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FA L L 2 0 2 1 V O L 17 N U M B E R I I

IN THIS ISSUE Muscle pays at BAR 30 LAND & CATTLE Junior KAITLYN DAVEY appreciates the carcass quality of Limousin Stockmanship is the key to THE TRUSTWORTHY COWBOY


Mark your calendar for the Fifth Annual

B.Bar Cattle Bull & Female sale 2PM – Tuesday, December 14, 2021 – at the Ranch B-Bar Empire 4J RPY Paynes Cracker 17E x B-Bar Nicole 102F (by JYF Chunk 35C) CPM4109621 | pictured at 8 months | Homozygous Polled

B-Bar Andy 79H RPY Paynes Cracker 17E x Andrew Bentley 84Y PNCS 819F (by B Bar Bentley 8D) | Due January 13, 2022 to Hunt Credentials 37C ET | CPF4104580 | Homozygous Polled

B-Bar / VLE Matrix 13J ET B Bar Warhawk 11G x Miss TMF Shameless (by Birubi Kaiser K140) CPM4109073 | pictured at 8 months | Homozygous Polled

We are excited for the development of this year’s bull calves! e e e e

All sale cattle will be GGP -100K tested All sale cattle will be polled & coat color tested All sale cattle will have performance data All sale bulls will have carcass data

Sale Consultant

Delaney and Deanna Boon 306.858.7609 ddboon@icloud.com

Eric, Terra, & Rozlyn Boon 306.280.8795 bbarcattleco@gmail.com

Box 181 :: Lucky Lake, SK :: S0L 1Z0 www.bbarcattle.com www.facebook.com/bbarlimousinc.om

Sale managed by


High LOT 1A

WE ARE THRILLED AND HUMBLED TO SEE OUR GENETICS GO INTO THESE RESPECTED HERDS!

After Hours Limousin J Bar J Limousin RG Farms Clark Cattle Co. Richmond Ranch Pinch Hill Limousin Edwards Limousin Young Limousin Farms Gracie Bohrson Spare Time Livestock

The Swaans & Kishkans

ROB: 250-991-8229 | ERIN: 250-991-6654 QUESNEL, BC | kishkan@quesnelbc.com | www.pvlimousin.com

LOT 16

FROM ALL OF US AT PINNACLE VIEW LIOUSIN!

LOT 25

B Bar Cattle Co. Canadian Donors Hawkeye Land & Cattle J. Yorga Farms Venture Livestock KMS Cattle Co. Rafter 7 Ranch Windy Gables Limousin Arcon Cattle Andrew Ranches

LOT 1B

who showed interest in our 30th Anniversary Production Sale!


CONTENTS 14 MUSCLE PAYS

Limousin at Bar 30 Land & Cattle

26 4-H MEMBERS

bring 1,300 pounds of joy to Senior's Centre during pandemic

30 A JUNIOR'S POINT OF VIEW

Kaitlyn Davey appreciates the carcass quality of Limousin

36 THE TRUSTWORTHY COWBOY

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

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Part one of a three part series exploring stockmanship with Dylan Biggs.

CLA Presidents Report CLA Office Update CLA Board of Directors CJLA News OJLA News CJLA Board of Directors Brian Lee Memorial Scholarship 4-H Acheivements NALF Report Social News Provincial News British Columbia Saskatchewan Manitoba Ontario Masterfeeds  MATURE COW REQUIREMENTS Sales Reports & Market Reports CCA President’s Report Herd Health  DETERMINING RISK LEVEL IN WEANED CALVES Breed Average EPDs Contributors Ad Sizes & Specifications Upcoming Events Advertiser's Index

7 10 12 18 19 20 21 22 42 43, 45 46 46 47 48 48 50 52 54 56 58 64 65 66 67


FALL 2021 14

26

30

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Cover Photo/Inset Photo: Jill Renton Livestock Photography

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

Image Credit: Highpoint Design

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READY

FOR JULY!

THE 5J by RPY PAYNES TANK 12G ET

We invite you to view our selection of heifers that would be competitive at the Junior Limousin Impact Show to be held next summer in Olds, Alberta!

THE 11J by RPY PAYNES CRUSHER 25F

THE 9J by EMF FRESH PRINCE 25F ET

THE 18J by RPY Diesel 37D

BULLS & FEMALES FORivaSALE te treaty by pr

WELCOME Avery Luc as the newest EMF crew member born on July 22 to Brandon & Erin.

TERRY & LYNETTE HEPPER & FAMILY

R.R.#1 Zehner, SK, S0G 5K0 306.781.4628 or 306.536.7075 Find us on Facebook Eden Meadows Farm


All heifers bred safe to BALAMORE FORTITUDE (Morrisvale Lumberjack x Balamore Charlie by Landmark)

WGL 214H

Greenwood Encore x RAE 1A •

HOMO POLLED

Calving Ease & Performance in one Solid Package

WGL 202H

HLC DBCC Flatliner x Richmond Your Too Sweet (Marathon) • HET POLLED

WGL 204H (red)

Greenwood Encore x WGL 3Z • HET POLLED

WGL 211H (black) Greenwood Encore x WGL 4Z • HOMO POLLED

WGL 203H

HLC DBCC Flatliner x WGL Zoey 1Z (Wyatt) • HOMO POLLED

Encore or Flatliner

Selling seven bred heifers October 23, 2021 in Cookstown, Ontario at the COLOURS OF AUTUMN SALE

THE CHOICE

IS YOURS!

WGL 215H

HLC DBCC Flatliner x DRA Crimson (Responder) • HOMO POLLED

Also Selling Limited Semen Packages on our newest addition to our Bull Battery!! Wulfs Haiti 4708H (Hunt Credentials 37C ET x Wulfs Best of Joy 4708B)

WGL 218H

HLC DBCC Flatliner x WGL 5B

(Zolt) • HOMO POLLED

Calving Ease with a unbelievable set of growth numbers! • Member of the Champion Pen of Bulls at Cattlemen’s Congress 2021 • HOMO POLLED

Bryce and Nathan Allen PO Box 189, RR#4 Warkworth, Ontario K0K3K0 Nathan 705-761-9426 nathana@alleninsurance.ca Bryce 705-924-2583 brycea@alleninsuraance.ca


CANADIAN LIMOUSIN ASSOCIATION

3378 – 15th Ave SW, Medicine Hat, Alberta, T1B 3W5 Phone: 403.253.7309 Toll Free: 1.866.886.1605 Fax: 403.253.1704 www.limousin.com

CLA STAFF

General Manager & Canadian Junior Limousin Association Coordinator

Limousin Voice Advertising Representative & Editor

Tessa Verbeek 403.636.1066 Laura Ecklund 403.559.9849 info@limousin.com tverbeek@limousin.com / cjla@limousin.com

Registry & Member Services Nicole Scott 403.253.7309 limousin@limousin.com

CLA BOARD OF DIRECTORS PRESIDENT Wayne Burgess Alberta 403.813.8416 vleburgess@gmail.com

CLA DIRECTORS

VICE PRESIDENT Ashton Hewson Saskatchewan 306.390.7987 doublebcattleco@yahoo.ca

Tyler Stewart 403.741.9571 777cattle@gmail.com

TREASURER Travis Hunter Manitoba 204.851.0809 diamondtlimo@gmail.com PAST PRESIDENT Amanda Matthews Alberta 403.470.1812 amandagracematthews@gmail.com

Alberta

Cody Miller 780.349.0644 cody@excelranches.com

Saskatchewan

Carey Hirschfeld 306.441.3723 bchirsch@hotmail.com

Ontario

Chad Homer 519.339.9659 pinchhill@gmail.com

PROVINCIAL ASSOCIATION PRESIDENTS

British Columbia

Ontario

Alberta

Quebec

Saskatchewan

Maritimes

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

Erin Kishkan 250.747.3836 kishkan@quesnelbc.com

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Tyler Stewart 403.741.9571 777cattle@gmail.com Eric Martens 306.391.9019 ermartens@hotmail.ca

Manitoba

Kyle Wright 204.305.0221 wrightwaylimousin@hotmail.ca

Chad Homer 519.339.9659 pinchhill@gmail.com Serge Dethier 450.454.6456 dianejoly19@hotmail.com John-Calvin Siddall 902.664.8008 jfsiddall@nsac.ca


CLA PRESIDENT

Wayne Burgess

Over the past couple months, we have had the pleasure to travel several areas of Canada and I want to say that our thoughts go out to all the breeders in Western Canada that are suffering through this widespread drought. In my lifetime, I have never seen this kind of dry before, and I truly feel for you as you scramble to get resources to maintain. As I am writing this, I have listened to the falling rain all night and still loving it this morning and we pray that it finds everyone. During my tenure as President, I want to try and identify a few things that may help us achieve what we all want with the breed.

Photo: Jill Renton Livestock Photography

Direction – As you know we have a highly successful Legacy Project with close to 3,000 females registered through this now. This was set up to help with the purity of our herd book and peace of mind for all buyers or sellers. I also wish and hope to try and improve our breed identity and where, why and how we fit in this beef industry. There are few breeds that have the versatility and genetics that can work in the many ways of Limousin starting right at birth and carrying on to the rail and furthermore to the plate. Breed Recognition – Over the time as we have watched the decline of presence of Limousin at shows, field days or in the public, it is my belief that the breed has lost the appeal throughout the industry. I ask and hope to see some displays out to try and boost that - and thank you to those who have continued to bring out strong displays in the past few years having the other guys noticing the strengths offered – well done!!! And, continuing with this thought I hope that we can support the efforts of those that do plan events, field days, auctions or any other outings – crowds gather interest and demand.

Juniors – First let me say that I was truly disappointed that the CJLA had to cancel their show once again in Ontario. I know the efforts that were put forth by the organizing committee were large and we feel for you and thank you for all the time put in and not able to see it through to fruition. We have a strong group of young people coming forth and I hope that we can get to see them in action. It truly makes my heart smile as I watch the little ones from Lakeside as well as the other little people playing with and leading their little heifers around and having fun. I know that plans are well under way for the coming year for a strong showing in Olds 2022. Also, we wish you the best with your marketing of the CJLA owned female this fall at Agribiton. 50th at Agribition – As we look forward to this year’s Agribition we hope that you can all get out to see and mingle with the fine folks at the show as they celebrate the 50th this year. Due to all the Pandemic issues, this is the year and what a showing it should be – $50,000 up for grabs in the big Finale so let’s give them a scare. Farmfair 2021 – It is “full steam ahead” in Edmonton for Farmfair. They have gathered up huge monies for each division in all breeds, making this an attractive place to meet, network and market your cattle. The committee here is led by some “outside the box” thinkers that have “been there and done that” and put this together for us. Thanks for enduring this and let me ask that you come forward to any of the fine people on the Board if you have any issues, concerns, or even constructive criticism to help us revitalize our breed. I hope this can provoke some interesting chatter. Looking forward to seeing you down the road.

Wayne Burgess CLA PRESIDENT

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

H

ere we go! First let me say that it is an extreme pleasure and honour to lead your CLA as President. I have had the pleasure of working with this breed for over 35 years now in some facet of it, and I continue to be impressed and happy with what there is to offer to the industry. We have seen many changes in the past 35 years, but there is always one constant and that is just good, well performing, and efficient cattle.

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"THEY'RE ALL 5 0

Y E A R S

R A I S I N G

GREAT ONES!"

L I M O U S I N

C A T T L E

HIGHLAND ZENITH 45Z • RMA 45Z (Mags War Admiral x Highland Watchout)

HIGHLAND STOCK FARMS LTD • LIMOUSIN • ANGUS

BULL SALE.MARCH 19.22 2 O'CLOCK AT THE RANCH, BRAGG CREEK, ALBERTA All Limousin bull calves are in the Limousin Legacy Project and all Angus will be DNA’d. Inquire about heifer calves for sale at the ranch.

The Matthews Family – Rob & Marci 403.585.8660 Amanda 403.470.1812 highlandstockfarms@gmail.com highlandstockfarms.ca

Y O U R

S O U R C E

F O R

H O M O Z Y G O U S

P O L L E D

G E N E T I C S


IT’S IN OUR DNA TO RAISE

AVAILABLE BY PRIVATE TREATY Proven females • Bred heifers • Open heifers • Bulls

good cattle AND IT’S IN THEIRS TOO

We are proud to announce that we have joined the LIMOUSIN LEGACY PROJECT and have DNA tested the whole herd at Amaglen. When you purchase an animal from Amaglen we guarantee a correct pedigree.

In our search for a balanced EPD package, outcross to our herd and the structure and docility that we demand, we found only 7 bulls in Canada that fit our criteria. JYF Galveston ended up our #1 pick. BW

WW

YW

MK

SC

DOC

3.2

71

106

26

1.70

19

Introducing JYF GALVESTON 383G

AMAGLEN LIMOUSIN

Amanda & Clint Seward • Ian & Bonnie Hamilton Box 55, Darlingford, MB R0G 0L0 Amanda and Clint: 204 246-2576 • Amanda Cell: 204 823-2286 Ian and Bonnie: 204-246-2312 • Ian's Cell: 204-823-1240 amaglen@inetlink.ca

Since 1982

One of the Platinum Elite Herds in Canada What you measure, you can manage!

KEEP AN EYE ON WWW.AMAGLENLIMOUSIN.CA AND FACEBOOK THIS FALL


Ça fait un bout que je n’ai pas écrit pour la Voice. L’Association est bien installée dans notre nouvel emplacement à Medicine Hat et le temps de traitement des dossiers s'améliore beaucoup. Il y a de l’enthousiasme dans l’industrie, on prévoit le retour des expos et encans en personne cet automne avec plusieurs événements provinciaux qui auront lieu. Je vous encourage de sortir et de soutenir les événements et exposants parce qu'il est important d’être présent pour la race Limousin.

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

Les événements Limousin sont tous annoncés sur notre site web et réseaux sociaux. Si vous êtes au courant d’un événement svp remplir un formulaire d'événement pour qu’il soit annoncé sur le site. Le CLA offre aussi gratuitement l’annonce des veaux commerciaux à vendre sur les réseaux sociaux et le site web. Ce service est disponible aux membres et producteurs commerciaux qui vendent des veaux avec influence Limousin. Svp partagez ce service avec vos clients et les aviser qu’ils peuvent nous faire parvenir leurs annonces.

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L’Assemblé Générale Annuel à eu lieu en mode virtuel le 22 juillet 2021. Sandy Russell à rejoindre la réunion pour faire un présentation sur le Canadian Beef Improvement Network (CBIN) (réseau pour amélioration du bœuf Canadienne), vous pouvez trouver sa présentation sur le site web. On était content comme association de faire un engagement financier au projet du CBIN. Chad Homer de l’Ontario et Tyler Stewart de l’Alberta étaient introduits comme nouveaux membres du conseil d’administration. Les deux auront une durée de terme de 3 ans. Merci aux membres sortant Erin Kishkan, Mike Geddes et Matthew Heleniak pour leurs service et dédication à l’Association, j’ai apprécié travailler avec chacun de vous. Merci à notre Présidente sortante, Amanda Matthews, qui nous a bien dirigés pendant les deux dernières années difficiles à cause de la pandémie globale. On commence la terme avec des nouveaux membres du conseil d'administration, on souhaite la bienvenue à Wayne Burgess de l’ Alberta comme Président, Ashton Hewson de Saskatchewan comme

Photo: Jill Renton Livestock Photography

OFFICE UPDATE/ NOUVELLES DU BUREAU DE L’ALC

Vice Président et Travis Hunter de Manitoba comme Trésorier. Félicitations aux trois pour leurs nouveaux rôles. Les membres du conseil invitent les membres à rejoindre les comités suivants: Breed Improvement Committee, Commercial Committee, National Show and Sale Committee, Promotions Committee and the Registry Committee. Le Limousin Legacy Project a date est un grand succès grâce à la participation de nos membres. Le projet va dépasser les objectifs établis par le conseil et va continuer jusqu’au 31 décembre 2021. Ceci est un rappel que les échantillons devront arrivés au labo avant le 31 décembre pour qualifier pour le taux spéciale du projet de $20/ animale. Pour les échantillons qui arrivent après cette date, ils seront facturés le plein prix. Décembre est une période très occupée donc on recommande que les échantillons soient placés dans la poste au plus tard le 10 décembre. Avec plusieurs vaches qui passent dans la cage cet automne c’est un excellent moment de prendre un échantillon de poile ou tissus pour le projet ou pour l’avoir si nécessaire pour l’ADN d’un de sa progéniture. Sur le sujet de l'ADN, tous les taureaux de troupeaux nés après le 1 janvier 2021 devront être vérifiés par ADN des deux parents pour être capable d'enregistrer leurs progéniture. Ça veut dire que ton taureau doit avoir son ADN complet et doit être qualifié du côté de son père et sa mère avant d’être capable d'enregistrer sa progéniture. Il est important de compléter le travail de l’ADN le plus rapidement possible pour s'assurer qu’il n’y a pas de délai pour enregistrer la progéniture. J’aimerais souhaiter à tous les membres une bonne récolte pendant cette année difficile de sécheresse et manque d’aliments. Prenez le temps de sortir aux événements de cet automne et de vous connecter avec les autres membres comme nous travaillons tous pour l’amélioration de la race Limousin.


BY / PAR

Limousin events are advertised on the website and social media. If you know of an event coming up please fill out an event form to have it listed on the website. The CLA also offers complimentary commercial calf listings on social media and on the website. This service is available to members and commercial producers selling Limousin influenced cattle. Please share this service with your customers and let them know they can submit their listing using the form on the website. The Annual General Meeting was held virtually on July 22, 2021. Sandy Russell joined the meeting to deliver a presentation on the Canadian Beef Improvement Network (CBIN). Her full presentation can be found on the CLA website. We were pleased as an Association to make a formal financial commitment to the CBIN project. Chad Homer of Ontario and Tyler Stewart of Alberta were introduced as the new board members appointed to the board by acclimation. They will both be serving a 3-year term. Thank you to outgoing directors Erin Kishkan, Mike Geddes and Matthew Heleniak for their long-term service and dedication to the board – I have enjoyed working with each of you. Thank you to our outgoing President Amanda Matthews who was a handson leader throughout the last two challenging years of change and a global pandemic. As we begin the term with a new board of directors we welcome Wayne Burgess of Alberta as President, Ashton Hewson of Saskatchewan as Vice President and Travis

Hunter of Manitoba as Treasurer. Congratulations to all three on their new leadership roles. The board of directors invites members to come forward and join the following committees; Breed Improvement Committee, Commercial Committee, National Show & Sale Committee, Promotions Committee and the Registry Committee. The Limousin Legacy Project has been a strong success thanks to the participation from the membership. The project is on target to exceed the original goals set by the board and will remain open until December 31, 2021. This is a reminder that samples need to arrive at the lab prior to December 31st in order to qualify for the special project pricing of $20/animal. For samples arriving after that date, they will be charged the full amount for testing. December is a busy time of year so we are recommending that samples are placed in the mail no later than December 10th. With many cattle going through the chute this fall it is an excellent time to take a tissue or hair sample to have on file for the project or in case it is needed for future DNA on that animal or it’s progeny. On the topic of DNA, all herd sires born on or after January 1, 2021 now require parentage verification in order to register their progeny. This means that your bull must have DNA completed and must qualify to both his Sire and Dam before his progeny is eligible to be registered. Donor females with a flush date on or after January 1, 2021 now require parentage verification before their progeny is eligible to be registered. It is important to complete this DNA work as early as possible, ideally prior to calves being born. This will ensure there are no delays at the time of registering the progeny. I would like to wish all members a successful fall harvest during this trying year of drought and feed shortages. Take time to get out and enjoy the fall shows and sales and reconnect with fellow members as we all work towards the betterment of the Limousin breed.

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

It has been a while since I last wrote for the Voice. The Association has settled into our new location in Medicine Hat and with that turn around times have improved greatly. There is excitement in the cattle industry as we all look forward to the return of an in-person fall show and sale season with many provincial events taking place. I would encourage you to get out and support fellow breeders’ sales and events as it is important to show up and be seen as the Limousin breed.

CLA OFFICE UPDATE

Laura Ecklund

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NEWS

CANADIAN LIMOUSIN ASSOCIATION BOARD 1

1. WAYNE BURGESS - PRESIDENT

Carstairs, Alberta  I have been involved in some way shape or form with the Limousin breed since the mid 80's. I have stuck with the breed because of my belief that they offer so much to the beef industry, with the calving ability, growth, yield and economics in finishing them; but most importantly and what is very often overlooked is the maternal side of the breed, as they make great cows. My wife Anne and I have a few head of cattle that we own in partnership with a few of the good people across the nation. We participate in the Colours of Autumn sale and the Fully Loaded Bull sale in Ontario as well as with our partner B Bar Limousin in Saskatchewan for marketing of a few of our cattle. I am happy to be on the Board and ask that if there are any questions big or small to give me a call. I love to discuss Limousin cattle and am always available to do so.

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

2. ASHTON HEWSON - VICE PRESIDENT

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Unity, Saskatchewan  I grew up on a cattle farm just outside Cut Knife, Sask. where we raised purebred Limousin. This is where my love for cattle and the industry began. Spending my childhood in 4-H, alongside cattle and the people who share the interest, is where I realized my true passion. Today, my wife, Kendra, and I run a purebred Limousin program just outside Unity, Sask. It was 7 years ago that we took this leap of faith for what we truly believe in. Bettering the breed, supporting the industry, and building lifelong friendships and business relationships. 3. TRAVIS HUNTER - TREASURER

Kenton, Manitoba  Along with my wife Rilla and sons Dillon and Brodie we operate Diamond T Limousin at Kenton, Man. We purchased our first Limousin females in 1979 and have held

true to the breed since. Currently we calve 160 cows and background our calves until February/ March. We market 15-20 bulls a year by private treaty and breed a group of replacement females to strengthen our cow herd and market. 4. CODY MILLER - DIRECTOR

Westlock, Alberta Along with my wife Amy, small children Lincoln, Avery, and Brooks and my parents Ron and Barb we own and operate Excel Ranches. My passion for the Limousin breed has seen the farm move forward and currently we are breeding 230 mainly Limousin and Lim-Flex females. We market bulls through our own on farm bull sale, The Excellence sale, each March. My focus has always been to make Limousin one of the leading breeds by bringing to the commercial cattlemen’s attention why it's the most profitable and sensible breed to be involved in. I have served on then CLA board for 4 years with the previous 3 serving as the Treasurer. I am always open to discuss any questions or ideas, give me a shout to talk cows or CLA any time.

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4

5. CAREY HIRSCHFELD - DIRECTOR

Cando, Saskatchewan I am proud to be part of the current board of the CLA. My husband Brent and I operate a mixed cattle and grain farm in west central Saskatchewan. Limousin influence genetics have been a foundation for our commercial herd for over 30 years. An opportunity to improve our breeding program and forge a path with our own purebred herd came forward in 2012, and with that purchase of those females, Lazy A Limousin was created. With our two children, Steven and Brittany, we have worked hard to promote the Limousin breed through our cattle, where docility, performance, maternal traits, and muscle development are the keys to better our breed and our cattle herd.

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6. TYLER STEWART - NEWLY ELECTED DIRECTOR

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7. CHAD HOMER - NEWLY ELECTED DIRECTOR

Stittsville, Ontario Together with my family, parents and brother, we operate Pinch Hill Limousin. I have been involved in the Limousin breed my entire life and the people that surround the breed are outstanding. It is enjoyable watching the strong Junior program

MEET THE 2021-22 Crown Hill Harper Jade (CHA 3H) WGL Avery Jade X CJSL Windfall

8. AMANDA MATTHEWS - PAST PRESIDENT

Bragg Creek, Alberta  I grew up with Limousin and Angus cattle on our family operation, Highland Stock Farms. I am very honoured to be a third generation CLA President following my Grandfather Don Matthews and father, Rob Matthews. I have always been active with the Limousin breed, through 4-H, I was on the inaugural board for the Canadian Junior Limousin Association, and now I have the pleasure of being a part of the CLA Board. I have two sons, Holt and Revington and along with my parents Rob and Marci Matthews we continue to be active in our breed, having a bull sale every March and participating in fall shows. I am grateful for my sons to grow up with such an amazing set of people in our breed and I hope they build the friendships that I have.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS lours of Autumn in the Co

s Sell CTOBER 23, 2021 IN COOKSTOWN, O Sale N

O

The Kennedy Family

Craig CELL 705.741.6700 • Samantha CELL 705.768.1554

Crown Hill Jade (CHA 5J) Crown Hill Crystal Jade X ROMN Cadillac Jack

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

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Stettler, Alberta  The Limousin breed has been a part of my life for as long as I can remember and has become a true passion for me. My grandpa, Wilbur Stewart, was a trailblazer and one of the first to bring Limousin cattle to Canada from France. Growing up I was always drawn to the cattle side of the farming operation and was eager to support in all aspects of that business. After graduating high school, I started working full time with my dad on the farm and became more invested in the Limousin breed. In 2016, my wife Claire and I bought our first cows from the Murphy dispersal, as well as selected a group from Excel Ranches to start 777 Cattle Ltd. We currently run twenty head of cows within our own operation and work day to day with my dad and brother at Stewart Limousin, south of Stettler, Alta.

that the breed has and look forward to my girls participating and making life long friends as so many of us have. I have been serving on the Ontario Limousin Board for 5 years, most of it as Show Committee Chair and currently as President. The breed is in a really positive spot with a great future ahead of it, and witnessing the celebration of the 50th Anniversary only confirms that.

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14 YOU HAVE TO

CIRCLE THE BRANDING IRON Muscle pays at Bar 30 Land & Cattle

T

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

ucked away near the eastern edge of the Special Areas in Alberta, Mike and Melanie Materi, along with son Mace and daughter Payten, ranch under the name Bar 30 Land and Cattle Company Corp. Mike was raised on the place that he and Melanie call home and after his father passed away in 1994, the mixed farm went solely in the direction of cattle. Mace and Payten both loved the lifestyle so much that they have both chosen to stay on and have largely taken over operation of the ranch. Melanie wasn’t too disappointed to start handing over the job of doing books to Payten. Mace went straight out of high school for a loan to purchase his own land 3 miles east of Esther, Alta. There he runs Orchard Cattle Corporation as a sister company to Bar 30 Land and Cattle. This new acquisition is primarily grass and hay land which they put up for their own use. The Materi’s calve 260 to 280 head. Their heifers sell so well into the feeder market that they opt instead to buy in their replacements, generally black and black brockle face females which they breed back to low birth weight Limousin bulls. A handful of red, Charolais and Simmental cross females dapple the herd as well. They have found their cowherd to be easy keeping, with good solid pigmented tight udders, and no pinkeye. They have developed a good relationship with the Provost team and trust them to help them source their replacements.

The Materi’s discovered the Limousin breed through their good friend Ken Rea. Mike had played hockey with Ken. There was a bull sale in Calgary and Ken picked up some extra bulls on the cheap and talked Mike into taking one of the extra bulls. They walked the bull off Ken’s trailer and onto Mike’s in the middle of the night on the main street of Sibbald, Alta. That was the first Limousin on the place. The Materi’s have continued to purchase all of their bulls as well as heifers and cows from Bar 3R Limousin at Marengo, Sask. Previous to discovering Limousin,


WRITTING AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

Tessa Verbeek

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Mike had used some Charolais bulls but went away from them as Limousin bulls have been more affordable and come without as many management issues such as pinkeye. When asked what sold him on the Limousin breed, Mike says, “We like the big double muscling, that and they’re pretty easy to sell to the boys down east.” “Tons of hair, big bone, and you can see the front shoulders easily,” Mace says. Payten adds, “And the heifers feed out just like the steers.” The Materi’s sell through Provost Livestock Exchange on their DLMS video sale at the end of August or beginning of September for mid-October delivery. Repeat buyers seek out their stock year after year with the cattle often going out of province. Recently, they have sold their heifers into Quebec. Eastern buyers comment positively on the hair that the Limousin cattle carry. “They always show there in October, when we have to put them on the trucks,” Mace adds, “even at branding time, you can easily see the Limo. When the butt is up higher than the front shoulders.” “When you have to use the branding iron and go around in a circle to try to get it on the rump,” Payten laughs, “it’s a pretty good tell.”

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

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“It’s like branding a bowling ball,” Mike adds. Cradle branding is a family affair, with Melanie’s nephews occasionally coming out to help with work on the ranch. One nephew and his girlfriend have spent the last two springs helping on the ranch while being laid off during the COVID pandemic. The help has been welcomed as Mike has had health issues over the past year. Being close with their family has been a blessing. Calving begins in early April on the home quarter section, which is segmented into three different pastures. They appreciate the hardiness and early vigour of the Limousin calves that get up and going quickly. All of their 7,000 acres, with the exception of Mace’s new piece, is connected, which is of great benefit as they move their earlier born calves and cows out to further pieces each week as calving progresses. During fall roundup this also gives them the option to settle the cattle overnight in one of their pastures and carry on the next day without overworking them on a long drive. They tend to prefer a steel horse with four wheels as opposed to the hay burning kind, and have always had a Heeler or two for additional bovine relocation motivation. Mike feels that their land base is just enough, but by the time the calves are delivered mid-October there is not a great deal of fall grazing left. Last year, Mace was able to run 80 head on second growth of Alfalfa until January 1st on his new land. As is always the case, the extent of fall grazing depends on the year and how


Mace says they go through an extensive selection process to find the bulls that will work for their operation and place a high value on what Ken has to say about his bulls when making their decisions. Mace is particularly fond of a great deal of length that makes for extra pounds. As we sat on their porch conducting this interview, a good laugh was had as Melanie recounted how Mike used to name the bulls and Melanie would always give them another name. Dr. Cec Ruschkowski from Oyen Vet Services Ltd. would often be the one to come out at semen testing time. “Cec would ask, well what’s this one?” Melanie recalls, “I’d say brick. The next one would come and I’d say hardwood. The next one would come and I’d say carpet.” “She goes, is there a pattern here?” Melanie laughs, “I’d say yes, everything I need is right there. One of these days I’m going to shoot them all and stitch them together and maybe I’d finally get some new carpet.” Mace had a similar story to recollect about the bull they named Doc Holliday because he took their holiday from them when they needed to get a new bull in the middle of the year. “Every time we’d see him we’d say, look there goes our holiday.” It seems the best way to get through some of those disappointments that come with ranching is to be able to

laugh about it. Among those setbacks has been this past summer being the driest the Materi’s can recall. They are thankful for how well Limousin hold up and feel they do exceptionally well, muscling even more, on hard grass. “As soon as the fall comes around and the calves are eating the hard grass they show big time,” Mace says, “they double as soon as the grass freezes, they explode.” While it’s not always happy days operating a ranch as brother and sister, Mace and Payten have discovered that they do work well together, “It’s not like training a new person,” Mace says, “She knows exactly what I want to do, and I know exactly what she wants to do.” Any disagreements are left in the field. Looking towards the future, Mace would like to see more Limousin, while Payten prefers a big boned Simmental/ Limousin crossed with a Limousin bull. They have identified that there is a lack of heifers bred Limousin on the market and the right educated buyers would pay handily for them. As such, the pair would like to start their own bred heifer program with black white face females bred Limousin. The fine reputation of their cattle will no doubt precede them for success and they feel confident in that they can always retain the females for their own herd if the market is depressed. When people ask Mace why they run Limousin cattle, he sums it up simply, “At the end of the year it always shows… and pays.”

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

much snow there is. They also have a smaller fall calving program that typically go to the same buyers through a presort sale.

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NEWS

CANADIAN JUNIOR LIMOUSIN ASSOCIATION

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IMPACT SKILLS CHAMPIONS

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

2021 VIRTUAL CANADIAN JR LIMOUSIN IMPACT SHOW

SUBMITTED BY

Emma Qually

T

he CJLA held another Virtual Impact Show this summer, there were multiple contests such as Photography, judged by Jill Renton, Artwork judged by Jenna Geis, Print Marketing judged by Cody Miller and Carey Hirschfeld, Public Speaking judged by Matt Zwambag, and Judging judged by Cody Miller. A big thank you to all of the judges, organizers, sponsors, participants and families who helped make this year’s Virtual CJLA Impact Show a success. On July 28, 2021, the CJLA held a virtual AGM where the winners from the Virtual Impact Show were announced, the new logo was presented, and a new Board of Directors was elected. Taylor Annett of Ontario and Cedar Hayne of Saskatchewan were elected to join the board. The CJLA is creating a cookbook as a fundraiser, please contact any CJLA member for more information. The Brian Lee Memorial Scholarship was founded in 2021 after the sudden passing of a Limousin breeder and supporter that touched the lives of many. The deadline to apply was August 31st. The deadline for the CJLA Scholarship and the Australia Exchange is coming up on October 31.

1ST PRINT MARKETING

2ND PRINT MARKETING

3RD PRINT MARKETING

PEEWEE

EMILY LAWRENCE

JESSA MARTENS

JUNIOR

BAILEY LAWRENCE

JACKSON MARTENS

MARGARET DARLING

CURTIS JONES

TIA SCHRAM

1ST ART

2ND ART

3RD ART

PEEWEE

EMILY LAWRENCE

JESSA MARTENS

LEXI MARTENS

JUNIOR

WHITNEY LABIUK

BAILEY LAWRENCE

JACKSON MARTENS

EMMA QUALLY

JAYSON LABIUK

TIA SCHRAM

1ST PHOTOGRAPHY

2ND PHOTOGRAPHY

3RD PHOTOGRAPHY

PEEWEE

JESSA MARTENS

EMILY LAWRENCE

LINCOLN MILLER

JUNIOR

JACKSON QUALLY

WHITNEY LABIUK

BAILEY LAWRENCE

INTERMEDIATE

CEDAR HAYNE

MARGARET DARLING

EMMA QUALLY

SENIOR

JULIE DARLING

TIA SCHRAM

JOE SCOTT

INTERMEDIATE SENIOR

INTERMEDIATE SENIOR


ONTARIO JUNIOR ASSOCIATION

NEWS

T

he 2021 Ontario Junior Limousin Association executive is: President Clayton Shaw; Vice President Bianca Byers; Secretary Jocelyn Kennedy; Treasurer Madi Lewis; Press Reporter Bailey Lawrence Unfortunately, because of COVID we have had our meetings via Zoom. During our Zoom meetings we have had a trivia night and learned about photography and videoing. At the first meeting we held elections and talked about topics for future meetings. At our second meeting we had Emily Gibson as our special guest. Emily told us about her photography and videoing life. She also told us about some tips and tricks on how to make our photography and videoing better. On our third meeting we had a trivia night, using Kahoot. It was a quiz on how well we know our Limousin animals. We also learned some fun facts about the people on the Ontario Limousin Association Board and our Ontario Junior Limousin Association. Some showmanship questions were also in it. Our next meeting will be a virtual judging meeting. We will be judging classes of Limousin cattle including heifer calves, bred heifers, bulls and market animals, carcasses, cuts of beef, photography and marketing.

Top, Whitney Labiuk's 1st Place Junior Artwork and bottom, Cedar Hayne's 1st Place Intermediate Photography

If you would like to join the OJLA please reach out our adult advisors Mary Lynn Lawrence at mll.lakesidefarm@gmail.com or Matt Zwambag at beezeeacres@gmail.com

1ST JUDGING

2ND JUDGING

3RD JUDGING

PEEWEE

LEXI MARTENS

JESSA MARTENS

EMILY LAWRENCE

JUNIOR

BAILEY LAWRENCE

JACKSON MARTENS

INTERMEDIATE

EMMA QUALLY

CEDAR HAYNE

MARGARET DARLING

SENIOR

KAITLYN DAVEY

JULIE DARLING

TIA SCHRAM

1ST PUBLIC SPEAKING

2ND PUBLIC SPEAKING

3RD PUBLIC SPEAKING

PEEWEE

EMILY LAWRENCE

LEXI MARTENS

LINCOLN MILLER

JUNIOR

BAILEY LAWRENCE

JACKSON MARTENS

HAYDEN QUALLY

MARGARET DARLING

EMMA QUALLY

CURTIS JONES

TIA SCHRAM

INTERMEDIATE SENIOR

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

IMPACT SKILLS CHAMPIONS

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NEWS

CANADIAN JUNIOR LIMOUSIN ASSOCIATION 1

1. CHEYENNE PORTER - PRESIDENT

4. KIRA AXLEY - SECRETARY

Cheyenne hails from Wainwright, Alta. where her family operates Plains Limousin. Cheyenne is 21 years old and is currently attending the University of Saskatchewan. For the past eight years Cheyenne has sat on the CJLA board, and was recently elected as president for this upcoming year. Cheyenne's dream career involves specializing in beef reproduction. When asked what she is most excited about for this year while serving on the board Cheyenne said, "I am the most excited to work on and finalize the new and upcoming projects the board has been working on over the past year. The board has been working to create new opportunities for its juniors".

Coming from Czar, Alta. Kira helps run her family's operation, North Slope Farms and has also started her own operation, K. Axley Limousin! Returning for her second year on the board, Kira was re-elected as Secretary. Kira is 19 years old and will be studying at Lakeland College again this fall with interests of finding a career in the bovine genetics and reproduction field. This year Kira is most excited about being able to promote the Limousin breed as well as the CJLA at future in-person cattle events as well as having the opportunity to network with many other juniors this summer at the Impact Show!

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5. EMMA QUALLY - PRESS REPORTER 2. BIANCA BYERS - VICE PRESIDENT

Bianca is retuning to the CJLA board again for her second year as the Vice President. Bianca calls Blackstock, Ont. home and along with her family operates MurrayHill Farm. Bianca is 19 years old and will be heading back out west to complete her second year at Lakeland College in the Animal Science Technology program this fall. Bianca's dream job would be to work as a ruminant nutrition specialist. When asked what she is most excited for this year while serving on the board Bianca said, “The ideas that the new members bring forward".

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

3. MADI LEWIS - TREASURER

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Madi calls Meaford, Ont. home and is chalking up her fifth year on the CJLA board. Madi is 20 years old and works for Smart Limousin. This year Madi holds the position of Treasurer on the board and is most excited about the cookbook which we are developing as a fundraiser! Madi is returning to the University of Guelph this fall with dreams of working as a beef nutritionist.

Beginning her journey on the CJLA board this year, Emma was elected as Press Reporter! Located at Rose Valley, Sask., Emma and her family own and operate Qually-T Limousin. Emma is 15 years old and attends Rose Valley School. While Emma is uncertain what her dream career is exactly going to include she is certain that it will involve cattle! Another 4-H year and season of volleyball are two things which Emma is excited for this year.

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6. JOCELYN KENNEDY - DIRECTOR

Returning for her third year, Jocelyn will be acting as a director on this year’s CJLA board. Jocelyn and her family own and operate Crown Hill Acres Limousin at Omemee, Ont. At 16 years old Jocelyn is heading into grade 11 at the I.E Weldon Secondary School with dreams of pursuing a career in agriculture. Jocelyn is most excited about future junior activities and opportunities as well as hopefully getting back to being at an in-person Impact Show.

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BRIAN LEE MEMORIAL MEET THE 2021-22

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

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Congratulations to the 2021 Brian Lee Memorial Scholarship recipient Kira Axley. Kira is the daughter of Eugene and Sylvia Axley of Czar, Alta. The family runs over 300 head of purebred and commercial cows under the name North Slope Farms. Kira also has her own purebred herd K. Axley Limousin. She is an active 4-H member and is currently the Secretary of the Canadian Junior Limousin Board of Directors. Kira is a second-year student at Lakeland College in the Animal Science Technology - Livestock Science program. After graduating Kira plans to pursue a career in beef genetics.

SCHOLARSHIP Brian Lee was a passionate supporter of the junior program and helped many young Limousin enthusiasts get their start in the breed. The CJLA thanks the Lee family for this generous scholarship. Applications will open again in the new year for 2022.

This year's applicants were asked to write an essay answering the question: How would you market a Limousin bull to a commercial buyer in the current beef industry?

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9

Returning for his second year as a director on the board, Joe is most excited for harvest! At 20 years old, Joe has attended the University of Guelph Ridgetown Campus and has a dream job of being a farmer and custom equipment operator. Joe calls Kemptville, Ont. home and operates Spare Time Livestock with his family. 8. TAYLOR ANNETT - DIRECTOR

Excited to meet other juniors who are just as passionate about the breed as she is, 16-yearold Taylor has joined the board for the first time as a director! Located at Mildmay, Ont., Taylor

helps her family operate Preferred Limousin. Taylor is currently in grade 11 at the Walkerton District Community School and hopes to attend the University of Guelph in the future to pursue a career in the animal sciences field. 9. CEDAR HAYNE - DIRECTOR

At 14 years old Cedar has joined the CJLA board for the first time and is a director. Cedar calls Gull Lake, Sask, home and has a dream of being a mixed animal vet in the future. Like many of our other board members, Cedar is most excited about meeting new people and having new experiences!

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

7. JOE SCOTT - DIRECTOR

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SHOW RESULTS 4-H ACHIEVEMENTS

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

1. 16 year old Jocelyn Kennedy of the Omemee Beef Club & Woodville/Little Britain Beef Club, Omemee, Ont. showing Crown Hill Shameless 2H yearling heifer and Crown Hill Shameless 12J heifer calf (Awards: Omemee Beef Club Champion Intermediate Showperson and Grand Champion Showperson and Champion Continental Senior Yearling, Woodville Little Britain Beef Club Grand Champion Female, Kawartha Lakes Haliburton 4-H Fair Champion Intermediate Showperson and Reserve Grand Champion Showperson and Champion Continental Senior Yearling with Crown Hill Shameless 2H and Kawartha Lakes Haliburton 4-H Fair Champion Continental Heifer Calf and Grand Champion Female with Crown Hill Shameless 12J)

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16 year old Taylor Annett of the Paisley 4-H Beef Club, Mildmay, Ont. showing her Limousin heifer

3.

14 year old Avery Annett of the Paisley 4-H Beef Club, Mildmay, Ont. showing her Limousin heifer

4.

10 year old Landen Clarke of the St. Vincent 4-H Club, Tara, Ont. showing his Limousin heifer Jinxi

5.

13 year old David Kirby of the Cookstown 4-H Beef Club, Lisle, Ont. with his Limousin heifer MBT Pin Up Girl 102H (Awards: 2nd place Conformation, 1st place Intermediate Showman & Overall Reserve Champion Showmanship)

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14 year old Chayle Oatt of the Desboro 4-H Calf Club, Tara, Ont. showing her Limousin heifer Oatt Acres Hot Stuff

7.

14 year old Sharlotte Stewart of the Desboro 4-H Club in Ontario showing AMGS Hashtag at Smart Limousin/AMGS, Meaford, Ont. (Awards: Champion Junior

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4-H

CONGRATULATIONS TO THESE EXHIBITORS OF

LIMOUSIN PROJECTS

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Champion Female at Desboro 4-H Invitational Show, 2nd place Junior Yearling at Keady Cattle Clash) 12. 11 year old Gregory Elchuk of the Grey County 4-H Beef Club, Durham, Ont. showing Lakeside Holdup

13. 13 year old Clara Elchuk of the Grey County 4-H Beef Club, Durham, Ont. showing Lakeside Honeysuckle

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14. 10 year old Bailey Lawrence of the Durham 4-H Beef Club, Durham, Ont. showing Lakeside Jade (Awards: Grand Champion Heifer at 4-H achievement show) 15. 8 year old Emily Lawrence of the Durham 4-H Beef Club Junior Calf Club, Durham, Ont. showing Lakeside Joella (JoJo) 16. 3 year old Addison Lawrence of the Durham 4-H Beef Club Junior Calf Club, Durham, Ont. showing Lakeside Jingle

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17. 11 year old Maddy Lillico showing Lakeside Jewel, 12 year old Myah Tupling showing Lakeside Jalapeno, 13 year old Ella Lillico showing Lakeside Joyride and 15 year old Rachel MacInnis showing Lakeside Jinger – all members of the Durham 4-H Beef Club in Ontario. 18. 13 year old Laura Seward of the Windygates 4-H Beef Club, Darlingford, Man. showing her home raised Limousin steer (Awards: Best groomed calf at her Interclub Achievement Day)

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Showperson at Markdale Fair Virtual 4-H Show, Reserve Supreme Showperson at the Invitational Desboro 4-H show)

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8.

11 year old Sam Stewart of the Desboro 4-H Club in Ontario showing Smart Polled Jeorgie from Smart Limousin, Meaford, Ont. (Awards: 1st place in 4-H achievement day confirmation class. A great first year in 4-H!)

9.

12 year old Austin McNally of the Grey Beef 4-H Club in Ontario showing Smart Polled June Bug from Smart Limousin, Meaford, Ont. Loves coming to the farm to work with his calf.

10. 11 year old Maia Chapple of the Grey Beef 4-H Club in Ontario showing Smart Polled Josie from Smart Limousin, Meaford, Ont. (Awards: 2nd place in Markdale Virtual Show)

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11. 17 year old Alex McNally of the Grey County Beef 4-H Club in Ontario showing Smart Polled Hope from Smart Limousin, Meaford, Ont. (Awards: Reserve Champion Female and Champion Senior Showperson at 4-H achievement day, Reserve

20. 11 year old Jackson Martens of the Serath Multiple 4-H Club, Strasbourg, Sask. showing his Limousin steer Jackpot (Awards: Grand Champion Steer at 4-H achievement day) 21. 9 year old Jessa Martens of the Serath Multiple 4-H Club, Strasbourg, Sask. showing her Limousin steer Ferdinand (Awards: 2nd in class at 4-H achievement day) 22. 16 year old Austin Porter of the Kitscoty 4-H Beef Club, Kitscoty, Alta. showing his Limousin steer Venom (Awards: Grand Champion Steer) 23. 14 year old Jayson Labiuk of the Kitscoty 4-H Beef Club, Kitscoty, Alta. showing his Limousin steer Hercules 24. 11 year old Whitney Labiuk of the Kitscoty 4-H Beef Club, Kitscoty, Alta. showing her Limousin steer Hulk 25. Allison Labiuk of the Kitscoty 4-H Beef Club, Kitscoty, Alta. showing her Limousin steer Hawkeye

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

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19. 11 year old Lillian Seward of the Windygates 4-H Beef Club, Darlingford, Man. showing her home raised Limousin steer out of her very first 4-H cow (Awards: Reserve Grand Champion Steer)

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SHOW RESULTS 4-H ACHIEVEMENTS 27

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LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

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4-H

CONGRATULATIONS TO THESE EXHIBITORS OF

LIMOUSIN PROJECTS

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27. 11 year old Kelly Laughlin of the Dryland Multi 4-H Club, Youngstown, Alta. My family raises Limousin cattle and we calve later in the year so I decided to buy my calf this year from Crossing Creek Cattle. He came out of the bull program at Hillview Farms, where we buy some of our bulls from. I spent a lot of time working with my steer and was really happy with how much progress we made together throughout the year. 28. 13 year old Taylor Conners of the Dryland Multi 4-H Club, Youngstown, Alta. showing her home raised Limousin steer (Awards: Hanna District Intermediate Grand Champion Showman)

34. Shelten Grabler of the Meadowview Multi 4-H Club, Barrhead, Alta. showing his home raised Limousin influence steer Smokey off his 4-H heifer Cupcake that was a Limousin cross (Awards: Barrhead District Reserve Champion Steer)

29. 14 year old Keegan Conners of the Dryland Multi 4-H Club, Youngstown, Alta. showing his home raised Limousin steer (Awards: Hanna District Grand Champion Market Steer and District Intermediate Reserve Champion Showman with his Limousin heifer)

35. Eric Krahn of Valhalla 4-H Beef Club, Grande Prairie, Alta. showing his purebred Limousin steer Henesse (Awards: Top 5 in the Peace Prospect virtual show)

30. 11 year old Kiptyn Conners of the Dryland Multi 4-H Club, Youngstown, Alta. showing his home raised Limousin steer (Awards: Dryland Club first place for Junior Conformation, Showmanship and Grooming. Hanna District Junior Grand Champion Grooming and Junior Reserve Champion Showmanship)

37. Andrew Penner of the Mapes 4-H Club, Vanderhoof, BC showing his Limousin cross 4-H steer (Awards: Grand Champion Steer)

31. 16 year old Megan Conners of the Dryland Multi 4-H Club, Youngstown, Alta. showing her home raised Limousin steer and heifer. (Awards: District Grand Champion Grooming and District Reserve Champion Showmanship with her heifer and District Grand Champion Showmanship with her steer.)

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32. 13 year old Mandy Conners of the Dryland Multi 4-H Club, Youngstown, Alta. showing her home raised Limousin/Black Angus cross steer and heifer. (Awards: Dryland Multi Reserve Champion Conformation, Champion Showmanship and Champion Grooming with her steer and Dryland Multi Reserve Champion Conformation and Champion Grooming as well as District Reserve Champion Conformation with her heifer.) 33. Tait Ackermann of the Millarville Stockland 4-H Club, Millarville, Alta. showing his home raised Limousin 4-H steer out of his very first 4-H cow project. Achievement day started with a snow storm this year! (Awards: Club Champion Intermediate Steer)

Photos (at left): Jill Renton Livestock Photography

36. Alex Dyck of Valhalla 4-H Beef Club, Grande Prairie, Alta. showing his purebred Limousin steer Red Bull

38. Andie Kishkan of the Kersley 4-H Club, Quesnel, BC showing her purebred Limousin steer Honky Tonk (Awards: Grand Champion Steer); Andie Kishkan of the Kersley 4-H Club, Quesnel, BC showing her purebred Limousin heifer Hilda (Awards: Grand Champion Heifer) 39. Austyn Kishkan of the Kersley 4-H Club, Quesnel, BC showing his purebred Limousin heifer 40. Jordan Rossmann of the Kersley 4-H Club, Quesnel, BC with her purebred Limousin steer (Awards: Top 2 – Light Weight Division); Jordan Rossmann of the Kersley 4-H Club, Quesnel, BC with her purebred Limousin cow/ calf pair (Awards: Grand Champion Cow/Calf) 41. Owen Rossmann of the Kersley 4-H Club, Quesnel, BC with his Limousin influenced steer 42. Ethan Rossmann of the Kersley 4-H Club, Quesnel, BC with his Limousin influenced steer 43. Kaydan Loomis of the Kersley 4-H Club, Quesnel, BC with his purebred Limousin steer; Kaydan Loomis of the Kersley 4-H Club, Quesnel, BC with his purebred Limousin heifer LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

26. 19 year old Kira Axley of the Czar-Metiskow 4-H Club, Czar, Alta. showing her Limousin heifer Hillary. Kira says she loved this heifer because of her nosey personality, easy going demeanor, desire to please you as well as her ability to learn tricks! I taught her to lick your face on command and anytime you would scratch the inside of her hind leg she would lift it up in the air.

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WRITTEN BY

PHOTOS

Tessa Verbeek

Supplied

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4-H MEMBERS BRING

1,300 POUNDS OF JOY TO SENIOR'S CENTRE LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

T

he restrictions resulting from the global pandemic have taken a heavy toll, but perhaps most of all on seniors, who through much of this pandemic were unable to leave their care centers. A 4-H club southwest of Calgary, Alta. came up with a plan to provide seniors at a local long term care centre with some much-needed joy and excitement. The Millarville Stockland 4-H Club, established in 1952, is one of the longest standing 4-H clubs in Alberta. Each year 4-H clubs in Canada do a community service activity. As many indoor community service activities were not possible to do together due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the club decided to stay outside and in their family groups to pull off what was likely one of the most talked about 4-H community service projects this year. Club members pulled up to the Rising Sun Long Term Care Center in Black Diamond, Alta. and unloaded steers, heifers, a cow/calf pair, sheep and even some goats to parade in front of the windows of the senior’s care centre. Each member took the time to write a paragraph about themselves and their animal which was read by the staff inside as the members paraded outside. Each member also wrote a letter about themselves, their 4-H career and their projects that were printed off and available for residents to read. The

Tait Ackermann with his Limousin steer Toffee


residents enjoyed reading them so much that many additional copies have since been made. “I honestly can't thank you all enough for bringing your livestock and smiles to the Rising Sun Long Term Care facility yesterday. The staff and residents were delighted to have you there. Destiny, our Recreation Therapist, was near tears describing the joy that your visit brought,” quotes a representative from the care centre in a Facebook post made by Millarville Stockland 4-H Club, “The buzz in the facility was exciting - there was a level of conversation between residents that hasn't been seen in ages. One resident who has been basically mute for months was pointing, smiling and talking about all of you. Those residents who had afternoon visitors talked about all of you and your cows, sheep, goats. Clara's beautiful "Charolais" heifer was a big hit while Finn's steer's foot placement was noted (and enjoyed) by many. The goats were a leaping success and even the falling children that were quickly scooped up by parents was something that was talked about. I guess we just don't realize how small the world has become for the residents, but you brought some normalcy to them and it really means so much."

The animals were all very well behaved and the day warmed the hearts of everyone involved. A Facebook post made later about the event went viral as people around the internet shared this good news story during these challenging times. The Millarville Stockland club hopes to be able to return to the care centre again when residents may be able to be outdoors with the members and communicate more freely – and perhaps even get to cuddle a sheep!

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

Jody Maull Castle speaks about her father’s reaction to seeing the members with their animals, “They went by Dad’s window there. He was a 4-H leader for many years with the Czar-Metiskow Beef Club and a rancher for over 65 years. Both my Mom and Grandmother are in the Alberta 4-H Hall of Fame. My brother and I were both in 4-H with both our parents as leaders. I can tell you it did mean a lot to them. He was so excited to see the kids. He was beyond touched, we can’t thank you enough for taking the time. Thank you from the bottom of my heart for brightening his day.”

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keep your eye out

F O R H AW K E Y E G E N E T I C S T H I S FA L L

THE BEEF PEOPLE Matthew Heleniak | (519) 537-1451 | matth@norpacbeef.com 11 Robson Street, Norwich, Ontario

www.hawkeyelandandcattle.com


LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

30 Photo: Prairie Pistol Designs


WRITTEN BY

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Tessa Verbeek

A JUNIOR'S POINT OF VIEW

KAITLYN DAVEY

S

In 1978, Maplehurst Farms became lifetime members of the CLA. Maplehurst Farms was a beef and dairy operation until Kaitlyn was 13 years old, when the family sold their dairy and expanded their beef herd. Like many other beef producers at the time, the Davey’s tried several exotic breeds on their British based cow herd before settling on Limousin due to their added muscle on the Holstein cross calves they were having at the time. Kaitlyn was always involved with their cattle and participated in her first Canadian Junior Limousin Association show at the tender age of 6. She hasn’t stopped since. Her love for showing has grown into a true passion that she hopes to continue. Today, the Maplehurst herd consists of 180 purebred and Limousin influenced commercial cows. Kaitlyn has taken a homegrown Limousin influence steer in 4-H every year and has brought home numerous Grand and Reserve Champion Steer titles. She made her first Limousin female purchase in the fall of 2010 from Campbell Limousin and has continued to grow her herd since under the prefix KAD. Club calf, Speckle Park and Simmental genetics have all been added to the herd, but the majority of the commercial cows are still the tried and true Limousin influence females. Limousin has always been Kaitlyn’s breed of choice due to the amount of natural muscling the breed possesses and their ability to pass it on to their progeny, especially in commercial herds. With just one cross to a Limousin bull the difference is extremely evident in the muscle shape of the calves. The Limousin breed is also known for their carcass yield and it is a trait that the Davey’s breed for. They want animals that will go and push down the scales and appeal to the feedlots.

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

Image courtesy ShowChampions

outh of Lake Manitoba, near Westbourne, the Davey family calls Maplehurst Farms home. It has been home to previous generations since 1888. 22-year-old Kaitlyn Davey is as passionate about the agriculture industry and the Limousin breed as they come, and has great plans for the future of her own herd


Photo: Kaitlyn shows MTF Legally Blonde at the Princess of the Marsh Jackpot (Image courtesy Princess of the Marsh show committee)

32 “We have a carcass competition in our 4-H interclub where our Limousin steers have won numerous times with huge rib eyes, large carcass weights and AAA carcasses. The steers we have fed up have all been fast growing with an excellent appetite that maintain their structure right up until they are finished,” Kaitlyn says, “On top of this the breeds docility is a huge bonus especially now that we have young kids around the farm.” Each year the Davey’s feed an extra steer or two to butcher for their own meat as well as for family and friends.

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

“We get comments about how good quality the beef was and that it was full of flavour and very lean. One repeat customer noticed a difference in the quality of the meat one year when we raised a half blood steer versus the purebred animal that we normally have. This puts an emphasis on how good the carcass quality of the breed is,” says Kaitlyn. The Davey’s aim to produce bulls that possess natural muscling and hip that will pass it down to their progeny while also staying correct in their structure to make sure that they stay sound throughout breeding season in the pasture. Over the years they have sold bulls to commercial breeders that appreciate the additional pounds the Limousin bulls have added to the calves come weaning time. The added muscling of Limousin in undeniable over these Angus and Simmental based herds. Kaitlyn also commented about the natural mothering ability of their Limousin females. They are low maintenance at


Kaitlyn was a participant at only 6 years of age when the CJLA show was in Portage la Prairie, and later joined the CJLA as a member when she turned 8. “I remember my very first show in Portage la Prairie where I showed for the very first time in the Pee Wee showmanship with a calf from Triple R Limousin and I was so excited that I could be just like the big kids that I had been watching have so much fun.”

Photo: CJLA Impact Show Committee

Throughout the years Kaitlyn attended a total of nine CJLA Shows across the prairie provinces. The 2008 show in Lloydminster was the first time that she took her own cattle to a show. “I was so proud of them,” Kaitlyn recalls, “I learnt a lot about grooming and showmanship at this show as I was on the second place grooming team with older kids who wanted to help me learn.” Her CJLA showing career came full circle in 2017 when Kaitlyn helped plan the show in Portage la Prairie, which was also the last year she participated in a CJLA Impact Show in person. She came home with Champion Commercial Female with a female from her own herd and Champion Senior Show Person which was a goal she had her sights set on for years. Kaitlyn also joined the CJLA Board of Directors that year and continued on the board until she aged out of the CJLA this year.

At the 2014 Manitoba Youth Beef Round Up, Kaitlyn went home with both the Grand and Reserve Grand Champion Mixed Breed Female titles with purebred pairs out of her herd. She also had a bred heifer in the champion drive that year. “It was a really good feeling knowing that females that I had picked out as heifer calves were working out so well for my herd and hearing from numerous influential breeders that they really respected the cattle that I had brought out,” recalls Kaitlyn. She was also very proud of a commercial female that she showed in 2018, MTF Legally Blonde. This female was out of a Limousin cow and sired by a club calf bull. Kaitlyn reached many milestones in her showing career on the halter of this bred heifer, including numerous Grand Champion Female titles and jackpot show wins across the province. Kaitlyn says she has knocked it out of the park every year since being bred back to a Limousin bull. Kaitlyn credits her parents Bob and Jackie for helping to guide her over the years when choosing females to add to her herd as well as driving her around the country to show cattle. The Smyth and Angus familes of Jaymarandy Limousin have also been a great help to her over the years, whether it be in the show ring or helping her develop her herd with quality females purchased from the Jaymarandy program. Her advice for younger cattlemen is to never be afraid to ask for help. Whether this be asking experienced breeders what attributes to look for when starting to build your herd, or older members about show ring tips. She also recommends attending as many shows, field

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

Photo: CJLA Impact Show Committee

calving time and the calves have plenty of vigour. In a year like this as much of Canada faces an extreme drought, Limousin females have proven their hardiness and resilience to still raise high quality calves while maintaining their own shape.

While Kaitlyn loves the show ring she has a balanced approach to what matters, “Showing cattle is such a humbling activity to partake in. It is easy to get discouraged if your cattle didn’t perform the way that they should have but you have to remember, just because your cattle did not work for the judge that day doesn’t mean they aren’t good cattle. Everyone has a preference on what style of cattle they like so just because you may not place well one day, doesn’t mean you won’t at the next show. The show ring also doesn’t determine everything, these cattle have to go home and produce calves that will push down pounds on the scale. As long as these cattle will go home and be sound and functional counts as a win in my books.”

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days, sales, and events as you can especially when you are young or just starting. This is where you will make friends, connections, and learn so much, even if you don’t realize it. Upon graduating high school in 2017, Kaitlyn entered the Agribusiness program at Assiniboine Community College in Brandon, Man. She found Agronomy to be her calling and is now a Sales Agronomist for a local independent Ag Retail. Her work is close to her family’s farm allowing her to continue her involvement in the operation and much to her delight continue showing cattle. As she looks towards the future, Kaitlyn plans to continue growing the purebred division of her herd and introducing new genetics that will help enhance the quality that is already present. She also has aspirations of attending Canadian Western Agribition in the coming years with animals of her own to showcase their breeding program. This is in addition to continuing to attend summer shows around the province to help the Limousin breed grow in Manitoba. The Davey family has been promoting the use of Limousin throughout their bull market in the cattle country Interlake part of the province, as a means of gaining muscle in the Angus and Simmental influenced herds in the area. Kaitlyn’s hope is that the Limousin breed becomes a staple in commercial herds that aim to raise feeder cattle because of their ability to increase the yield and carcass on feeder animals. “The Limousin breed winning supreme at various major shows these past few years has been huge for the development of the breed in many ways by gaining recognition from both purebred and commercial breeders,” Kaitlyn adds, “Shows like these are a way to help showcase what all the breed has to offer and the versatility.”

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

Photo: Kaitlyn Davey and her family along with the Smyth family made up the provincial organizing committee for the 2017 CJLA Impact Show

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LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

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LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

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WRITTEN BY

PHOTOGRAPHY

Dylan Biggs

Various

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THE

TRUSTWORTHY COWBOY

Part One of a Three Part Series on Stockmanship

I also thought that the principles Ray utilized successfully with horses could be used to work cattle. I hoped I could approach our cattle differently and a voluntary willingness to do what I was asking would result. I

worked hard at applying what I learned to herding cattle for a number of years with very limited success. Then in 1989 I met Bud Williams and he opened my eyes when it came to herding large groups of cattle. Figuring out when, where and how to be on the back of a horse is one thing, making the jump to a herd of 200 fresh yearlings on range is another. The underlying principles are the same but the feel is more distant, the scale larger and the attention to detail is spread over a lot of animals. I grew up working cattle, using horses and dogs to help get the job done on our family ranch. In the 1960’s when I was kid, horses were broke, cattle were chased and dogs and kids tried to help but mostly learned to stay the hell out of the way. It was standard

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

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n 1985 I attended a Ray Hunt colt starting clinic at Sid Cook’s place west of Nanton, Alta. That was my first exposure to a different way of handling horses. I attended two more clinics during the late 80’s. Ray’s clinics introduced me to many new possibilities and Ray’s sayings are still with me today. My thinking changed and those possibilities slowly became realities. Thank goodness because if I was going to spend the rest of my life working with animals, I had to find a different way than brute force when things weren’t going according to plan.


when horses or cattle were not cooperating to show them, in no uncertain terms, who’s the boss. I don’t recall any other consideration. One of my first challenges applying Bud’s techniques was to quit being so demanding and start being more observant. If one is too busy telling it is hard to observe what is actually going on. To be in the right place with the proper amount of pressure one needs to read the herd and take cues from the herd. We need to observe what the herd movement is telling us and adjust accordingly. Herding cattle is a dynamic feedback process that demands attention to detail. Some may interpret this as becoming a limp noodle, pussy footing around the cattle with no conviction or intent but that isn’t the case at all. It is a matter of understanding a progressive process of building trust and respect with strategic use of pressure position and movement. To reach the point where you gain control of the herd so you can drive the cattle where you want without it turning into a chase. It is all in the approach, it is about learning what to ask of the cattle, when to ask it, how to ask and how firmly to ask. In the past I thought my job as “the boss” was only to tell. Effective working relationships with horses, cattle and/or dogs are built on trust and respect. Trust and respect are the two sides of one coin. Respect can easily be confused with fear. An animal or a herd of animals consumed by fear are very difficult to control. Fear won’t allow them to behave in a trusting respectful manner. The difference between

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

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The approach, what, when, how, and how much we ask, depends on the animal’s response to us, and so I had to learn to pay attention to their actions and body language to be able to adjust accordingly. Nowadays most horse owners acknowledge the value of a process that replaces fear with trust. They value a calm trusting demeanor in their horse as a good starting point. There are few horsemen left that will simply resort to restraining a terrified horse and immediately get on, consequences be damned. Most realize that is ill advised at the very least and potentially suicidal at worst. A terrified animal is very difficult

to control and very dangerous as a result. It is worth spending time on the ground, most often in a round pen these days, using position and movement in concert with the horse’s movement to develop a level of trust and acceptance so we can then start to ask for respectful yielding. Using a settling process to cattle has value as well. We used to go to the pasture to move fresh spring yearlings and immediately start moving them with the expectation that everything would go as planned and when things got western the cattle would be to blame. If we were lucky, we could gather them and get them to the gate, once at the gate was where we figured out how much control we really had. Typically, we had very little, we could protest and make noise and get aggressive but regardless cattle would start spilling and it wouldn’t take long before we would lose the whole bunch. Just a bunch of crazy yearlings was our conclusion. We now use a step-by-step approach to gaining control of a herd of cattle. The goal is the same as with a horse, to build acceptance and trust, then a respectful yielding by using one’s

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

respect and fear may seem slight and some may say it is just semantic but in reality, it is the difference between animals that WANT to do what you ask or feeling they HAVE TO do as asked, it’s the willingness that makes the difference.

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position and movement in a strategic manner. For cattle the first step is to reach the point where I can ask for movement and they don’t bolt. Instead, they turn and walk away calm and quiet and I can get out to the side of the herd and walk along with them. That calm relaxed kind of movement is our foundation as it reflects the desired attitude. I learned the hard way that if you can’t control cattle at a walk, chances are slim you can control them at a run. It is easy to blame the cattle, horses and dogs when things go awry but it starts with us and in the final analysis, we must take responsibility for the outcomes or nothing with our livestock handling will ever change.

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

In the end outcomes are what it is all about, after all beauty is as beauty does. Historically getting certain ranch jobs done with our cattle was far from beautiful. Sorting cattle in corrals or alleys usually peppered the air with a lot of cussing. Getting our cows to go up the chute to the squeeze was accomplished with no shortage of poking, prodding and whacking with old hockey sticks and or canes. Moving cow calf pairs resulted in the inevitable run back of calves and cows or both. Pulling bulls quite often

required use of ropes and almost always ended with fence that needed repairing and the list goes on. Then there is the human turmoil. There is a running joke in the cattle community that the best test of a ranch couple’s future compatibility is for them to work cattle together and see if they are still talking to each other at the end of the day. As a kid I remember my Mom going back to the house in tears on more than one occasion. After 25 years of travelling across the country doing livestock handling clinics and talking to families about the reality of working cattle together, I can safely say that working cattle puts a strain on family relationships. It is safe to say that if it is stressful for people, it is stressful for cattle as well. It is often said that good help is hard to find, it may actually be the case that good leaders are even harder to find. In the very traditional realm of the cattle industry change is needed and thankfully I have observed growing interest in this topic of the years. I invite you to join me in my next article where I will delve into more detail of the do’s and don’ts of good stockmanship.

Photo credit: Prairie Song Photography. Taken at Andrew Ranches


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NORTH AMERICAN LIMOUSIN

WRITTEN BY

FOUNDATION REPORT

Mark Anderson

Photo: Jill Renton Livestock Photography

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

NALF is approaching its fiscal year end for 2020-2021 at the time of this writing. In spite of challenges with COVID-19 and drought conditions throughout much of our Northern areas, we are coming off a very successful year for our breeders as well as the Foundation. The Spring bull sale season was as successful as any during the last 10 years at NALF with sale averages improving measurably over the previous year.

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evaluation and its reported accuracies. As most of you are aware, NALF has incorporated the inclusion of nearly 86,000 head of actual carcass data phenotype records into the IGS evaluation which has greatly enhanced carcass trait EPD accuracy for many pedigree lines of cattle in our current evaluation.

Much of that credit goes to our breeders and members who have made a dedicated effort to supply accurate data. This enhances our EPD accuracy to our members cattle when making mating decisions that are in line with current industry demands.

At the current rate of continued additional inclusions, this will lead to NALF contributing more actual carcass record phenotypes to cattle evaluations by the end of the first quarter next year as compared to any other breed in the U.S. It is rather fitting that the “carcass breed” will eventually take the lead in supplying this data set to the industry.

The tools we are using today are much more advanced and informational beginning with our National Cattle Evaluation that is produced at International Genetic Solutions for both NALF and the Canadian Limousin Association. The inclusion of genomics along with performance and pedigree data in a national cattle evaluation that includes over 18 breeds that are all across breed comparable has been invaluable throughout both the seedstock and commercial cattle industries for both of our associations.

Demand factors and signals have changed dramatically the last 10 years in the commercial cattle business. Quality is being paid for as it never has before in the current marketing system in the U.S. This is evidenced by the premiums paid on upper 2/3 of choice and prime cattle. Currently our spread between Choice and Select product in the U.S. is at $30.00/ cwt. on a carcass basis. This increase has happened all while we have continued to throw an increasing supply of choice and higher grading cattle into the supply system as never before.

The exciting element is the continual improvement process of that

The U.S. slaughter data reflects we are now annually processing nearly


85% of our cattle grading choice or higher and price premiums have continued to increase. The abundance of high-quality product has dramatically improved beef demand here in the U.S. since the 90’s when we were actually losing demand for our product.

SOCIAL NEWS 1

2

Just as important to achieving those quality levels is achieving that on a cost-efficient basis given high feed cost and current drought conditions. The industry needs cattle that can achieve both of these factors in their genetic makeup and that’s where Limousin and Lim-Flex can capitalize moving forward.

Most in the commercial cattle feeding industry still prefer the crossbred animal to obtain the heterosis advantages for both feeding performance and improved carcass merit as it relates to both quality and yield grade. Limousin and Lim-Flex cattle can accomplish this in a crossbreeding program on English based cows better than anyone when superior genetics are utilized in the commercial cattle industry. All this has to be accomplished while still maintaining maternal traits for our commercial cow operators throughout the country. We are getting closer to nearing the end of the liquidation phase of the U.S. cattle cycle, this assumes mother nature cooperates over the next 6 to 18 months and rain returns through drought-stricken areas. Given current inflation rates, that means an uptrend for commercial cattle prices will eventually materialize as we transition back to expansion down the road. That may not happen overnight but it should be in the back of your mind as you do long term planning for your own operations. This will create additional opportunity that is long overdue for the prices the cow/calf operator are currently receiving. Most of whom critically need this price improvement on their annual calf crop to remain in business given rising cost of production. NALF values and highly appreciates its relationship with the Canadian Limousin Association and its membership as we move forward into the next decade. Our board and staff here at NALF looks forward to the continued strong relationship with CLA as we take advantage of promoting the value and benefits of utilizing high quality Limousin seedstock genetics to the commercial cattle industry into the future!

STOCKING THE HERD 1 Congratulations to Cassandra Hollingsworth and Kevin Shier on

the birth of their first little farmer, a boy, Henri Richard Shier, on December 6, 2020 weighing in at 7 lbs. 10 oz. and 20 inches long. Proud grandparents are Terry and Wendy Hollingsworth of Red Maple Farms, Orono, Ont.

2 Kyle Sharpe and Rachelle Ormiston welcomed a baby boy, Walter

Donald Edwin Sharpe, on March 16, 2021. Walter came into the world at 7 lb. 11.6 oz. and 21 inches long.

3 Congratulations to Aaron and Katrina Boulter who welcomed their second child, a boy, Greyden Charles Boulter, on May 13, 2021. The next generation of Boss Lake’s fitting crew is stacking up well with big sister Brooklyn leading the crew.

4 Brandon and Erin Luc welcomed a sweet little 5 lb. 12 oz. girl,

Avery Erin Luc, to the world on July 22, 2021. Proud first-time Grandparents are Terry and Lynette Hepper of Eden Meadows Limousin, Zehner, Sask.

3

4 LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

We are feeding cattle longer in addition to producing much larger outweights than ever before. To do that requires enough genetic potential for cattle to remain efficient on their dry matter conversions to achieve the larger outweights. That trend will not likely reverse given the fact that most packers will demand larger carcass weights as well in spite of high feed cost as it increases production efficiencies at their packing houses.

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CANADIAN LIMOUSIN 1

2

SOCIAL NEWS TYING THE KNOT 1 Congratulations to Melanie Gollinger and Bryan Twiss of Lisle Limousin, Lisle, Ont. who were married on June 5, 2021.

2 Congratulations to Emily Gibson of Gibson Farms, Ripley, Ont. who wed Dillon MacTavish on September 4, 2021.

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CONDOLENCES 3 Christina Baumann-Massie passed away on December

4 Earl Joseph Brears of Walkerton, Ont. passed away on

February 19, 2021 at the age of 83. Earl was predeceased by his beloved wife Elizabeth ‘Beth’ (Ritchie) Brears after 53 years of marriage. Upon retiring from a successful teaching career, Earl established a purebred Limousin herd in 1981 with the name, “Queen’s Bush Limousin”. The bulls were performance tested in stations across Ontario, including Harriston, Mount Forest, Arkell, Parkhill, and London. One year, a bull was put on test in Calgary, Alta., in the National Limousin Test. Out of 140 bulls from herds across Canada, Earl’s bull finished in the top 10. Earl was farming right up to the final two weeks of his life, after two major heart attacks left him weak and fragile.

5 Brian Lee passed away suddenly on May 15, 2021 in

his 69th year. Brian and his wife Holli operated Hollee Limousin at Janetville, Ont. Brian was a passionate

supporter of the Limousin breed in Canada and played an integral role in the breed, taking on both provincial and national leadership roles. Brian served as Canadian Limousin Association President from 2013-2015. He enjoyed showing cattle and he will fondly be remembered as the Barn Boss at the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair for many years. He was a passionate supporter of the junior program and helped many young Limousin enthusiasts get their start in the breed. His legacy will live on through those young people, his loving family and grandchildren.

6 Kevin Rea of Bar 3R Limousin, Margeno, Sask. passed away on

May 19, 2021 at 52 years of age. Kevin’s true passion was always ranching as a partner in Bar 3R Limousin with his brothers, David and Kenny. He would often reminisce of travels to pick up cattle with family and roping or rodeo trips with his buddies. Agribition, the Lloydminster Female Sales and preparing for the Annual Purebred Bull Sale (more than 25) was the highlight of his year – followed by his personal delivery to many customers’ farms. He also contributed to the community by serving as a 4-H judge, Village councillor, Limousin Association executive, pasture co-op member and more.

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

12, 2020 just shy of her 92nd birthday. Predeceased by her husband Larmier Massie, the couple were leaders in bringing Limousin to Canada. Many will have fond memories of viewing cattle at Nordic Farms/ Bridlebrook Farms Eden Mills, Guelph, Ont.

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NEWS BRITISH COLUMBIA Greetings from beautiful British Columbia! This past summer has been one with many challenges, but also had some small triumphs as well. Our spring moisture disappeared in mid-June and the forest fire threat became more and more imminent. Unfortunately, many areas of our province succumbed to a fierce forest fire season. That, coupled with the ongoing challenges that COVID-19 has placed on the industry, made cattle events very difficult. However, in early July the Province of BC did lift restrictions on our fairs and exhibitions which did allow for some normalcy to resume. Most 4-H shows went ahead as planned, as did a few community exhibitions. The Dawson Creek Exhibition had a small but mighty cattle show and the Supreme Bull and Female will represent BC at Canadian Western Agribition. Limousin competed there, as well as, in many 4-H shows across the province and came home with some Champion banners. I would like to congratulate all the youth members who exhibited Limousin influenced projects on a job well done!

SUBMITTED BY

Erin Kishkan

Rounding out the summer’s events was the 30th Anniversary Celebration at Pinnacle View Limousin where they hosted over 100 people throughout the day for tours, cattle displays, a guest speaker, pig roast dinner, and ended the evening with their Anniversary Production Sale. Limousin genetics were sold to four provinces and one state and everyone who attended had a great day. BC is getting some much-needed moisture now and the fall grazing season is looking more promising that previously predicted. We wish everyone a successful show and sale season coming up this fall and look forward to celebrating Limousin in the coming months.

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

Stay tuned for progeny Selling

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SRD 45G

SRD 90F

THE RICHMOND FAMILY bulls@richmondranch.com

Jim & Stephanie 403-323-8433

SRD 102F

Tiffany 403-740-3748

~Branded for SucceSS~

Brandon & Samantha Nemetz 403-741-2675, 403-741-7262

www.richmondranch.com


NEWS SASKATCHEWAN Earlier this summer the Saskatchewan Limousin Association Annual meeting was held on June 15, 2021 at the Elbow Harbour Club Meeting room. Elections were held for the SLA board and are as follows. SASKATCHEWAN LIMOUSIN BOARD OF DIRECTORS President: Eric Martens ♦ Vice President: Ashton

Hewson ♦ Treasurer: Janet Hale ♦ Secretary: Jean Hewson

GREG & LINNEA TIM, LOIS & CLAYTON

Directors: Terry Hepper, Jay Bohrson, Jeff Yorga (Saskatchewan Stock Growers Representative), Bob Turner, and new director, Kyle Payne. The SLA would like to sincerely thank Lee Carpenter for his work with the board as he did not return for another year. Our director in charge of the Juniors, Jay Bohrson, asks that we all remind anyone involved with juniors exhibiting Limousin influence animals to contact him with photos so they can be put on the SLA Facebook page and be awarded with a gift for their hard work. There was a lot of discussion on the fall shows and in particular the AGM. The SLA is working on some new features for the show which will be sure to interest all breeders. Stay tuned for this exciting announcement on the SLA Facebook page and the CLA website. Be safe everyone and have a safe bountiful harvest.

403.377.2572 403.779.2273

GLANDREW@EIDNET.ORG TLANDREW@NETAGO.CA

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

As fall seems to be creeping up on us we are making preparations for the harvest and weaning of our calves is proceeding. As cattle producers we are still finding it difficult to deal with the drought, lack of quality feed and low market prices but we will however see the return of the fall cattle shows: Farmfair International, Lloydminster Stockade Roundup and Canadian Western Agribition to name a few.

SUBMITTED BY

Jean Hewson

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NEWS ONTARIO

SUBMITTED BY

Chad Homer

Photo: Jill Renton Livestock Photography

MANITOBA

SUBMITTED BY

Kyle Wright

Greetings from the Manitoba Limousin Association. As I sit down to write this report, we finally received much needed rain as the past few months have been hot and dry. There have been many producers who had to sell part of their herd due to having no grass or water running low. The prices seem to be holding steady but with the prices of feed grains at record highs the cost to rations are increasing which is also causing producers to sell their calves early. The board had one meeting since our AGM just to go over a few things to make our breed more present in the industry. Manitoba Ag Ex is happening at the end of October. Online entries are now open with the closing date being October 1st.

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

Once again, the board has set out to promote Limousin influenced feeder calf sales at a number of different sale locations across the province during the fall run. Another exciting marketing opportunity that the OLA is working on for fall is a Limousin influenced female sale. The goal is to offer quality Limousin genetics in the form of purebred, fullblood, crossbreds and other breeds mated to Limousin sires as replacement females at public auction this November. The goal with both of these marketing ideas are to help build the base and voice of Limousin cattle in Ontario. Hopefully with an increase in marketing options in the future, it will help us expand and draw new breeders and customers.

With harvest season started or on the near future I want to remind all members that fall sale season will be coming up quick so keep an eye on the Manitoba Limousin Facebook page for breeder’s posts on cows or heifers they have for sale by private treaty or upcoming sales.

On the purebred side of things, the OLA will be hosting a purebred sale called the Eastern Showcase on December 4, 2021. This event will be managed by Bohrson Marketing and will be broadcasted on DV Auctions. The plan for the event is to showcase the strength of the breeders in Ontario. With a lack of events to display sale cattle this fall the board is in the early stages of planning a display day in Listowel, Ont. in early November. The thought is to allow breeders to get their Eastern Showcase cattle out in front of people and also provide some time for social interaction. At this display day we are aiming to have a Junior Limousin Show to provide an outlet for our large group of keen juniors to have a final outlet to show at.

I would like to wish everyone a good harvest season and a wonderful fall.

Please follow the OLA social media pages for updates of all our upcoming events.

If any breeders would like to advertise in the News and Views, please contact one of the directors and they will be more than happy to help you. We are always looking for new members also, if you are interested in joining the board, please contact any one of the directors.

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The OLA had another disappointing summer after learning about the cancellation of the Royal Winter Fair and Markham Fair, which hosts the OLA Provincial Show each year. We had once again shifted our focus away from the showring and into helping our breeders and producers market their cattle with some new avenues and events.

SHORT ON GRASS, STILL BIG ON MUSCLE Breeding the right kind that wean calves like this – no matter the conditions

ANNUAL BULL & FEMALE SALE

MARCH 5, 2022 AT THE RANCH

LARGE SELECTION OF 2 YEAR OLD & YEARLING BULLS AND SELECT HEIFERS • MORINVILLE, AB

RGK 125J

RAYMOND & CORINE VERBEEK HOME 780.939.2173 | RAYMOND 780.982.2176 COLIN, TESSA, & RYLIN VERBEEK COLIN 780.982.1676 | TESSA 403.636.1066 Morinville, Alberta | crverbeek@xplornet.ca www.hillviewfarmslimousin.com


YOUR SUCCESS IS OUR BUSINESS WE ARE PASSIONATE ABOUT THE GROWTH OF THE LIMOUSIN BREED AND INVITE YOU TO JOIN US AT THESE FALL SALES:

Saturday, October 23 Saturday, November 13 Thursday, November 25 Saturday, December 4 Thursday, December 9 Tuesday, December 14 Wednesday, December 15 Friday, December 31

Scott Bohrson 403.370.3010

Martin Bohrson 306.220.7901

WWW.BOHRSON.COM

Colours of Autumn Limousin Sale, Cookstown, ON Ken-Doc Limousin Complete Dispersal Sale, Saskatoon, SK Solid Gold Limousin “CWA 50th Anniversary” Sale, Regina, SK The Eastern Showcase Limousin Sale, Hanover, ON Western Select 10th Anniversary Limousin Sale, Lloydminster, SK B Bar Cattle Co Bull & Female Sale, Lucky Lake, SK Canadian Donors Pregnant Recipient Online Sale, DLMS.ca New Years Resolution 10th Anniversary Sale, Moose Jaw, SK

Taylor Richards 306.821.4169

Jaxon Payne 306.830.0456

Geoff Anderson 306.731.7921

Rob Voice 306.270.6082

Jay Sibbald 403.899.2625

RR 4, Site 7, Box 28 • Olds, AB • T4H 1T8 403.519.3515 scott@bohrson.com

Cody Haney 403.845.8806


MATURE

COW REQUIREMENTS

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

Beef Feed Technical Sales Masterfeeds, an Alltech Company

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WRITTEN BY

Jason Hurst

As everyone reading this is fully aware, the western part of the country has been extremely dry. This has led to many crop failures and a shortage out there of feed to get through the winter. This brings up some topics that I have talked about before. Budgeting feed stores out, meeting requirements and so on. With feed being quite expensive strategic culling also makes it on the list of tasks to do. These are challenging decisions that no one wants to make, but there are some options to help keep some cows around on the feed stuffs available.

need to add some grain or byproduct to make up the energy by lowering the hay. Many producers tend to shy away from grain going to cows, but if we better target the requirements, it will not result in over-sized calves and fat cows if it is balanced correctly. Often time buying grains or byproducts can be a more cost-effective way of feeding the cow herd than just buying more hay. Think of how easy it is to transport grains versus similar tonnes of hay, often moving 3 tonnes of grain to the same tonne of hay from a cost standpoint.

First, we need to look at what the requirements of mature cows are through the periods we are planning on feeding them. Here we would break it down into three main stages of production: mid gestation, late gestation and lactation. When feed supplies are tight pinpointing the exact requirement at each stage is very important.

Requirements change as the calves grow and the cows move into their third trimester. Here the minimum for CP is 9% and the TDN is at 60%. Making sure our rations are balanced to these specs will ensure a successful calving season. Typically, shorting cows on energy will result in lower quality colostrum and lower birth weights. Low birth weights may be desirable for some, but best to leave that up to genetics over malnutrition. With under nourished cows, the low birth weights will affect the thriftiness of the calves. This can make calving season much more of a challenge then it needs to be.

Through the next couple of months many producers will wean their calves if they haven’t already done so to conserve feed and pasture going to the cow herd. This will put the cows in the mid gestation stage of production. This is where the animals’ requirements are the lowest. With free choice feed the cow typically requires feed that is at least 8% crude protein (CP) and has a total digestible nutrients (TDN) of 55% or higher depending on condition of the cows. This makes it possible to help stretch our hay and other feedstuffs that are typically higher than this level out with other feedstuffs such as straw. Typical mixed hay doesn’t seem to vary much east to west in Canada. Usually it runs about 12-13% CP and has a TDN of somewhere between 57-59% based off some of our summary data. To get to these minimums there gets to be some options. With just hay and straw there gets to be two options one that meet or exceed the minimums and another that meets the protein minimum but will short the cattle on energy. The ration that will meet both minimums is a ration made up of 25% straw and 75% hay. If we have enough hay to hold this ration for a while we can stop here, but if not, we can look at the ration that is 56% straw and 44% hay but would

As everyone knows, after calving we have the task of raising the calf. Once the cow is in lactation, her nutrient requirements increase. Here she has a CP need of 11% and a TDN need of 65%. Based on our typical feed test results we will notice that there isn’t enough energy in typical hay to support these minimums. This usually results in a shortage of milk production and cows starting to lose their body condition score. At this point we would want to feed our best quality hay or look at supplementing with some grain or byproducts. Overall stretching out our feed reserves can be a bit of a challenge but not impossible. With a better understanding of the requirements and how they change over the winter, we can make better use out of the feeds that we have and get better results in our calf crop. For more information feel free to talk to your local Masterfeeds representative.


She sells in the

SOLID GOLD LIMOUSIN CWA 50TH ANNIVERSARY SALE THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2021 REGINA, SK

RPY Payne’s Cracker X B Bar Nicole 6F

SUMMIT RANCH-HAND P40

HOMO POLLED // JANUARY 28, 2020

Bred for early January to the new and exciting imported bull, SUMMIT RANCH-HAND P40!

B BAR NICOLE 6F

ASHTON & KENDRA HEWSON

PO Box 182, Unity, Saskatchewan S0K 4L0 | Phone: 306.390.7987 | Email: doublebcattleco@yahoo.ca

New

FOR THE 2022 BREEDING SEASON

Contact us for inquiries! Watch for our Western Select Offerings on our Facebook Page.

SCOTT AND JACKIE, JAYDEN & JAXON PAYNE

Home 306.825.4328 Jackie 780.870.8184 Jayden 306.821.2260 Jaxon 306.830.0456 PO Box 159 • Lloydminster • SK S9V 0Y1 • greenwoodlimo@mcsnet.ca

RICHMOND Govener SRD 167G

Live cattle, semen and embryos available by private treaty

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

TREF Hardcore 204H

51


REPORTS SALES PINNACLE VIEW LIMOUSIN 30TH ANNIVERSARY PRODUCTION SALE September 11, 2021 • Quesnel, BC Sale Management: Bohrson Marketing Services Actioneer: Dan Skills 30 LOTS GROSSED $144,800 TO AVERAGE $5,156 15

BRED FEMALES

AVERAGED $5,210

11

OPEN FEMALES

AVERAGED $5,027

1

SEMEN LOT

AVERAGED $5,750

3

EMBRYO LOTS

AVERAGED $1,867

SALE HIGHLIGHTS – HIGH SELLING COW LOT 1A

Pinnacle’s Flirt 7F sired by Pinnacle’s Cop Car 26C sold for $6,000 to B Bar Cattle and Canadian Donors, Lucky Lake, SK

LOT 2A

Pinnacle’s Flashy Queen 9F sired by B Bar Bentley D sold for $6,000 to Hawkeye Land and Cattle, Norwich, ON

HIGH SELLING BRED HEIFER LOT 16

Pinnacle’s Honor Roll 72H sired by B Bar/Hawkeye Sting 47F ET sold for $6,750 to J BAR J Limousin, Lebanon, MO, USA

HIGH SELLING HEIFER CALF LOT 25

Pinnacle’s Just a Dream 45J ET sired by Greenwood Fernando PYN 704F ET sold for $6,500 to Richmond Ranch (Junior Division)

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

From top to bottom, the top sellers at Pinnacle View: Lot 1A, Lot 2A, Lot 16 and Lot 25

52


LIMOUSIN INFLUENCE FALL FEEDER SALES ONTARIO Cargill Auction Market, Cargill, ON SEPT 3 Special Yearling Sale featuring Limousin OCT 29 Feeder Calf Sale featuring Limousin NOV 5 Feeder Calf Sale featuring Limousin Hoard Station Sales Barn, Campbellford, ON SEPT 17 Stocker Sale featuring Limousin OCT 22 Stocker Sale featuring Limousin NOV 26 Stocker Sale featuring Limousin David Carson Farms & Auctions Services Ltd., Listowel, ON OCT 25 Stocker Sale featuring Limousin NOV 20 Commercial Limousin Breeding Stock Sale Ontario Stockyards Inc., Cookstown, ON NOV 2 Special All-Vaccinated Stocker Sale featuring Limousin NOV 16 Special All-Vaccinated Stocker Sale featuring Limousin DEC 9 Special All-Vaccinated Stocker Sale featuring Limousin Ontario Livestock Exchange, St. Jacobs, ON NOV 4 Stocker Sale featuring Limousin

STOCKER

For week ending Sept 17, 2021

MARKET REPORT

ALBERTA WEIGHT

STEERS

HEIFERS

900

184.00-190.00

164.00-174.00

800 – 899

187.00-204.00

173.00-183.00

700 – 799

195.00-212.00

178.00-192.00

600 – 699

202.00-219.00

182.00-194.00

500 – 599

217.00-232.00

184.00-197.00

400 – 499

234.00-251.00

197.00-211.00

WEIGHT

STEERS

HEIFERS

900+

190.08-205.04

153.43-178.80

800 – 899

193.57-215.79

165.10-182.12

700 – 799

177.21-219.85

174.85-187.95

600 – 699

170.67-227.13

153.95-199.28

500 – 599

193.30-246.14

132.76-206.54

400 – 499

168.97-260.26

132.11-214.34

ONTARIO

December 4’21 • Hanover, ON

Keady Livestock Market, Tara, ON NOV 5 Stocker Sale featuring Limousin ALBERTA Stettler Auction Mart, Stettler, AB NOV 5 Calf sale featuring Limousin Dryland Cattle Trading, Veteran, AB NOV 1 & 4 Calf sales featuring Limousin Vold, Jones & Vold Auction Co. Ltd., Ponoka, AB NOV 3 Calf sale featuring Limousin

Selling a full sister! Bill & Mary Anne • Matthew & Kali • Nick & Tanya Bill: 519.494.9613 • Matthew: 519.870.3219 4140 Glendon Drive • Glencoe, ON N0L 1M0 bzwambag@execulink.com www.beezeeacres.ca • @bzacres L

The Zwambags

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

Vold, Jones & Vold Auction Co. Ltd., Westlock, AB NOV 4 Calf sale featuring Limousin

53


CANADIAN CATTLEMEN'S ASSOCIATION

PRESIDENT'S REPORT

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

Bob Lowe President, CCA

I am pleased to see the world is starting to open again and return somewhat to pre-pandemic life. For the first time in a long time, those able to travel had the opportunity to get together in person at the CCA Semi-Annual Meeting held in Calgary in August to discuss industry issues and plan CCA advocacy efforts.

government are working on an AgriRecovery program to help deal with drought and wildfire challenges producers are facing. At the time of writing, total funds have not been announced, but the program details are anticipated to be similar to the AgriRecovery Wildfire initiative in 2017-18.

Our efforts around resilience are paying off. Most food service businesses are now open and there is a compelling case to keep them open. Labour is now their biggest challenge. The massive and ongoing investments our processors have made are keeping our plants operating at near 100 per cent capacity.

Alberta – Alberta earmarked $136 million in provincial funding. The

We heard more good news at the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) convention in August. CattleFax gave one of the most positive outlooks for cattle prices over the next three years that we have seen in a long time. We heard beef demand is at the highest level in 33 years in the U.S. and the increase in beef sales between just 2019 and 2020 was four times greater than total sales of plant-based alternatives. Export sales for both Canada and the U.S. are up double digits supported by very strong international demand. If mother nature cooperates, we could see beef being one of the leading growth industries coming out of the pandemic lockdowns.

54

WRITTEN BY

We are also now learning about the full impact of this summer’s drought. On Sunday, August 22, 2021, with only a few hours before the federal election was called, the beef industry received good news about the AgriRecovery program, as the Government of Canada increased total funding to up to $500 million to address extraordinary costs faced by producers due to drought and wildfires. This includes initial funding of $100 million announced on August 6, 2021. Using the 60-40 costshared basis, as outlined under the Canadian Agricultural Partnership, the federal share would be up to $482.5 million, not including British Columbia's planned program. Here is a summary of what this means for producers in drought-stricken areas: B.C. – In B.C., the government announced that the province and federal

federal contribution is an additional $204 million in federal funding under AgriRecovery for total funds of $340 million. The 2021 CanadaAlberta Livestock Feed Assistance Initiative will provide eligible producers an initial $94 per head payment for breeding females based on inventory as of August 6. Later this year, producers may receive an additional payment up to a maximum of $106 per head, through a receipt-based approach, to reflect extraordinary circumstances faced in some areas of the province. At time of writing, details of the second payment were still being finalized.

Saskatchewan – in Saskatchewan, the Province announced $119 million in funding. The federal government will provide an additional $178 million for a total program of $297 million. The 2021 CanadaSaskatchewan Drought Response Initiative will provide eligible producers a $200 per head payment to help maintain breeding females, with an initial $100 payment on inventory as of August 1 and the next $100 payment based on inventory on December 31.

Manitoba – Manitoba allocated $62 million in provincial funding. The federal government is expected to add up to $93 million for a total of $155 million in program funding. The Livestock Feed and Transportation Drought Assistance program will help producers purchase and test feed for livestock to maintain their breeding herds including transporting purchased feed from distant locations. The Livestock Transportation Drought Assistance program will help offset freight expenses associated with moving livestock to alternative feed supply areas. Manitoba is also in the process of designing a cowherd-rebuilding program under the Canada-Manitoba AgriRecovery Drought Assistance framework to help livestock producers forced to sell breeding stock due to limited feedstock


www.limousin.com/juniors/cjla-impact-show/ in 2021 with the goal to rebuild their herds starting in 2022. At time of writing, program details were under development.

Ontario – heading east, Ontario announced up to $5 million in provincial funding. The federal contribution is expected to contribute an additional $7.5 million for a total program of $12.5 million. The program is expected to cover costs for purchasing feeds, transportation of feed and water, transportation of animals to feed, temporary fencing and other extraordinary costs related to the drought. These costs are estimated at approximately $200 per head for cattle.

we’ve all been Waiting for! 2022 Canadian Junior Limousin Impact Show

See you there!

2022

July 12–16 olds, Alberta

Bring YOUR BEST to Olds, Alberta Hosted by the ALA in conjunction with Alberta’s premier junior livestock event, Summer Synergy

cjla@limousin.com

We are selling

TWO OF OUR BEST!

Carlsruhe

HALLIE

(CCC 1H) Sire WULFS AMAZING BULL T341A Dam CARLSRUHE FIFTY SHADES Bred b-bar Bentley (AI March 29) TaDomi Hunt • Hanover, On 15193731798 • bar3c@hotmail.ca

Carlsruhe

JAMMY

(CCC 637J) Sire GREENWOOD CANADIAN MADE ET Dam CARLSRUHE FERGIE

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

THE COLOURS OF 23, 2O21 AUTUMN SALE OCT THEY SELL IN

show

Photo credit: Joel Dunn on Unsplash

As we look ahead, one of the Canadian beef industry’s primary modern objectives is sharing the positive story of agriculture with consumers, government, and other stakeholders. CCA is tackling this head-on through the United Nations Food Systems Summit (UNFSS). While the summit itself takes place in September during the UN General Assembly, CCA staff have been working tirelessly since the spring to make sure the voice of Canadian beef producers is heard at this international table.

the

55


HERD HEALTH

DETERMINING RISK LEVEL IN WEANED CALVES WRITTEN BY

Dr. Roy Lewis DVM

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

There are many factors one must consider when bringing in calves to feed to minimize BRD (bovine respiratory disease) that is still the number one cause of morbidity and often mortality in our feedlots or after weaning our calves. Knowing the history of the calves regarding weaning time, distance transported, vaccination and health history as well as upcoming weather conditions will help you determine level of risk. If as a purebred breeder you are weaning your own calves and commercial cattle you definitely are going to save replacements. Each group of calves need to have a risk category ranging from low risk to ultra-high risk in order to determine how they could be handled. The overall goal is to prevent a disease outbreak and high death loss by implementing management changes so you will get top performance from your calves. If we can determine risk level ahead of time that gives us hands up on battling the respiratory and other pathogens we know the calves may be exposed to. The final step is making the economic calculation of preventative cost in terms of vaccines, labor, or metaphylactic antibiotics versus treatment and potentially higher death loss. As with most things in farming this is a risk and of course there are always unknowns that vary year to year that can blindside us.

56

In bringing in calves or for that matter feeding your own calves there have been many factors which increase risk and we need to manage or handle these as best as we can. Try and ask yourself the question ahead of time. What is the risk level of this group of calves to developing respiratory disease and is there any management changes I need to do to mitigate or minimize this risk. The drought or severe lack of rainfall can drive up this risk higher than other years. Because of the shortage of pasture grass nutritional deficiencies such as Vitamin A or other vitamins and minerals together potentially with higher levels of internal parasites and finally the heat stress experienced earlier in the year with potentially poorer quality water drives the risk level up. High-risk calves for developing BRD are generally considered those presenting with one or more of these points. They have been co-

mingled because they are auction market derived or mixed at home. Once a group has settled avoid adding in more calves and the quicker a pen is filled from as minimal a number of original owners the better. Extended transport times where calves become stressed and dehydrated are another risk factor. The loading and unloading are more where the stresses come in but if huge distances are transported such as bringing in cattle from a province or more away tips these calves, in my opinion, to ultra-high risk. The more local we can derive cattle the better but that is not possible very often as where calves are raised and fed can be two totally different areas of the country. Think of using electrolytes solutions such as “destress” before transporting long distances. Bad weather or wide temperature swings can create severe stress. Watching the weather channel may help but you need to buy when you can. The further the distance travelled the more likely these temperature fluctuations are going to happen. The on-arrival procedures such as castration, dehorning and branding all have their stressors. The cattle industry is always under scrutiny from an animal welfare perspective for these procedures and in the majority of cases castration is done way ahead of weaning. Polled bulls are eliminating horns or the calves are dehorned early. Dehorning in the feedlot these days generally involves tipping the few horns that are left. If financial institutions and feeder associations or grazing reserves did not require branding there would be little done anymore. If you need to brand minimize size and number of characters as much as possible. Better analgesics (pain killers) and anti-inflammatory drugs are being commonly administered that will help minimize stress in these painful situations. Calves recently weaned with no or a poor (unknown) vaccination history are a definite risk. The old preconditioned programs where calves have already been weaned a month is ideal. The greater the respiratory pathogens we have some protection for the better. This would include the viral as well as the bacterial components of the BRD


complex. Don’t forget the clostridials and histophilus in your vaccination protocols. Quarter Page Ad Young Limo Farms

YOUNG’S 132H TREF EPIC POWDER X CLARK’S APPLE TEA 132A

If calves fall into any one of the above categories they are considered high risk. Low 55H risk are essentially your own calves YOUNG’S EDWARD’S COLOSSAL 55D preimmunized, weaned at home intoX MURPHY’S a situation where they know where feed Both andbred water older heavier to JYXare. 482G Weaning BY NORDALinAVENGER calves and weaning in good weather with either fence line or I have also attached a few generic photo options supplied by the Voice. some other type ofThey softdon’t weaning is considered low risk. This have photos of their consignments yet so theyis said they would dig up something generic for them. most commonly exactly what most purebred producers do. It is ideal to removeThey the are cows from they are a brand newthe ranchcalves so thereand is nothat old branding you need to match, and also no previous logo or farm colours. used to the ration they will be fed. Even in these situations pulls for respiratory disease can climb and you reach a point where you see what it looks like if you kern the script font that reads treating them withCan antibiotics may become necessary to thwart “Young” at the top so that the tails on each of the letters are touching? an outbreak. The letters are awkwardly spaced as is. I think you will have to write out ‘Limousin’ instead of Limo under it.

Typographically, there is a lotisgoing beneath that. Can With high-risk calves then the dilemma whatonto do when youyou try removing the red bar (it sort of cuts the ad in half) and using just the get them. Your herd will have forauction whatand the two twoveterinarian weights of the sans-serif fontatoprotocol announce the easier to take the line out under them that has they believe is bestsale andheifers? againItitmight maybevary pen to pen. Most would the breeding and put something like ‘Both heifers bred JWX...’ Shorter consider giving thelines necessary vaccinations and processing and of type are typically easier to read if they are left-aligned which might help differentiate the two “groups” of pedigree information covering with metaphylactic antibiotics. The newer macrolide antibiotics last a long time in the lungs and they are a completely different family to our treatment antibiotics. The label typically states for the control of BRD or to use in cattle at high risk of developing BRD. This is where knowing the risk level of the calves coming into your feeding pen is critical in deciding which ones to treat. In the past antibiotics were given in the feed but they needed to be given for a long period of time and are hard to manage in large feedlots in order to avoid residues.

Keep in mind where possible we want to prevent pneumonia and avoid antibiotics. It may be extremely tempting this year since the macrolide antibiotic Draxxin has a large number of generic products hit the market. There are 4-6 products on the market that have the same chemical composition as Draxxin and the same dosage, etc. This will drive the cost down considerably. The problem with a decreased price is usage will go up and so we still want to use product when we need to but not overuse it. That is how lack of efficacy and resistance can quickly develop. Use only the products recommended at the dosage recommended and don’t overuse. Let’s hope weaning goes uneventfully this year. We also know that any sickness around weaning can have long term productivity effects on that animal into maturity so best to always record the ones treated.

LIMO FARMS

On offer AT THE EASTERN SHOWCASE SALE YOUNG’S 55H YOUNG’S 132H SIRE TREF EPIC POWDER DAM CLARK’S APPLE TEA 132A

&

SIRE EDWARD’S COLOSSAL DAM MURPHY’S 55D

BOTH HEIFERS BRED JYX 482G BY EDW AVENGER

THE YOUNG FAMILY ENNISMORE, ONTARIO | JOE 705.755.6820 | JIM 705-760-5438

Consigned to the

AFTER HOURS HARLEY Electric Impact x Brass

Dec 4, 2021 Hanover, ON

AFTER HOURS HELLO DOLLY Electric Impact x Adrenaline

TWO BRED HEIFERS PLUS A TOP HEIFER CALF AND A SELECT BULL PROSPECT! ROB 519–375–5108

BRAEDEN 519–375–2625

AFTER HOURS LIMOUSIN

RO B AN D E R I N W E P P L E R – TA R A , O N TA R I O

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

& Percentagecompromised Limousin Cattle or parasitized Light weight calvesPurebred or nutritionally (internal parasites The suppress the immune system) may also carry Young Family Ennismore, Ontario an additional level of risk with them. To me calves under 400 Joe 705.755.6820 pounds would be Jim considered ultra-high risk. For the four to 705-760-5438 five weight calves high risk and above 600 pounds it depends Watch for our bred heifer consignments in the Eastern Limousin on the other categories above as to how their risk was assessed. Showcase Sale December 4th Veterinarians will vary in their opinions here.

57


ACTIVE SIRES AVERAGE

GEST

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

TM

CEM

SC

STAY

DOC

YG

CW

CREA

MARB

CFAT

-2.9

9

2.1

62

89

22

53

5

0.6

13

11

-0.58

18

1.19

-0.13 -0.09

GEST

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

TM

CEM

SC

STAY

DOC

YG

CW

CREA

MARB

-2.5

8

2.5

58

81

23

52

5

0.5

14

9

-0.59

14

1.15

-0.13 -0.10

GEST

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

TM

CEM

SC

STAY

DOC

YG

CW

CREA

MARB

-2.8

9

2.3

61

87

23

53

5

0.6

14

11

-0.58

17

1.18

-0.13 -0.09

ACTIVE DAMS AVERAGE

CFAT

NON-PARENTS

Photo: Jill Renton Livestock Photography

AVERAGE

CFAT

GEST Gestation Length (higher value = longer gestation length)

CEM Calving Ease Maternal (higher value = greater calving-

CED Calving Ease Direct (higher value = greater calving ease)

ease in first-calf daughters) SC Scrotal (higher value = sons have larger scrotal, daughters mature earlier) STAY Stayability (higher value = greater chance daughters will stay productive in herd longer) DOC Docility (higher value = more docile progeny) YG Yield Grade (higher value = better yield) CW Carcass Weight (higher value = heavier carcasses) CREA Rib Eye Area (higher value = larger rib eye area) MARB Marbling (higher value = additional marbling) CFAT Back Fat (higher value = more back fat)

BW Birth Weight (higher value = larger birth weight) WW Weaning Weight (higher value = heavier calves

at weaning) YW Yearling Weight (higher value = heavier calves at 1 year) MILK Milk (higher value = additional milk from daughters TM Total Maternal (higher value = cow has calves with higher weaning weights)

LIMOUSIN

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

BREED AVERAGE EPDS

58

All breeds do not need the same scrotal size, which means you can’t compare Limousin with other breeds because scrotal size will be different, and Limousin will need less scrotal size than other breeds to do the job. Scrotal circumference is a trait which is moderately to highly heritable. Research indicates that testicle size is an excellent indicator of age at puberty of a sire's daughters and is also related to seminal quality and quantity.

AVERAGE SCROTAL CIRCUMFERENCE FOR LIMOUSIN BULLS

SUGGESTED MINIMUM SCROTAL MEASUREMENT REQUIREMENTS FOR LIMOUSIN BULLS AGE (MONTHS)

SC (CM)

12

29 CM

AGE (MONTHS)

SC (CM)

13

30 CM

12

31.5 CM

14

31 CM

24*

35.7 CM

15

31.5 CM

16-20

32 CM

21-30

33 CM

*Bottom 10th percentile = 33 cm


BRITISH COLUMBIA

Dave & Linda Harvey Box 1469 100 Mile House, BC Canada V0K 2E0 Phone 250.397.2306

Limousin hivalleylimo@gmail.com www.hivalleylimo.com

ALBERTA

Hi-Valey

Specializing in Fullbloods & Purebreds Box 149 Carmangay, Alberta Canada T0L 0N0 jaapcanada@eidnet.org

Scott & Lesley Hansen

Ph: 780-727-4557 Cell: 780-202-0607

Home: 403.897.2264 Jaap’s Cell: 403.363.5587 Carla’s Cell: 403.363.7857 www.dejagerlimousin.com

Box 248 Entwistle, Alberta T0E 0S0 Blue Heeler Dogs

59


Richmond Ranch

Stewart Limousin

ALBERTA

MURRAY & BEV STEWART BOX 1326 STETTLER ALBERTA T0C 2L0 STEWARTLIMOUSIN@GMAIL.COM TEL 403-742-5226 CELL 403-742-9813 IMPERIAL RANCH LTD.

LIMOUSIN • BLACK ANGUS • RED ANGUS Jim & Stephanie Tiffany Samantha & Brandon 403-323-8433 403-740-3748 403-741-2675 Box 58 Rumsey, Alberta T0J 2Y0 www.richmondranch.com

QUALLY-T LIMOUSIN Rose Valley, Saskatchewan Alvin 306-322-7563 Chris 306-322-7554

The Rea Family Marengo, SK S0L 2K0 Ken Rea 306-463-7454 rea54@live.com

Bulls for sale by private treaty

RED + BLACK POLLED LIMOUSIN CATTLE

MANITOBA

CHERWAY

Raising Limousin for over 30 years

LIMOUSIN

Stan & Pat

COCHRANE STOCK FARMS

www.cherwaylimousin.ca 204-736-2878 60 2021_02_03_cherway_card_v2.1.indd 1

Q T Canada’s largest herd of registered Limousin Females

2021-02-01 8:42 PM

204.855.2214 204.729.1772 Kyle & Erin 204.855.2633 204.724.0892 Darby & Kelly 204.855.2191 204.573.6529 RR#1 Alexander MB R0K 0A0 Fax 204.855.2472 Email csf@westman.wave.ca www.cochranestockfarms.com

SASKATCHEWAN

ALBERTA

Lazy A Limousin


DIAMOND K

E

N

T

O

RAISING LIMOUSIN for over 45 YEARS

Hockridge Farms Dauphin, Manitoba • gghock@goinet.ca Brad Hockridge 204-648-6333

LIMOUSIN

N

MANITOBA

TRAVIS, RILLA, BRODIE & DILLON HUNTER Home 204-838-2019 Travis 204-851-0809 diamondtlimo@gmail.com

Glen Hockridge 204-648-5222 204-638-8554

M A N I T O B A

Poplarview STOCK FARM

Lloyd & Joan Atchison H 204-854-2947 Trevor & Melisssa Atchison H 204-854-2510 C 204-522-5542

RR#1 Pipestone MB R0M 1T0 poplarviewfarm@gmail.com

triple Your Source

for

r* limouSin

*

QualitY GeneticS

Since

1982

ONTARIO

Art & Maria Rodgers Box 156 MacGregor, MB R0H 0R0 Home: 204-685-2628 Art Cell: 204-856-3440 email: triplerlimo@yahoo.ca We’re located west of MacGregor 69026 Rd 62W

R.R.#4 GLENCOE, ONTARIO N0L 1M0

Quality Purebred & Commercial Cattle

The Kennedys – Craig, Michelle, Samantha, Trevor & Jocelyn 258 Sturgeon Road, Omemee, ON KOL 2W0 • crownhillacres@gmail.com Craig CELL 705.741.6700 • Samantha CELL 705.768.1554

Ron & Rita Gardiner Phone 519.287.3147 Fax 519.287.3697 Email gardinerlimousin@hotmail.com

61


ONTARIO

Haystack Acres Purebred Limousin Cattle – Bulls & Heifers for Sale

John & Michelle McLean Res 519.738.0453 haystacklimousin@yahoo.ca

3114 Walker Road RR#2 Harrow, Ontario N0R 1G0

Specializing in Polled Fullblood Genetics E. JOHN & ENA POST 7396 20TH SIDEROAD, RR #2 ALMA , ON N0B 1A0 ejpost@posthavenlimousin.com | FARM: (519) 846-9320 | CELL: (519) 766-7178

www.posthavenlimousin.com

519-538-4877 519-372-7459 Email smartlimo@bmts.com 137606 Grey Road 12 R.R.#2 Meaford, ON N4L 1W6 Ph/Fax Cell

SERVICE MEMBERS

Industry accepted for over 40 years

www.smartlimousin.com

587.887.1934 embryos@bowvalleygenetics.com www.bowvalleygenetics.com

www.goldenthread.ca

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Sarah Buchanan 306.681.5340 sarah@goldenthread.ca Emily Gibson 519.440.9907 emily@goldenthread.ca Jordie Buba 780.818.4047 jordan@goldenthread.ca Lacey Dekeyser 204.747.5991 lacey@goldenthread.ca PLUS Live Auction broadcasts powered by

SERVICE MEMBERS

Garry & Sheila Smart

Embryo Transfer Services IVF Certified for Exportable Embryo Production Export Qualified Semen Collection & Bull Stud Owner’s Use Semen Embryo & Semen Storage & Distribution


SERVICE MEMBERS

Embryo Transplants

www.bova-tech.com Embryo Collection, Freezing & Transplants

In-Clinic & On Farm Services

IVF - In Vitro Fertilization

Recipient Programs

Donor Care Facility

Export Certified

PO Box 80142 Airdrie, Alberta T4B 2V8 Canada Find us on Facebook

Tel: (403) 332-1567 Email: info@bova-tech.com Follow us on Instagram

Alberta – Saskatchewan – Manitoba

FARM NAME

COUNTRY

NAME

POSTAL CODE

ADDRESS

PHONE

CITY

EMAIL

Check one of the following  Q Canada $35.00 (plus tax) Q United States $50.00 (tax included) Q International $50.00 USD (tax included)

CREDIT CARD PAYMENT Card Number  Expiry Date

OR cheque payment – please make cheques payable to the Canadian Limousin Association

Q I would like to advertise in your next issue. Please contact me.

Please complete and return to the Canadian Limousin Association via mail, fax or email: Canadian Limousin Association 3378 15th Ave SW Medicine Hat, AB T1B 3W5 Phone: 403.253.7309  Fax: 403.253.1704 E-mail: limousin@limousin.com

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HAVE CONTENT?

THE LIMOUSIN VOICE TEAM

Publisher & Creative Director Katie Songer publisher@limousinvoice.net 587.802.3110 Editor & Advertising Representative Tessa Verbeek tverbeek@limousin.com 403.636.1066

Have an article idea, Limousin story, social news or event to share with the Limousin Voice? Please contact Tessa Verbeek at tverbeek@limousin.com or 403-636-1066

UPCOMING ISSUES

Issue Book by Published Winter Nov 1 Dec 7 Spring Jan 10 Feb 8 Fall TBA TBA ADVERTISING RATES

Double Page Spread Full Page Half Double Page Spread Half Vertical / Half Horizontal Quarter / Quarter Banner Business Card

$1800 $1000 $1200 $650 $375 $250

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

All ads are full color. 5% GST not included. Yearly contract discount 10% (Card Ads Exempt)

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The Limousin Voice is published three times per year. One year subscription costs $35.00 per year ($36.75 with GST) in Canada, $50.00 USD per year in the USA and internationally. The Limousin Voice hereby expressly limits its liability resulting from any and all misprints, errors and/or inaccuracies whatsoever in the advertisement and editorial content published by The Limousin Voice and its said liability is here by limited to the refund of the customer for its payment for said advertisement, or the running of the corrected advertisement, or editorial notice. Notification by the customer of any error must be made within 30 days of the distribution of the magazine. Advertising copy received after the deadline may not be returned for proofing. Changes to advertising copy made after the deadline date will be allowed only if time permits, and will incur the appropriate charges according to time and materials involved in the changes. The opinions or views expressed in the editorials are those of the persons interviewed in the article and not The Limousin Voice magazine. The Limousin Voice does however reserve the right to edit or refuse all material which might be objectionable in content. No material or part thereof may be reproduced or used out of context, without prior specific approval of a proper credit to The Limousin Voice.

CONTRIBUTORS DYLAN BIGGS Since 1995, Dylan Biggs has taught cattle handling clinics to all segments of the livestock industry from family farms and ranches, PFRA pasture riders and feedlots, universities and colleges to research stations and government agencies. South of Coronation, Alta., the Biggs family operates TK Ranch, a vertically integrated pasture to plate operation direct marketing dry-aged grass-fed beef, grass-fed lamb, heritage pasture-raised pork and free-range chicken.

JASON HURST Jason Hurst grew up on a cow/calf operation in Ontario, then attended the University of Guelph. After graduating Guelph he started in the feed business and has been advising beef customers since 2009. He works with feedlots, commercial cow calf producers and purebred operations. Together with his wife and family they also manage a cow calf operation in Ontario.

ROY LEWIS, DVM Dr. Roy Lewis has been a large animal veterinary practitioner for over 30 years with a cattle practice in Westlock, Alberta. His interests were herd health and bovine reproduction. Since Spring 2020 he has been doing consulting work in the veterinary field.


AD SIZES & SPECS Ads requiring a bleed should be built to trim size and have images or graphics extended 0.125in beyond each edge. All text and critical elements should be at least 0.5” inside trim edge. We accept ads in PDF or JPG format built to 300 dpi resolution or greater. We do not accept ads built in Microsoft Word, Excel, Powerpoint, Publisher or Adobe Pagemaker. For full specifications, see our online media kit at www.limousinvoice.net

NO CELL PHONE PHOTOS

Cell phone photos will not be accepted, as their poor optical quality, bad light sensitivity, and wide angle lenses generate blurry, noisy or distorted photos that do not accurately represent your cattle. Cell phone cameras do not capture a sufficient number of pixels (enough image data) to use that photo in print.

HOW DOES IMAGE RESOLUTION WORK?

Full Page W 9.75”

11.5” BLEED 0.125”

Half Horizontal

Half Vertical

W 8.55”

W 4.15”

5.03in” BLEED none

H

H

BLEED

H 10.3” none

Digital images are composed of individual dots of stored data, called pixels. Your computer screen or cell phone can display 72 pixels per inch (called display resolution). 300 pixels per inch is the minimum size required by a printing press to produce clear, crisp images (called print resolution). The more pixels an image has, the more detailed it is.

1 inch

at display resolution

Double Page Spread W 19.5”

H

11.5”

BLEED

Quarter Banner 0.125”

W 8.55”  BLEED

Half Double Page Spread W 18.3”

H

5.03”

BLEED

H 2.388” none

(contains 72 pixels)

1 inch

at print resolution

(contains 300 pixels)

Each blue dot at left is a pixel. The dark blue square represents the largest a 1 inch² picture at display resolution could be printed on a printing press and remain crisp.

Images taken at a low resolution (eg. Taken by a cell phone camera) or images that have been downsized cannot be enlarged again and remain crisp. When they are enlarged, the computer ‘makes up’ the missing or deleted pixels, resulting in blurry or ‘pixelated’ images.

Business Card

none

W 4.15”  BLEED

H 2.25” none

IMAGE TAKEN AT WRONG RESOLUTION

IMAGE TAKEN AT RIGHT RESOLUTION

Minimum image size at print resolution

YOUR DIGITAL CAMERA  Set your camera 1 USE to take the highest resolution images.

At display resolution (72 pixels per inch)

SIZE should be 1.5 MB or more! 2 FILE Send as a high resolution JPG. Do Not Resize.

(300 pixels per inch) Width: 8.75in  Height: 6.25in

Width: 36.458 in  Height: 26.042 in

Total Minimum dimensions

2625 pixels wide by 1875 pixels high (regardless of image resolution) Supplied images must be 300dpi. Although we will advise you when your images are low quality, the Limousin Voice is not responsible for blurry or pixelated images.

(1MB = 1000KB)

Do not allow your email to resize or 3 EMAILING down-sample your image.

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

DIGITAL IMAGE SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS

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ADVERTISERS, WANT TO ADD YOUR EVENTS TO THIS CALENDAR?

Email them to publisher@limousinvoice.net

OCTOBER 1–3 OLDS FALL CLASSIC Olds, Alberta

16 A PIECE OF THE PIE J. YORGA FARMS FEMALE SALE

CALENDAR

at the ranch, Flintoft, Saskatchewan

23 COLOURS OF AUTUMN SALE Cookstown, Ontarios

27 MANITOBA AG-EX – 30 Brandon, Manitoba 31 CJLA SCHOLARSHIP & AUSTRALIA TRIP APPLICATION DEADLINE www.limousin.com

NOVEMBER 11 FARMFAIR INTERNATIONAL – 13 Edmonton, Alberta 13 KEN-DOC LIMOUSIN COMPLETE DISPERSAL Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

25 NATIONAL LIMOUSIN SHOW & SOLID GOLD LIMOUSIN "CWA 50TH ANNIVERSARY" SALE

FEBRUARY 21 STEWART LIMOUSIN BULL SALE at the ranch, Stettler, Alberta

28 J. YORGA FARMS BULL SALE at the ranch, Flintoft, Saskatchewan

MARCH 5 HILLVIEW FARMS BULL & FEMALE SALE at the ranch, Morinville, Alberta

11 RICHMOND RANCH BULL & FEMALE SALE at the Ranch, Rumsey, Alberta

Regina, Saskatchewan

DECEMBER 4 EASTERN SHOWCASE LIMOUSIN SALE Hanover, Ontario

9 WESTERN SELECT 10TH ANNIVERSARY LIMOUSIN SALE Lloydminster, Saskatchewan

14 B BAR CATTLE BULL & FEMALE SALE at the ranch, Lucky Lake, Saskatchewan

15 CANADIAN DONORS PREGNANT RECIPIENT ONLINE SALE

14 DIAMOND C RANCH BULL SALE at the Ranch, Ponoka, Alberta

15 ANDREW RANCHES & DEJAGER LIMOUSIN BULL SALE

Bow Slope Shipping Association, Brooks, Alberta

17 BAR 3R LIMOUSIN BULL SALE Crossroads Centre, Oyen, Alberta

19 FULLY LOADED LIMOUSIN BULL SALE Cookstown, Ontario

19 HIGHLAND STOCK FARMS BULL SALE at the Ranch, Bragg Creek, Alberta

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

DLMS.ca

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31 NEW YEARS RESOLUTION 10TH ANNIVERSARY SALE Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan

31 LIMOUSIN LEGACY GENETIC ADVANCEMENT PROJECT

End Date – Samples must be received by lab prior to December 31

APRIL 1 CONTINENTAL CONNECTION BULL SALE at Pinnacle View Limousin, Quesnel, British Columbia

JULY 12 CJLA IMPACT SHOW –16 Olds, Alberta


B

C

D

E

After Hours Limousin Amaglen Limousin Andrew Ranches Arcon Cattle Company

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G

Gardiner Limousin Golden Thread Livestock Images Greenwood

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H

9 47 61

Hansen Limousin Hawkeye Land & Cattle Haystack Acres Highland Stock Farms Hillside Farm Hillview Farms Hi-Valley Limousin Hockridge Farms

62 51 59 29 62 8 62 48 59 61

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J. Yorga Farms

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Ken-Doc Limousin

44

59

L

Lazy A Limousin

60

53

N

Neogen Canada New Life Limousin

28

IFC

Canadian Junior Limousin Impact Show Carlsrhue Cattle Cherway Limousin Cochrane Stock Farms Corad Farms Crown Hill Acres

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Eastern Showcase Sale Eden Meadows Farm

Fouillard Limousin

57

B Bar Cattle Bar 3R Limousin Bar-Dale Limousin Bee Zee Acres Bohrson Marketing Services Bova-Tech Ltd. Bow Valley Genetics

Dan Skeels Davis-Rairdan de Jager Limousin Diamond C Ranch Diamond T Limousin Double B Cattle Co DVAuction

F

49 63 62

P

55 60 60

Payne Livestock Pinnacle View Limousin Plains Limousin Poplarview Stock Farm Posthaven Limousin

IBC

68 BC 1, 59 59 61 62

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Q

Qually-T Limousin

13, 61

R

Richmond Ranch

62

S

Smart Limousin Southbridge Limousin Stewart Limousin Stockmens Insurance

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T

Triple R Limousin

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Venture Livestock Enterprises

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63 59 59 61 51 62 41 4

W Windy Gables Limousin Y

Young Limo Farm

60 46, 60 62 60 60

5, 62 57

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2021

Photo: Jill Renton Livestock Photography

A

ADVERTISERS INDEX

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A Piece

of the Pie

Female sale Mark your calendars

OCTOBER 16, 2021 Offering AT THE RANCH, FLINTOFT, SK

Cows & Heifers Bred for January • Cows & Heifers Bred for Spring • Open Fall Heifers

KELLY AND NORMA YORGA (H) 306-263-4432 (C) 306-642-7023 (F) 306-263-4473 yorgakelly@gmail.com BOX 14, FLINTOFT, SK S0H 1R0

JEFFREY AND KRISTEN YORGA (H) 306-531-5717 jeffyorga@yahoo.ca WH

ERE

LIMO

USIN KEEP GET TING

BET

TE

R


RPY PAYNES JORDAN 52J  RPY PAYNES REDMAN 1G x JYF EMBRACE 504E

KEEPING IT BULLS & FEMALES AVAILABLE BY PRIVATE TREATY

Q Rocky & Debbie Payne

P 306.825.4056 F 306.825.4025

RPY GIBSONS  SHADE 27J ET RPY PAYNES TANK 12G x HSF ZENA Owned with Gibson Farms, Inquiries Welcome

OUR ENTIRE BULL PEN IS AVAILABLE PRIVATELY. FIRST COME- FIRST SERVE Show heifers or herd building packages, whatever you are looking for, we can set you up with quality cattle that are fairly priced. Our 2021 calf crop is mainly made up of Redman and Tank progeny. We are beyond impressed with the job these two RPY bred bulls have done for us. There are also a few calves sired by proven AI sires. Watch Facebook for updated Photos. Please text Cole or Kyle or give Rocky a call for more information. Cole 780.870.8335 Kyle 639.840.2530 E paynelivestock@hmsinet.ca

Box 1997 Lloydminster Saskatchewan Canada S9V 1R5