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ISSUE 11 WINTER 2017

OUT OF THE ASHES

The BC Ranchers who faced this summer's wildfires

&

A Culture of Support – Encouraging Women to the Judge's Circle Judges Profiles – Dolliver and Glasman to sort the Royal and Agribition


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WORDS FROM THE Welcome to the Winter Edition of Top Stock. It doesn’t seem so long ago that I put pen to paper to write the opening for the final edition of last year. Not only has 2017 flown by, it has left an indelible mark on many of us and not always for the right reasons – the year was characterized by trials and tribulations across the country. It is a blessing that the agriculture community is nothing if not resilient. Our coverage this issue begins with a story of that resilience. My exposure to the wildfires that ravaged British Columbia this summer was limited to the smoke that turned many sunny Alberta days cloudy. I can only imagine confronting the threat of evacuation with livestock in my care, or the loss experienced by many ranchers while they waited for rain that did not come. Piper Whelan, our resident writer, had the chance to speak with three of those who faced the wildfires – bringing us stories of loss, survival and community that highlight what is really important in life. As I watched many young women excel in the show ring this summer, our second article calls attention to a question that

04

I have wanted to address for some time – Why do we not have more female judges in the beef show ring? This is topic that requires sensibility and objectivity and I was thrilled to have Brenda Schoepp, whose travels have investigated the role and needs of women and girls in agriculture, agree to be my chief detective. She set to work interviewing men and women across Canada and has put together an article that I hope catalyzes a discussion on this issue. Finally, we return to the ring with our first judging doubleheader interview. Jared Glasman will judge the Agribition Junior Beef Extreme show, and John Dolliver will sort the steers of the Toronto Royal Queen’s Guineas. Both judges bring a wealth of knowledge to the ring and we were thrilled to catch up with them in this issue. Be sure to pick up a complimentary copy of Top Stock in the stands at both shows, as well as at Farmfair International this fall. I would be remiss if I didn’t acknowledge our advertisers for making this the biggest winter issue of Top Stock yet – they are the reason we get to celebrate coverage of shows across the country. We look forward to serving you again with our spring A.I. issue published in early March. Thanks for a great year – see you at the shows! - Katie Songer

Top Stock Magazine / Winter 2017


WINTER 2017

FEATURES

IN THIS

20

ISSUE 20 36 74

Out of the Ashes The BC Ranchers who faced this summer's wildfires

A Culture of Support Encouraging women to the judge's circle

Judge Profiles Glasman and Dolliver tackle Agribition and the Royal

36

74

Top Stock Magazine is published four times per year. One year subscription cost $10.00 per year ($10.50 with GST) in Canada, $35.00 per year in the USA. Top Stock magazine, hereby expressly limits its liability resulting from any and all misprints, errors and/or inaccuracies whatsoever in the advertisement and editorial content published by Top Stock and its said liability is here by limited to the refund of the customer for its payment for said advertisement, or the running of the corrected advertisement, or editorial notice. Notification by the customer of any error must be made within 30 days of the distribution of the magazine. Advertising copy received after the deadline may not be returned for proofing. Changes to advertising copy made after the deadline date will be allowed only if time permits, and will incur the appropriate charges according to time and materials involved in the changes. The opinions or views expressed in the editorials are those of the persons interviewed in the article and not Top Stock magazine. Top Stock does however reserve the right to edit or refuse all material which might be objectionable in content. No material or part thereof may be reproduced or used out of context, without prior specific approval of a proper credit to Top Stock.

Top Stock Magazine / Winter 2017

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WINTER 2017

CANADA-WIDE COVERAGE

On the Cover The Kleena Kleene Fire bares down on the Dane Ranch. Picture from August 2017. ©© Cordy Cox

©© ShowChampions

SHOW INDEX 47 48 52 53 54 55 55 56 59 60

DEPARTMENTS

Canadian Charolais Youth Show YCSA National Classic Alberta Junior Angus Show Canadian JR All Breeds Show Pacific National Exhibition South Bruce Jackpot Beef Show Acton Fair Interior Provincial Exhibition Brampton Angus Preview Young Ranchman’s Show

UPCOMING ISSUES Issue Spring Summer Early Fall Winter

BC Ag Expo

04 WORDS FROM THE EDITOR 14 CONTRIBUTORS 16 JUNIOR NEWSMAKERS 46 SHOW RESULTS 90 UPCOMING EVENTS 62 ADVERTISERS INDEX

Junior Stockman's Show

Princess of the Marsh Ilderton Fair N.B. Beef Expo Olds Fall Classic Expo Boeuf Rockton Fair Beef Show Red Brand Show

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Top Stock Magazine / Winter 2017


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M A G A Z I N E WINTER 2017

ISSUE 11 Editor-in-Chief

Letters to the Editor

Katie Songer

Top Stock Magazine welcomes your

Contributing Photographers

comments, questions and opinions.

Barn Girls Photography Cameron Nykoliation

Send your letters via email to info@topstockmagazine.com

Charolais Banner

Back Issues

Cordy Cox

Back issues can be found online at

Designs by Sadie

topstockmagazine.com or can be

Erin Campbell

ordered, subject to availability, from

Grant Rolston Photography Ltd.

the publishers.

Jill Renton Photography

Subscription Services

Prairie Pistol Designs ShowChampions Simmental Country (Meghan Black)

Contributing Writers Piper Whelan Brenda Schoepp

Advertising Representatives Katie Songer Canada/USA info@topstockmagazine.com

MEET THE TOP STOCK TEAM

Katie Songer

Editor-in-chief Creative Direction

Sarah Buchanan Canada Ad Sales

Tracy Kimmel Canada Ad Sales

Meghan Hoffman USA Ad Sales

Subscribe to Top Stock magazine for only $10/year (+$0.50/GST) in Canada

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

and $35 (+$1.75/GST) in the USA

2017 Publication Schedule

Piper Whelan is a writer and editor from

Top Stock is published four times per

Irricana, Alberta. Raised on her family’s

year in full color.

Maine-Anjou ranch, she competed in

All rights reserved

junior shows and 4-H. After graduating

No part of Top Stock magazine may be reproduced or transmitted in

from the University of Alberta, she studied

any form without the expressed

at the University of King’s College School

Sarah Buchanan Canada

written consent of the publisher.

sbuchanan@gold-bar.com

of Journalism. Her work has appeared

The publisher reserves the right

306.681.5340

to accept or reject any editorial or

587.802.3110

Tracy Kimmel Canada

advertising material.

topstockmagazine@gmail.com

Office

phone 780.875.2089

Top Stock Magazine

Meghan Kimmel USA mags_gk@yahoo.com phone 913.370.3945

Piper Whelan

Contributing Writer

in Atlantic Beef & Sheep, Western Horse Review, and various breed publications. The recipient of the 2012 Lord Nuffield Scholarship for Canada, Brenda traveled

17B Hampton Crescent

globally investigating the role and needs of

Sylvan Lake, Alberta T4S 0N4

women and girls in agriculture and food

phone: 587.802.3110

production in relation to gender equality,

info@topstockmagazine.com

infrastructure and mentorship. She is an

www.topstockmagazine.com

internationally recognized speaker and

THE BOOKING DEADLINE FOR THE SPRING SIRE ISSUE IS FEB 5!

Brenda Schoepp

Contributing Writer

mentor. Her work has been featured at World Food Day 2014, the World Economic Summit 2015, FAO of the United Nations in 2016 and in Paris at SIA in 2017 and has been translated

SHOW RESULTS LISTED FREE

Attention Event Organizers! We will run your show results for free! Simply email your results and high resolution pictures of your champions to info@topstockmagazine.com

into several languages. Her regular column Straight from the Hip is featured in Cattlemen Magazine and the Alberta Farmer Express. Brenda is currently completing her MA Global Leadership at Royal Roads University. Contact Brenda at www.brendaschoepp.com

014

Top Stock Magazine / Winter 2017


Send your junior news or letters to the editor to info@topstockmagazine.com.

M A G A Z I N E NEWS + NEWSMAKERS

Toronto Royal and Edmonton Farmfair to host Stock Show U Clinics this fall Join Professor Wess Richey at the Royal Winter Fair Ring of Excellence, Exhibition Place, Toronto on November 2 at 3:00PM for a clipping and fitting demonstration compliments of Sullivan Supply and RK Cattle. For stock show enthusiasts in Western Canada, a Stock Show U clinic will be held at Farmfair International, Edmonton, 30 minutes after PeeWee showmanship on November 9 with professors Mark Sullivan, Allan Hjertaas, Brayden Schmidt, and Jordan Buba. Stock Show University is a FREE educational clinic open to all stock Master Professor Wess Richey

show youth and adults. For more information, contact Taylor Harrison, Stock Show University Manager at taylor@sullivansupply.com

The Royal extends a Supreme invitation The 95th edition of Toronto’s Royal Agricultural Winter Fair will see more animals in the Beef Supreme Show, thanks to a new initiative inviting the supreme champions of other major exhibitions to compete for this prestigious title. “We decided that we wanted to spread our wings a bit, so what we did is that we’ve gone to eight of the best-known and biggest county fairs in Ontario and Quebec,” says Peter Hohenadel, Director of Agriculture and Food at the Royal. The qualifying shows are Ontario’s Peterborough Expo and the fairs in Barrie, Beachburg, Carpe, Erin, Renfrew and Teeswater, as well as Quebec’s Expo Boeuf.

A panel of three beef producers representing a variety of backgrounds will judge the event. These individuals will have not judged another

Supreme champions from qualifying shows are eligible to compete

beef event at the 2017 Royal, and their identities will not be revealed

in the Royal’s Supreme Show if they fall into one of the five breeds

until show time.

represented in shows at the Royal. The breed shows that currently send champions to the Supreme Show are Angus, Charolais, Shorthorn, Simmental and Hereford.

Hohenadel says that the participating fairs are excited about this new opportunity. The Royal’s beef committee has also heard from a number of other fairs that are interested in becoming a qualifying

“A supreme from a county fair has to enter the show like all the other beef exhibitors, and no matter where they place (at the Royal), they’re going to be in the ring for the Supreme,” says Hohenadel. With the possibility of 13 females and bulls now vying for the Supreme Champion honours, Hohenadel says the goal is to increase the excitement surrounding the show.

016

western Ontario (and) Quebec want to cheer on their favourites.”

show in the future. “More people are saying their entry numbers are up, and everybody’s excited about the prospect of being able to be in the ring for the Supreme at the Royal,” he says. The Royal’s Beef Supreme show will take place on Sunday, November 5 at 6:00 p.m., and will also be livestreamed at royalfair.org.

“Our idea here was to get some more animals in the ring, and of

Masterfeeds, the Supreme show’s sponsor, will award $2,500 each for

course the people in the stands who are from … eastern Ontario,

the Supreme Champion Bull and Female.

Top Stock Magazine / Winter 2017


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The 2017 fire season is notable for three reasons; first, for the largest total area burnt in a fire season in recorded history; second, for the largest number of total evacuees in a fire season; and third, for the largest single fire ever in British Columbia.

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Top Stock Magazine / Winter 2017


A Top Stock special report on the B.C. ranchers who faced this summer’s wildfires

WORDS BY PIPER WHELAN

T

his summer saw the worst wildfires in British Columbia’s history. With record-breaking temperatures and no sign of precipitation in sight, hundreds of fires across the province burned thousands of square kilometres of land. As communities were evacuated, livestock producers across the country watched the devastating images on the news and wondered how B.C.’s ranchers were faring in the midst of this disaster.

Out of this crisis came stories of loss, survival, community and the drive to fight for one’s home and livelihood. Here, we speak with three of those who faced British Columbia’s wildfires this year.

Catherine Brown never faced the threat of wildfire until a few months ago. A livestock journalist at Princeton, British Columbia, Brown grew up in Ontario

Top Stock Magazine / Winter 2017

and has roots in the cow-calf industry. She and her husband moved to B.C. six years ago. Together, their backgrounds are in the Hereford, Shorthorn, Angus and Charolais breeds. “For most of our married life, we’ve either managed other herds or run our own operation and custom managed for other people,” she says. Currently, they manage a ranch with a large commercial cow-calf operation and purebred Hereford operation.

021


"We sat down with all of the staff and put something in place so that we knew what each person was going to do if we got the alert to evacuate the main ranch facility."

As someone who wasn’t raised in B.C.’s cattle industry, Brown quickly learned of a major difference in grazing in this province that isn’t present elsewhere in the country. “Ranching here is very much dependant on crown rangeland, shared with forestry and the public,” she explains. This is often found in the more forested and mountainous areas. “Unless you have a lot of forewarning, it’s almost impossible to just go out and gather a herd.” With cattle scattering into smaller groups on large ranges that have primarily natural boundaries, it’s no small feat to bring them home. This often has to be done on horseback due to the forested terrain. “So forest fire is a massive risk to all of the ranchers here and puts a lot of the cattle herd here in grave danger.”

camping out at the ranch office, and we were able to be close to our top end of our herd that we keep close by,” says Brown. Their emergency plan came together as the situation escalated. “We sat down with all of the staff and put something in place so that we knew what each person was going to do if we got the alert to evacuate the main ranch facility.” They were ready to move the cattle if the situation changed, but thankfully, this wasn’t necessary. “Our ranges weren’t immediately at risk,” she says. “Our house was affected, but if it had gone over one more mountain top, then our main facilities would have been affected, and that’s where we keep our donor cows and our top-end females and our daughter’s herd.”

Brown saw first hand the dangers of wildfire when she and her family had to flee their home this summer. The fire that affected the Princeton area started in close proximity to their house. Luckily, neighbours alerted them to the fact that they were in the fire’s path. “We just saw how quickly it took off and grew in size, and then skipped the road and came over to our side,” she recalls. “We just happened to be in the house for lunch at the time, and we knew we had to get out. So we just quickly filled the trucks up with all our essentials and headed out.”

Kevin Boon, general manager of the British Columbia Cattlemen’s Association, estimates that somewhere between 30,000 to 40,000 cow-calf pairs were affected by the fires, meaning that they have been or will be affected by the loss of feed and pasture. Thousands of head were moved during this crisis, Boon reports. “We were able to keep them in irrigated pastures amongst the fires, get them into riparian areas or just get them into other pastures within a couple miles,” he says. Given the range of the fires and the fact that some continue to burn, he is unable to provide an estimate on the number of bovine fatalities at this time.

They travelled to the headquarters of the ranch that they manage, 10 kilometres from their house. “We actually started 022

As ranchers responded to the fires, the Top Stock Magazine / Winter 2017

On July 7, the fires caused a provincial state of emergency to be declared by Todd Stone, Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure. It lasted until September 15. This was the first state of emergency for British Columbia in 14 years, and the longest state of emergency in the province's history.


Top Stock Magazine / Winter 2017

023


BCCA worked directly with emergency response crews so that some producers could return after being evacuated to protect their herds. When an evacuation is ordered, people can refuse to leave their homes, but they can’t travel around the fire zone, and a permit is needed to return if they leave. “I think that was one of the places that was perhaps our biggest win in some areas,” says Boon. “Livestock ended up being a numbereight priority for fire services. Of course human safety is number one, and so establishing with them the value and 024

the need for animal welfare and animal health circumstances was a challenge.”

ranchers could re-enter an evacuation zone to move their cattle and fight fires.

In some areas, such as the Cariboo Regional District, which was particularly ravaged by fire, the BCCA placed an official in the emergency operations centre to act as a liaison for ranchers. “This amounted to putting into process with the wildfire services a permitting process that allowed us to put ranchers back in to fulfill essential services,” says Boon, defining these as actions to benefit the welfare of livestock and protect infrastructure that supports animals. With this permit,

In some cases, this allowed ranchers to safely complete their haying. “That feed is critical for us this year, especially with the droughts and the fires having consumed so much,” Boon notes. This also removed potential fuel from the fire’s path. “By getting that hay off, we were again able to start some irrigation up and get it wet, and it has proven to be key to being able to stop these fires or redirect them and slow them.”

Top Stock Magazine / Winter 2017


This process used a mapping system that helped the BCCA and emergency crews track where ranchers had been allowed back onto their land. “Utilizing premise ID and that permit, we were able to have that contact and the actual ability to monitor and work with those guys for their safety,” says Boon. “It actually also proved to wildfire management what an asset it could be to work with these guys, rather than treat them all as a liability.” The BCCA also assisted in organizing

the donation of feed, pasture and fencing supplies to affected producers. Coordinating the transportation of livestock out of affected areas, generally from smaller operations, proved to be trickier. “The first couple of weeks, I would say it was absolute chaos,” says Boon, explaining that several people would show up when a call to pick up animals went out. This is where the BCCA stepped in to organize these efforts, and soon other organizations were able to take over.

Left More than 39,000 people have been evacuated from their homes and 30,000 cattle have been threatened. Below The Kleena Kleene Fire bares down on the Dane Ranch. Picture from August 2017. ©© Cordy Cox

Top Stock Magazine / Winter 2017

025


"We had a pretty good idea that with the temperatures we were getting and with the low precipitation that it was only the matter of a lightning strike and we were going to have some serious issues. We never had any idea that basically the whole Cariboo-Chilcotin region would literally be on fire."

Cordy Cox is a well-known voice in B.C.’s

year was definitely unprecedented,” she

beef industry. Cox runs the Dane Ranch, a

says. Out of necessity, Cox and Ellis have

commercial cow-calf program consisting

equipment to fight fires at their ranches,

of two locations in the Cariboo-Chilcotin

such as fire hose, pumps, a water tank

region, Kleena Kleene and Anahim Lake.

and a D7 Cat. “We had a pretty good idea

With a background in the purebred

that with the temperatures we were

sector, she went on to buy out her parents’

getting and with the low precipitation

ranch, making it her home operation.

that it was only the matter of a lightning

She and her husband, Clint Ellis, a cattle

strike and we were going to have some

broker, then bought their second ranch,

serious issues. We never had any idea that

expanding their operation from 400

basically the whole Cariboo-Chilcotin

to 1,000 females. Cox is currently the

region would literally be on fire.”

president of the Cariboo Cattlemen’s Association, a director with the British Columbia Livestock Co-op and is involved with the Tatla Lake Livestock Association.

026

A lightning strike did start the fire that threatened their Kleena Kleene ranch. Upon reporting it, they were told that there were no resources currently

This year’s wildfires, Cox explains, were

available to fight it, given the larger

unlike anything she’d ever seen before.

fires approaching 100 Mile House and

“We have been threatened by fires here

the Williams Lake area at the time. As

before, but the situation in all of B.C. this

the fire spread, locals began to fight it Top Stock Magazine / Winter 2017

using heavy machinery and the help of a local helicopter company familiar with bucketing wildfires. “It took quite some time before we had any significant resources, so the fire did get out of control quite quickly,” says Cox. Like many ranchers on evacuation order, Cox and Ellis were not willing to leave their animals. They had to act quickly when one of their ranges, where pairs were grazing, started to burn. “We were really close to having this fire jump and go on to our main range, which would have been massive and terrible,” says Cox. “With the help of some great neighbours that live about an hour further west, we were able to evacuate all of the cattle off of this range that was burning, and we were able to take them to our other ranch.” They also evacuated around 30 horses to their Anahim Lake ranch.


In addition to working to protect her own livelihood, Cox helped other ranchers in similar situations through her role with the Cariboo Cattlemen’s Association. To make matters even more hectic, Cox gave birth to her first child, a daughter named Harlow, during this crisis. “I had the baby in the hospital while (their ranch) was being evacuated, and I jumped right into it,” she explains. “I literally spent the first month of Harlow’s life on the phone … helping coordinate and set up programs to help ranchers in need.” There is still an active fire close to the Dane Ranch, but Cox finds that it doesn’t affect their day-to-day operations. “You’re used to being surrounded by a fire, and now it’s just spot fires, and there is some active fire burning up above the ranch, but it’s not directly threatening the ranch anymore,” she says. The cooler mornings and evenings have helped some, she adds, though it likely won’t be fully extinguished until the first snow. “You can definitely breath a sigh of relief. You know it’s coming to an end.”

Top The Kleena Kleene Fire bares down on the Dane Ranch. Picture from August 2017. ©© Cordy Cox

Right Having raised cattle in B.C. all her life, Cordy Cox's livelihood had been threatened before, but nothing like what happened in 2017. ©© Cordy Cox

Top Stock Magazine / Winter 2017

027


"With the trees gone, there’s no ability to hold the snowpack, so the runoff will be very fast, and we won’t be able to utilize that water throughout the year the way we typically would. It will also create some issues for things like fish spawning."

Moving forward, the BCCA’s main priority is working with the provincial and federal agricultural ministries on implementing an AgriRecovery program for affected producers. “We worked very hard over the last couple of weeks on really defining and getting that into place as to what they would cover and in a meaningful way that would help these guys get back in business,” says Boon. The federal and provincial governments announced a $20 million initiative for this at the beginning of September. With fires still burning, the BCCA continues to run the permitting process, and has a horse and rider program in place to help ranchers subsidize the cost of hiring ranch hands to move cattle. In addition to working oneon-one with ranchers, Boon says the BCCA will play a role in the rebuilding efforts. “There’s about three million acres of land up there that is burned, and in the eye of the disaster lies an

028

opportunity,” he states, suggesting that something akin to a 100-year plan could be created for the devastated landscape, including considerations on grazing land, trees and wildlife. “We saw where agriculture and irrigation stopped the fire or changed its direction. Let’s plan those so we can fire-safe some of these communities for the future.” Boon also notes the importance of planning for dam placement. “With the trees gone, there’s no ability to hold the snowpack, so the runoff will be very fast, and we won’t be able to utilize that water throughout the year the way we typically would. It will also create some issues for things like fish spawning,” he adds. Other related projects the BCCA will tackle are the rehabilitation of land where fire guards were quickly created, and replacing burned fences along highways and on crown land. “A lot of hard work has gone into fighting (the fires), but I would suggest that the hard work is really starting now,” says Boon.

Top Stock Magazine / Winter 2017


Boon believes that in the wake of this disaster, many facets of the evacuations and policies related to livestock will need to be examined. “Nobody was prepared for the magnitude of these fires, and there’s certainly a lot of things that were done that are being questioned by the ranching community in the way that the fires were fought,” he says. Despite the loses of livestock, grazing land and property, he does see a few positive aspects. “We didn’t lose any human lives, which I think is spectacular in a fire this size. The wildfire services and the firefighters out there did a fantastic job. It’s a very thankless job and it’s very frustrating, but it just goes to show how fragile we are and susceptible,” he says. “Everyone needs to realize that you’re just a lightning strike away from a major event in your backyard.” For some B.C. ranchers, the greatest danger is now over, though the threat of wildfire hasn’t disappeared. “It hasn’t ended,” says Brown. “We haven’t had rain for a couple of months or so, and everybody’s in fear of lightning of any kind. Everybody’s still holding their breath.” After two and half weeks, Brown and her family were able to return to their house, though signs of the nearby fires linger months later. “The smoke is just horrible. It has been for weeks upon end. The air has been full of ash and pine needles,” she says. “That’s the major thing that’s been affecting our animals and us on a daily basis.” Brown knows of other cattle producers, though, who were not so fortunate. “There

As of August 13, 3,906 firefighters were deployed to fight the fires including 647 out of province personnel and 1,606 contractors. Crews were fighting the fires with assistance of 233 helicopters and airplanes. In addition, 50 Australian firefighters, 80 Fire and Emergency New Zealand firefighters and 108 fire personnel from Mexico have come to BC's aid.

Top Stock Magazine / Winter 2017

029


are some sickening stories. Some cattle are trapped by flames. A lot of them are affected by smoke and stress, ending up with a lot of open cows. Some cattle herds that were recovered had burned feet and had to be put down, or burned hides,” she recounts. “We feel really quite fortunate ourselves.” She praises the hard work of those who did their best to keep their livestock safe. “When we ourselves are safe, the very next thing in line is we all go to our animals in our care, and they become the priority.” In the aftermath of this disaster, Cox stresses the importance of being as prepared as possible and creating an emergency management plan for moving livestock to safety if possible, as well as having proper insurance coverage. “Ranchers have worked hard for what they have, and most ranchers aren’t willing to leave when there’s an event such as this, so the other thing is to always be safe, too,” she says. “Things can be replaced, but people can’t.”

As a representative of the beef producers in her community, Cox considers the permitting process to be the most useful initiative developed in response to the crisis. “One of the major things I can’t stress enough is having some policies in place with your local government or regional districts,” she states. “Pretty quickly the wildfire service realized that a lot of these ranchers had defended their whole communities—not just on their ranches, we’re talking their whole rural communities—against the fire, and they had excellent knowledge of the land. Most of them have lived there forever,” she says, adding that many of the ranchers have taken fire fighting courses. “They’ve got that local knowledge and can be of help, and that’s something that going forward needs to be looked at.”

Looking back at this difficult summer, Brown found comfort in seeing how people can work together in times of crisis. “It really draws a community together and brings out the best in people,” she says. “It’s really comforting to see neighbours come together, and fellow ranchers—sometimes themselves in a place of peril—give you a call, asking if they can help. I think it draws an industry together and it draws a community together, and I think that’s a really beautiful thing.”

2017's fire season became particularly notable for causing the closure of Highway 97 from Kersley, south of Quesnel all the way south to Pavilion (along Highway 99), and south of Ashcroft. It also closed Bella Coola Highway to westbound traffic and created evacuation alerts the entire length of the Bella Coola Highway from Precipice to the junction with Williams Lake. No other fire season has had the breadth of large fires across the province.

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Top Stock Magazine / Winter 2017


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A Culture of Support Encouraging Women to the Judges Circle

Donna Jackson, of High Bluff Stock Farm, judges the 2016 Farmfair Charolais show with her husband Carman. ©© ShowChampions

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Top Stock Magazine / Winter 2017


"The culture itself must nurture the skills in boys and girls and encourage them to continue in judging, align them with mentors and be active in encouraging a balance of gender in the ring. "

WORDS BY BRENDA SCHOEPP

T

his story is not my own. Men and women equally participated across Canada who are engaged in different breeds as association managers, judges, contestants, exhibition managers and commercial cattle people to weigh in on one question: Why do we not have more female show judges in the livestock industry?

This was not a rant for gender inequality but an emergent query in which I set stage for the conversation to take place and to address the lack of female judges in the livestock industry, particularly in beef, and especially at the higher level. Women are missing from the judge’s circle when it comes to livestock shows in

Top Stock Magazine / Winter 2017

037


Canada and the reasons remain obscure. Girls often judge when they are young and then gradually fade. Very few females maintain a presence at the national and international level and when they do are rarely solo and often part of a panel or as a combo with their husband or brother. The independent female judge in equal representation to males at the same venue is greatly appreciated, but unique. Many of the seed stock folks I spoke with reminded me that judging can be a thankless job for men and women and may be complicated by internal politics, a traditional culture and the repeated presence of notable farms – a potentially misunderstood and discouraging combination. There certainly is no malicious intent meant by these comments. Human nature has a default to those we know in our circle, those familiar to us; and that brings us back to the familiarity of male judges. The cost of showing may deter new families. As for the politics that were discussed, it was suggested that this can be partly addressed through outside judges or a more secretive approach to the selected judge. For the judges themselves, low remuneration is a factor although the greatest draw back to getting judges was simply time and the value of that time for the judge. None of this addresses the question of when judging falls off the rails for females. Women are recognized as great cattle people, with a good eye and the understanding of production. They are performance savvy and can articulate all of this. Why are they not judging extensively after 4H? Have they not stepped up or have they not been asked? Women who are currently judging want to be there and excel at their task. In addition to a strong eye and clear articulation, they are educated in the breed, have a professional presence and a deep respect for the cattle and the contestants. Whip smart and decisive they radiate confidence with eloquence and flair. Outside of that circle are the ladies who 038

Top Stock Magazine / Winter 2017


"Girls often judge when they are young and then gradually fade. Very few females maintain a presence at the national and international level and when they do are rarely solo and often part of a panel or as a combo with their husband or brother."

Dawn Wilson, of Miller Wilson Angus, judges the Speckle Park show at the 2016 Farmfair International. ŠŠ ShowChampions Top Stock Magazine / Winter 2017

039


feel intimidated by the industry to which they belong. Some women expressed that by working part time off of the farm, they disqualify themselves as judges, while others were so fearful of cultural norms that they would concede to the male in the family ‘to keep the peace’, even when they were better suited. Some felt they were not taken seriously while others were simply burned out. Women across the nation repeatedly related stories of a time when they were treated as ‘insignificant’ within the seed stock industry. Based on those conversations I felt the need to foster further discussion with 040

their male colleagues. Men responded that girls and women should go with their passion, stand their own ground and strive for being a judge if that is what you want to do and are natural at it. As I have found in other gender equality studies, it was not that men were always purposely blocking the path. They may have simply been unaware at that moment in time of the need for change. Rather, women were often holding themselves back. In doing so, these talented individuals had missed an opportunity to inspire others in the industry. Top Stock Magazine / Winter 2017

"Women were often holding themselves back. In doing so, these talented individuals had missed an opportunity to inspire others in the industry."


Change starts with small steps; keeping a judging resume, being present and asking questions and most importantly – networking. Networking remains a challenge for women who don’t want to ‘hang around and drink beer’, possibly exposing the need for family friendly post show events that ensure boys and girls and men and women are together for networking that is inspiring and offers the opportunity for interaction. Mentorship came into this conversation repeatedly as a valued way to gain confidence and contacts. Comments included encouraging the elite to educate, mentor and engage new entrants – fostering a belief that it takes everybody to be successful and ensures the existence of the ring itself. Success is not guaranteed however and consistently there was a message

from both men and women that emerging female judges seemed to fall into a gap with some breeds at the association level. In the past, breed associations have a history of excluding female judges even when the host venue had a policy requesting balanced representation. Overall this portrays the ongoing concern which can be termed as ambiguous selection. Who moves you through the ranks and determines your competencies to be a national judge? Young girls and young women achieve through to senior 4H and then thin in numbers. While commercial spectators argued that the women are taking a traditional back seat to men and need to be in the ring at all levels, the inviting of females to judge often lies directly with the association. Is this a gender bias or does it highlight a broader problem endemic in industry?

Top Jordan Buba, of Lewis Farms, judges the Gelbvieh show at the 2016 Farmfair. ©© ShowChampions

Right Nancy Biglieni judges the Agribition Beef Supreme Challenge as part of the panel of 5 judges that sorts this prestigious event. ©© ShowChampions

Top Stock Magazine / Winter 2017

041


"Of greater importance and in every discussion was the concept of formal accreditation within the seed stock industry that was not restrictive to age, gender or breed affiliation and which had streams of mentorship and continuous training."

042

Considering that there are very few women auctioneers and order buyers, it is fair to say a lack of women show judges is not a case in isolation. There are more complex issues at play.

of accredited judges which industry,

The exceptional quality of cattle in the beef industry in Canada is without question; what is unclear are the credentials and path required to be on the list to place cattle at national shows. The lack of any accreditation standard for beef judging beyond 4H came up repeatedly in the conversations as did an absence of a data base that could be referred to. Until we can point to specific avenues of accreditation within the industry itself, it may be difficult to attract youth and particularly young women to further their judging.

to be a positive move. Of greater

Where that information is housed is another consideration. A data base

a national judging conference every

breed associations and exhibitions can reference does not exist nor does an accreditation process. The idea of keeping a list of judges was considered importance and in every discussion was the concept of formal accreditation within the seed stock industry that was not restrictive to age, gender or breed affiliation and which had streams of mentorship and continuous training. The dairy industry is an example of a specific program to teach, monitor and mentor youth who desire to judge. Holstein Canada sports the National Judging Program in Canada which encompasses annual judging clinics and conference in each province and three years. Attendance is mandatory Top Stock Magazine / Winter 2017


Top Left Jill Harvie of Harvie Ranching shows in the Alberta Supreme Show in Edmonton. ©© ShowChampions

Top Right Alana Williams accepts accolades at Edmonton's Farmfair. ©© ShowChampions

Bottom Krista Erixon judges the 2016 Charolais show alongside her husband Dave. ©© ShowChampions

Top Stock Magazine / Winter 2017

043


for aspiring judges and mentorship is ongoing. In addition, international training is available along with prejourney briefing for international shows. There are 180 nationally accredited dairy judges in Canada compared to an estimated 40 available beef judges. To talk about judging without inclusion of the discussion of the future relevance and survivability of the show ring itself would be mute. The challenges of the day are fewer entries, less shows and dwindling incentives along with the sheer cost of showing and the direct forms of marketing that have put intense pressure on the ring and on the judges.

044

Acknowledgment that the beef industry could improve on mentoring and training of the next generation opens the dialogue to talk about increasing the opportunity for men and women to be skilled and build a judging profile in that critical time after 4H. Creating a balance of beef cattle judges comes from honest encouragement and will not sustain from a mandated platform. The culture itself must nurture the skills in boys and girls and encourage them to continue in judging, align them with mentors and be active in encouraging a balance of gender in the ring. Behind every successful show string and every respected show judge is a culture

Top Stock Magazine / Winter 2017

of support from a partner, a family, a mentor or an association. The artistry of showmanship and of skill of judging are unique and desirable attributes that set the seed stock industry apart and give it international presence. Identifying areas of gender inequality, broader industry challenges and bringing solutions to the table starts with this conversation. The end game is for both genders in each generation to accomplished; and radiate confidence as ambassadors for their breed – be that in the ring or judges circle.

Rach Wheeleer judges the UFA Junior Futurity at Farmfair in 2016. ŠŠ ShowChampions


Fa l l S h o w R e s u lt s

046

Top Stock Magazine / Winter 2017


AUG 5, 2017 Âť BARRIE, ON Photos: Charolais Banner Judge: Nathan Stirk, ON

canadian charolais youth show

Grand Champion Female, Junior Champion Female Cedardale Miss Daphne 105D, Shae-Lynn Evans

Reserve Champion Female, Res Junior Champion Female Cedardale Miss 16D, Emily Snoddon

Champion Heifer Calf

Champion Two Year Old Female

Champion Senior Female

Reserve Heifer Calf

Reserve Champion Two Year Old Female

Reserve Senior Female

Champion Steer

Champion Bull Calf

Reserve Bull Calf

WSS Ela 700E, Eve Snobelen

WSS Elsie 745E, Hannah MacDonald

Richard, Tyson Black

Sharodaon Charlize 16C, Wyatt Burgomaster

Bridor Connie 1C, Kaycee Buchanan

Sharodan Empire 1E, Wyatt Burgomaster Top Stock Magazine / Show Results

JSR Aphrodite 31A, Travis Saunders

WSS Annabelle 355A, Griffin Tupling

JSR Evolution 49E, Travis Saunders 047


ycsa national classic AUG 10-13, 2017 » FREDRICTON, NB Photos: Meghan Black/Simmental Country

Champion Purebred Female, Junior Champion Female Xcel PHCC Ebony Dare 409D, Kendra Stanley

Reserve Purebred Female, Heifer Calf Champ CDM Ms Dream Date 7E, Connor Morse

Reserve Purebred Bull, Junior Champion Bull Xcel Zeus 413D, Morgan MacIntyre

Donovandale Bailout, Kaylea Donovan

Reserve Yearling  Sane UPG Garnette 128D, Jade Noiseux

Senior Champion Female

Res Champ Heifer Calf

Reserve Senior Female Brandy

Fusion Eclipse, Cassidy Pinkham 048

Champion Purebred Bull, Bull Calf Champion

LPP Star Date 2Z, Connor Morse

Brook Cha-Ching, Jennifer Deon

Reserve Bull Calf  Forest Hill Adaptor, Brady Matheson

Res Bred & Owned Heifer Calf

Reserve Yearling Bull

Commercial Heifer Calf Champ

Donovandale Denzel, Kaylea Donovan

Top Stock Magazine / Show Results

CDM Ms Elvira 4E, Connor Morse

Emoji, Grace Reynolds


ycsa national classic AUG 10-13, 2017 Âť FREDRICTON, NB Photos: Meghan Black/Simmental Country

Champion Commercial Female, Champ Commercial Mature Pair Melvern Ms Matrix 57U, Connor Morse

Reserve Commercial Female, Res Mature Pair Firecracker, Ashley Black

Champion Bred & Owned Female, Champ Bred & Owned Heifer Calf CDM Ms Dream Date 7E, Connor Morse

Reserve Bred & Owned Female, Champ Yearling CDM Ms Starstruck 13D, Connor Morse

Commercial Bull Calf Champion

Commercial Champ Yearling

Get of Sire

Progeny of Dam

Commercial Reserve Bull Calf

Commercial Reserve Yearling

Breeder's Herd

Spirit of Youth

DJ's Earthquake 9E, Connor Morse

The Bomb.com, Ashley Black

DJ Bazinga, Allison Booth

Darla, Grace Reynolds

Connor Morse

Connor Morse

Top Stock Magazine / Show Results

Connor Morse

Heather Creamer 049


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MAPLE CREEK

NOV 6, 2017 (MON)

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NOV 27, 2017(MON) 5:00PM STOUGHTON VETERINARY SERVICES

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DEC 4, 2017 (MON)

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ab junior angus show

summer Show Results

AUG 13-15, 2017 Âť BASHAW, AB Photos: Grant Rolston Photography Ltd. Judge: Dwayne Martin, AB

Supreme Champion Female, Champion Owned Female Red Ter-Ron Diamond Mist 26C, Kasey Adams

Reserve Supreme and Reserve Champion Owned Female PM Rosebud 77'15, Laurie Morasch

Champion Bred & Owned Female

TWST She's A Hearbreaker 66D, Brianna Kimmel

Reserve Bred & Owned Female

Champion Commercial Female

Champion Open Female

Champion Commercial Bull

Reserve Commercial Female

Reserve Open Female

Red Ter-Ron Alice 129D, Keely Adams

052

BCL Arizona 434B, Cache McLerie

Candy, Laurie Morasch

Top Stock Magazine / Show Results

Red Cinder Freyja 629E, Brynne Yoder

MJT Miss Sizzle 45D, Taylor Pashulka


national junior allbreeds show AUG 16-19, 2017 » BASHAW, AB Photos: Grant Rolston Photography Ltd.

UFA Supreme Quest Champion, All Breeds PeeWee Champion Red Ter-Ron Diamond Mist 26C, Halley Adams

PeeWee Reserve Champion

Heifer Bracket Champion

Heifer Bracket Reserve Champion

Champion Purebred Female

Champion Commercial Female

Open Champion Female

Reserve Purebred Female

Reserve Commercial Female

Open Reserve Female

Miss Prairie Cove 726E, Indy Fowler

Miss Rusylvia Dream, Taylor Pashulka

Red Blair's Monique 572D, Baxter Blair

Red Blair's Monique 572D, Baxter Blair

GSB C-Zee, Bailey Wauters

New Trend Sparkle 4C, Jacey Massey Top Stock Magazine / Show Results

Miss Rusylvia Diamond, Riley Pashulka

Red Cinder Freyja 629E, Brynne Yoder

CCR 38B Hazel 76D, Brandon Fraser 053


pacific national exhibition

AUG 18 - 22 » VANCOUVER, BC Photos: Erin Campbell

Grand Champion Steer

Grand Champion Female

Reserve Champion Steer

Reserve Champion Female

Alana Higgins

Meghan McGillvray

Victoria Hergott

Cailyn Campbell

Ch JR Fitting & Showmanship Ch Int Fitting & Showmanship Peyton Haslam

Jean MacAulay

Senior Fitting

Grant MacDonnell

Res JR Fitting & Showmanship Res Int Fitting & Showmanship Reserve Senior Fitting Layla Dorko

054

Amanda McGillvray

Jeremy Gill

Top Stock Magazine / Show Results

Senior Showmanship Cailyn Campbell

Res Senior Showmanship Meghan McGillvray


south bruce jackpot beef show AUG 28 » TEESWATER, ON

Grand Champion Market Animal Brady Hassen

Reserve Champion Market Animal Kade Earley/Tyler Nostadt

Grand Champion Bull Premier Livestock

Grand Champion Female Gilchrist Farms

SEPT 16 » ACTON, ON

acton fair

Reserve Champion Bull Earley Livestock

Reserve Champion Female Rail Line Farms

Grand Champion Market Animal Regan Hasson

Top Stock Magazine / Show Results

055


interior provincial exhibition

Supreme Champion Female, Champion Simmental Female New Trend Karizma 5C, Tim & Derri Massey

Photos: Grant Rolston Photography Inc.

Supreme Champion Bull, Champion Simmental Bull PM True North 2'16, Poplar Meadows

Champion Hereford Female

Champion Hereford Bull

Champion Angus Female

Reserve Hereford Female

Reserve Hereford Bull

Reserve Angus Female

Reserve Simmental Female

Reserve Simmental Bull

Champion Lowline Female

WJP Chianti MVP 123C, Billy Paul

CCR 109 Donna 19E, Copper Creek Ranch

PM Miss Consensus 1'16, Poplar Meadows 056

AUG 29 - SEPT 2 Âť ARMSTRONG, BC

CBB 9500 Kip 420D, Cayley Brown

GH 377X Eclipse 27E, Nelson Hirsche Purebreds

RJY Shock N Awe 5D, Schweb Family Cattle Top Stock Magazine / Show Results

Running Steady Gypsy 30C, Justamere Farms & Running Steady Ranch

PM Princene 45'14, Poplar Meadows Angus

Silverhills Razi, Silverhills Lowline


AUG 29 - SEPT 2 Âť ARMSTRONG, BC Photos: Grant Rolston Photography Inc.

Grand Champion Steer Jacey Massey

interior provincial exhibition

Reserve Champion Steer Poplar Meadows Angus

Champion Angus Bull

Champion Multi-Breed Female

Champion Multi-Breed Bull

Reserve Angus Bull

Reserve Multi-Breed Female

Reserve Multi-Breed Bull

Reserve Lowline Female

Champion Lowline Bull

Reserve Lowline Bull

PM Journey 522, Poplar Meadows Angus

Lorenz Unified 17C, Lorenz Angus

Alta Elsie BIL 41E, Darrell Gotaas

Pinnacles Ever After 12E, Pinnacle View Limousin

Pinnacles Evaline 15E, Pinnacle View Limousin

Alta Red Rocket BIL 332C, Darrell Gotaas Top Stock Magazine / Show Results

Pinnacles Envy 17E, Pinnacle View Limousin

KCC Keriness Kaden 6E, Kerriness Cattle Co.

Alta Red Bull BIL, Darrell Gotaas 057


interior provincial exhibition

Champion Female, Owned Junior Show & Supreme Female, Stars of the Future Jackpot WJP Chianti MVP 123C, Billy Paulz

Photos: Grant Rolston Photography Inc.

Champion Female, Borrowed Junior Show PM Princene 45'14, Shawna Williams

Reserve Female, Owned Junior Show

Stars Champion Futurity Bred Heifer

Stars Champion Futurity Heifer Calf

Reserve Female, Borrowed Junior Show & Reserve Jackpot Heifer

Stars Reserve Futurity Bred Heifer

Stars Reserve Futurity Heifer Calf

Sires of Tomorrow Champion Bull

Sires of Tomorrow Reserve Bull

Champion Jackpot Heifer

New Trend Class Act 3E, Jacey Massey

PM Miss Consensus 1'16, Kathryn Dolliver

JT Greater Concenscious , JT Livestock 058

AUG 29 - SEPT 2 Âť ARMSTRONG, BC

PM Polly 94'16, Poplar Meadows Angus

Ridgeline Hustlers Vision, Ridgeline Cattle

Pinnacle Envy 17E, Pinnacle View Limousin Top Stock Magazine / Show Results

Poplar Meadows Blossom 83'17, Poplar Meadows

New Trend Elegance 10E, Tim & Deri Massey

Poplar Meadows Angus


SEPT 18 Âť BRAMPTON, ON Photos: Barn Girls Photography; Judge: David Lasby

Supreme Champion Angus, Grand Champion Female, Junior Champion Female Brantnor's Flora 1D, Brantnor Angus

brampton angus preview

Grand Champion Bull, Junior Champion Bull

Whiskey Lane Dynamite 11D, Whiskey Lane Livestock

Reserve Champion Female, Calf Champ

Reserve Champion Bull, Calf Champ

Reserve Champion Junior Bull

Reserve Heifer Calf Champion

Reserve Bull Calf Champion

Reserve Champion Junior Female

Champion Senior Bull

Champion Senior Female

Reserve Senior Female

Whiskey Lane Emmy 1E, Whiskey Lane Livestock

Brantnor's Flora 12E, Brantnor Angus

Black Lane Crush 8C, Blacklane Livestock

Brantnor Exclusive 4E, Brantnor Angus

Worth-Mor Estrada 7E, Worth-Mor Cattle

Black Lane Forevery Lady 6C, Blacklane Livestock Top Stock Magazine / Show Results

Walkerbrae Ilegal Addiction 5D, Walkerbrae Farms

Justamore 486A Countess 155D, Tullamore

Brantnor Daisy 27C, Ron & Linda Bryant 059


young ranchman's

AUG 31 - SEPT 3 Âť SWIFT CURRENT, SK Photos: Grant Rolston Photography Inc.

Champion Hereford Female Kylee Dixon

Supreme Champion Female, Champion Angus Female Garrett Liebreich

Reserve Hereford Female Kylee Dixon

Reserve Angus Female Ty Schwan

Champion Charolais Female Calina Evans

060

Reserve Supreme Champion Female, Champion Club Calf Female Kylie Berner

Reserve Charolais Female Cassidy Vermeulen

Top Stock Magazine / Show Results

Reserve Club Calf Female Kord Phillips


AUG 31 - SEPT 3 » SWIFT CURRENT, SK Judge: Bruce Thomas, MT

young ranchman's

Champion Commercial Female Bailey Wauters

Grand Champion Steer Cody Cockburn

Reserve Commercial Female Roan Bosch

Reserve Champion Steer

Champion Multi-Breed Female

Lazy H Farm Ltd.

Champion Simmental Female Will Bradford

Jules Smyth

Reserve Simmental Female Sadie Anwender

Top Stock Magazine / Show Results

Reserve Multi-Breed Female Sadie Anwender

061


bc ag expo

SEPTEMBER 21, 2017 » BARRIERE, BC

Supreme Champion Female

Grand Champion Overall Steer & Champion 4-H Steer  Matthew McGillivray

Champion Open Steer

Reserve Supreme Champion Female Meghan McGillivray

Reserve Grand Champion Overall Steer & Reserve 4-H Steer  Amanda McGillivray

Reserve Open Steer

Champion Open Female

Reserve 4-H Yearling Heifer

Champion Homegrown Steer

Reserve Open Female

Reserve 4-H Cow/Calf Pair

Reserve Homegrown Steer

Photos: Grant Rolston Photography

Amanda McGillivray

Allison Speller

Matthew McGillivray

062

Mariah Mitchell

Tye Mitchell

Top Stock Magazine / Show Results

Emalee Higgins

Nick Van Iterson

Matthew McGillivray

Amanda McGillivray


SEPT 22 - 23 Âť SWIFT CURRENT, SK Photos: Designs by Sadie

Supreme Champion Female, Champion Angus Garrett Liebreich

junior stockmans show

Reserve Supreme Champion, Champion Commercial Kylie Bernier

Champion Red Angus Female

Champion Hereford Female

Champion AOB Female

Reserve Red Angus Female

Reserve Hereford Female

Reserve AOB Female

Reserve Black Angus Female

Champion Commercial Female

Keaton Kaufmann

Keaton Kaufmann

Hillary Sauder

Luke Andrews

Matt Hansen

Cassidy Vermeulen

Sadie Anwender

Hillary Sauder

Top Stock Magazine / Show Results

063


princess of the marsh

Photos: Cameron Nykoliation Judges: Amanda Hamilton-Seward, Devin Boitson, Steven Manns

Champ Heifer Calf, Champion Angus

Champion Futurity Yearling

Champion Futurity 2 Year Old

Res Heifer Calf, Champion Shorthorn

Reserve Futurity Yearling

Reserve Champion Futurity 2 Year Old

Champion AOB Heifer Calf

Champion Charolais Heifer Calf

Champion Hereford Heifer Calf

Champion Commercial Heifer Calf

Champion Simmental Heifer Calf

Prime Prairie Belle, Prime Angus Ranch

ACC Candy's Eclair 1E, Anwender Cattle Co

LSCC Sugar Blossom 27E, Lightning Strike Cattle Co.

46E, Brody Slykhuis

064

SEPTEMBER 30, 2017 » DOUGLAS, MB

MTF Rosie 27D, Kaitlyn Davey

Cam Poll Daddy's Girl, Campbell Land & Cattle

McCaw Pandora 4E, McCaw Charolais

HTH Honey Dew 18E, Anwender Cattle Co.

Top Stock Magazine / Show Results

N7's Mary Kate 37C, Ty Nykoliation

Ramrod Hope 503C, Ramrod Cattle Co

RSK H117 Miss Sage ET 44E, RSK Farms


SEPT 30 - OCT 1 » ILDERTON, ON Photos: Barn Girls Photography

Grand Champion Steer Zach Hale

Reserve Champion Steer Clayton White

SEPTEMBER 24 » SUSSEX, NB Photos: Jill Renton

Supreme Champion Male

Earlybird 23B 10Y Express 1E, Raymond Family

Reserve Champion Male

Bannockburn Valley McIntosh 8E, Boyd Dixon Family

ilderton fair

n.b. beef expo

Supreme Champion Female

Bannockburn Valley Dolly 2C, Boyd Dixon Family

Reserve Champion Female

Tee-Jay Eggie 200D, Tee-Jay Simmentals

Top Stock Magazine / Show Results

065


olds fall classic

Photos: Grant Rolston Photography

Champion Angus Female

Champion Angus Bull

Champion Red Angus Female

Reserve Angus Female

Reserve Angus Bull

Reserve Red Angus Female

Champion Hereford Female

Champion Hereford Bull

Champion Limousin Female

Reserve Hereford Female

Reserve Hereford Bull

Reserve Limousin Female

PM Rosebud 77'15, Lazy MC Angus

Golden Oak Magnolia ET 2D, Golden Oak Livestock

JDH MS 20R Victor 33Z 55D ET, JM New Trend Cattle Co

GH MVP Daisy Lou 4D, Nelson Hirsche Purebreds

066

OCTOBER 6-8, 2017 Âť OLDS, AB

Remitall F Decisive 35D, Remitall Farms

Boss Lake Pedigree 722E, Boss Lake Genetics

MLL 10Y Rocky ET 225D, MJT Cattle Company

KJ BJ 719Z Truman 695D ET, Harvie Ranching

Top Stock Magazine / Show Results

Red Ter-Ron Diamond Mist 26C, Ter-Ron Farms

Red Ter-Ron Amber 25D, Ter-Ron Farms

Boss Lake Day Dreamer, Boss Lake Genetics

PLNS Polled Enchantress 89E, Plains Limousin


OCTOBER 6-8, 2017 Âť OLDS, AB Open Show Judge: Tyson Hertz, SK; Red Angus & Jackpot Show Judge: Casey Bishop, AB

olds fall classic

Champion Red Angus Bull

Champion Charolais Female

Champion Charolais Bull

Reserve Red Angus Bull

Reserve Charolais Female

Reserve Charolais Bull

Champion Limousin Bull

Champion Shorthorn Female

Champion Shorthorn Bull

Reserve Limousin Bull

Reserve Shorthorn Female

Reserve Shorthorn Bull

Red Lazy MC Tradition 111C, Lazy MC Red Angus

Red Six Mile High Caliber 177C, Diamond T Cattle Co

Cottage Lake Dark Horse, Boss Lake Genetics

PLNS Polled Executioner 19E, Plains Limousin

CML Desirae 669D, Mcleod Livestock

ONL Miss Belladonna 2E, Daines Cattle/ O'Neill Livestock

HB Swag Delight 1D, Lilac Lane Farm

CLF 40P Delight 106D, Melba Stock Farm

Top Stock Magazine / Show Results

HRJ Crowd Favourite 515C, Johnson Charolais

ONL Daddy Cool 4C, DainesCattle/ O'Neill Livestock

Saskvalley Dynamite 258D, Saskvalley Stock Farm

CLF RSB Melba Expo 305E, Melba Stock Farm

067


olds fall classic

Photos: Grant Rolston Photography

Champion Maine Anjou Female

Champion Maine Influence Female

Champion Maine Influence Bull

Reserve Maine Anjou Female

Reserve Maine Influence Female

Reserve Maine Influence Bull

Champion Simmental Female

Champion Simmental Bull

Cam Clark Herdsman Award

Reserve Simmental Female

Reserve Simmental Bull

ZTA Black Ruby 438D, Wise Maine-Anjou Ranch

Four Dees Jinquette XDW 475E, Wise MaineAnjou Ranch

New Trend Karizma 5C, New Trend Cattle Co.

Double Bar D BB 407D, Double Bar D Farms

068

OCTOBER 6-8, 2017 » OLDS, AB

GSB C-Zee, GSB Stock Farm

SC Bellatrix 63D, Miller Show Cattle

VCL LKC Dagger 605D, Double Bar D Farms

Barlee Rangers Smith, Ultra Livestock

Top Stock Magazine / Show Results

GSB Revenant, GSB Stock Farm

DRSS Dynasty 182E, Dun Rite Stock & Stables

Boss Lake Genetics


OCTOBER 6-8, 2017 » OLDS, AB Open Show Judge: Tyson Hertz, SK; Red Angus & Jackpot Show Judge: Casey Bishop, AB

olds fall classic

Champion Purebred Jackpot Heifer

Champion Purebred Jackpot Yearling

Champion Purebred Jackpot Bull Calf

Reserve Purebred Jackpot Heifer

Reserve Purebred Jackpot Yearling

Reserve Purebred Jackpot Bull Calf

Champion Commercial Jackpot Heifer

Champion Commercial Jackpot Yearling

Champion Jackpot Steer

Reserve Commercial Jackpot Heifer

Reserve Commercial Jackpot Yearling

Reserve Champion Jackpot Steer

New Trend Elegance 10E, JM New Trend Cattle Co

Triple A Time's Elise ET 701E, Triple A Herefords

LSF Miley 8Z 23E, Lucky Springs Farms

Molly, Compass Ranch

JDH Ms 20R Victor 33Z 55D, JM New Trend Cattle Co

MJT Miss Sizzle 45D, MJT Cattle Company

WHL Brooke 1629, Miller Show Cattle

Daines Miss Spot On, Daines Cattle & ONeill Livestock

Top Stock Magazine / Show Results

Boss Lake Pedigree 722E, Boss Lake Genetics

GH 377X Eclipse 27E, Nelson Hirsche Purebreds

Jm New Trend Cattle Co

Triple A Herefords

069


expo boeuf

OCT 6 - 8 » VICTORIAVILLE, QC Photos: ShowChampions

Supreme Champion Female, Champion Angus Soo Line Lady Sandy, Nathan Latchford

Jem Arial 10C, Ernest Mutch

Champion Hereford Female

Champion Hereford Bull

Champion Charolais Female

Reserve Hereford Female  CB 139T Miss Crown Royal 3Z, Crystal Brook Farm

Reserve Hereford Bull

Reserve Charolais Female

Champion Simmental Female

Reserve Simmental Female

Champion Simmental Bull

Stonewood Rose 3C, Stonewood Grange

Barlee Lexi Lou, Jerry Barber 070

Reserve Supreme Female, Reserve Champion Angus

Redwing Dino 2D, Redwing Farms

Stonewood Cinch 3C, Stonewood Grange

Rusion Day Dreamer, Fusion Livestock Top Stock Magazine / Show Results

Sharodan Charlize 16C, Sharodan Farm

Echo Springs Oriana 6B, Open Gate Farm

Dunraven Dude, Dunraven Simmentals


OCT 6 - 8 Âť VICTORIAVILLE, QC Photos: ShowChampions

Supreme Champion Bull, Champion Angus Bull EF Colossal, Enright Farm

expo boeuf

Reserve Supreme Bull, Reserve Champion Bull Blacklane Crush, Ryan Currie

Champion Charolais Bull

Champion Shorthorn Female

Champion Shorthorn Bull

Champion Charolais Bull

Reserve Shorthorn Female

Reserve Shorthorn Bull

Reserve Simmental Bull

All Breeds Champion Jackpot Bull

All Breeds Champion Jackpot Female

Sharodan Empire 1D, Sharodan Farm

Cornerview Hemi 42E, Cornerview Charolais

Elm Tree Encounter 18E, Elm Tree Farms

Shadybrook Picture 3D, Shadybrook Farms

Lilacview Belle 42D, Conerview Charolais

Earlybird 23B 10Y Express 1E, Raymond Family Top Stock Magazine / Show Results

Shadybrook Precision, Shadybrook Farm

Steel Brook Buddy, Carey Johnston

Blair Allnut

071


rockton worlds fair

OCT 7 » ROCKTON, ON Photos: Barn Girls Photography

Grand Champion Market Animal

Reserve Champion Market Animal

Jarod Scott

Champion Angus Bull

Champion Angus Female

Reserve Angus Female

Champion AOB Bull

Champion AOB Female

Champion Commercial Breeding Femae  Laura Scott

Reserve AOB Bull

Champion AOB Female

Reserve Commercial Breeding Femae  Ben Scott

First Line Angus

Concordia Herefords

Rick-Sha Farms 072

Regan Hasson

First Line Angus

Jeff Stephens & family

Jeff Stephens & family

Top Stock Magazine / Show Results

Tom & Judy McDonald


Champion Speckle Park Bull Underhill Specs

Champion Speckle Park Female Andchris Farms

OCT 10 Âť GLENCOE, ON Photos: Barn Girls Photography

Champion Market Animal Derek Derbyshire

Reserve Speckle Park Female Silver Tip Speckle Park

red brand show & sale

Reserve Market Animal Johnathan McNeil

Top Stock Magazine / Show Results

073


WORDS BY PIPER WHELAN

The judge of the Royal Winter Fair’s Queen’s Guineas Show on raising cattle all across Canada and learning along the way

Judge Profile – John Dolliver

THE ROYAL QUEEN'S GUINEAS

I

n a country as vast and geographically diverse as Canada, agriculture varies across regions, from the land itself to ideal commodities produced to everyday practices. Many Canadian beef producers don’t get the opportunity to experience what it’s like to raise cattle in other parts of the country. John Dolliver is an exception. Dolliver and his family have been part of the cattle business from the Maritimes to the prairies. Dolliver’s story begins on the East Coast. Along the highway known as the Evangeline Trail and not far from the Bay of Fundy’s shore lies the village of Kingston, located in Nova Scotia’s picturesque Annapolis Valley. With lush fields and forests and stunning views of the Atlantic Ocean, the Valley is home to orchards and wineries, and has attracted settlers in search of fertile farmland for centuries. “I grew up on a family farm, so I was born into it,” Dolliver says of his childhood home. “My grandfather started it, and my father continued on.” His family ran 150 head, feeding their calves out in a feedlot, and also raised 250 sows. Though he’s gone on to raise a variety of breeds of cattle, he has a soft spot for the breed he was raised with. “I grew up with Angus, and Angus is closest to my heart,” he says. Ten years of 4-H provided a foundation for his passion for raising steers and

CONTINUED ON PAGE 76 074

Top Stock Magazine / Winter 2017


Judge Profile – Jared Glasman The judge of the 2017 Canadian Western Agribition Junior Beef Extreme discusses the family legacy that shaped him as a cattleman

AGRIBITION JUNIOR BEEF EXTREME

A

ccording to family lore, it would seem that Jared Glasman was destined to find his path in life through the cattle business. “I’ll put it to you this way: they took me home from the hospital with a gooseneck truck and trailer and a load of bulls,” the rancher from Russell, Manitoba, says with a laugh. “I knew I wanted to farm and ranch right from the get-go. When you ask kids what they want to be when they grow up, there was no policeman or anything. It was always farming and ranching.” This perspective isn’t surprising, given his family’s history in the beef industry, starting in the late 1920s with the purchase of their first Angus cattle. “It’s all we’ve ever done since we came to Canada,” Glasman explains. His great-grandfather registered his first purebred Angus cattle in the 1930s, establishing C. Glasman & Sons with his sons, Larry and Marshall, the latter being Jared Glasman’s grandfather. “It turned into Black Eagle Farms, because of a black eagle that used to hang around the ranch,” Glasman notes. Their herd soon developed into one of the country’s most notable Angus operations. It was in the show ring that the prominence of their herd was

CONTINUED ON PAGE 80 Top Stock Magazine / Winter 2017

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CONTINUED FROM PAGE 74

judging cattle. As a teenager, the show circuit called his name, and Dolliver travelled across Canada and the United States, working for breeders and fitting companies at noteworthy exhibitions before bringing his own cattle to these shows. “I’ve shown my own cattle in Denver, and I used to work in Louisville,” he says. “I’ve bounced around quite a bit. I’ve sure met a lot of people along the way.” Back in Nova Scotia, he established his own Limousin herd and started a family. Later on, the Dolliver family turned their attention west for their next chapter in the cattle business. “A lot of the industries are kind of fading back there in the Maritimes, and we decided we wanted to keep playing with the cows, so we decided we’d try Alberta,” Dolliver explains. In 2007, he, his wife, Tammy, and their children, Kathryn and Chase, headed across the country with two truck-loads of cattle to their new home. They now run JT Livestock at Stettler, Alberta, and have raised a number of breeds, including Angus, Simmental, Maine-Anjou and Shorthorn. In the last decade they’ve had numerous show ring victories and champion titles with steers and females alike. Now, the Dollivers’ next step has taken them further west, away from the prairies and into British Columbia’s rolling meadows and forests. John and Tammy have worked as herdsmen for Poplar Meadows Angus at Houston, B.C., for two years. Back home at Stettler, they currently have 40 head. “I think we’re going to downsize our herd enough so that Kathryn can look after it, and we’ll be pretty much full time in B.C., looking after Poplar Meadows,” says Dolliver. This experience of raising cattle in different regions of Canada has broadened Dolliver’s knowledge of beef production and provided him with an interesting perspective as a cattleman. “It give me a lot of different aspects from how they’re raised, and if I’m selling cattle to an area, I can know how they’re going to be fed and the type of feed,” he explains. “In the east and here in British Columbia, it’s a little bit wetter grass, so the cows do a little bit differently compared to the prairies and their dry grass and their native grass. I’ve don’t’ a lot with people with cattle in Ontario as well, so I’m used to that area and the cattle they raise.” He’s also seen the variations in types of cattle most often favoured in certain regions. “Each area has their own type of cattle,” he notes. “Ontario and the east follow the American styles a lot closer. Alberta tends to run on

076

Top Stock Magazine / Winter 2017


Judge Profile – John Dolliver

Dolliver's JT Livestock is a family operation. Left (top and bottom respectively) they show the at the Calgary Stampede and Canadian Western Agribition. ©© Grant Rolston Photography

Below Kathryn shows the National Champion Shorthorn Female in the Alberta Supreme show in Edmonton in 2016. ©© ShowChampions

Top Stock Magazine / Winter 2017

077


their own, beat to their own drum— just a little bit different style.” These differences also appear when he judges cattle shows across the country, which he has done for many years. “I wasn’t long out of 4-H, and I started doing quite a bit of judging around the Maritimes, Quebec and into Ontario,” he recalls. Despite the evolving styles favoured in the show ring, he’s found that what he looks for in an animal hasn’t changed at its core. “I’ve certainly learned and progressed along the way, but right back at the start when everybody wanted really tall cattle, I didn’t like that, so I stuck with the more moderate cattle, and I know when everything changed—the types changes, the styles changed—I was right on track, and did quite well,” he explains, noting that he prefers stylish, well-balanced cattle. Steers in particular have always captured Dolliver’s attention. “I’ve played with steers my whole life,” he says. “When 078

Top Stock Magazine / Winter 2017


Judge Profile – John Dolliver

I was 12 years old, I started with my first steer project. I showed some, but I was more interested in raising the calves. I like to raise steer calves and sell to the people who were showing … I started in my teens, so close to 35 years I’ve been selling prospect steers.” In that time, Dolliver has seen many changes in the types of steers raised and shown throughout the last few decades. “It’s certainly progressed in style and function. They got pretty freaky there for a while in the different breeds, the clubby side of it. Even before the clubbys, they were a bit more functional, and went straighter and tubular, and now they’re going back functional again,” he says. “They don’t need to be so deep and so deepflanked. If you make soggy or hay-bellied, you’re taking away muscle, and the whole idea of the steer show is they’ve got to be thick throughout and deep-quartered,” he continues. “They’re not supposed to be cows. They’re supposed to be steers.” In addition to being part of the show steer world, Dolliver has seen much of the junior show scene, first through his time competing in 4-H and now thanks to his daughter’s involvement in many youth programs. He places great value on the benefits of junior shows because of these experiences. “It’s a really big deal to me. “You get so much out of it. You get to meet so many kids,” he says, noting the travel opportunities that can accompany some of these competitions. “The other aspects of it, the judging, the interviews, the public speaking— it all helps to develop a young person.” This sentiment is particularly fitting for Dolliver now that Kathryn is nearing the end of her own successful junior career. “Nowadays the prizes and the scholarships and everything else that’s

Top JT Livestock markets JT Beat the Heat 584C, the bull calf at side the 2015 National Champion Shorthorn Female. ©© ShowChampions

Left The 2016 Queen's Guineas was a highly competitive show. ©© Top Stock

"It's a big honor [to be asked to judge the Queen's Guineas]. When I was young, I always wished I could show in it because it was one of the top steer shows in Canada."

with it, it’s big time. Kathryn’s going to pretty well pay for her college just with scholarships from showing cattle,” he says. “We’re in great favour of it. We sponsor some, and now that we’re probably going to be away from the junior scene here shortly, we’ll probably keep donating to a junior show somewhere.” A specific junior show that holds special meaning for Dolliver is the National Junior Beef Heifer Show at the Royal Winter Fair. In fact, Toronto’s famous exhibition has long captured his attention. “I started (attending the Royal) when I was probably 16, working for people, and then by the time I was 18, I was trucking my own cattle up,” he says. “I showed there for 20 years.” It was at the National Junior Beef Heifer Show that Dolliver won a tough competition that he considers a major accomplishment. “The first year they had the National 4-H show at the Royal, I was Champion Showman,” he says. “Ten years later, I was back and I judged showmanship for the National Junior Show, so it was kind of neat. When I showed, there was about 240 kids, and then when I judged it there were 350 … They put on a good show there. They have some good cattle there, and they import judges from all over.” This fall, Dolliver will judge another of the Royal’s prestigious junior events, the Queen’s Guineas Show. This highly competitive steer show takes place on the morning of Friday, November 3, with the auction following that evening. “It’s a big honour,” says Dolliver when asked what it means to him to judge this event. “When I was young, I always wished I could show in it because it was one of the top steer shows in Canada … They were selling steers for $50,000 back when I was young, and it was a big to-do. I’ve always regarded that as one of the best shows in North America, so being able to judge it is pretty exciting to me.”

Top Stock Magazine / Winter 2017

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Judge Profile – Jared Glasman

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Top Stock Magazine / Winter 2017


CONTINUED FROM PAGE 75

reinforced. In the 1950s, ‘60s and ‘70s, the Glasmans were regular fixtures on the show circuit, taking carloads of bulls as far away as Denver’s National Western Stock Show. “They’d push out of Russell, Manitoba, in the yard with an old beat-up grain truck and an old converted semitrailer in a snow storm, and drive all the way to Denver,” says Glasman. During the summers, they took their show string to exhibitions in Winnipeg, Regina, Calgary and Vancouver. In the fall, the Brandon Winter Fair, Toronto’s Royal Agricultural Winter Fair and Regina’ Canadian Western Agribition were the top destinations. “We actually showed at over 40 in a row Agribitions, and had champions at the very first Agribition,” he adds. The operation changed in the early 1970s, when the Glasman brothers decided to split up the business to try their own ventures, and the next

generation became involved. “Grandpa and Dad wanted to farm more, and Dad wanted to get into Simmentals, so in ’72 they got into the Simmentals, and M&J Farms was formed,” says Glasman. “Dad was breeding black baldies way ahead of his time,” he recalls, noting how much his parents liked the AngusSimmental crosses. “He tried multiple breeds when they first started coming over … but they ended up seeing the Simmental rise to the top in their eyes.” They haven’t wavered in this choice, and today the family raises purebred Simmental and Red Angus cattle at their Manitoba ranch, as well as Simmentalcross cattle. Along with his parents, Miles and Bonnie, Glasman and his fiancée, Chelsey, and their son, McCoy, currently operate M&J Farms. Working closely with them is Glasman’s brother Matthew, who runs Glasman Farms, a purebred Angus

"We’ve downsized and we’ve grown with the fluctuations in the cattle business and with opportunities we’ve had to sell large groups of females. We still have the same focus on quality and not really following any fads—just raising good ones."

Left and Right Glasman judges at the recent 10 Year anniversary of the Manitoba Beef Expo. ©© Prairie Pistol Designs

Top Stock Magazine / Winter 2017

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Judge Profile – Jared Glasman

082

and Simmental operation, with his wife, Leanne, and their daughter, Sarayah.

in 4-H, the Young Canadian Simmental

“We’ve downsized and we’ve grown with the fluctuations in the cattle business and with opportunities we’ve had to sell large groups of females,” Glasman explains. “We still have the same focus on quality and not really following any fads—just raising good ones.” They usually calve between 200 and 300 head, depending on female sales, and have developed a strong customer base through their annual two-year-old bull sale, held in February.

Simmental Association and the Canadian

Glasman developed his skills and interest in raising cattle through his involvement

great uncle and my grandpa and their

Association, the American Junior Junior Angus Association. Looking back, he considers his participation in these junior programs to be one of the best things he has been involved in. Glasman’s experiences as a junior exhibitor took place in a much different world than when his grandfather and great uncle headed down the show road, something that has always intrigued him. “It was actually pretty cool to talk with my friends about the old days,” he says.

Top Stock Magazine / Winter 2017


“When they talk about leaving in a snow storm in a ’56 Fargo, pulling 30 bulls on a pieced-together trailer with truck parts, that to me is awesome,” he states. “Think about it nowadays. Think about us. You’ve got to look at the weather on our cell phones, we’ve got to have our cell phones, got to have our GPS. They didn’t know what the weather was 10 miles away.” With the three previous generations exhibiting cattle extensively, his family’s achievements provided Glasman with an strong legacy to learn from. “It made

Top Left The Agribition Junior Beef Extreme has proven to be a highlight of the show for many years. ©© ShowChampions

Top Right Glasman gives some pointers at the Manitoba Beef Expo. ©© Prairie Pistol Designs

Left M&J Farms has a highly successful bull sale each spring. ©© Golden Thread Livestock Photography

Top Stock Magazine / Winter 2017

me, as a cattleman, appreciate the good ones, and I know that sounds kind of broad, but it really engrained the idea of marketing cattle and getting yourself seen,” he explains. “When you show, you want to go and win, but you can win sometimes without winning in the ring. You can win by just being at the right place and the right time, and having your cattle presented the right way.” At this time, the Glasmans have become more selective about where they exhibit their cattle to ensure maximum exposure

while balancing current costs and manpower. In past years, they’ve taken bulls to display at major shows such as the National Western Stock Show, and they plan on taking cattle to Agribition this November. Glasman does mention that he looks forward to the prospect of having a child involved in junior programs. “Now that Chelsey and I have a little guy, the junior show thing’s getting revved up, and he’s not even a year old and I’m excited already,” he says. It was through such junior programs that Glasman primarily became interested in livestock judging. His father also judged

083


many shows, contributing to this interest. “I always liked judging growing up in the junior programs, then went to school in the U.S. on a judging scholarship,” he says. He studied at Dodge City Community College in Kansas, and has gone on to judge at a number of fairs and exhibitions. Looking back at his own experiences, Glasman finds that one of his favourite aspects of showing cattle was the lasting friendships and connections he made.

“I’d say 95 percent of my best friends are all from that,” he says. Noting that social media has made it easier for juniors to stay in touch, he remembers how a particular show was “that one time of year you see one of your best friends for a week, and you looked forward to it,” he recalls. “It was awesome! (You thought), ‘why can’t I just hang out with them all the time? They get it!’” The benefits don’t end there in his mind.

Photo Young Canadian Simmental Association member Carissa Richardson with Judge Jared Glasman.

084

Top Stock Magazine / Winter 2017

Glasman considers the skills developed and opportunities provided to young exhibitors to be of great value when they pursue their own careers, whether that be on the farm or in an office. “The work ethic instilled in these kids, the drive, the learning how to lose graciously … I have friends that are head hunters in the U.S., and a good friend straight up tells me, ‘I want junior livestock people because they can speak, they have a work ethic— because they usually have to be up doing chores, or late at night washing—and they have pride.’ They’ve got a good head on their shoulders.” For Glasman, to have followed this path as a junior was vital, from the friends made to the lessons learned to the opportunities that arose. “I wouldn’t trade it for the world, any of it.”


National Hereford Sale - Novem e 2017 Agribition ber 23, 2 h t t a g n i 017 S e ll

Summertime will be the first Bam Bam female to sell! We have not sold a purebred female off the ranch in over 10 years; ensuring a top quality cowherd that can produce under ranch conditions. The proceeds of this heifer will be donated to the Cody Sibbald Scholarship Fund to support all juniors passionate about the beef industry!

Triple A 2059 Bam Bam ET 11B - Sire of Summertime 11E 2015 & 2016 Agribition Champion Bull

MURRAY, BRIDGET & LUKE ANDREWS, Moose Jaw, SK, Canada 306.631.9271 www.tripleaherefords.ca

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Top Stock Magazine / Winter 2017


to be INSPIRED is great.... but to inspire is

incredible! March 16-18, 2018 Medicine Hat, Alberta Entries Open December 1, 2017

$20,000 in Youth Scholarships Awarded Annually. All Attending Participants will be eligible to win a lease on an Aluminum Stock Trailer for a Year donated by T Down Trailers!

Visit www.codysibbaldlegacy.com For More Details! Photos Courtesy of Lonesome Road Photography and Grant Rolston Photography


F O G IN R E F F O IC L B U P T WLC’S FIRS S R A E Y 7 1 IN S R E E T S & S E L A M E F G IN D E E R B Bred for function, disposition and competition. Non-clubby, non-continental and all british.

TIME FOR A CHANGE?

Jillian Wiens and her steer WLC 1906D “Brownie” Reserve Grand Champion Clover Bud Steer at the Weyburn Regional 2017 Fair

WLC 560B Jewel 437E

WLC Cool Mode 190B 11E PC0303977

WLC 453C 111E

Sire Red Blair’s Cutting Edge 560B 1825112 Dam WLC 957U 43A D.O.B April 10/2017

Sire Harvie Cool Water E.T. 190B PC02997226 Dam WLC Haroldson’s Mila 11W E.T. PC03039671 D.O.B April 8/2017

Sire Big Gully 0247 Armani 453C C03010276 Dam WLC 23M 111A D.O.B April 5/2017

WATCH FOR US AT CANADIAN WESTERN AGRIBITION PROSPECT STEER & HEIFER SALE NOV 24 & 25

Fresh, functional & Fancy

Tom@warnycalc.com


find us on the web www.topstockmagazine.com

NOVEMBER NOV

4

NOV

11

NOV

18

NOV

23

NOV

25

NOV

25

UPCOMING SHOWS + EVENTS

DECEMBER

Royal Elite All Breeds Sale

DEC

5th Annual Arch Holdings November Gold Sale

DEC

4

Toronto, ON

Saskatoon, SK

8

Northern Select Angus Sale

DEC

Agribition National Hereford Sale

DEC

Bar S Ranch Mature Cow Herd Dispersal

DEC

Canadian Western Agribition Show Calf Genetics Sale

DEC

10

Camrose, AB

11

Regina, SK

Paradise, KS

Regina, SK

14 14

Frontline Angus Female Sale

NOV

Alberta Select Charolais Sale

NOV

1- 4

Moose Jaw, SK

Westerner Park, Red Deer

Lazy JB Angus Elite Angus Sale

3 - 12 NOV

8- 12

cwcattlesales.com

The Season Finale Hereford Event

NOV

Gerrard Cattle Company Complete Dispersal Sale

NOV

9

Olds, Alberta

Red Deer County, AB

Form & Function Angus Female Sale Lloydminster, Sk

20-25 DEC

15 - 16

Lloydminster Stockade Round-up Lloydminster, Sk

Royal Agricultural Winter Fair Toronto, On

Farmfair International

Edmonton, Ab

Farmfair International Stock Show U Clinic Edmonton, Ab

Canadian Western Agribition Regina, Sk

All Beef Pen Show & Christmas Trade Show Medicine Hat, Ab

SELLING RASA MR BOJANGLES (COMFORT ZONE X HALLE BERRY)

SELLING 8 STEERS, 6 HEIFERS, 2 BREDS AND A HERD SIRE PROSPECT

BULL PROSPECT SELLING 1/2 INTEREST TESTED TH FREE

SELLING CHOICE OF TOM SELLECK DAUGHTERS MOONSTAR & AMARILLO

SELLING OZZY, A CONTROL FREAK STEER

TESTED TH FREE

TESTED TH FREE

CANADIAN SEMEN REPS

ARCH HOLDINGS

Ryan, Sara & Jack Archdekin — Speers, SK — 306.246.9992 — archholdings@hotmail.com 090

Top Stock Magazine / Winter 2017


Manchester 39A Pin Up 656D Sire: Glenlees 68Y Indeed 39A Bred to: Churchill Stud 3134A, due January 25

Manchester 106A In Style 651D Sire: MHPH 521X Action 106A Bred to: Churchill Stud 3134A, due January 6

Selling at Canadian western Agribition

Selling at The Season Finale

23 November, Regina

10 December, Olds

Manchester 106A Wanda 706E Sire: MHPH 521X Action 106A

Manchester 106A Cyress 717E Sire: MHPH 521X Action 106A

innovation grounded in tradition Remitall-W GD Lawless ET 37C See him at Agribition

Manchester 37C Gangster 728E Lawless son who will be in our Agribition show string

MANCHESTER POLLED HEREFORD’S Darren & Kari-Rae Manchester Box 21 Senlac SK S0L 2Y0 Darren’s cell 306.228.7462 Kari-Rae cell 306.893.8148 manchesterpolledherefords.com


www.facebook.com/topstockmagazine

INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 12

Double Bar D Farms

Alberta Limousin Association

34

Genex

Arch Holdings

90

Gerrard Cattle

AXA Herefords

15

Gold-Bar Livestock

85

Alberta Charolais Select Sale

Pederson Livestock

73

13

Phillips Cattle

35

16

River Hill Farm

45

17

RK Animal Supplies

32

Golden Oak Livestock

15

RK Cattle Co

Bohrson Marketing

IFC

Ladies of the Fall Sale Group

45

Saskatchewan Verified Beef

Calgary Stampede

BC

Larry Toner Ag Services

35

Shadybrook Shorthorns

94

Canadian Sires

IFC

Lazy JB Angus

31

Sullivan Supply

6-7

92

Lazy MC Angus

Summit Sale Group

89

11

Triple A Herefords

86 88

Bar S Ranch

Canadian Western Agribition Churchill Cattle Co.

9

Lucky Springs Farms

IBC

Codiak Acres

45

Manchester Polled Herefords

91

Warnyca Land & Cattle

Cody Sibbald Legacy Classic

87

Merit Cattle

93

Weaver Leather & Livestock

Optimal Bovines Inc.

35

Colgans Cattle

092

3

14, 45

Top Stock Magazine / Winter 2017

33 50-51

8


Foundation females available at Touch of Class sale on Dec 8 Saskatoon. Heifer calves available by private treaty.

YOUTH ARE OUR FUTURE

WE ARE GRATEFUL TO BE RAISING OUR KIDS IN THE STOCK SHOW FAMILY!

Trent, Janelle, Macy, Garrett & Carson Liebreich

Radville, Saskatchewan 306.869.7207 meritcattleco.com Y O U R

S O U R C E

F O R

Q U A L I T Y

G E N E T I C

Top Stock Magazine / Winter 2017

A L T E R N A T I V E S 093


NOVEMBER 4 AT 6:30PM SELLING AT THE ROYAL WINTER FAIR ELITE BEEF BREEDS SALE

SHADYBROOK PERFECT SPICE 2E Free K-Kim Hot Commodity x Perfect 20C (pictured below)

the

pow e r

of

excellence

SELLING CHOICE OF 2 FULL SISTERS TO SHADYBROOK HOT SHOT 88A AT CANADIAN WESTERN AGRIBITION

NOVEMBER 23 AT 2PM

Selling

CHOICE

SHADYBROOK VERONA 14E Free K-Kim Hot Commodity x Shadybrook Veronica 92Y

SHADYBROOK HOT VERONA 56E Free K-Kim Hot Commodity x Shadybrook Veronica 92Y Shadybrook Veronica 92Y, Grand & Supreme Champion Female, RAWF 2013 with Hot Shot at side

LEFT

Laurence Pathy

Lloyd Wright, manager, cell 450.260.5272 • Kevin Dempsey, herdsman, cell 450.260.5567 19 Soles Road, West Brome, Quebec, Canada farm 450.263.7137 email shadybrookshorthorns@gmail.com www.shadybrook.ca


Saturday April 21, 2018 at the ranch

22 N D A N N UA L

BULL SALE

RED LAZY MC TRADITION 111C

TC OUTSIDER 101B

RED LAZY MC BENELLI 102B

RED TER-RON PARKER 34A

RED DKF RAZOR 55C

5T POWER CHIP 4790

N E W DAT E • N E W LO C AT I O N

Selling 80 Red & Black Angus yearling, long yearling & two year old bulls We are very excited to host our upcoming 2018 bull sale here at the ranch. Along with NCJ Cattle, we look forward to hosting everyone & providing tours of our cowherd and Bow Valley Genetics facility.

Moderate Trait-balanced Red & Black Angus for both the seedstock and commercial producer

The Morasch Family Bassano, Alberta, Canada 403.793.1656

lazymc@xplornet.com

www.lazymcangus.com


NEW YEAR NEW STEER SAME DREAM

2018 MARKS THE 35TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE JUNIOR STEER CLASSIC As part of the Calgary Stampede’s commitment to developing the next generation of agriculture advocates, the 2018 Junior Steer Classic show will be entirely oriented to youth competitors aged 9-21 years. There are over $73,000 in scholarships and prizes available in 2018.

CALGARYSTAMPEDE.COM/AG

Top Stock Magazine November 2017  
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