tote bags. Ipad cases. And

my incredulity – ‘today you’ve got over one

other leather items leave me swooning. Like

hundred and fifty seven thousand YouTube

the dark chocolate-coloured satchel that

subscribers who watch you craft leather

Ryan’s brought along with him for our chat.

wallets, and bags, and computer cases?’

He hoists the solid bag onto the barbershop’s

Ryan nods again – hints of pride spreading

poured concrete bar, placing it neatly between


15


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our americanos. And I’m mesmerized. ‘Can I hold it?,’ I ask him – referring to the bag like it’s some sort of museum piece. ‘Of course,’ replies Ryan. ‘Spend some time with it.’ I lift the satchel to my nose, close my eyes, and inhale. Deeply. Satisfying aromas of rich leather transport me to another place and time – a world filled with dapper-dressed folk, stately stone hearths, and pipe smoke. My hands – clutching the bag near my face – caress its supple hide and pronounced seams. The tips of my fingers skim across its perfect stitching. I open my eyes and examine the weighty carryall. A thing of beauty, to be sure. Its clean design. Dark umber hue. Solid metal buckles and handhammered brass rivets. I unbuckle the satchel’s straps, fold back its heavy front flap, and peer inside. ‘What do you think?’ asks Ryan. It seems I’ve been silent – reverent – for far too long. I look up from the hand-crafted artifact in my hands. Blink. Blink again. And murmur: ‘I just want to crawl into it. Be enveloped by it. And take a nap.’ Ryan laughs. I laugh, too. Fast forward an hour or so, and Ryan and I are in his basement studio – a short walk from Nathaniel’s barbershop. Leatherworking tools – everything from hand-held utensils to industrial sewing machines and embossers – fill the place. Leather bits, too. Unfinished projects and prototypes and scraps and whole hides lie in piles and boxes around the room. An imposing worktable sits in the middle of the space. I note its smooth white top and the professional lighting set-up that’s been positioned all around it. And I recognize almost right away what it is I’m looking at: Ryan’s Little King Goods stage. The one he uses for his wildly-popular YouTube videos, in which he takes his ever-growing audience through the process of creating one of his exquisite creations. ‘YouTube,’ Ryan notes, ‘and, to a lesser extent, Instagram, have proven invaluable tools for me to spread the message of my craft.’ He continues: ‘To be honest, I spend almost as much time thinking creatively about the production of my social

poster papercraft handcrafted by @caitdo


18

media posts as I do about the bags I make.’

of my process and products to YouTube.

And it shows. Ryan’s YouTube video featuring

Now I can’t even keep up with the orders

him making an ipad case from scratch, for

– and it’s all being driven by social media.’

instance, is a wonderfully satisfying cinematic

Ryan points to a digital counter positioned

event that captures the imagination from

on top of a shelving unit in the corner of his

the first shot. The fact that it has garnered

studio. As I look at it, the numeral readout

over one million views is clear evidence of its

keeps growing. One hundred and fifty seven

success as a creative achievement that stands

thousand four hundred and six. One hundred

alone – outside of Ryan’s leatherwork. ‘Before

and fifty seven thousand four hundred and

I got into working with leather,’ Ryan remarks,

seven. One hundred and fifty seven thousand

‘I was a professional photographer – working

four hundred and eight. Onward and upward.

weddings and other events. When I got into

‘It tracks my YouTube subscribers in real

leather, I never abandoned my passion for

time,’ Ryan says matter-of-factly. ‘To let me

photography. Instead, I effectively amplified

know how I’m doing.’

my leather business by showcasing it through my lens for social media audiences.’

I pick up a near-finished wallet lying on the

Ryan pauses before adding: ‘It’s the perfect

table in front of me. Lift it to my nose, close

marriage, really.’

my eyes, and inhale. Deeply. I feel the supple leather between my fingers. I open my eyes

It’s not lost on me how ironic this all seems;

and inspect the perfect stitching. Admire it.

that is, the fact that new technologies like

Lust after it. And respond: ‘You’re doing just

YouTube and Instagram are making relevant

fine.’

the (seemingly near-distant) raw crafts of

.

yesteryear. Ryan can’t help but agree. He remarks: ‘My work was getting almost no traction at all before I began posting videos

LITTLE KING GOODS

littlekinggoods.com


@LITTLE.KING.GOODS

19


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DAYTRIPPIN’

A C O U PL E O F BUSI NESS-OWNI NG SW E E T H E AR T S SH AR IN G A F AVOU R IT E S A TU RD A Y D A Y TRI P AROUND OUR REG ION .

OWNERS OF THE SPRITZ – A MOBILE BARTENDING SERVICE BASED IN A SWEET VINTAGE CAMPER TRAILER (THESPRITZCAMPER.COM) Around these parts, Alanna and Woof are known commodities. Having run in regional music (Alanna) and beer (both Alanna and Woof) circles for quite some time, they’ve become familiar with some of the region’s coolest kids – and spots. And now, as co-owners of The Spritz, they’re looking to use their knowledge, experience and networks to assist hosting the choicest, most stylish events. But not before they guide you around the region to a few of their favourite haunts. Come along.

D E TO UR CAFÉ 41 KING ST W, DUNDAS

1. Want to start any Saturday off right? Then begin it at Detour Café in downtown Dundas – a quaint community just west of Hamilton that will leave you feeling like you’re in Stars Hollow. Our fave early morning fuel? Breakfast sandwiches and cortados (espressos cut with warm milk). Bottoms up.

2. Next stop: a morning hike at Spencer

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Gorge Conservation Area – renowned for its geological formations and pair of waterfalls: Webster and Tew Falls. While Tew Falls is only

S PE N C E R G OR GE CON S ER V A T IO N AR E A TEW FALL PARKING LOT, HARVEST RD,

a few metres shorter than Niagara Falls, we prefer the hike to Webster Falls – a marvelous tiered waterfall that’s worth the jaunt.

DUNDAS

3. Feeling refreshed and ready for browsing, we hop into the car and head to Inglewood

INGLE WO O D ANTI QU E MAR K E T 16083 HURONTARIO ST, CALEDON

Antique Market – an old apple barn in Caledon that’s full of unique trinkets, fun antiques, and vintage furniture and décor.

4. Next we drive the scenic route down Forks of the Credit Road toward Belfountain – the quaintest little village in Caledon. Our destination: an old-fashioned general store with the most amazing assortment of curated

T H E C OM M O N GO O D & GE N ER A L STO R E 758 BUSH ST, BELFOUNTAIN

stuff. From baked goods to ice cream, ceramics to cushions, The Common Good has so much to offer.

photo by Nicolette Hoang

ALANNA GURR & JARRETT WOOF


TI N ROOF CAFÉ

5. All set for lunch, we head to Tin Roof Café in Erin. If the patio’s still open, we take

4 MAIN ST, ERIN

a seat for prime people- and dog-watching. If the patio’s closed, we post up by the garage door window and do the same. We split an Apple Cheddar grilled cheese and Smashed Chickpea Salad sandwich and go to our happy place.

6.

AP OLLO CI NEMA 141 ONTARIO ST N, KITCHENER

Next? An afternoon movie at The

Apollo Cinema in downtown Kitchener, of course. With a bag of popcorn and tasty local craft beer, we set up in a couple of this old school-style cinema’s comfy chairs, put our drinks on an accompanying table, and take in the flick.

TH E LOKAL @ TH E WALP ER H OTEL

7.

20 QUEEN ST S, KITCHENER

From The Apollo we walk to The Lokal

– The Walper’s hip and elegant secondfloor bar – for pre-dinner house-crafted cocktails. The dehydrated fruit and flower garnishes, the celery salt, the syrups and house sodas – all are made in-house.

P UBLI C KI TCH EN & BA R 8.

300 VICTORIA ST N, KITCHENER

Ready for dinner, we drive to Public –

where we had our first date. Gulf shrimp in Romesco sauce with pickled fennel. Pork and beef meatball sliders with blue cheese sauce and crispy fried onions. Beef tartare with pickled onions, red wine reduction and fried capers. Honestly – just bring

COMMERCI AL TAVERN

friends and order the whole menu.

1303 MARYHILL RD, MARYHILL

9. It’s late, but there’s still one place we need to visit. Maryhill’s Commercial Tavern – a real blast from the past. We order butter tarts and watch couples twostep to the sounds of the family house

.

band. The perfect way to cap off the night

DAYTRIP, TAG & POST!

@TOQUELTD #TOQUEDT #TOQUEDAYTRIPPING


MEET YOUR MAKER

26 26

photo by Alexander Kus

WOLF DOTTIR Margaret Kelly wolfdottir.com

HO W T O D ES C R I B E H A M I L T O N - B A S ED A RTI ST WOL F D OT T I R ’S W OR K – A L I N E OF V I N TAG E C H I N A T H A T ’S B EEN R EW OR KED F OR A N EW A U D I EN C E? S H E S U MS I T U P QU I T E N I CEL Y, A C T U A L L Y , W R I T I N G T H A T H ER P I EC ES ARE ‘ W H A T Y O U W OU L D B U Y F OR Y OU R G R AN, I F T OD A Y W A S O P P O S I T E D A Y A N D H ER S I TTI NG RO O M W A S I N H EL L .’ I R R EV ER EN T . P I T H Y . I R O N I C . B R I L L I A N T – WOL F D OT T I R ’S R EP U R P OS ED C H I N A I S A REMED Y F OR T H E MU N D A N E, A N D O F F ERS A WI N K T O T H OS E S U B V ER S I V E F O R C ES T HAT K EEP L I F E I N T ER ES T I N G . OH – A N D I T L O O KS HEL L A N I C E ON A W A L L , T OO . S O W H A T ARE YO U W A I T I N G F O R ? V I S I T W O L F D O T T I R . CO M T O S EE F OR Y OU R S EL F .


27

VISIT WOLF DOTTIR'S ONLINE SHOP: wolfdottir.com


photos by Chris Tiessen

28 ME

THE FRIENDLY SOCIETY:

TC AL FE

ST W

ELORA

ST

MILL

A N EI GHBOUR HO O D G A S T R O P U B W I T H P O LI S H BY CHRIS TIESSEN We follow the group ahead of us down

Soon enough the manager (and our good

the narrow flight of stairs from street level

friend), Katie, shows us to our table.

into the subterranean world below. Behind

A four-seater high-top near the back of the

us, the humming sights and sounds of

restaurant. Perfect for people watching.

Elora’s Mill Street. Ahead of us, something

And positioned right next to The Friendly’s

completely different – yet no less inviting.

only block of windows, which look out at the

The thrum of chatter, laughter, and The New

silvery Grand River and the Metcalfe Street

Pornographers’ ‘Champions of Red Wine’

bridge that spans it. While I’m surveying

beckons us forward.

the view, Liz gives our drink order. Cocktails tonight – to match the tone of the place, and

Liz and I arrive at the bottom of the steps,

because Katie also happens to be the head

and I’m transfixed by the underground scene

bartender. And she’s good, real good, having

laid out in front of us. By the dramatic black-

helped open such awesome regional spots

and-white checkered floor. Oddly benevolent

as downtown Guelph’s Ox (may it rest in

exposed stone walls. Warm reclaimed

peace), Elora’s The Porchlight (another recent

wood ceiling. And groups of people. Dining.

addition to Elora’s ever-growing foodie scene),

Drinking. Spending this Friday evening in one

and now this brilliant space. ‘Chris’ll have a

of Elora’s newest culinary destinations – The

negroni,’ Liz tells Katie, ‘and I’ll try the cherry

Friendly Society. Filling the cozy space with

gin mint fizz.’ And so this pleasant evening

energy and delightfulness.

kicks off.


29


30 While Liz and I sip our first round, awaiting

at street level behind glass on a luminous

our appetizers – including an order of fried

white subway-tiled wall] is a superb example

olives, charcuterie board, and wings – The

of what Becky’s talking about. Inspired by

Friendly Society’s owner Becky Lalui takes

the exalted tradition of medieval heraldry,

a break from working in the kitchen to

it cheekily features a lowly chipmunk

chat with us about her new place. (Becky

sharing a drink with a squirrel. The perfect

and her husband Ardin are far from hands

combination of elevated and familiar. Like

off owners, and can be found around the

the restaurant.’ Cheeky, yes, I think to myself.

restaurant most days.) When I ask what gave

And aesthetically-dazzling, too. Like the entire

her the inspiration to open, she’s quick to

joint. Indeed, every square inch of the place

reply: ‘Travel.’ She elaborates: ‘Ardin and I

has been finished beautifully – with drama,

have had the pleasure of adventuring far

warmth and flair.

and wide – from Montreal to Prague to Paris. And of eating in these cities’ fantastic

Take the brass bar, for instance, built by

local restaurants. Culinary destinations

Elora metal artist Mike Hintermeister (who

with amazing vibes. Gorgeous designs.

also made the awesome swing-out stools at

And exceptional customer experiences.

The Porchlight, and the horse head sculpture

We wanted to replicate the best of

in front of Elora Centre for the Arts). ‘When

these restaurants right here. To create a

Mike was installing the bar top, he decided to

space that’s elevated, yet comfortable. A

cut the large piece of brass in two and weld

neighbourhood gastropub with polish.’

the pieces back together in a ‘meandering’ pattern – to evoke the Grand River,’ Ardin

Our appetizers arrive – as does Ardin, who

tells us. And then there’s the wallpaper:

chimes in: ‘Our logo [displayed prominently

William Morris (featuring bunnies and birds


32


and floral patterns) for the dining room and Gucci (monochrome cats with bright red lipstick) for the restrooms. And the giant resin stag head mounted behind the bar. ‘It used to be in our bedroom,’ admits Ardin with a laugh. All these stunning features. Photogenic. And, perhaps more importantly, Instagrammable. Katie returns to clear our appetizer plates (picked clean) and deliver our mains – a house burger with fries and Bourbon maple salmon with succotash and cornbread. And another round of drinks. A sangria for Liz and a pint of 1664 for me. (Katie tells us later that while The Friendly serves regional craft beer, it mixes in choices like Kronenbourg 1664 ‘to remind folks of their worldly travels.’ Indeed, it reminded me of my one-time seeming endless – and oh so heady – nights in Vienna and Amsterdam.) I take a sip of my pint and ask about the place’s name. ‘It’s after a temperance group founded in the mid-nineteenth-century by a number of Elora’s business owners,’ Becky says. ‘The Friendly Society promoted drinking in moderation – and proclaimed themselves

33

a happier, more carefree option than the ‘humourless’ Elora Temperance Society.’ She tells us she’d love this place to be ‘a destination for locals and visitors alike to enjoy a few drinks, revel in some great food, and share excellent company.’ I take a bite of my burger and look over at Liz, who’s enjoying her maple salmon. (We will delight in Becky’s peach and apple crisp – later.) At the bar, Katie pours a group of locals another round. All around us, folks are immersed in conversation. And at our table, Becky and Ardin eagerly share more about The Friendly – their beautiful new baby.

.

A neighbourhood gastropub with polish, indeed

THE FRIENDLY SOCIETY 8 MILL ST W, ELORA

friendlysociety.ca


15 Wyndham Street North Guelph, ON tmodernbride.com

35


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#P H O TO S P R E AD

FI N D I N G S P AC E :

CELEBRATING OUR COMMUNITIES’ (COZY) ALTARS OF CREATIVITY ‘THE ONLY THING I KNO W IS THAT IF I GET TO MY STUDIO, THAT MEANS I’M ALIVE TODAY.’

38

– PHOTOGRAPHER & LECTURER ROBERT FARBER

OUR REGION IS FILLED WITH THEM: IMPROVISED BASEMENTS, MULTIPURPOSE LIVING ROOMS, CONVERTED GARAGES, SHARED SPACES, AND OTHER NOOKS AND CRANNIES INSIDE AND OUT THAT DOUBLE AS HUBS OF CREATIVITY. HIVES OF WHIMSY. CENTRES OF PRODUCTION FOR LOCAL MAKERS. ILLUSTRATORS. DESIGNERS. JEWELLERS. BACKYARD FARMERS. AND OTHER INSPIRED AND RESOURCEFUL FOLKS WHO DEVOTE THEIR LIVES TO MAKING OURS MORE BEAUTIFUL. SO STEP INSIDE. TAKE A PEEK. THERE’S (JUST) ROOM ENOUGH.


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T A YLA R DO BBI E Tattoo Artist (Shared Studio) @taylardobbietattoos


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TH O M A S J AM ES ‘T J’ RA D CLI FFE Farmer (ad hoc Out Building) @hoppyfieldsfarm


41

J E NN Y PULLI N G Jeweller (Converted Garage) @straystones


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C A R LY K LA S S EN Soap Maker (Improvised Kitchen) @thesagesoapcompany


MICHAEL BYER S Illustrator (Occupied Bedroom) @michaelbyers


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detail from ‘Kaufman’s, Building from Within,’ oil on wood, 38” x 27”, 2010. Photos by Chris Tiessen

48

INVITING PERSPECTIVES:

TH E MES MER I Z I N G W O R L D O F A R T I S T HE AT HER KOC S I S BY CAI SEPULIS ‘Nothing in this studio is safe,’ artist Heather

any object I can get my hands on to create the

Kocsis says with a laugh, holding up the

texture and look that the piece needs.’

tattered cage of an electric fan missing over half of its radiating spokes. ‘When I

Difficult to define but perhaps best described

realized the spokes would be perfect for

as ‘sculptural paintings,’ Heather’s work is

a staircase I was building, I cut them free

part architectural, part fine-art painting,

from their cage and used them in my piece.’

and part woodworking. It tends to feature

She pauses, before adding (with a grin): ‘I

iconic, mostly local buildings, cathedrals and

had to buy a new fan, of course. But the

industrial settings – all intricately crafted and

piece looks great.’ My TOQUE Partner Chris

accurately detailed. Each piece presented

Tiessen – who is taking photos of Heather,

from a unique perspective. MC Escher meets

her work space, and her art – and I laugh

architectural realism.

and continue wandering through the artist’s studio in Cambridge, where we observe this

It’s hard not to be drawn into any one of

same type of (albeit sometimes questionable)

Heather’s pieces – even if it’s of a building

resourcefulness resonating from each of

you’ve seen a hundred times. Each one is

Heather’s pieces. ‘I’ll use anything: wood,

like looking at a memory: some details are

corrugated cardboard, string, pretty much

familiar, some parts you had forgotten. And


49


work in progress, ‘Eglinton Station’

50

the play of light and shadows painted on the

six inches square, and eight inches thick.

facade inevitably draws you in for a closer

And weighs at least twenty-five pounds.

look.

She moves it over to her work table without concern; it’s been built strong and built to

‘Do you have a background in woodworking?

last. There are no shortcuts in her craft.

Did you go to architecture school?,’ I ask the

Chris and I inspect the piece, constructed

artist. I am driven by my own curiosity about

for her clients: Isherwood Geostructural

this work, mesmerized with wonder about

Engineers. Over the years, Heather has

where and how these pieces came to be.

created a few pieces for their office based on

Having gone to Dalhousie for architecture

projects they’ve worked on. This particular

over a decade ago, I know all about creating

piece features the intricately-engineered

scaled drawings and building models in the

underground infrastructure for the Laird

woodshop. But this is different. Heather’s

subway station in Toronto, currently under

ability to construct in perspective on a

construction and scheduled to open in 2021.

three-dimensional plane with such artistry is

The concrete walls, steel beams, pipes and

inspiring. ‘I actually started as a printmaker

pillars (and whatever else I can’t even name)

while I studied fine art at Queen’s in Kingston,’

are still in bare and raw form, and mostly

Heather begins. ‘I loved the process, the

made of wood at this stage.

scheming, the superimposing of media. Then I just learned along the way. I figured out

Heather points out the tiniest string-like

what I had to do and I did it.’ As we discuss

details. ‘I’m about four weeks in,’ she remarks.

her process – the planning, the textures and

‘I have another week of building to go

the layering which are so prominent in her

because of these intricate cable ties,’ she says,

work – I recognize the natural evolution of an

pointing at the steel replicas of actual ties,

artist.

‘then at least a couple weeks to paint in oils.’ Knowing what it’s like to illustrate technical

Heather picks up a new piece she’s been

drawings and how precise they need to be

working on. It’s about twenty-four by thirty-

for clients like engineers, I ask how Heather


detail from ‘Spiralling Blue,’ oil on wood, 48” x 13”, 2011

51

detail from ‘As Above, So Below,’ oil on wood, 51” x 41” x 14”, 2015


‘Eglinton Station,’ mixed media, 24” x 37” x 8”, 2019. Photo by Nick Stanley

manages it. ‘I start with a lot of site visits,’ she

52

explains, ‘taking photos and really trying to build an understanding of what I’m looking at and what I need. Then I pull it all together and present the client with a detailed sketch

WHERE TO SEE HEATHER’S PIECES IN PERSON:

omit or misrepresent any key pieces.’

RED CIRCLE COFFEE CO 137 GLASGOW ST SUITE 390, KITCHENER

Long before our visit winds down, Chris and

Look to the left of the bar

before building anything. It ensures I don’t

I find ourselves inspired by the uniqueness of Heather’s craft and discuss with her the journey of finding your creative voice (or calling) and being bold enough to stick to it.

MONIGRAM COFFEE MIDTOWN 618 KING ST W, KITCHENER

‘Find out what you uniquely do, and do more of it – it is your gift,’ Heather says, invoking Gloria Steinem’s advice to her younger self. A comment worth pondering. ‘I don’t want to do anything else,’ Heather observes with unwavering confidence. ‘This is what I’m supposed to be doing.’

.

Looking around the studio, I can’t agree more

HEATHER KOCSIS BY APPOINTMENT, CAMBRIDGE

heatherkocsis.com

KITCHENER CITY HALL 200 KING ST W, KITCHENER Heather has 14 pieces at City Hall – the easiest to spot is her Kaufman Building piece on the main floor by the revenue desk HEATHER KOCSIS STUDIO Contact Heather if you would like to drop by – she loves having visitors


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WHEN’S THE LAST TIME YOU VISITED DOWNTOWN CAMBRIDGE? YOU KNOW – THAT GORGEOUS DISTRICT SMACK DAB IN THE MIDDLE OF HISTORIC GALT WHICH DOUBLES AS THE SET OF THE MARGARET ATWOOD-ADAPTED SERIES, ‘THE HANDMAID’S TALE.’ POSITIONED ON THE BANKS OF THE GRAND RIVER, THIS DELIGHTFULLY-SCENIC AND ARCHITECTURALLY-RICH AREA IS WORTH THE TREK. FOR SHOPPING. DINING. AND ADVENTURING – ALONG MAIN DRAGS, ACROSS RIVER-SPANNING BRIDGES, UP AND DOWN SIDE STREETS, IN AND OUT OF SHOPS AND GALLERIES, PAST HISTORIC STONE BUILDINGS. 56 A MONTH OR SO AGO THE TOQUE TEAM VENTURED INTO #DTCBRIDGE FOR AN AFTERNOON OF EXPLORING. ALONG THE WAY, WE PAID VISITS TO FIVE PHENOMENAL DOWNTOWN DESTINATIONS TO SEE WHAT THEY HAD ON OFFER. HERE’S A TASTE.

3 AINSLIE ST N

WATER ST S

GRAND RIVER

DICKSON ST

MAIN ST

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DOWNTOWN CAMBRIDGE

300m radius


Plaid wool hat + matching gloves

Olive wood serving fork

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Prayer beads

Pilgrim watches

Teraz zo cutting board Rifle Paper Co pins

1 T H E A R T O F H O ME

11 Ainslie St S, Downtown Cambridge theartofhome.ca • @theartofhome


Mondaine watch

Kaweco cartridges

Secrid Wallet

58

Lamy 2000 pen

Pilot Iroshizuku ink bottle

Shinola notebook

2

P H ID O N PEN S

63 Dickson St, Downtown Cambridge phidonpens.com • @phidonpens


Maple Fudge

Milk chocolate & dark chocolate Sea Salties

Hot chocolate mix

Jelly Beans

59 Fancy Mix nuts

Mint Sandwich Tortoise chocolates

Assorted chocolates

3

R E ID S CH O CO LA T E, CA N D Y & NU T SHOP 42 Ainslie St N, Downtown Cambridge reidchocolates.com • @reidschocolate


Porcelain-finish pottery

Original art pieces

60 Polymer clay designs

Bashful Pineapple cufflinks

Jewellery crafted with hand-painted paper with set-in resin Polymer-coated glass bowl

4

NO W O RD S

29 Ainslie St N, Downtown Cambridge nowords.shop

Repurposed silver plate silverware

Marquetry box lid


Coffee beans, roasted in-house

Beetroot latte mix

Local Jellies

Latte Ceramic coffee mill

Pain au chocolat

Americano

BLT croissant with side salad

Giftcards

5

M O NIG RA M CO FFEE RO A STERS 16 Ainslie St S, Downtown Cambridge monigram.ca • @monigramcoffee

61


A BOLD & C R EAT IV E C O M M U N IT Y IN THE HEAR T OF THE WARD Introducing Alice Block, a creative collection of 2 & 3 storey towns coming soon to Guelph.

RE G I S TE R TO DAY:

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AR TIST’S C O N CE P T


Photos by Chris Tiessen

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AN EXC U RS I ON IN T O F A L L :

MI SS ISA UG D A R

S BO

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ON

MI

LL

S

TERRA COTTA (CALEDON)

RD

SPIRIT TREE CIDERY BY CHRIS TIESSEN As we tear across open countryside

Located among the rolling hills and bucolic

somewhere between Guelph and Caledon

farmland of Caledon, this fifty-acre family

– red and orange and gold autumn leaves

farm with nine-acre high density orchard

flying up in our wake – I think to myself that

founded some ten years ago by Thomas and

it doesn’t get much more Canadian than this.

his wife, Nicole, has become an increasingly

Two folks from a company called TOQUE

popular destination for folks craving a

visiting an apple orchard and cidery. During

weekend excursion into the countryside.

harvest. As we approach our destination I can

Folks like us, of course, who are looking to

feel the anticipation building. ‘I can’t wait to

sample a selection of hard ciders in Spirit

get back to the cidery,’ I tell TOQUE Partner

Tree’s tap room. And also friends, families,

Cai Sepulis from the passenger seat of her

co-workers eager to venture out into the

two-tone Rav. ‘Especially at this time of year.’

expansive orchards, pick apples during

Cai, eyes glued to the dirt road ahead, chimes

harvest season, take a guided tour of the

in: ‘Ya. Me too. Spirit Tree has got to be one of

operation, enjoy an incredible meal in the

my favourite fall road trip destinations.’

cidery’s bistro, or simply pop by the farm

Spirit Tree Estate Cidery. Thomas Wilson’s place.

shop for jams and jellies, prepared comfort


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foods, focaccia pizzas, and bread prepared in Spirit Tree’s massive brick-lined, wood-fired oven. (Throughout our visit, I will find myself returning to this behemoth of an oven time and again. ‘It burns so efficiently,’ Thomas will tell me, ‘that it produces no emissions at all. Ten dollars of wood is all it takes to heat it for an entire day.’) A few more minutes on the road and Cai and I arrive at our destination. If you’re a first-time visitor, not to worry – you won’t miss it. Indeed, along the road the estate’s main building rises up from the fields, almost evoking a French chateau. ‘I like to think of it as some combination of Cowbell [Brewing, in Blyth] and Willibald [Farm Distillery, in Ayr],’ Cai declares as we pull into the parking lot. ‘Caledon’s own Mont SaintMichel,’ I add with a chuckle. One thing’s for certain: the place is both distinctive and functional. Designed by Thomas and Nicole, the building is a true marvel in sustainable design and execution. Straw bale construction. A ceiling made of shredded recycled paper. Geothermal heating and cooling. Biodigesters for waste, treated on-site. ‘We’re essentially a carbon neutral operation,’ notes Thomas when we meet up with him in the farm shop. I admire the open concept space – including soaring cathedral ceiling. From where I stand in the shop, I can see into the commercial kitchen (with aforementioned wood-fired oven), the bistro (which is absolutely packed for lunch service – on a Wednesday), and the cidery’s apple pressing room too (through a window on the shop wall). ‘The guys are pressing today, if you’d like to take a look,’ Thomas tells us. I’m eager to check it all out. But first we pause to take stock of the vast selection of Spirit Tree ciders lining the shelves of the Farm Shop. Single varietal ciders. Hopped ciders. Barrel-aged ciders. Ice ciders. Pumpkin and pear ciders. Sparkling (‘champagne’) ciders. And so many more. ‘We grow forty-seven varieties of apples right here at Spirit Tree,’ Thomas tells us as he leads us out back of the building to the orchard (with that stop in the pressing room along the way). While most of the trees have already been picked, there are still stacks of massive wooden crates filled with fresh apples from which

Saving money for retirement is hard.


68


Thomas picks a couple for us to sample. ‘This one’s a golden russet,’ he notes as he hands Cai a firm round fruit with a rough, rusty skin. ‘And this one,’ he declares as he hands me a small butter yellow orb with a distinctive ‘suture line’ along one side, ‘is a tolman sweet.’ Both are delicious and would surely, it seems to me, make some incredible ciders. Sensing my desire, Thomas asks us if we’re ready for a couple flights and some lunch in the Ciderhouse Bistro. ‘Lead the way,’ I say without hesitation, ‘because I’m certainly keen to try one of everything.’ Which is almost what we did. The lunch is memorable, so richly evocative of autumn’s bounty: the ‘Momiji Tempura’ (salt cured maple leafs fried with tempura batter, drizzled with maple syrup and peanut praline), ‘Three Sisters In The Woods’ salad (chard, spinach and arugula tossed with roasted squash, sautéed button mushrooms, roasted apples, coloured carrots, shallots, red lentils and roasted corn with mustard vinaigrette, topped with apple smoked cheddar and toasted walnuts), ‘Autumn Gemelli’ (gemelli pasta & light cream with herb roasted squash, carrots, red onions, and mushrooms, sautéed in garlic oil and deglazed with pumpkin cider and then topped with pumpkin seeds and parmesan shavings), and ‘Black n’ Blue Limousin Burger’ (Nimmo farm ground Limousin beef patty with blue cheese and caramelized onion on a brioche bun with roasted garlic aioli, grainy apple dijon, boston lettuce and fire roasted tomatoes). Oh my. I want to return already. And the ciders. From Spirit Tree’s ‘Sparkling Estate Reserve’ (aged in French oak barrels) to the cidery’s ‘Applelager’ (finished with a lager yeast), the ten samples presented on two flight boards keep us intrigued, engaged, and content. About halfway through our meal, Thomas returns for a visit. ‘What do you think of the tempura fried maple leafs?’, he asks. It’s a question that, before this meal, I would never have imagined being asked. And a dish I’d never have expected could work this well. Like everything on the menu, they’re delicious. Unique. Inspired. I nosh on my third leaf – crispy, sweet, like a bite of autumn – and wash it down with a mouthful of

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70 the cidery’s ‘Dry Hopped Cider’. The citrus and herbal notes of the hops pair perfectly with the sugary flavour profile of the maple leaf. I look through bistro windows at red and orange and golden fall leaves waving in trees outside. And down at my plaid shirt, where I spot a rogue maple leaf. I reach down, pop it into my mouth, and think about the many ways we can ‘get Canadian’ here in southwestern Ontario – especially at this time of year. ‘I'm so glad I live in a world where there are Octobers,’ Anne of Green Gables declares in that classic Canadian novel. ‘It would be terrible if we just skipped from September to November, wouldn’t it?’ Anne would have certainly enjoyed a trip to Spirit Tree Estate

.

Cidery. In Caledon. The perfect destination for an excursion into fall

SPIRIT TREE ESTATE CIDERY 1137 BOSTON MILLS ROAD, TERRA COTTA (CALEDON)

spirittreecider.com


We are your navigators.

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80

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UNCOVERING WELLINGTON COUNTY

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PUSLINCH

CASSOULET CATERING Since Chef Greg Hubbard – owner of Cassoulet Catering in Puslinch – founded the company’s Dinner Club some eight years ago, it’s been booked solid. And for good reason. As Wellington County’s Christina Mann notes: ‘Cassoulet’s Dinner Club is definitely a bespoke culinary experience designed for folks who appreciate great food crafted with local, seasonal ingredients.’ Hosted by Greg on his one-acre property, these private dinners are a unique culinary experience in Wellington County. Usually consisting of three courses plus hors d’oeuvres (and whatever beverages Greg’s guests bring with them), Dinner Club meals are crafted using ingredients sourced from such local growers as Zocalo Organics in Hillsburgh and

Wagyu World, and whatever Greg finds at the Aberfoyle Farmers’ Market. Like so many incredible food businesses and farms that dot Guelph and Wellington County, Cassoulet Catering is a partner of Taste Real – a County of Wellington program that promotes local food and facilitates valuable connections among farmers, consumers and food businesses. Businesses like Greg’s Cassoulet Catering – whose Dinner Club brings flavour to our region.

.

Call Greg at 226-486-1011 to book your private dinner.


R E C IPE: BUTTERNUT & VANILLA SOUP W/ APPLE SAFFRON JAM

TO P TE N LO C AL FO O D GIFT ID E A S

By Chef Greg Hubbard, Cassoulet Catering (Puslinch)

I N GRE D I E N T S SOUP: 2 Butternut Squash 3 Apples 2 White Onions 1 Litre 35% Cream 1 Vanilla Bean Salt & Pepper Chicken Stock or Water JAM: ½ White Onion 1 oz Water 1.5 oz Honey 2 oz White Wine Vinegar 1 Apple 1 Tsp Saffron Salt & Pepper

DIRECTIONS: SOUP: Peel onions, cut into slices, and place into soup pot with a few tsp. of water. Cover with lid and cook over medium heat. Add peeled, seeded and roughly-cut apples and squash. Add water or stock to cover the apples and squash, and continue to cook, in the covered pot, until soft. In a separate pot, warm cream over medium heat and add sliced and scraped vanilla bean. Remove the pot with the cream from heat when hot, and remove the vanilla bean after 10 min. Add hot cream mixture to the soup pot and puree all until smooth. Season with salt and pepper. JAM: Finely dice onion and add to saucepan with water, saffron, vinegar, and honey. Cook over medium heat until the onion is softened. Dice apple finely and add to the pan. Cook until apple starts to soften. Season with salt and pepper, and more honey and vinegar (or lemon juice) to taste. COMBINE: Ladle hot soup into jars or bowls and garnish with jam. Enjoy.

1.

WE’VE HAND-PICKED SOME OF THE BEST LOCAL GIFT IDEAS TO GET YOU INSPIRED WHILE SUPPORTING LOCAL BUSINESSES! Get a custom-made local food basket from Creative Edge, Elora Mercantile, Fraberts Fresh Food or Market Fresh or create your own with ingredients from the Taste Real Local Food Map.

2.

Gift someone a ‘Grand Food Tour’ in Elora, or a Guelph

3.

For the veggie lover or meat enthusiast, how about a CSA

food tour offered by Taste Detours.

veggie programme subscription or a frozen meats gift box? Check our website for locations.

4.

Give light and comfort for long winter months with beeswax candles from Cedarwood Honey and Terra Verde Homestead.

5.

Not just a last-minute idea – a gift card to a local food restaurant is a delicious gift. No wrapping required. Check out our line-up of restaurants and eateries on our website.

6.

For lavender body butter, beeswax lip balm or lilac soap, check out Flowers To Fragrance or Ever Smiles Gardens who make the best-smelling beauty and wellness products around.

7.

For stocking stuffers, hostess gifts or just ‘a little something’, why not bring a jar of preserves, local honey or maple syrup? For unique flavours, see the full line-up on our website.

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For sheepskins, alpaca socks, locally made yarn or fibre products, Alpaca Time, Circle-R-Livestock, Harmony Meadows Alpaca or Pootcorners Alpaca have you covered with warm and cozy gift ideas.

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The best thing about gifting local beverages is that you might get to enjoy them together with family and friends. Check out Cox Creek Cellars, Heartwood Farm and Cidery or any of our local breweries for gift packs and more.

10.

Inspire the chef in your life or simply learn a new skill. Workshops and cooking classes are great gifts for young and old. For a line-up of workshop providers, see our website. Discover more unique gift ideas at TASTEREAL.CA

Learn more about finding local food, experiences, and events in Wellington County at tastereal.ca and experiencewellington.ca


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86 86 86

GETTING TO KNOW:

86

photos by Cai Sepulis

POD INTERVIEW BY CAI SEPULIS

G O O D D E S I G N . G O OD MAT ERIALS. GOOD INTENTION. L OC AL L Y RENOW NED A N D B E A U TIF U LLY CU RAT ED , PO D IS THE DESTINATION TO REVAM P YOUR W A R D R O B E – AN D D O IT WIT H A SOC IAL L Y ETHIC AL MINDSET. POD’S SU C CE S S A T PU LLIN G T O G ET H ER FORM, FUNC TION AND STYL E FROM MAKE R S A R O UN D THE G LOBE MAK ES AN Y VISIT TO THEIR DOW NTOW N GUEL PH SHOP W O R TH WH I L E.

I N TR I GU E D BY POD O WN ER LY N N W HAL EY’S JOURNEY – W HIC H INC L UDED W O R K I NG A S A D ESIG N ER AN D CREATOR OF L IGHTING FIXTURES IN VA NCO U V E R BEF O RE O PEN IN G HER FIRST B OUTIQUE IN EL ORA – TOQUE’S C A I SE P UL I S S A T D O WN WIT H LY N N TO C HAT AB OUT W HERE THE SHOP IS TODA Y.


CAN YOU TELL ME ABOUT WHERE THE NAME ‘POD’ COMES FROM? There’s no simple answer to that. Pods are homes for seeds – which represent new ideas and new growth. Let’s start there. And, how about this: whales swim in pods – and my last name is Whaley :)

WHAT EXPERIENCE CAN SOMEONE EXPECT FROM POD? WHAT CAN THEY FIND? Pod offers a comfortable and reliable place for our customers to shop for everyday wardrobe essentials that are unique and playful. We feature fun, functional pieces sourced from quality makers and designers around the world.

A FEW ITEMS THAT YOU CARRY? We’ve got clothing by FIG, Toad&Co, White Stuff, Nice Things, Annie50, Uchuu, and Thought – to name a few. Footwear by Lotta from Stockholm and Campers from Spain. And a large selection of eco-conscious jewelry brands – including Pyrrha from Vancouver and Machete from the States.

WHAT’S ‘GREENING YOUR WARDROBE’ ABOUT? From the beginning, we have focused on products made of ecofriendly materials. Our long-time customers will tell you that once you‘ve experienced the feeling, the textures of natural fibres on your skin, it’s really hard to wear clothing made from synthetics. It’s important to me that Pod be a source of knowledge in ‘green’ fashions and that we share with everyone who walks in the store the benefits of wearing clothing made from up-cycled materials or organic (or natural) fibres – clothing that is environmentally friendly and sustainable.

DO YOU HAVE A FAVOURITE PLACE IN DOWNTOWN GUELPH YOU GO TO, TO TAKE A BREAK (OR GRAB LUNCH)? Right now, my favourite place to eat is Crazy Carrot. I've been vegetarian for about forty years and the bowls they offer are exactly how I like to eat every day. I also love Eric the Baker, of course. And Crafty Ramen is the best.

ANY SNEAK PEAKS FROM YOUR TRAVELS OF WHAT TO EXPECT THIS FALL? For fall, I'm most excited about the new collections I ordered while at trade shows in London UK – shows that featured work from smaller, independent designers. And we just returned from New York where we discovered a range of perfect gift items, particularly

.

some scarves made in South Africa and some stunning hand-crafted ceramic statement pieces. I’m very excited to be able to introduce these things to our clientele

POD 50 CARDEN ST, GUELPH

podstyle.ca


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photos by Chris Tiessen

TIM MURTON: PORTRAIT OF AN ARTIST BY CHRIS TIESSEN ‘I’m naturally inclined to be an artist,’ Tim remarks, pulling on the cigarette that hangs loosely from the corner of his mouth. ‘Everything else,’ he sighs, ‘is just effort.’


90 It’s late September. A sunny Tuesday

screws and other materials are amassed

afternoon. Elora-based mixed media artist

on shelving units. I count at least a half

Tim Murton and I are standing on the deck

dozen pairs of broken eyeglasses – on tables

of his backyard studio. Somewhere near our

and windowsills and in open drawers. An

feet a cicada punctuates the air. Above our

overflowing ashtray and a gaggle of Elora

heads birds chatter on a wire. A few feet to

Brewing empties huddle on the paint-

our left sits Tim’s idyllic century home, tucked

splattered floor. A loose bag of weed rests

a couple streets back from Elora’s main

on a windowsill. And a worn green leather

drag. And directly behind us lies his spacious

sofa claims the far corner. ‘It doubles as my

studio – a substantial single-room standalone

bed,’ the artist chuckles. ‘During the day. At

building with large windows, skylights, and a

night. Whenever I find time to shut my eyes

cathedral ceiling. The centre of Tim’s creative

between work.’ Something that’s been a real

universe.

challenge these past few weeks. But more on that later.

When we move from the deck into the studio through a pair of sliding glass doors,

A large canvas mounted on a sturdy wooden

we enter a space stripped down to bare

easel dominates the studio’s middle space.

essentials, single-minded in design and

The still unfinished piece – executed in black-

purpose: to facilitate art-making. Canvases –

and-white ‘with charcoal and primer,’ Tim

both finished and unfinished – lean stacked

tells me – seems at first glance to depict

against bare white walls. Paint tubes and

an enraptured audience watching the

brushes are everywhere. Bins of wood and

whirling action of a boxing match inside a


‘Watching the World Stage,’ charcoal & primer on canvas, 2018

91


‘Condo,’ charcoal & primer on canvas, 2016

92 ring. Upon closer inspection, though, I see

things leads to lives filled with isolation and

that the painting portrays something more

depression, greed and anxiety, gossip and

sinister. The spectators’ faces are contorted

envy.’ He adds: ‘We’re all participating in

– as though in agony. Mouths agape and

this vast and unfathomable miracle called

eyes bulging, they recall medieval artistic

life – yet our minds have been hijacked by

representations of sinners in purgatory.

corporate conditioning.’

Suffering. Distressed. Pained as they witness whatever’s going on. I can see now that this is

I walk from one side of Tim’s studio to the

not a boxing match. And the whirling shapes

other and gaze out one of the large windows

are ghost-like. The frenetic energy the piece

overlooking his back yard. I spot what seems

exudes is palpable, disturbing.

to be a substantial hole in the middle of Tim’s garden that’s been reinforced with large

‘It leaves me feeling uneasy,’ I remark to Tim.

rocks and topped with a wooden frame. ‘It’s

‘Good,’ he replies, ‘then you’ve connected

a sunken greenhouse,’ Tim remarks, ‘one

with it.’ Or, more precisely, with them.

of my ongoing projects.’ I nod, and note

Those tortured souls who, I come to realize,

several other unfinished ventures around the

occupy so many of Tim’s pieces. ‘I find myself

spacious yard. A hand-dug fish pond on the

birthing them over and again,’ Tim tells me.

far side of the studio deck. (‘To sit in and keep

‘They’re a commentary on how we’ve been

cool while the fish nibble at me during those

conditioned to value things like material

hot summer days,’ he says.) A twelve-or-so-

gain and commercial success and instant

foot-high art installation in metal that looks

gratification over everything else. And on

like an incomplete staircase reaching into

how our relentless attempts to attain these

the sky. (‘It’s supposed to represent life,’ Tim tells me. ‘We’re always climbing, and always


‘Two Party System, First Version,’ charcoal & primer on canvas, 2014

93 working, yet never finished.’) And more

way to work in faceless skyscrapers. ‘I used

ongoing projects dotting the backyard space.

to work in the corporate world,’ Tim tells me (he served as a scene artist on major motion

I turn back to the studio where I see so

picture sets for over two decades), ‘and it

many more paintings – stacked one behind

almost drove me to madness.’ He pauses

the other. ‘I’m gathering them together for

before adding with a grin: ‘It certainly drove

an upcoming solo show,’ Tim remarks. An

me to drink.’ And it drove him to this career

exhibit that runs until November 17th at the

– as a free-thinking, free-willed creative.

Minarovich Gallery in the Elora Centre for

‘I’m exactly where I want to be,’ he asserts.

the Arts. An exhibit for which Tim has been

‘Exactly where I need to be.’

working day and night for several weeks now. I survey Tim’s kingdom. His splendid, Titled ‘The Air Conditioned Nightmare,’ the

comfortable century home. His dishevelled,

show is comprised of a decade of Tim’s work.

functional, productive backyard studio.

Work that speaks to his thesis that our social

Those audacious paintings. And all the other

conditioning is leading us to live, in his words,

projects-in-process that somehow both

‘unnatural lives.’ Those tortured souls I saw

please him and don’t demand to be finished.

executed on the canvas in Tim’s studio are

And I understand that he means what he

evident in virtually every one of the paintings

says

stacked here. Isolated folks living behind

.

glass in condominium towers. Seeminglypossessed individuals around board – and dinner – tables. Faceless crowds making their

TIM MURTON BY APPOINTMENT, ELORA

timmurton.com


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HAMILTON

MU L B E RRY S T RE E T CO F F E E HO U S E : HAND-CRAFTING AN AUTHENTIC SPACE BY CAI SEPULIS It’s a quiet morning on James Street North in

baked goods. Delightful items to invigorate

Hamilton and the air is still damp from last

the senses on a sleepy morning. This space,

night’s storm. A slight fog lingers in the air.

already full with people seemingly camped

I marvel at the iconic, round Mulberry Street

out for the morning, conveys an authentic

Coffeehouse sign swinging above me and

sense of home – mine, yours, ours – with its

take a few photos before going in. ‘That sign

plants in the window, rustic tables, exposed

used to be a table,’ managing partner Ella

walls, tin ceiling and comfy chairs. Clear

Shepherd will inform me later over food and

evidence of a community coming together

drinks. ‘And that one,’ she'll add, pointing to

and not-to-be-missed comfort food are

a big neon ‘M’ that sits above another door,

qualities that make a great and welcoming

‘is from an old Shopper’s Drug Mart sign.’

coffee shop. In my own travels, finding the

Handcrafted personal touches – and traces of

coffee shop the locals call home is always on

re-purposing – are everywhere.

my list. On today’s trip to Steeltown, Mulberry fits the bill perfectly.

Coffee shops and the idea of ‘handcraft’ are a natural fit, and Mulberry is a perfect instance

Fresh coffee and warm pastries – including

of this confluence. Fresh coffee. In-house

the coffeehouse’s coveted lemon loaf – in


105


106

front of us, Ella and I sit in what regulars call

aligned perfectly from the start; that is, to

‘The Baking Room.’ We manage to get only

establish a place that offered, in Ella’s words,

a few words in before someone comes by

‘fair trade coffee, as organic and local as

to say hi to Ella, the unproclaimed Queen

possible, and good food at fair prices. And,’

of Mulberry Street. Ella, who grew up in

she adds, ‘a welcoming destination where

Vancouver and moved to Hamilton twenty

members of the community might want to

years ago, tells me that she knew right away

stay all day.’

Hamilton was home. ‘People say the West Coast is chill, but they must have never met

A destination that’s full of nooks and crannies

Hamiltonians,’ she confides. I agree.

– and a rich history too. As Ella tells me: ‘The building itself was constructed in the late

Because Ella experienced the city as warm

1800’s as the ‘Armoury Hotel,’ whose main

and welcoming, and found the revitalization

purpose was to serve the armed forces

that was happening on James Street

stationed in the monstrous red-bricked

exhilarating, she jumped at the chance to

Armoury [still in use] across the street.

open the coffeehouse when the opportunity

Later,’ she continues, ‘the hotel became

presented itself nine years ago. It was then

a laundromat. And now, after numerous

that she partnered with Roger Abbiss, local

expansions and renovations, it’s Mulberry.’

businessman and environmental demi-god,

Coffeehouse. And gallery, too, which is put to

to bring Mulberry to life. (Read about Roger’s

good use – especially when the James Street

other initiatives – including coffeecology,

Art Crawl and annual Super Crawl pack the

Bikeables, and Dundurn Market – in TOQUE

streets.

issue 6.) Their visions for the coffeehouse


RELICS & SPACES OF MULBERRY Not to scale. For illustrative purposes only.

1

9 Kitchen

2

Private

The “Baking Room” wc

wc

3 8 Mulberry Street (patio)

7

4

Main Entrance

5

James Street North

6

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Original tile flooring Upcycled Shopper's Drug Mart Sign Wooden booths from 'Susie's Diner' Vintage arched windows Signage repurposed from an old table Chalkboards from Dundas Parkside High School The Gallery Photographic chandelier by Jeff Tessier Salvaged barn door


108

While I watch the first pints of the day being

that extends the place’s homage to the past

poured in the distance (Collective Arts – for

– lighting up sepia-toned photographs in a

anyone keeping tabs), Ella and I talk more

lightbox-meets-chandelier type of fixture.

about the space and what it took to open its doors. ‘Over six months of ripping down

When our server brings over more food, I

walls, putting up walls, tearing up the floor,

murmur to myself, ‘Oh sure, I can stay a bit

exposing old treasures,’ Ella explains. ‘Roger

longer,’ unable as I am to resist the vivid salad

and I tried to keep the space as authentic as

bowls in front of us. ‘And you have to try

possible,’ she tells me, ‘by incorporating the

one of these, too,’ Ella demands – splitting a

original tile flooring, exposed brick, and other

cupcake with me. ‘It’s gluten free,’ she adds. It

finishes and details’.

doesn’t disappoint. I am more than content.

And yet these two were also not afraid to

As the sunlight streams through the rustic

incorporate local relics from outside the

arched windows and dances through the

original space into their design. As Ella

steam of my third coffee, Ella regales me with

notes: ‘Roger has always been something

more intriguing stories. Of this space. And

of a ‘master salvager’ – giving items from

city. And of herself too. I take another sip and

further afield new life here at Mulberry.’ Like

look around. Here I am, like so many others,

the high-top table where we’re sitting, which

camped and cozy. In good company and with

Roger sourced from the now defunct Susie’s

great food. There is no doubt in my mind

Diner (which would have been located just

that this is the perfect way to spend the day.

down the block, where the White Elephant

Basking in this home away from home

boutique is now). And the chalkboards that were sourced from the now closed Parkside High School in Dundas. And a unique photographic installation by artist Jeff Tessier

.

MULBERRY STREET COFFEHOUSE 193 JAMES ST N, HAMILTON

mulberrycoffeehouse.com


A r t b y Fra n ce s H a h n ( w w w. f ranc e s h i l ar y h ah n . c a) 519-821 -3 6 0 0 | www.a n d raar n o l d . c o m | and ra@ c b n . o n .ca


local. quality. custom.

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112


113


ANATO M Y O F A B R A N D :

ARC H T O T E B A G S CLIENT: ARCH – HIV/AIDS RESOURCES & COMMUNITY HEALTH (GUELPH) DESIGNER: CAI SEPULIS, TOQUE LTD.

#COMMUNITYCOLLABORATION FOR THIS DESIGN PROJECT, TOQUE TEAMED WITH ARCH AND OTHER LOCAL PARTNERS TO CREATE AN ORIGINAL PIECE CELEBRATING ARCH’S THIRTY-PLUS YEARS OF WORK IN THE COMMUNITY. THE ARTWORK CREATED BY TOQUE’S CAI SEPULIS REPRESENTS ARCH’S ROLE AS NURTURER IN THE COMMUNITY AND FEATURES LOCAL FLORA – INCLUDING CEDAR AND SAGE – AS WELL AS WHIMSICAL ILLUSTRATED INTERPRETATIONS. HAND-SCREENPRINTED ON 100% HEAVY CANVAS TOTES, THESE BAGS WILL BE AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT VARIOUS LOCAL RETAILERS, INCLUDING GUELPH’S KENNEDY PARK AND BLOOMS + FLORA. ALL PROCEEDS FROM SALES WILL GO TO SUPPORT ARCH.

114 114

T H A N K Y O U! By purchasing this bag, you are supporting community health and well-being – all proceeds go to ARCH. ARCH provides sex-positive & stigma-free care for people living with HIV/AIDS, preventative outreach and educational opportunities for all community members. Visit archguelph.ca for more information. Illustration & design by Cai Sepulis, TOQUE LTD

F INA L PRINTED VER SION MAY VAR Y SLIGHTLY


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3121 King Street East, Kitchener | HeffnerToyota.ca | 519 748-9666 1, Highest Total Driving Range - 1035 km Combined electric/hybrid driving range Based on Natural Resources Canada 2019 Fuel Consumption Guide published ratings for both plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and battery-electric vehicles. Estimated combined range rating when fully charged and with a full tank of gas. Actual results will vary based on driving habits and other factors. 2 5 hour 30 minute charge time with a household outlet Charge time is for standard 120v household outlet. Always plugin in accordance with Owner’s Manual.*Price includes Freight and PDI, Air, Tire, anf Filter tax, and OMVIC Fee


ST ART I NG W I T H ‘ WH A T I F ’ :

THE OAK TREE PROJECT What do corporate good will, imagination,

Community Foundation, The Letter M

collaboration, community support and

and Pearl Street Communications have all

community involvement, and affecting

provided leadership since the start. And

and uplifting stories have in common?

each year other businesses and donors have

Will Mactaggart, Portfolio Manager at the

joined the Oak Tree movement – sharing

Mactaggart Hyrn team at the Richardson

time, money and insights. ‘The impact of Oak

GMP offices in Guelph, knows. Six years ago,

Tree has been incredible,’ says Chris Willard,

Will decided to create something special.

Executive Director of the Guelph Community

Something distinctive that could foreground

Foundation. ‘The Oak Tree program aligns

community support through corporate giving.

to our Vital Signs reporting and helps to

Deciding that ‘just cutting a cheque to show

fund immediate needs in our community

our community support wasn’t good enough

and supports those charities that need it

for our team – or the charities we wanted

most,’ Willard observes, adding that ‘funding

to help,’ he founded the Oak Tree Project.

in these areas really helps us to see direct

Now, six years on, he (along with his brother

impact to those that truly need support.'

and business partner, Mike Hryn) leads a

116

remarkable project that has been warmly

Always interested in trying something new,

embraced by The Guelph community – and its

Oak Tree will expand its reach once again in

many charities.

2020, when it collaborates with University of Guelph – its largest partnership yet – in Oak

But what is it? The Oak Tree Project, now

Tree Six. But before looking too far forward,

entering its sixth year, is a unique corporate

let’s take a minute to celebrate the project’s

granting program for charities in Guelph and

past accomplishments by highlighting folks

Wellington County. Local charities apply with

from five charities who have benefited from

a specific plan or project that aligns with an

Oak Tree over these past years.

annual theme. Their submissions are vetted through a panel of community and expert judges, but what sets this project apart is that members of the community are also

OA K TREE PRO JEC T – BY T HE N UMBERS

invited to vote for their favourite project –

Years Running: 5

by sharing an impact story about the work

Participating Charities:

the organization has done. Winners are announced at a finale event where attendees vote on their favourite projects, and several cash prizes are distributed throughout the night. The (very impressive) bottom line is

nearly 60 Community experts and judges:

over 50 Planning meetings over pints at The Wooly:

that over the past five years nearly sixty

dozens

charities have taken part in Oak Tree, and

Total votes/stories shared:

more than $162,000 has been awarded to

over 14,000

participating organizations. Partnerships have been instrumental to the success of the Project. The Guelph

Attendees at 5 Grand Finale events:

over 850 Total funds distributed since 2014:

over $162,000


‘ .. . P RO V I DI N G AL L S TUDEN T S WIT H T HE O PP O R T U N I T Y TO RE ACH T HEIR P O T EN T IA L. ’

117

S T . JO HN B O SC O SE C O N DARY SCH OOL

Marissa DeVries (Student Senator, 2018-2019), Kellie Angerilli (Principal) & Emily Fuller (Student Senator, 2019-2020) stjohnbosco.wellingtoncdsb.ca


118

‘ . . . I N S T I G ATI N G TH E CREA T IO N A N D E XH I B I TI ON OF I N DEP EN DEN T MEDIA A RT . ’

E D VID E O

Liz Dent (Executive Director), Elia Morrison (Technical Manager) & Scott McGovern (Program Director) edvideo.org


119

‘. . . P RO VIDIN G A SSIST A N CE A N D CA RE T O T HE GUELP H CO MMUN IT Y & A BRO A D. ’

L A K ESID E HO PE HO USE

Jaya James, Executive Director lakesidehopehouse.ca


‘ . . . IN S P I R I N G Y OU N G P EO P LE T O EXP LO RE A ND C O N N E C T W I TH THE N A T URA L WO RLD T HR OU G H P H OT O G RA P HY . ’

120

F O C US O N NATUR E Simon Bell, Executive Director focusonnature.ca


121

‘ .. . W ORK I N G TO W AR DS A HEA LT HY , SA FE C O M M U N I TY W HERE EVERY O N E FE E L S AT H OM E . ’

ON W AR D WILLO W NE IGHBOU RH OOD GROU P , PART OF THE GUELPH NEIGHBOURHOOD SUPPORT COALITION Dan Evans (Neighbourhood Development Supervisor, GNSC), Susie Sauffer (Neighbourhood Support Worker, OWNG), Shauna B rown (Neighbourhood Programmer, OWNG) & Brendan Johnson (Executive Director, GNSC) guelphneighbourhoods.org


TRUST THE PROCESS

122

Mike Hryn | mike.hryn@richardsongmp.com | 519-827-2918

122

EXPERT OPINION | INVESTMENT

MIKE HRYN With the Raps returning to defend their championship, the question that comes to my mind is: how are they going to do that without Kawhi? However, last season will be forgotten, and they’ll forge ahead with a new team and a good core that might just surprise some, come playoffs next year. Spicy P will play an integral role in making that happen. I’m sure of that because I know Coach Nurse has a rigorous process and a commitment to consistent leadership. Clients often ask me: ‘We’ve had a good year in the market (so far), so what’s next?’ And I tell them I honestly don’t know. It seems uncertainty reigns supreme in today’s media, and financial forecasts abound. But that’s not much of an answer to instill confidence. And so I also say, ‘I know what your goals are. I understand the purpose of your investments. We’ve spoken about what you want them to achieve. That’s the first important step.’ From there, we’ve designed a strategy to meet those goals – whether they are performance targets, a retirement date, or philanthropy. We continue to have conversations about how goals might be shifting, and how we are going to go about realizing

them. The key is we take the time to listen to what clients need, and then we tailor a well-constructed, proven process around that. That’s the stabilizing factor. Our process comes from our experience of working with clients from all walks of life: those in suits, those with tattoos, and those wearing both. The common element is the fundamental process that keeps everything on track. This gives us confidence that – no matter what happens in the uncertainty of today – with patience and commitment to a rigorous approach, we’ll reach the goals of tomorrow. These days the world of investing can look a lot like a Raps free throw: a player trying to shoot a ball into a hoop from close range but with lots of things waving in their face. With both, focus on what you can control to help keep it simple: Concentrate. Breathe. Bend your knees. Elbow, wrist and release. Swish. All material has been prepared by Mike Hryn, who is a Portfolio Manager, Investment Advisor with the Mactaggart Hryn Team at Richardson GMP Limited. The opinions expressed in this report are the opinions of the author and readers should not assume they reflect the opinions or recommendations of Richardson GMP Limited or its affiliates. Richardson GMP Limited, Member Canadian Investor Protection Fund. Richardson is a trade-mark of James Richardson & Sons, Limited. GMP is a registered trade-mark of GMP Securities L.P. Both used under license by Richardson GMP Limited.


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The new look and feel of The Bookshelf’s Greenroom

41 QUEBEC ST, GUELPH BOOKSHELF.CA


ANATO M Y O F A B R A N D :

GRA N D R I V ER G RO W N CLIENT: KYLE FORTH, GRAND RIVER GROWN DESIGNER: CAI SEPULIS, TOQUE LTD.

VIBRANT, COLOURFUL LOCAL FOOD MEETS LOCAL CHEF-FOR-HIRE. WITH THIS LOGO FOR GRAND RIVER GROWN, WE SOUGHT TO CREATE A SIMPLE YET COMPLEX DESIGN TO COMPLEMENT KYLE'S STYLE OF COOKERY. OUR AIM WAS TO PRODUCE A COHESIVE BRAND COMPRISED OF A LOGO MULTIFACETED ENOUGH TO LEND ITSELF TO BE DISASSEMBLED INTO INDIVIDUAL ELEMENTS THAT MIGHT EMBELLISH MENUS, FOR EXAMPLE, OR ENHANCE THE IMPACT OF BUSINESS CARDS. INSPIRED BY IMAGES OF THE REFLECTING RIVER AND STIMULATED BY THE COLOURS OF KYLE'S DISHES, WE CREATED AN ICONIC GEOMET RIC LOGO THAT EVOKES THE SPLENDID NATURE OF KYLE'S CULINARY ART AND CAN BE ADAPTED TO A RANGE OF GRAPHIC EXPRESSIONS. .

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LOGO OVERLAY


photos by Chris Tiessen

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E

KITCHENER

THE YETI CAFÉ: GETTING ACQUAIN T ED W I T H T H E F A M I LI A R BY CHRIS TIESSEN

‘Sometimes,’ I suggest to Cai Sepulis, my

and cordiality – even if you don’t frequent

TOQUE Partner and breakfast companion,

them often. It’s in their laid-back vibes.

‘familiarity feels so good.’ I push a morsel

No-nonsense menus. Eclectic interior

of perfectly fried egg onto my fork with my

designs. Kind (yet ever so slightly distracted)

knife and continue: ‘And this place conveys

staff. These sorts of places leave you with

it.’ I deliver the egg to my mouth. Morning

the overwhelming feeling they’ve been

sunlight catches my utensil. I blink. Smile.

assembled from the ground up, assorted and

Take another bite. Enjoy. And add: ‘I think I

miscellaneous, piece by piece. They reveal

could hang out here all day.’ Cai takes a swig

an urge to endure as some sort of eclectic

of her coffee – caffeinated, with milk – and

art installation as much as a destination for

nods. ‘Ya,’ she says, ‘I could get up for this

food, drink, and good times. Places like The

every morning. Feels like the good life.’ At the

Common Café in downtown Guelph, for

Yeti Café. In downtown Kitchener.

instance. The Lost & Found Café in downtown Elora. City Café Bakery on Strange Street in

It’s true, you know: that certain places evoke

Kitchener. Mulberry Coffeehouse in Hamilton.

a particular sense of intimacy, comfort

The Jane Bond in Uptown Waterloo.


129


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ALONG THE WAY ‘That’s what this place reminds me of,’ I tell Cai as it comes to me. ‘The Yeti’s like The Jane Bond – but for early mornings.’ (The only early mornings you’ll enjoy at the late night Uptown staple, on the other hand, is last call.) Cai feigns a smile - perhaps not entirely convinced by my association between this spot and my long-time favourite haunt. And yet I see it. Clear as day. In the place’s bohemian chic vibe. Its 1950s-style diner tables and chairs. Year-round Christmas lights. Gaudily painted walls. Mismatched mugs and dishes and cutlery. Heck, even the cafe’s logo - a silhouette of the abominable snowman, or yeti, loafing about - echoes The Jane Bond’s own silhouetted emblem. And the food, too. Tasty, large-portioned, eclectic diner fare done right. Like my ‘Brekkie’ – a dish featuring the aforementioned (perfectly) prepared eggs with toast, delectable fried halloumi, regular and sweet potatoes, sausage, and fresh fruit. Kiwi. Blackberries and strawberries. Watermelon, grapefruit and oranges. And Cai’s ‘Collard Wrap’ – house-roasted turkey, sweet potato, fried egg, tomato, slaw and greens with chipotle aioli wrapped tight (and held with rubber bands, no less) inside a large, crunchy collard leaf. With a mouthful of halloumi, I look up from my plate and notice Joel Gingerich – an owner at

Finished your breakfast and ready to explore the neighbourhood? Be sure to check out these #DTK hot spots: FARMERS’ MARKET (25m - 1 min walk) 300 KING ST E The market’s located literally just across the street – which makes The Yeti the perfect Saturday morning spot for people watching, followed by market shopping. Fresh produce, meats & cheeses oh my THEMUSEUM (600m – 8 min walk) 10 KING ST W With a plethora of engaging exhibitions, events and experiences, TheMuseum is a great way to pass the time and pique your curiosity. Visit themuseum.ca 131

KITCHENER PUBLIC LIBRARY (800m – 10 min walk) 85 QUEEN ST N Ready to cozy up with a book? KPL has a gorgeous open atrium space (with coffee bar), which is perfect for bunkering with a good read. And while you’re there, why not sign out a musical instrument or two

Kitchener’s Smile Tiger Coffee Roasters – entering with a friend for morning coffee and grub. He sees us and saunters over for a chat. I ask what’s brought him here. ‘Every town’s got that one glorious breakfast destination,’ says Joel. ‘And in Kitchener, The Yeti’s the spot.’ Strong words, indeed, from a proprietor of one of the region’s favourite morning hangouts. As Joel makes his way back to the front counter (which boasts an imposing espresso machine, coffee grinder, baked goods on display, dog-eared customer loyalty cards, and an old copy of TOQUE to boot) to place his order, I push my

SHORT FINGER BREWING CO (1.2km – 15 min walk) 20 HURST AVE, KITCHENER If you’re ready to wet your whistle, mosey over to Short Finger to sample some brews in their taproom. And while you’re at it, be sure to check out their home brewing supplies to help with your own recipes


132 chair back and survey the cozy single-roomed space. Across from me a young couple with a newborn chats over coffees and food. Under the large front window, two women enjoy the sunshine and each other’s company. Near the counter, friends check out the café’s bulletin board. Just outside, a couple souls eke out the last sunny autumn days on The Yeti’s sprawling patio. I drag a piece of sweet potato through runny yolk and lift it to my mouth. I don’t know any of these folks, I think to myself – yet it’s a familiar scene.

.

And, sometimes, familiarity breeds contentment

YETI 14 EBY ST N, KITCHENER

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133


MEET YOUR MAKER

134 134

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140

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141


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146 146 146

photos by Gary Rhijnsburger

GETTING TO KNOW:

146

FRAN ROBINSON MORTAGES INTERVIEW BY CAI SEPULIS

‘I’ L L N E V E R BE ABLE T O O WN A HOUSE’ IS A STATEMENT C OM M ONL Y HEARD T HE S E D A Y S. OT H ER POPU LAR (A L BEIT M YSTIFYING) TOPIC S OF DISC USSION : T A L K O F V A RIABLE MORT G AG ES. FIXED MORTGAGES. AND BROKERS VERSUS B A N K S . R E C EN T LY , T OQ U E’S CAI SEPUL IS SAT DOW N W ITH MORTGAGE B ROKE R F R A N R O B I N SO N T O G ET T O K N OW A L ITTL E AB OUT FRAN AND HER W ORK – I N CL U D I N G D EMY ST IF Y IN G MORTGAGES, OFFERING SOME TIPS OF THE TRA DE , A N D R E C O MMEN D IN G A G REAT PL AC E TO EAT IN GUEL PH.


WHAT BASIC THINGS SHOULD I KNOW ABOUT YOU? I’ve been in Guelph for over fifty years. My family moved here from Italy in 1967 and settled on Alice Street in the Ward. I love the financial industry and I’ve worked in it almost forty years. My colleagues would say I have a reputation for getting things done, that I’m knowledgeable, energetic, approachable.

HAVING LIVED IN GUELPH FOR SO LONG – CAN YOU TELL OUR READERS WHERE YOU’D RECOMMEND EATING IN THE ROYAL CITY? There are so many great restaurants in Guelph so it’s hard to pick just a few but I really enjoy La Cucina, Bin 23, Artisanale, and Borealis.

WHAT MADE YOU DECIDE TO BECOME AN ENTREPRENEUR? After thirty-two years at ScotiaBank, I wasn’t ready to retire. I still loved working with my clients. Joining Mortgage Financial Corporation, a small brokerage out of Hamilton, was a natural progression into entrepreneurship for me. I have my own satellite office in the AgriCentre Building in Guelph, near the university.

TELL US ABOUT THE FINANCIAL WORLD WE LIVE IN. Government and lending policies are always in flux, and lending products change all the time as well. Qualifying for a mortgage is not as easy as it once was. Banking in 2019 is a very dynamic business and you need to be able to adapt quickly – which is where I come in.

WHY WOULD A HOME BUYER GO TO A BROKER RATHER THAN A BANK? A broker gives you multiple (and alternative) lending options where a bank simply provides its own offer. Think of yourself as shopping around and I’m your personal shopper. As a broker I can still set up bank mortgages (if it’s your best and/or only option), but these days not everyone can qualify for a bank mortgage, so it’s good to have options, which I can identify for you.

WHAT SHOULD EVERY FIRST TIME HOME BUYER KNOW? Get pre-approved for a mortgage before you start house shopping. That will let you know what range of home is in your budget, or it will help you know what steps you need to take if owning a home isn’t in your budget just yet.

WHAT ABOUT RENEWING A MORTGAGE? There, too, it pays to shop around. When it’s time to renew, you don’t need to stick with your bank or current lending agent. A broker can help you find the lowest rate and assist you in deciding what type of mortgage works best for you.

WHAT PART OF YOUR JOB DO YOU LIKE BEST? A big proportion of my clientele are newcomers and new home owners and I love the amazing feeling I get when I am able to help clients attain their dream home.

YOUR FAVOURITE PASTIME?

.

It would have to be shopping. That’s why I’m still working, lol

FRAN ROBINSON MORTGAGES 100 STONE RD W, SUITE 103B, GUELPH

franrobinsonmortgages.com


January 23–26, 2020 · Guelph

148

Friday, January 24

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Photos by Chris Tiessen

152

CRAFT I N G NOS T A LG I A : SEAN KANE AND HIS PAINTED GLOVES BY CHRIS TIESSEN ‘So you’re basically in the Hall of Fame, then?,’

his cute Hospital Hill neighbourhood home.

I inquire with equal parts wonderment and

The place is cool – ‘mid-century modern’

envy – my eyes as big as baseballs. It’s a

cool. The living room chairs. Kitchen table.

question I never thought I’d be posing on

Heck, even the bungalow’s carport seems

such a gorgeous autumn morning. Or on any

to hearken back to some brief golden age.

morning, for that matter. After all, it’s a rare

An era of starched white shirts, brill cream,

day that you get to meet a Hall of Famer.

and unapologetic sentimentality. And Sean?

‘Well,’ Sean replies, ‘not me, per se. But

He completes the aesthetic perfectly. His

yes – one of my gloves is in the permanent

perfectly coifed hair. Strong chin. Thick-

collection at Cooperstown.’

rimmed glasses. A sort of Clark Kent meets the cast of ‘Leave it to Beaver’ type, I think to

Without hesitation, I shoot back (sincerely):

myself as we sit chatting about his work.

‘Good enough for me.’ Which is why I’m here. To talk about Sean’s I’m hanging with Guelph-based illustrator

work. Magical objects that speak to a boy like

and artist Sean Kane in his home studio – a

me; that is, one who spent his formative years

brightly-lit space located in the basement of

(on the one hand) touring the galleries and


153


‘IT'S YOUR GLOVE, YOUR BASEBALL GLOVE. IT'S GOT A SOUL, A MEMORY ALL ITS OWN, AND A FUTURE THAT NEVER FADES.’ – MIKE BARNICLE, BROADCAST JOURNALIST


156

Photo courtesy of Sean Kane


museums of Europe and (on the other) listening to Tom Cheek and Jerry Howarth call Jays’ games in the confines of his childhood bedroom. ‘I call them hand painted baseball glove art,’ Sean tells me when I ask how he describes the phenomenal objects on display in front of me, ‘that merge detailed painted portraits of a well-known ball player with graphical illustrations of his career stats and highlights.’ Fair enough. I’d describe them a bit differently, though. For me, Sean’s painted gloves serve as shrines of nostalgia. Monstrances of reminiscence. Relics of wistfulness. Take, for instance, the glove Sean handcrafted as an homage to (in-)famous early twentieth-century White Sox star, ‘Shoeless’ Joe Jackson. Everything about this extraordinary artifact evokes a sense of remembrance – from the periodcorrect fielder’s mitt that serves as the piece’s canvas, to the black-and-white portrait of Jackson in midswing, to the vintage font Kane uses to spell out the hall of famer’s name on painted bygone scroll.

157 ‘The research component comprises a large part of each piece,’ Sean notes when I ask about his creative process. ‘It’s important that each glove I source for a particular project is both period-correct and positioncorrect, and that it reflects whether the player is [or, in cases like Kane’s Jackson piece, was] right- or left-handed. I draw inspiration for each glove from any number of sources,’ he adds, ‘including ticket stubs, cigar boxes, movie posters and other historical ephemera.’ Sean concludes: ‘I want each finished item to function as a sort of time machine – to summon a particular time and place for its audience.’ Audiences that have included some pretty heavy hitters (pardon the pun). Like the Philadelphia Phillies’ former all-star, Ryan ‘The Big Piece’ Howard, who was given one of Sean’s gloves by the major league club in homage to his brilliant career. Or the Cubs’ hall of famer, Andre ‘The Hawk’ Dawson, who cherishes the glove Kane made for him. Or the Milwaukee Brewers’ Cecil Cooper, who displays the glove Sean crafted for him on his mantle – between his Roberto Clemente Award (awarded 1983) and two Gold Gloves (awarded 1979, 1980).


158 Sean and his gloves didn’t always enjoy such

me or my creative concepts seriously. And

celebrity, though. Indeed, there was a time

yet, by the end of the meetings, my gloves

not so long ago that this former full-time

earned attention from MLB Radio and NBC

editorial illustrator from Chicago wasn’t even

Sports, and were even featured on the ESPN

sure he would be able to make a living as an

Christmas list.’

artist. Indeed, during the financial meltdown in 2008 Sean watched as work dried up. ‘The

And the rest, as they say, is history.

crash affected everything,’ he tells me, ‘and so

Nowadays, Sean handcrafts about twenty

I had to look for something outside editorial

gloves a year for major league teams,

illustration as a means to make a living.’ It

individual players, and private sports

was then that he turned to painting gloves –

memorabilia collectors. He’s got an upcoming

combining his love of baseball with his skills

solo show of his work at his alma mater,

as an artist.

Butler University. And, as I mentioned at the top of this story, he’s in the hall of fame. Or

Sean remembers hustling his first prototypes to major league executives at the 2012 winter

his glove is, at least.

.

baseball meetings in Nashville, Tennessee.

Which is good enough for me, I remind him.

‘I built a custom glass case,’ he recalls, ‘that I

‘And me,’ Sean laughs

wore on my back throughout the meetings. Inside, I mounted three of my earliest gloves.’ Guerrilla marketing at its best. ‘I honestly didn’t know whether anyone would take

SEAN KANE BASEBALL ART BY APPOINTMENT, GUELPH

seankanebaseballart.com


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161


CO CKTAIL HOU R WITH SPRING MILL DISTILLERY MIXOLOGIST TIM CRAWFORD

THERE ARE FEW DRINKS MORE ICONIC THAN THE CLASSIC GIN AND TONIC. IT’S CLEAN, STRAIGHTFORWARD, AND VERSATILE TOO. IN ‘THE WARD BAR’ AT SPRING MILL DISTILLERY IN DOWNTOWN GUELPH, MIXOLOGIST TIM CRAWFORD HAS CREATED THE PERFECT SEASONAL VARIETY OF THIS TIME-HONOURED COCKTAIL THAT’S PERFECT FOR CRISP AUTUMN DAYS AND, LATER INTO THE CALENDAR, LONG WINTERY EVENINGS. AND WHAT’S MORE – IT PERFECTLY HIGHLIGHTS THE BRIGHT AND APPROACHABLE JUNIPER, GENTLE FLORAL NOTES AND CRISP CLEAN CITRUS FINISH OF SPRING MILL GIN. BOTTOM'S UP.

162

SPRING AND TONIC Method: Build in a Glass Glass: Highball or Balloon glass In a glass, add:

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Be sure to pay us a visit at ‘The Ward Bar’ in Spring Mill Distillery seven days a week. And why not celebrate the holidays with us too? We’d love to host your private party or event. Visit springmilldistillery.com to find out more.


Profile for Toque Magazine

TOQUE 9 - Handcraft Issue  

Issue #9 of TOQUE Magazine. We're a regional lookbook featuring stories, destinations and great eats in Guelph, Kitchener-Waterloo, Hamilton...

TOQUE 9 - Handcraft Issue  

Issue #9 of TOQUE Magazine. We're a regional lookbook featuring stories, destinations and great eats in Guelph, Kitchener-Waterloo, Hamilton...