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FA L L 2020 VO L 16 N U M B ER II

Official Publication of the Canadian Limousin Association

IN THIS ISSUE JUNIORS Samantha & Jocelyn Kennedy take the lead with Limousin MARKETING PUREBRED LIVESTOCK Considerations for long-term success How Commercial producers can utilize DIGITAL BEEF CHANGES in Markets and Genomic Tests


Service Sells

Progeny & Influence, Last CAN Semen Sells

Progeny & Service Sell

TREF Freewheeling 051F

Ivy’s Bubba Watson 24B

RPY Paynes Cracker 17E

B Bar Urban Girl 55E ET

B Bar Foxtrot 21B

B Bar Urban Girl 105C ET

Son Sells

Son Sells, Genetic Influence Sells

Sons & Daughter sell

B Bar Foxtrot 32E

B Bar/HWK Foxtrot 25F ET

B Bar Shania 100C

Son Sells

Son Sells, Brother Sells

Daughter Sells

Sale Consultant

Delaney and Deanna Boon 306.858.7609 ddboon@icloud.com

Eric, Terra, & Rozlyn Boon 306.280.8795 bbarcattleco@gmail.com

Box 181 :: Lucky Lake, SK :: S0L 1Z0 www.bbarcattle.com www.facebook.com/bbarlimousinc.om

Sale managed by


WESTERN SELECT LIMOUSIN SALE

CONTINENTAL CONNECTION BULL SALE

30TH ANNIVERSARY PRODUCTION SALE

WATCH FOR OUR FEMALE CONSIGNMENTS TO THE UPCOMING WESTERN SELECT LIMOUSIN SALE AND STAY TUNED FOR OUR YEARLY CONTINENTAL CONNECTION BULL SALE AS WELL AS OUR 30TH ANNIVERSARY PRODUCTION SALE!

Give us a call and stop by this fall for a tour!

The Swaans & Kishkans

Rob: 250-991-8229 | Erin: 250-991-6654 | Quesnel, BC | kishkan@quesnelbc.com | www.pvlimousin.com


CONTENTS 12 UPDATES TO GROWTH TRAIT PREDICTIONS in Bolt 16 CHANGES IN MARKETS and genomic tests, brought to you by Neogen. 22 A JUNIOR'S POINT OF VIEW

Samantha and Jocelyn Kennedy take the lead with Limousin.

31 MARKETING PUREBRED LIVESTOCK

Considerations for long-term success

50 DIGITAL BEEF

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

2

and how commercial producers can utilize it

CLA Presidents Report CLA Office Update Breed Average EPDs CJLA News CJLA Virtual Impact Show Results OJLA News Provincial News Alberta Saskatchewan Manitoba Québec NALF Report CCA President’s Report Social News Market Reports & Limousin Influence Fall Feeder Sales Herd Health  WHY VACCINE ADMINISTRATION MAY FAIL Masterfeeds  EXTENDING THE GRAZING SEASON Contributors Ad Sizes & Specifications Upcoming Events Advertiser's Index

6 8 14 18 18 30 40 40 41 42 43 44 46 48 49 52 54 60 61 62 63


50

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

FALL 2020

22

31

3


THE 1H by LFLC EASY STREET 107E

FOR SALE

OFF THE FARM BY PRIVATE TREATY

THE 21H by RPY PAYNES DILLINGER 43D

THE 13h by RPY PAYNES DIESEL 37D

BULLS AND FEMALES AVAILABLE REPRESENTING THE QUALITY OF OUR COW HERD

TERRY & LYNETTE HEPPER & FAMILY R.R.#1 Zehner, SK, S0G 5K0 306.781.4628 or 306.536.7075 Find us on Facebook Eden Meadows Farm


A DIFFERENT WORLD TODAY

SAME GREAT GENETICS FOR TOMORROW ...

SELLING LIMITED SEMEN PACKAGES on this proven calving ease sire at the COLOURS OF AUTUMN Limousin Sale

HEW DBCC Flatliner 05F ET

Homo Polled • WGL calves by Flatliner have averaged 80lbs at birth with no help required on heifers. Calves are full of VIGOR and GO! Semen owned with Double B Cattle Company and Hewson Land and Cattle

WGL 14G

Greenwood PLD Zambuka x LRF 11W Safe to Flatliner and one of the rare Zambuka bred heifers available

WGL 19G

Flemington Legend x Greenwood PLD Treffic An outcross genetic package straight from the basis of our herd. • Homo Polled and Safe to Flatliner 05F ET

CWG 28G

Greenwood Encore x Greenwood Beretta A beautifully made Homo Polled heifer safe to Flatliner 05F ET • Owned with Clark Cattle

Bred heifers also on consignment by WGL Crowley 1C, Greenwood PLD Zambuka and Greenwood Curve Ball

THE COLOURS OF AUTUMN SALE OCTOBER

24 , 2020

AT THE COOKSTOWN STOCKYARDS, COOKSTOWN ONTARIO

Bryce and Nathan Allen PO Box 189, RR#4 Warkworth, Ontario K0K3K0 Nathan 705-761-9426 nathana@alleninsurance.ca Bryce 705-924-2583 brycea@alleninsuraance.ca


CLA PRESIDENT

6

PRESIDENTS REPORT

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

Amanda Matthews

I

I hope this edition of The Voice finds you in good health. 2020 has come with its challenges, however Agriculture, especially the cattle business, is resilient.

Our board responsibility is not just around a table, but it is to represent the good of the Association and its members. At our December 2019 meeting we put forth a structured effort to represent our Association to the best of our abilities. We put together a set of goals to work towards in 2020, the main being to inspire respect between breeder to breeder. We want to protect the time-honoured handshake between buyer and seller. The Canadian Limousin Association has a set of bylaws that were created for our members to adhere to, and for the board to utilize to uphold the integrity of our breed. All of us should believe in these strongly. We will take the routes necessary to protect the membership and the Association. This leads into the model of creating value in our membership, as many of you have heard rumblings, we will be restructuring our DNA bylaws to be user friendly and to begin to create a data base that we can draw genomic information from. We are working on a genotyping project, where we will be able to offer a reduced cost on lab services in conjunction with Neogen Canada. This is an exciting opportunity for our membership. We will also be increasing our random DNA pulls through the membership. This allows us to make sure that our herd book is accurate. I would recommend while running animals through the chute this fall for preg-checking and weaning, that you take the time to keep a sample of tail hair. Store it in a cool and dry place and then you won’t be scrambling when you potentially receive a request. This can be a simple addition to your chute side practices. I encourage everyone to reach out to fellow breeders to arrange private tours, or just to visit about the calf crop. We will certainly be all missing each other, with the cancellation of many of the fall shows. I am so pleased to have announced that our CJLA Virtual Show was a success, and a big thanks to Laura Ecklund and Amy Miller for their efforts, as well as CJLA President Samantha Kennedy and her junior board. We hopefully will be able to be all together again very soon at the Impact Show 2021 in Ontario.

Amanda Matthews CLA PRESIDENT


CANADIAN LIMOUSIN ASSOCIATION

#13, 4101 – 19 Street N.E. Calgary, Alberta T2E 7C4 Phone: 403.253.7309 Toll Free: 1.866.886.1605 Fax: 403.253.1704 www.limousin.com

CLA STAFF

General Manager & Canadian Junior Limousin Association Coordinator

Limousin Voice Advertising Representative & Editor

Tessa Verbeek 403.636.1066 Laura Ecklund 403.559.9849 info@limousin.com tverbeek@limousin.com / cjla@limousin.com

Registry & Member Services

Nicole Scott & Shayla Chappell 403.253.7309 limousin@limousin.com

CLA BOARD OF DIRECTORS PRESIDENT Amanda Matthews Alberta 403.470.1812 amandagracematthews@gmail.com

CLA DIRECTORS

VICE PRESIDENT Wayne Burgess Alberta 403.813.8416 vleburgess@gmail.com

Ontario

TREASURER Cody Miller Alberta 780.349.0644 codymiller8@gmail.com

Saskatchewan

Carey Hirschfeld 306.441.3723 bchirsch@hotmail.com Dan Darling 905.375.4019 dmdarling13@gmail.com Mike Geddes 519.502.8864 mikegeddes@jfm.ca Matthew Heleniak 519.537.1451 matth@norpacbeef.com

PAST PRESIDENT Erin Kishkan British Columbia 250.747.3836 kishkan@quesnelbc.com

PROVINCIAL ASSOCIATION PRESIDENTS

British Columbia

Ontario

Alberta

Quebec

Saskatchewan

Maritimes

Mike Geddes 519.375.6230 mikegeddes@jfm.ca

Cameron Olson Serge Dethier 403.999.1682 450.454.6456 cameron_olson@aggienetwork.com dianejoly19@hotmail.com Eric Martens 306.391.9019 ermartens@hotmail.ca

Manitoba

Travis Hunter 204.838.2019 diamondtlimo@gmail.com

John-Calvin Siddall 902.664.8008 jfsiddall@nsac.ca

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

Photo by Jenna Loveridge

Erin Kishkan 250.747.3836 kishkan@quesnelbc.com

7


OFFICE UPDATE/ NOUVELLES DU BUREAU DE L’ALC

Bon, le monde n’était pas prêt pour le chaos que 2020 à apporter. Les termes comme rencontre virtuel et distanciaon social sont devenu une pare de notre langue quodienne. Par contre, il peut avoir du posif dans les situaons difficile. L’industrie de boeuf c’est adapté rapidement et a trouvé des nouveaux façons de faire affaire et de vendre des taureaux. Comme Associaon on a trouvé de nouveaux méthodes pour desservis nos membres et pour performer nos tâches quodiennes. Ces méthodes vont bien servis l’Associaon pour longtemps. On veut remercier les membres pour leurs paence ce printemps pendant la fermeture de nos bureau pendant 2 mois du au Covid-19. Aussi on a vécu des changements majeurs de personnel pendant ces mois. Il y avait des délais pour cee période, mais je suis contente d’annoncer qu’on est revenu à une cédule normale. On était content d'accueillir Nicole Sco dans notre équipe en avril cee année.

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

Nicole vient d’une ferme Limousin et elle a parcipé dans le programme junior. Elle est une bonne addion à notre équipe et une voix amicale en rendant service à nos membres.

8

Le conseil du CLA a tenu une assemblé virtuel de deux jours cet été avec succès. Ça faite preuve d’un succès et le conseil a pris des décisions important qui vont protéger les membres et l’intégrité du livre généalogique de Limousin. Cet automne le CLA va introduire un projet génotype en collaboraon avec Neogen Canada. Les taureaux et femelles reproducteurs peuvent se qualifiés pour des tests GGP-uLD ou GGP-100k à un prix réduit au cours de la prochaine année. Svp appel le bureau ou visite le site web pour plus de détails. Plusieurs de nos membres ont commencé à uliser des TSU pour leurs échanllons de ADN. On comprend qu’il a eu un apprenssage pour tous impliqués dans cee procès. Avec l’aide de Neogen Canada on a rassemblé plusieurs ressources pour aider avec la collecon, entreposage et la soumission des échanllons. Ces ressources ainsi qu’une magnifique vidéo soumis par Darling Farms peuvent être trouvés sur le site web du CLA pour vous aider. Si vous avez 20

échanllons ou plus à soumere, on vous demande d’envoyer un courriel à l’Associaon avec un fichier excel qui comprend le taoo de l’animal et le numéro du code de l’échanllon. Vous pouvez entrer les codes manuellement ou par les scanner. Quand vous demandez de l’ADN, quelqu’un du CLA va vous aviser si le fichier électronique doit être soumis aussi. On aimerait remercier l’Associaon Shorthorn de Canada pour leurs confiance en nous pour administrer leurs travaux d’enregistrements pendant les 3 dernières années. En décembre de cee année le contrat de deux ans entre les deux associaons prend fin. Shayla Chappell retourne en Saskatchewan pour travailler avec l’Associaon Shorthorn en janvier 2021. On aimerait féliciter les membres du CJLA d’avoir fait leurs meilleurs possible dans les circonstances bizarres, avec la première version du CJLA Impact Show en version virtuel. Le show virtuel avait une bonne parcipaon avec 41 juniors et 64 têtes. J’aimerais Amanda Mahews pour leurs travail exceponnel sur cet événement. Le conseil du CJLA a aussi tenue une assemblé virtuel en août qui a vu une bonne parcipaon par des juniors partout au Canada. Il y avait 8 juniors qui souhaitez faire pare du nouveau conseil du CJLA cee année. Félicitaons à Bianca Byers, Kira Axley et Joe Sco, et aussi à Cheyenne Porter et Madi Lewis qui ont été réélus. Le CJLA est une programme solide qui aide dans la développement de nos futurs leaders de la race Limousin, on devra être tous fiers! Je vous souhaite du bon succès quand les veaux avec l’influence Limousin sort du pâturage. On veut vous rappeler qu’on offre sans frais une liste de veaux commercials sur le site web du CLA et sur les réseaux sociaux, svp prend avantage de cee service. Rappelez vous de tagger ces veaux avec les tags rose Limousin qui sont disponible à l’année sur le site web du CCIA. Rester posif et concentré sur les bonnes choses qui se sont produits en 2020.


BY / PAR

We would like to thank the membership for their patience this spring as we closed the office for two months due to Covid-19 and had staff working from home. We also went through a significant staff change during these months. There were delays in turnaround during this time, but I am happy to report we are back to the normal schedule. We were excited to have Nicole Scott join our registry staff in April this year. Nicole comes from a Limousin background and has participated in the junior program. She has been a great fit to our team and is a friendly voice providing registry service to our membership. The CLA Board of Directors held a successful two-day virtual summer board meeting to conduct the business of the Association. This proved to be a successful method to host this meeting and the board was able to make important decisions that will protect the membership and the integrity of the Limousin herdbook. This fall the CLA will introduce a genotype project in conjunction with Neogen Canada. Bulls and breeding females will qualify for GGP-uLD or GGP-100K testing at a reduced rate over the course of the next year. Please call the office or visit the website for details about this important initiative. Many of our members have started using TSU’s for their DNA samples. We recognize there has been a learning curve for all parties involved in this process. With the help of Neogen Canada we have put together numerous resources to help with the collection, storage and submitting of TSU samples. These resources as well as

a great video submitted by Darling Farms can be found on the CLA website to help with the process. If you are submitting a large batch of samples of 20 or more, we ask that you e-mail the Association an Excel file with the animal’s tattoos and the samples barcode. The barcodes can be entered in the file using a barcode scanner or by manually typing them. When you request DNA, CLA staff will advise you if the electronic file needs to be submitted. We would like to thank the Canadian Shorthorn Association for trusting us with their registry work over the past 3 years. December of this year marks the end of the contract between the two Associations. Shayla Chappell will be moving home to Saskatchewan to work in-house with the Shorthorn Association come January 2021. We would like to congratulate our CJLA members for making the most of an unconventional year by hosting the first ever CJLA Virtual Impact Show. The virtual show was well supported with 41 juniors and 64 head. I would like to thank the CJLA Board of Directors, Amy Miller and Amanda Matthews for their hard work on this show. The CJLA board also hosted a virtual AGM in August that was well attended by juniors across Canada. There were 8 juniors running for board positions this year. Congratulations to newly elected board members Bianca Byers, Kira Axley and Joe Scott and to re-elected members Cheyenne Porter and Madi Lewis. The CJLA is a strong junior program building leaders that will ensure the success of the Limousin breed, we should all be very proud! Wishing you good luck this fall as Limousin influenced calves come off grass. We would like to remind you that we offer complimentary commercial calf listings on the CLA website and social media, please take advantage of this service. Remember to tag those calves with pink Limousin tags which are available year-round at the CCIA webstore. Stay positive and focus on the good things that have come out of 2020.

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

Well, the world was certainly not prepared for the chaos that has come with 2020. Terms such as virtual meetings and social distancing have become a part of our everyday language. However, good things can still come out of tough situations. The cattle industry quickly adapted this spring and found new ways to conduct business and to sell bulls. As an Association we have learned new ways to efficiently serve the membership and to perform our daily administrative tasks. These will serve the Association well long term.

CLA OFFICE UPDATE

Laura Ecklund

9


5 0

Y E A R S

R A I S I N G

L I M O U S I N

C A T T L E

"THEY'RE ALL GREAT ONES..."

18TH ANNUAL BULL SALE

MAR 20, 2021 AT THE RANCH

The Matthews Family – Rob & Marci 403.585.8660 Amanda 403.470.1812 highlandstockfarms@gmail.com highlandstockfarms.ca

Y O U R

S O U R C E

F O R

H O M O Z Y G O U S

P O L L E D

G E N E T I C S


Performance, Pedigree and Personality

AND AFTER DATA COLLECTION AND CONSISTENCY SINCE '82

PREDICTABILITY BULLS & FEMALES AVAILABLE BY PRIVATE TREATY Junior/4-H Heifer Calf prospects, bred heifers, proven cows and bulls for sale

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AMAGLEN LIMOUSIN

Amanda & Clint Seward • Ian & Bonnie Hamilton Box 55, Darlingford, MB R0G 0L0 Amanda and Clint: 204 246-2576 • Amanda Cell: 204 823-2286 Ian and Bonnie: 204-246-2312 • Ian's Cell: 204-823-1240 amaglen@inetlink.ca

Since 1982

One of the Platinum Elite Herds in Canada What you measure, you can manage!

KEEP AN EYE ON WWW.AMAGLENLIMOUSIN.CA AND FACEBOOK THIS FALL


12

WRITTEN BY

Bob Weaber, Ph.D, Professor, Kansas State University

UPDATES TO

GROWTH TRAIT PREDICTIONS

IN BOLT

W

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

hen the current genetic evaluation system at International Genetic Solutions (IGS), powered by BOLT software, was deployed several years ago, it was viewed as a ‘quantum leap’ forward in genetic prediction. IGS is the current service entity that runs genetic evaluation services for more than a dozen partner breeds including NALF and the Canadian Limousin Association. Single-step utilization of genomic data was the key feature of the new evaluation methodology proving EPD for growth, maternal, calving ease and carcass traits. As with any system, it is constantly evolving. Over the last year several US and Australian breed organizations have joined the partnership as well as Neogen. The IGS science team has been busy evolving the models used to produce EPD and several genomic data processing improvements. The goal of each of the changes has been to improve the prediction of growth traits. The improvements result in more accurate EPD that do a better job of predicting progeny performance. Several of the changes to the evaluation system are outlined below and were deployed during August of 2020. Genomics tools have revolutionized livestock improvement systems around the globe. With many of IGS partner breeds now routinely submitting genotypes to the evaluation, development of a new genomics pipeline was needed.

This new data pathway from genotype lab to evaluation software features a new multibreed imputation process to provide better predicted genotypes from a variety of genotype marker density products. The new process has been in service since late summer 2019 and appears to be performing very well. A planned update in the marker subset used in the evaluation was also deployed. The subset used in production represent the first marker selection for markers that had genetic association with more than one trait in the evaluation. Not all makers of the approximately 50,000 used as the imputation target or on the 50K genotype platform influence a trait. In fact, a vast majority don’t. The new marker subset was constructed to use a reduced set where each marker had impact on at least one trait eliminating the forced correlation structure between traits. The number of markers were reduced to a minimal set to avoid overfitting the genetic model and introduction of noise and maximize prediction accuracy. Another improvement to the weaning weight model is a change to the genetic correlation between weaning weight direct (calf growth) and milk (weaning weight influenced by maternal environment). This correlation had been set at -0.3 since the evaluation was performed at Cornell. The new model uses a ‘0’ correlation. There exists a wide range


It’s well documented that male calves grow faster than female calves. As a result, there tends to be more phenotypic variation in the weight measurements of males versus females. The updated evaluation system models the variance amongst records for the genders differently, providing better predictions. The last major change is the implementation of a method to handle different methods of collecting birth weights. When the IGS science team began looking at the growth trait data they observed that not all reported data followed expected amounts of variation. Much of that difference stems from different methods used to observe birth weights. Sometimes producers report in two- or five-pound increments due to the scale used. Other producers may use a hoof tape to estimate weights which substantially reduces variation. In some cases, the data was clearly fabricated (all weights in the group were equal) or the result of using standardized weights when none was reported. A machine learning algorithm was developed to classify birth data contemporary groups. Once classified, the useful records are included in the evaluation accounting for the differences in variation for each classification. Clearly falsified data is omitted from the evaluation. Last, but still very important, the IGS science team has conducted a wide range of validation studies to evaluate the performance of the current production model and new features proposed for deployment in the upgraded evaluation system. The updates resulted in substantial improvements in the predictive capacity of the EPDs produced. One statistical approach used to evaluate the performance of the two EPD systems is the correlation between animals’ EPDs and the adjusted performance records when their data was not included in the analysis. A second criteria was an analysis to detect prediction bias. In effect the test evaluated the relationship between an animal’s adjusted phenotype and it’s EPD for that trait. A departure in the test parameter from 1 indicated a bias. The test parameter of 1 indicated a one-unit change in EPD was associated with a one-unit change in adjusted phenotype. The proposed improvements in the evaluation resulted in decreases in bias and improvement in the predictive accuracy of the EPDs across the birth, weaning and yearling weight and milk evaluations.

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

Photos courtesy Tessa Verbeek

of estimates for this correlation in the scientific literature. The science team has agreed that considering those differences the best approach is to treat them as independent traits (correlation of zero). One impact of the change will be removal of downward pressure on Milk EPD for very high growth animals that is observed in the current production run. In the case of non-parents with high WW EPD, Milk EPD was being adjusted downward without any daughter calf records in the analysis.

13


ACTIVE SIRES AVERAGE

GEST

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

TM

CEM

SC

STAY

DOC

YG

CW

CREA

MARB

CFAT

-2.9

9

2.0

59

84

23

53

5

0.6

12

11

-0.77

14

1.21

-0.48 -0.16

GEST

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

TM

CEM

SC

STAY

DOC

YG

CW

CREA

MARB

-2.5

9

2.5

55

76

24

52

5

0.5

14

9

-0.80

10

1.18

-0.52 -0.17

GEST

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

TM

CEM

SC

STAY

DOC

YG

CW

CREA

MARB

-2.7

9

2.3

58

82

24

53

5

0.6

14

10

-0.79

13

1.20

-0.51 -0.17

ACTIVE DAMS AVERAGE

CFAT

NON-PARENTS AVERAGE

GEST Gestation Length (higher value = longer gestation length)

SC Scrotal (higher value = sons have larger scrotal,

CED Calving Ease Direct (higher value = greater calving ease)

daughters mature earlier)

BW Birth Weight (higher value = larger birth weight)

STAY Stayability (higher value = greater chance daughters will

WW Weaning Weight (higher value = heavier calves

stay productive in herd longer) DOC Docility (higher value = more docile progeny) YG Yield Grade (higher value = better yield) CW Carcass Weight (higher value = heavier carcasses) CREA Rib Eye Area (higher value = larger rib eye area) MARB Marbling (higher value = additional marbling) CFAT Back Fat (higher value = more back fat)

at weaning) YW Yearling Weight (higher value = heavier calves at 1 year) MILK Milk (higher value = additional milk from daughters TM Total Maternal (higher value = cow has calves with higher weaning weights) CEM Calving Ease Maternal (higher value = greater calving- ease in first-calf daughters)

CFAT

LIMOUSIN

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

BREED AVERAGE EPDS

14

All breeds do not need the same scrotal size, which means you can’t compare Limousin with other breeds because scrotal size will be different, and Limousin will need less scrotal size than other breeds to do the job. Scrotal circumference is a trait which is moderately to highly heritable. Research indicates that testicle size is an excellent indicator of age at puberty of a sire's daughters and is also related to seminal quality and quantity.

AVERAGE SCROTAL CIRCUMFERENCE FOR LIMOUSIN BULLS

SUGGESTED MINIMUM SCROTAL MEASUREMENT REQUIREMENTS FOR LIMOUSIN BULLS AGE (MONTHS)

SC (CM)

12

29 CM

AGE (MONTHS)

SC (CM)

13

30 CM

12

31.5 CM

14

31 CM

24*

35.7 CM

15

31.5 CM

16-20

32 CM

21-30

33 CM

*Bottom 10th percentile = 33 cm


PROUD SUPPORTER & PURCHASER OF FEEDER & FINISHED LIMOUSIN CATTLE

A family run beef processor located in Ontario Contact Matthew if you have Limousin feeder cattle available for purchase. Matthew Heleniak | (519) 537-1451 | matth@norpacbeef.com 11 Robson Street, Norwich, Ontario www.hawkeyelandandcattle.com

THE BEEF PEOPLE


WRITTEN BY

Nicki Westerlund

Western Canada Territory Manager Beef Genomics

NEOGEN CANADA

CHANGES IN MARKETS AND GENOMIC TESTS

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

T

his spring we have seen many changes in our global economy and the beef market is no exception. The supply chains were interrupted as consumer demand fluctuated. Although the high-quality, nutritious beef that Canada produces remained constant, consumers became more aware of beef supply and quality. With increased awareness, it is important to not only maintain production but be constantly looking for ways to improve it. So how can we use genomic testing to not only help mitigate market changes but capitalize on them? Neogen Canada has products for both the seedstock and commercial producers to help ride the tides of a changing marketplace. For seedstock producers, genotyping tests are available to help select the most desired traits in your breeding stock at an early age of the animal. Parentage testing verifies sire performance and guarantees accurate pedigree reporting. Commercial producers also can run genomic profiles on their animals to help make herd decisions. The DNA testing that is available to seedstock producers determines the genotype of each animal and provides the genomically enhanced expected progeny differences (gEPDs). The difference of gEDPs over traditional expected progeny differences (EDPs) is accuracy. An animals gEPDs will have a higher rate of accuracy over traditional EPDs This is because gEPDs factor each animals’ genetic potential into

16


their evaluation. gEPDs give insight into an animal’s heritable traits before the animal has even had a single offspring, potentially saving a breeder time and money by only making breeding decisions based on desired traits, thus ensuring herd/breed improvement. The tests that will generate gEPDs are the GGP-30k and the GGP-100k (formerly the GGP50k). Both the GGP-30k and 100k include parentage verification to verify the predicted sire is the true sire. This allows for accurate recorded pedigrees. The difference between the 30k and 100k tests, simply put, is the density. The GGP-30k test analyzes 30,000 markers while the GGP-100k analyzes 100,000. The GGP-100k is a higher density panel, therefore this test is used on highly prolific animals (i.e., AI sires, ET dams, and prolific herd sires) that contribute a great deal of genetic material to the entire herd through their many offspring. The GGP-100k test allows different genetic conditions such as coat colour or horn/polled testing to be ran because of the higher that is applied to the assay. Other genetic conditions can be tested when the 100k test is ran.

A very important aspect of genetic testing to understand and embrace is that gEPDs/ EPDs and Igenity® beef are powerful tools to make genetic change in herds. They are an objective indicator of the heritable genetic merit of the animal which is how we can use them to make breeding and breed improvement decisions. They are also a marketing tool available to producers. Whether the goal is marketing carcass traits for selling your farm to table product or promoting low birth weight bulls, genomic testing is an investment that can help improve your herd as well as your bottom line. Knowing the depth of your herds genetics and what you are building can help to mitigate any market uncertainties or changes. Always keep in mind that DNA testing is not the be all end all and should be used in combination with other selection practices such as conformation, soundness and management practices. Using and marketing gEPD’s will be the best investment to generate not only the most income back to your herd but the longevity of the breed and industry.

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

If you are a commercial producer, you also have options to use genomic testing in your commercial herd. The Igenity® Beef Profile is a genomic profile tool to use on either cross bred or straight bred cattle. With 16 traits and three indexes plus parentage, this DNA profile helps you make more confident decisions. Using the Igenity® Beef Profile much like gEPDs you can identify animals that have the most heritable traits in your herd for future generations. The Igenity® Beef Profile evaluates 16 different traits and generates a 1-10 score on each trait to help you sort and rank cattle, see patterns, strengths, weaknesses, areas of improvement and create custom indexes to meet your goals. This 1-10 number is based on beef cattle records and genetics in the International Genetic Solutions (IGS) database. IGS is the genomic evaluation provider for most North American beef breeds thus providing you with the most accurate and relevant data in relation to your animals in your operation. The following traits are evaluated in the profile; birth weight, calving ease direct, calving ease maternal, stayability, heifer pregnancy, docility, milk, residual feed intake, average daily gain, weaning weight, yearling weight, tenderness, marbling, ribeye area, fat thickness, and hot carcass weight. An example of how using the Igenity® indexes to increase your return on investment is selecting replacement with the goal of raising weaning weight average score by one Igenity point on 250 cows boosts calf production by 1,750 pounds per year. That can equate to a thicker bottom line for a commercial producer.

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SPECIAL REPORT

SUBMITTED BY

Jocelyn Kennedy

CANADIAN JUNIOR LIMOUSIN ASSOCIATION NEWS

A

lthough 2020 has brought many difficulties, it has been a great year! The CJLA has continued to be represented well throughout the country through many virtual shows and competitions including our own CJLA Virtual Impact Show. Following the postponement of the 2020 CJLA Impact Show that was supposed to be held in Spencerville, Ont., the board decided to hold a Virtual Impact Show. The competitions that were offered included conformation classes, marketing, photography, artwork, and graphic design. There were 41 juniors and 64 head that competed in the virtual show. We would like to thank our judges, Jordan Buba, Sam Cunningham, and Erica Halliday for judging the cattle and Katie Songer for judging the other competitions. We would also like to thank Amy Miller and Amanda Matthews for all their work they did as our volunteers for the virtual show. It is greatly appreciated!

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

On August 25, 2020 the CJLA held our Virtual AGM over Zoom as we were unable to have our meeting in person this year. We would like to thank the juniors who attended for being there and participating!

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At the AGM, we elected a new Board of Directors. Our new board consists of Kaitlyn Davey, Jocelyn Kennedy, Sienna Bohrson, Madi Lewis, Cheyenne Porter, Joe Scott, Bianca Byers, and Kira Axley. We would like to welcome our new board members, Joe Scott, Bianca Byers, and Kira Axley!

This year, we had two outgoing directors, Samantha Kennedy and Jackie Wismer. Thank you to Samantha and Jackie for your time, dedication, and great work you did while on the CJLA Board of Directors! In April, we unfortunately had to postpone the 2020 CJLA Impact Show due to COVID-19. We are very excited to hold the 2021 CJLA Impact Show, July 28-31, 2021 in Spencerville, Ont. We hope to see you there! Photo by Cheyenne Porter, Senior Photography Winner


CONFORMATION JUDGES

Jordan Buba, Sam Cunningham, and Erica Halliday

CJLA VIRTUAL IMPACT SHOW RESULTS

1

1. The Grand Champion Female & Champion Yearling Heifer Pinch Hill Gingersnap 911G (Koyle Earmark 16E x Pinch Hill Xuberance 13X) exhibited by Liam Banks 2. The Reserve Champion Female & Champion Cow/Calf Loyal Line Xena (RUNL Trinity 390T x Loyal Line No Bodys Gal ) with Loyal Line Heavy Metal (by Romn Made To Order) at side exhibited by Michaela Rodger

2

Champion Purebred Heifer Calf Loyal Line Hillary (Edwards Chevy ET x Loyal Line Ugly Betty) exhibited by Michaela Rodger

Reserve Purebred Heifer Calf Lakeside Hells Angel (TMF Darby 136D x TMF Miss 41Y) exhibited by Bailey Lawrence

Division Third Heifer Calf Crown Hill Harper Jade 3H (CJSL Windfall 9072W x WGL Avery Jade 16A) exhibited by Samantha Kennedy

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

DIVISION CHAMPIONS

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Reserve Purebred Yearling Heifer After Hours Gracen (Greenwood Explicid PYN 705E ET x Pinnacle's Zina 38Z) exhibited by Caden Martin

Reserve Cow/Calf Pair Pinch Hill Fruitloops 802F ET (RCL Wind Chill 8B X ATJ Polled Royalty) with calf Pinch Hill Honey Combs 019H (Koyle Earmark 16E) exhibited by Jaelyn Homer

Champion Commercial Heifer Calf PLNS Hera 29H (RPY Paynes Diesel 37D) exhibited by Cheyenne Porter

Division Third Yearling Heifer Anchor B Georgia Rain 5G (Cole Architect 08A X Anchor B Ava 7A) exhibited by Riley Bohrson

Division Third Cow/Calf Pair Boothville Friskey Whiskey (B Bar Granite 57C X Boothville Blossom) with Boothville Hollywood 3H (EDW Boss Hog) exhibited by Caden Martin

Reserve Commercial Heifer Calf PLNS Harmonia 53H (RPY Paynes Diesel 37D) exhibited by Austin Porter

SKILLS CHAMPIONS

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

SHOW RESULTS CJLA VIRTUAL IMPACT SHOW

CHAMPION ARTWORK

RESERVE ARTWORK

3RD PLACE ARTWORK

PEEWEE

JESSA MARTENS

BAILEY LAWRENCE

SADIE ECKLUND

JUNIOR

JACKSON MARTENS

INTERMEDIATE

AUSTIN PORTER

JOCELYN KENNEDY

EMMA QUALLY

SENIOR

TYLER MURRAY

SARAH BRYANS

CHEYENNE PORTER

CHAMPION MARKETING

RESERVE MARKETING

3RD PLACE MARKETING

PEEWEE

BAILEY LAWRENCE

JESSA MARTENS

JUNIOR

JACKSON MARTENS

PAIGE GRANT

EMMA QUALLY

ALEX MCNALLY

BIANCA BYERS

SARAH BRYANS

CHAMPION GRAPHIC DESIGN

RESERVE GRAPHIC DESIGN

3RD PLACE GRAPHIC DESIGN

JUNIOR

JACKSON MARTENS

JAYSON LABIUK

WHITNEY LABIUK

INTERMEDIATE

JOCELYN KENNEDY

AUSTIN PORTER

EMMA QUALLY

SENIOR

CHEYENNE PORTER

SARAH BRYANS

BIANCA BYERS

INTERMEDIATE SENIOR


Champion Commercial Cow/Calf Pair Triple 'J' Fenix (Greenwood Canadian Ways ET) exhibited by Jayson Labiuk

Champion Market Animal Triple J Grid Iron exhibited by Whitney Labiuk

Division Third Commercial Cow/Calf Pair Ferrari (HLC Disel 16D) with Hot Rod (RPY Paynes Cracker) exhibited by Cedar Hayne

Reserve Champion Commercial Cow/Calf Pair Triple 'J' Fiesta (Greenwood Canadian Impact ET) exhibited by Whitney Labiuk

Reserve Champion Market Animal Gonzo exhibited by Avery Bohrson

SKILLS CHAMPIONS

Champion Commercial Yearling Heifer Gidget (SYC It's Time for a Bud 526D) exhibited by Cheyenne Symens

CHAMPION PHOTOGRAPHY

RESERVE PHOTOGRAPHY

3RD PLACE PHOTOGRAPHY

PEEWEE

BAILEY LAWRENCE

EMILY LAWRENCE

SADIE ECKLUND

JUNIOR

CEDAR HAYNE

JAYSON LABIUK

AVERY BOHRSON

INTERMEDIATE

CADEN MARTIN

PAIGE GRANT

EMMA QUALLY

CHEYENNE PORTER

KAITLYN DAVEY

SAMANTHA KENNEDY

SENIOR

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

Photo by Jill Renton with CattleVids

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22

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020


23

WRITTEN BY

PHOTOGRAPHY

Tessa Verbeek

ShowChampions, Jill Renton

A JUNIOR'S POINT OF VIEW

SAMANTHA & JOCELYN KENNEDY

Image courtesy ShowChampions

Growing up, the girls did not always know they wanted to be involved in agriculture. Samantha went to high school in the city and was contemplating architecture as a career path. It was her involvement in 4-H, initially with a small flock of Suffolk sheep, that sparked her interest. She soon began to show cattle and her interest in animals blossomed from there.

Younger sister, Jocelyn, found herself tagging along to the 4-H shows and fairs and by 7 years of age she was also showing cattle alongside her sister. The Crown Hill Acres’ cattle operation was founded in 1978, when Craig’s father, Murray Kennedy, purchased five Charolais, Hereford, and Simmental cows. A Limousin bull was chosen to breed the cows and the superior natural muscling ability and carcass characteristics of the Limousin breed quickly made Limousin the basis of the herd. Samantha and Jocelyn’s father, Craig, took over the herd of 25 commercial Limousin females and began purchasing purebred Limousin heifers to add to the program and Samantha began showing them. She soon attended her first

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

W

ithin Kawartha Lakes, Ont. between the cities of Peterborough and Lindsay, the community of Omemee is home to Crown Hill Acres. Craig and Michelle Kennedy’s two daughters, 21-year-old Samantha and 15-year-old Jocelyn have been taking the lead, both figuratively and literally, when it comes to showing their families purebred Limousin herd.


24 CJLA Impact Show and the family started registering their purebred cattle with the Canadian Limousin Association. In 2015, the first Limousin calf with the CHA prefix was born. Their herd has now progressed to around 30 head of registered red and black Limousin cows. Primarily utilizing artificial insemination, the Kennedy’s calve two groups, one in January and one in April. The focus of their breeding program is around consistency and breeding cattle that are sound and functional while also being competitive in the show ring.

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

“It is important that every calf we raise is good quality and has great performance from birth, whether we sell them as stockers or breeding stock,” Samantha says, “Limousin cattle were the answer for farmers looking for carcass quality when our Grandpa bought a bull 40 years ago, and they still are. The quality of our calves has increased immensely.” Jocelyn goes on to say, “The purebred Limousin and LimFlex calves we raise are structurally sound, have great natural muscle, and the females are outstanding mothers. Besides good conformation, we are able to breed the perfect balance of performance and style with calving ease, milking ability and docility.” The Kennedy sisters spend a great deal of time making their breeding decisions for each cow and watching Limousin sales across the country for new females to introduce to their program. They are excited about the future of the breed as the junior program and membership continue to grow, as does the


SHOWING CATTLE HAS PROVIDED ME WITH SO MANY SKILLS THAT ARE APPLICABLE TO ALL ASPECTS OF MY LIFE."

“I really enjoyed working with my fellow board members and juniors across the country,” Samantha speaks to her time on the CJLA Board of Directors, “During my time as a junior I have attended five Impact Shows and have had the opportunity to travel all over Canada to show and connect with Limousin breeders and other juniors. I am so thankful for the opportunities the CJLA has given me and being involved in the Association has shaped me into the person I am today.” “Every Impact Show I have attended I have made so many memories with other juniors from across the country,” she goes on to add, “The moments I remember the most are not the prizes or classes I won, it’s the other juniors and the fun we had doing the competitions and social activities at the show. Showing cattle has provided me with so many skills that are applicable to all aspects of my life. Learning how to judge and speak on a microphone in front of a crowd of people is a skill I am grateful to have learned by attending the Impact Shows. Marketing skills and learning important aspects to selling cattle and how to understand pedigrees are all things I have learned from showing cattle that will benefit me forever. Most of all, hard work and determination are the biggest skills I will take with me wherever I go.” 2015 was the first time Jocelyn had attended an Impact Show and she has since exhibited in three more. In 2019 she joined the CJLA Board of Directors and is currently the Press Reporter. “Over the last 5 years, I have had the opportunity to meet amazing people from all across the country. They have taught me a lot, not only about cattle, but also about myself. I have made many life-long friends and the memories we share are special to me,” Jocelyn says, “The

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

Image courtesy ShowChampions Image courtesy Jill Renton with CattleVids

"The moments I remember the most are not the prizes I won, it’s the other juniors and the fun we had...

quality of the cattle and their commercial use. The work that Canadian Limousin breeders have done to breed for docility, style, soundness and mothering ability, without giving up the characteristics that make Limousin functional and profitable has made the breed a valuable cross over almost any type of cow herd. Limousin has also provided Samantha and Jocelyn with many opportunities to prove themselves in the show ring. By the second time she attended the Canadian Junior Limousin Association (CJLA) Impact Show in 2015, Samantha was hooked. She joined the CJLA Board of Directors and in her last year as a CJLA member, she was elected President of the CJLA.

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dedication, perseverance, patience, and work ethic I have gained in the last few years will definitely be some things that I take away from showing.” Samantha and Jocelyn set their sights high with each new animal each year. In 2019 Samantha set a goal with her heifer TMF Shameless that she would win showmanship at her 4-H achievement, 4-H regionals, the OJLA Provincial show, and the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair. She achieved all of those goals as well as winning Grand Champion Limousin Female at Lindsay Ex, and took her to Canadian Western Agribition to compete in the RBC Beef Supreme. “That has been my greatest accomplishment of my show career and I am so proud of how far our breeding program has progressed over the past 5 years.”

26

Image courtesy Jill Renton with CattleVids

Image courtesy ShowChampions

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

"EVEN IF YOU DON’T MAKE IT TO THE CHAMPION DRIVE, YOU SHOULD STILL HAVE A GOOD ATTITUDE AND GIVE YOUR BEST EFFORT."


Jocelyn’s proudest moment also came in 2019 at the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair when she was a junior showmanship finalist in the National Junior Beef Heifer Show. “This was special because I was showing a heifer that I worked very hard on all year.” Samantha has lived by the quotes, “No matter how bad the situation is, never let go of the rope,” and “You can’t control an outcome, but you can always control your attitude and effort,” both in and out of the showring. She adds, “Never give up on your dreams, never have doubts and just work hard for it. If the going gets tough just hold on tighter and never let go of the things you are passionate about. Just like how you would never let go of the halter of a calf you’re training and let them get away. Persevere – if you want it, you can work for it, and achieve it. The work you put in and the traits you gain because of it will benefit you.” “Even if you don’t win a show or make it to the champion drive, you should still have a good attitude and give your best effort,” Jocelyn remarks, “At the end of the day, you will find that you have gained many important characteristics because of the work you have done, which you will use in other aspects of your life. Finally, be proud of yourself. When you get something accomplished or you achieve a goal, be proud of yourself because isn’t easy.” Samantha credits Brian and Holli Lee for exposing her to experiences and people that taught her about showmanship, clipping and the business aspects of the cattle industry, “They truly started my journey in the breed, and I am forever thankful for them.” She goes on to thank Wayne and Anne Burgess as well as Laura Ecklund for their mentorship,

Jocelyn credits her sister, Sam, as being the most influential in teaching her most of what she knows about showing cattle, “She has been my biggest rival in the show ring but also my teacher, and my teammate. Sam’s successes have motivated me as one day, I want to be as successful as she has been. She has always pushed me to be a better show person and has always supported me. For many years, I have admired her passion, work ethic, and determination as well as all her successes.”

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

“Laura Ecklund has been a great mentor for me on the junior board,” Samantha says, “she is someone I have always looked up to and has given me the confidence to be a leader and take on challenges with optimism.”

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LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

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Jocelyn goes on to say, “My dad has always been someone I look up to the most. He has taught me about agriculture and has gotten me involved in the farm. His work ethic, strength, and love are things about him that I admire the most. My grandfather, Murray Kennedy, has been a mentor and has had a large influence in my life. Without him, I would not be where I am today. I admired him very much, the work he did, and the knowledge he had.” Samantha is in her final year of post-secondary education at the University of Guelph and will graduate with a bachelor’s degree in

With a number of years as a CJLA member still ahead of her, Jocelyn plans to soon start her own herd of Limousin under her own prefix. Samantha won’t be far away, and looks forward to continuing to be involved as a volunteer helping with the Ontario Junior Limousin Association or helping organize the Impact Show. We will no doubt be seeing both of the Kennedy sisters down the road at junior Limousin events for many years to come.

29

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

“Both great cattleman who have taught me everything I need to know about raising cattle and the industry,” Samantha remarks.

Agricultural Science with an Animal Science major. She intends to pursue a post graduate degree in animal reproduction and aspires to have a career in large animal embryology and reproductive health. Jocelyn is entering grade 10 this year and has a passion for math and science. Samantha’s stories of Guelph have sparked her curiosity and she wishes to go into agriculture science as well as thinking about a future career in kinesiology.

Image courtesy ShowChampions

Never hesitating to lend cattle for the Kennedy sisters to show, Terry, Lynette, Erin and Sara Hepper have been a source of advice and encouragement for Samantha and Jocelyn. Most of all, though, their late grandfather, Murray Kennedy, and their father, Craig Kennedy have had the largest influence on them,


NEWS

ONTARIO JUNIOR LIMOUSIN ASSOCIATION

SUBMITTED BY

Jocelyn Kennedy

With the difficulties that 2020 has brought us, the OJLA has still been represented well through various virtual shows. The CJLA hosted a Virtual Impact Show following the cancellation of the 2020 CJLA Impact Show that was to be held in Spencerville, Ont. There were 21 exhibitors from Ontario that competed in the virtual show. Congratulations to all exhibitors who competed in the CJLA Virtual Impact Show. A special congratulations to Liam Banks who exhibited the Grand Champion Female, as well as Michaela Rodger who exhibited the Reserve Grand Champion Female. Ontario was represented very well! The OLA is holding a scholarship competition for active OJLA members. The deadline for the OLA 50 Years Forward Scholarship is October 1, 2020. In the video, juniors will speak about a topic related to Limousin cattle. Video submissions are to be submitted over Dropbox to Emily. gibson0707@gmail.com. Visit the OJLA Facebook page for more information.

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

The 2021 CJLA Impact Show is to be held July 28-31 2021, in Spencerville, Ont. We are very excited for this show as the 2020 show was postponed. We hope to see you there!

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Greenwood Can. Impact x HBD 4Y 2019 CWA Grand Champion Female 2019 Limousin Miss World

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LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

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LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

32


WRITTEN BY

Tessa Verbeek

PART FOUR OF SIX

PUREBRED LIVESTOCK MARKETING

A terrible thing happens when you don’t advertise – nothing.

I

n this segment, we will discuss some of the main forms of larger investment advertising, how to build a better print ad and considerations when formulating your advertising budget and evaluating success.

Print BREED PUBLICATIONS Breed specific publications are a tried and true way to reach not only all of your fellow breeders but also commercial cattlemen that are already buying bulls from your breed. While we would all like to advocate the merits of our respective breeds and make ‘converts’ out of so and so who’s Daddy and Granddaddy only ever raised (insert breed here)… the reality is that the most likely person to buy the breed of bulls you are offering is someone who is already investing in that breed. Your breed association publication is distributing their publication to all of those commercial buyers who have purchased from members of the Association. In this way, it could be argued that the potential interest per dollar spent is likely to be exponentially higher since every recipient of the publication is at least interested in the breed you have to offer. INDUSTRY PUBLICATIONS

There are a number of industry publications that cattlemen frequently advertise in. These include national and provincial beef magazines, as well as other agricultural magazines if you feel your customer base is reading those. For example, if the majority of the bull buyers that would be in your potential customer base also have crops you may want to consider advertising in a grain industry publication. The competition for attention may be less than beef publications where there is a cow or bull on every page.

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

ShowChampions, Barn Girls

33


"YOU MAY WANT TO ORGANIZE YOUR OWN FIELD DAY WITH OTHER BREEDERS WHERE YOU CAN EACH BRING YOUR BEST ANIMALS TOGETHER FOR A DAY OF SOCIALIZING."

34 RURAL NEWSPAPERS

Seek out options for special bull sale inserts outside of your local area. Consider advertising not only in your local newspaper but perhaps especially in publications local to the majority of your customer base. Your own pleased customers will be your best advertising of all, better yet when their neighbours recognize your operation’s name.

could be utilized solely for web and social media or professional videos, and perhaps commentary, of your sale lots could be included and a hard copy DVD could be sent to your customers. Both traditional television advertisements, as well as the ideas of web-based or hard copy videos, would tend to be some of the more expensive forms of marketing. WEBSITE BANNER ADS & LINKS

RADIO

Radio advertisements may seem old-school, but when it comes to selling cattle and reaching your customer base, they may be the most relevant avenue to your audience. They are also quite affordable. Whether in the truck, the tractor or the farmhouse kitchen, it is a rare occasion for the radio to not be on. If you are fortunate to have an agriculture-based station that the majority of farmers and ranchers in your area or province listen to, the decision of which station to advertise on is easy. If your station has a farm report that airs daily, that may be the most appropriate timeslot to advertise in. Radio advertising is best saved for the week or so prior to your event (i.e. bull sale or field day).

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

TELEVISION & VIDEO

While our friends south of the border have significantly more options for advertising through television channels such as RFD-TV, you may want to consider thinking outside of the box when it comes to digital promotion efforts. There are a number of agriculture specific videography companies that could come to your place and capture video footage, messages from the owners and testimonies from customers and craft it into a breathtaking short video. With the advent of drone footage, and the addition of some timely music placement, these can turn your ‘ordinary’ operation into something that appears to be out of a movie. This

Many cattle related websites such as breed associations, livestock marketing agencies, and industry groups offer advertising space on their websites for a cost. The goal of this type of advertisement is to drive traffic to your website – therefore ensuring your website is up to date is imperative. As with all forms of advertising, consider your customer base when deciding if and where to spend your budget in the online advertising space. As mentioned in Part 2 of this series, targeted Facebook advertising campaigns can be a highly cost-effective way of reaching your target market, especially if you have a sale to promote or animals selling by private treaty. SHOWS

It could be said that your cattle are as much of an advertisement, good or bad, as any paid advertising. We certainly all hope our animals are a truly good reflection of our operation. While it is also an investment-heavy means of advertising, showing your livestock is the best way to get your actual product, not just words or pictures, out in front of a captive audience. Provided you have done the work ahead of time in terms of proper feeding and training and have sufficient equipment and help to make it a successful endeavour, showing can serve as a means of advertising, customer and interbreeder relationship building, and a whole lot of fun for your entire family. And, if glue and sheen are all a little much for you, but you still like the premise of getting


Photo courtesy Barn Girls.

Images courtesy Barn Girls

your stock in front of people, look into entering into a pen show. These are widely popular with commercial cattlemen. Alternatively, you may want to organize your own field day with other breeders where you can each bring your best animals together for a day of socializing.

Although donations and sponsorship may be done purely as an act of good will, they are also a form of advertisement. Sponsorship can help to create and maintain brand awareness, while also demonstrating your good character and care for the betterment of the organization or event you are donating to. BUILD A BETTER AD

Headline, Tagline, Copy, Call to Action, Contact Info – Your headline should be attention grabbing. It may simply be the name of your sale or the sire you are promoting or it may be more creative and tie into the graphic elements of your ad.

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

SPONSORSHIP

35


The tagline is often your operation’s slogan such as “Family owned and operated since 1970”. While more widely used in main stream corporate advertising (i.e. McDonald’s® i’m lovin’ it®), a tagline can certainly be effective in livestock advertising, but is optional. Most livestock advertisements include some type of advertisement copy, or text. This may be animals pedigrees, performance information, show accomplishments, notable relatives, or other selling points.

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

A call to action, simply put, is the take away message of the advertisement and gives the reader an idea of the next step to be taken after reading the ad. This can simply be an invitation to your sale or event with the date, location and time or a statement such as “Contact us for your next herd sire”.

36

Contact information is imperative to every advertisement. Most advertisements generally include the owner name(s), phone number(s), e-mail, website, and possibly social media URL or icons. PHOTOS

It is absolutely imperative that photos, especially for printed publications, be high-resolution images taken with a digital camera, not a cell phone. Even the most advanced cell phones that appear to take stunning images do not have the ability to capture the sufficient number of pixels (enough image date to use the photo in print without it becoming blurry or distorted when blown up to the size necessary for publications. If taking your own photos ensure you set your digital camera to take the highest resolution images. Send files as a high-resolution JPG (1.5 MB file size minimum). Do not re-


37 "MANY AGRICULTURAL BUSINESSES SET THEIR ADVERTISING BUDGET AT 2% TO 5% OF GROSS ANNUAL SALES" Photo courtesy Top Stock

MARKETING PARTNERS DIRECTORY PHOTOGRAPHY & VIDEOGRAPHY GOLDEN THREAD LIVESTOCK IMAGES

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Team members located in Ontario, Saskatchewan & Alberta Sarah Buchanan

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GRAPHIC DESIGN ADFARM

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SALES MANAGEMENT BOHRSON MARKETING SERVICES LTD. Image courtesy ShowChampions

Olds, AB Scott & Rebecca Bohrson

1.403.370.3010 bohrsonmarketing@gmail.com www.bohrson.com

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

GRAPHIC DESIGN & VIDEOGRAPHY


38

"GOOD ADVERTISING IS NOT AN EXPENSE – BUT AN INVESTMENT"

size your images yourself and do not allow your e-mail to resize or down sample your image when sending to the graphic designer. When taking your own background photos for an advertisement (i.e. a herd shot or an image of a cow/calf pair on pasture) a good rule of thumb is to leave ample space around your subjects. Zooming in too closely without leaving some landscape constricts space that may be necessary for the text on the ad. When making an investment in a printed advertisement, it is ideal to also invest in professional photographs, especially of the animals, so as to present your livestock in the very best way possible. Always schedule photographers with ample advance time to shoot, edit and receive the photos back to be sent onto your graphic designer.

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

INFORMATION TO PROVIDE

Provide your graphic designer with all of the written information you would like included in the advertisement. This may include the headline, tagline, call to action and, if applicable, sale date/location/time, and all contact information. Double check the information before you send it and triple check the proof you receive back. You may also provide the graphic designer with specific ideas or requests, or show them examples of other advertisements you like. Ultimately though, it is their artistic eye and skill that you are paying them for so let them do their work and you will always have the opportunity to proof and ask for changes to be made. Once you begin working with a professional to design your advertisements, it will be easy for them to help you maintain consistency throughout all of your promotional efforts by utilizing the same colour scheme, text, and design elements to maintain that important brand recognition that I spoke about in Part 1 of this series.

Image courtesy Barn Girls

ADVERTISING BUDGET

Although absolutely essential, advertising does come at a cost. While there is certainly no one-size-fits-all approach, “Many agricultural businesses set their advertising budget at 2% to 5% of gross annual sales,” says Cole Christiansen, President of Cole’s Ag Communications. It is wise to establish an advertising budget, and a well thought out advertising plan, each year. You may also want to budget a bit of excess for unexpected publication deals that may arise. The ideal advertising plan includes a calculated mix of advertising mediums. Remember the old adage about not keeping all of your eggs in one basket? The same applies to advertising. Your target customers are unlikely to all be reached via solely one method of advertising. Make efforts to keep your brand in front of your audience year-round, even if your ‘off-season’ efforts are more minimal and less costly. When you are preparing for your own annual sale or other big event, or have consigned animals to a sale, your advertising efforts should ramp up significantly. In our next issue, I will be delving into developing your sale planning checklist, including timeline suggestions for advertising efforts. EVALUATING SUCCESS

Unlike the hard measurements and numbers that come at weaning time to evaluate the success of this year’s calf crop, evaluating your advertising success is a lot less tangible to measure. It is still necessary, though. Simply asking new inquirers how they heard about you is a great starting point. Each year, determine which customers were new buyers and how they found your operation. We are all looking for ways to cut costs, likely more so now than ever. However, tough times are not the time to let up on advertising. While results are not always immediate, remember that the longer a company, sale or animal is advertised, the better. Good advertising is not an expense, but an investment.


LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020


NEWS ALBERTA

I am as surprised as everyone else to discover that it is already midAugust. Recent overnight temperatures indicate that my South African wife will soon be lamenting her absence from the Cape’s more “amicable” climate. I am going to avoid the “as-you-read-this” speculation in this report, because honestly it probably will not be correct given the pattern of the previous seven months. ANNOUNCEMENTS

The ALA board decided to postpone our AGM and Field Day, originally scheduled for June 21. We are relieved to announce that we have established Saturday, October 24, 2020 as the new date for the AGM. Please plan to join us for lunch at noon and a meeting starting promptly at 1 pm in the Stettler Community Centre.

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

At that meeting, directors Lois Andrew and Tiffany Richmond will be finished their 3 year terms. On behalf of the ALA, I extend my sincere appreciation to Tiffany and Lois for their continued efforts to improve the association and the breed.

40

ALA BOARD EFFORTS

The ALA regrets that the Bull Buyer Draw was not able to be completed prior to the first bull sale of the season. In order to avoid this next year and in the future, the new deadline for animals to be submitted to the CLA for transfer is now December 15, 2020. This will ensure the CLA is able to create the list required to do the draw and avoid the crunch time associated with Christmas and WHE in early January. Please note that animals submitted after the December 15, 2020 cutoff will be entered in the draw for early 2022, not the draw for early 2021.

SUBMITTED BY

Cameron Olson

The ALA has created a new set of bylaws for approval by our membership. The new bylaws are easier to operate under and lend clarity to certain areas. We look forward to presenting the new bylaws to you soon, and encourage you to read them carefully and remember that bylaws can be amended by a majority vote at any meeting of the membership when amendments are announced ahead of time. Many thanks to Tiffany Richmond, Wayne Burgess, and Amy Miller for their efforts to review and comment on the revision process. NEW MEMBERS

Welcome to new ALA members Allan and Lorrie Mattie of LAM Limousin, Mirror, AB and Darren and Chase High of High Cattle Company, Crossfield, AB! Remember, if you are a Limousin breeder or you utilize Limousin genetics in your operation, the ALA would like to count you among our membership. Membership forms can be found on the website, and all are welcome – you need not be a breeder of purebred cattle or a member of the CLA to participate in the ALA. Further, the board of the ALA would like to remind members to keep thinking of ways to improve the association – please feel free to contact any board member with ideas for new events, programs, or draws to improve our reach into the commercial beef industry in Alberta. We produce an excellent product – help the ALA help you!


NEWS SASKATCHEWAN

SUBMITTED BY

Jean Hewson

Saskatchewan is experiencing, like all of the world, an unprecedented pandemic and it has had a huge affect on the beef industry. It has forced the cancellation of 4-H events, as well as the summer and fall (Brandon, Agribition, Olds, Farmfair) cattle shows. However, there is still optimism that the Lloydminster Stockade will still be held at the end of October. The SLA met on June 26 at the Harbour Golf Clubhouse for their Annual meeting and their first regular meeting. Elections were held for directors. SASKATCHEWAN LIMOUSIN BOARD OF DIRECTORS President:

Eric Martens ♦ Vice-President: Ashton Hewson ♦ Treasurer: Janet Hale ♦ Secretary: Jean Hewson ♦ Directors: Terry Hepper, Bob Turner, Jeff Yorga, Jay Borhson & Lee Carpenter

Be safe and have a safe harvest and may your Limousin calves bring top dollar!

Quality

THE YOU’LL FIND IN OUR PENS Come for a tour and watch for our fall sale consignments

GREENWOOD PLD Electric

SCOTT AND JACKIE, JAYDEN & JAXON PAYNE

Home 306.825.4328 Jackie 780.870.8184 Jayden 306.821.2260 Jaxon 306.830.0456 PO Box 159 • Lloydminster • SK S9V 0Y1 • greenwoodlimo@mcsnet.ca

Impact

702A

GREENWOOD Canadian

Impact ET

Cattle, semen and embryos always for sale

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

GREENWOOD PLD Ally 702A

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NEWS MANITOBA It has been a really quiet summer for M.L.A. events due to Covid. Fairs and exhibitions were all cancelled throughout Manitoba so there was no provincial summer show and our picnic/pasture tour was also cancelled. Some of the 4-H clubs were able to hold their achievements through small on-farm shows and sales, virtual online shows, and private treaty sales. Congratulations and thanks to the leaders and volunteers for pushing ahead and making things happen. It's great to see our 4-H members reap the benefits of their year’s work and learn that things can still happen by thinking out of the box. The M.L.A. presented 22 tokens to 4-H members that exhibited a Limousin animal. Congratulations to them.

SUBMITTED BY

Travis Hunter

All of the fall cattle shows have been cancelled for this year including the Manitoba AG-EX. This is a major hit for the cattle industry across Canada. How will this affect our promotion, marketing and sales? From a personal aspect I will miss the visiting and socializing with fellow breeders and analyzing the quality Limousin cattle on display. Enjoy your read through this issue of the Voice, stay safe and healthy and lets beat this Covid 19. 4-H Members enjoying their Limousin Projects: 1.Lilly Seward 2. and 3. Tyler Scott with his heifer and steer projects 4. Laura Seward 5. Chase Cochrane 6. Brooklyn Cochrane 7. Wyatt Cochrane 8. Courtney Cochrane 9. Rose Cochrane

2

1

3 5

6

8

9

4 LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

7

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NEWS/NOUVELLES DU QUÉBEC

SUBMITTED BY / SOUMIS PAR

Diane Joly

ENTRIES AT THE BEAUCE BULL TEST STATION, SAINT-MARTIN

ENTRÉE DES TAUREAUX À LA STATION GÉNÉTIQUE DE LA BEAUCE, SAINT-MARTIN

Tuesday, September 22nd, the Beauce bull test station in SaintMartin opened its doors for the 24th year to receive young bulls to begin their evaluation. You can easily follow their progress on the Agr-Réseau website by using this link: https:// www.agrireseau.net/. Always looking to improve the genetic quality of the Limousin breed, the breeders will be happy to meet with you at the sale on Saturday, February 20, 2021.

Mardi, le 22 septembre dernier, la Station génétique de la Beauce à Saint-Martin ouvrait ses portes pour sa 24ième année d'opération afin d'accueillir de jeunes taureaux pour procéder à leur évaluation génétique. Il vous sera facile de retrouver l'évolution des taureaux Limousin sur le site de Agri Réseau sur le lien suivant: https://www.agrireseau.net/. Toujours préoccupés par l'amélioration génétique de la race Limousin, les producteurs participants seront fiers de vous rencontrer lors de la vente à l'encan qui se tiendra le samedi, 20 février 2021.

COVID 19

COVID 19

In these difficult times that we are all experiencing, why not look for one positive aspect.

En ces temps difficiles que nous traversons tous en raison de l'arrivée sur la planète du coronavirus depuis mars 2020, pourquoi ne pas essayer d'en voir au moins un côté positif.

It is in this spirit that the website LE PANIER BLEU, financed by the Quebec government, was launched to encourage buying local and supporting our producers. Just like BoeufQuébec. com, producers who sell beef off the farm can register and help make known the exceptional qualities of the Limousin breed.

C 'est dans cet esprit que le site internet LE PANIER BLEU, financé par le gouvernement du Québec a été lancé afin de dynamiser l'achat local et favoriser les produits et les entreprises d'ici. Tout comme pour BoeufQuébec.com, les éleveurs qui font la vente de viande à la ferme peuvent s'inscrire gratuitement et ainsi faire connaître les qualités bouchères exceptionnelles de la race Limousin.

Phone: 1 (306) 664-3458 Email: info@houghtonboston.com If we’ve learnt anything from the wee coos of Scotland over the years, it’s that great things can come in small packages. At Houghton Boston Printers in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, we specialize in low and high volume ‘cattle-logue’ printing and we’d love to work with you.

Proudly Printing on the Canadian Prairies for over 100 Years

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

www.houghtonboston.com

43


WRITTEN BY

Mark Anderson

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

Hello from your Limousin friends from the South. Much has changed throughout the world and both of our nations since the advent of Covid-19. The world economy and the way we do business has adjusted dramatically over the previous 7 months. As you are aware in Canada, agriculture producers and the cattle business in particular, were hurt financially as essential food producers took the brunt of the economic loss in the food chain production system we have in place in America.

44

There were few shutdowns in production agriculture. Cattle still had to be calved bred, fed, vaccinated and marketed. Crops still had to be planted. While most of the nation sheltered in place, agriculture moved forward in spite of severe market declines. Perhaps much of the world finally came to the revelation the essential food items were not produced by magic in a grocery store, but rather were the result of the toil and dedication of the American rancher and farmer who continue to produce a perishable food product that also comes with inherent market risk and financial exposure. Cattle markets realized severe declines as packing houses reduced hours at slaughter facilities or had to temporarily shut down due to Covid. This dramatically hurt fed cattle prices as backlogs developed in the country as fed cattle supplies backed up. This in-turn hurt commercial feeder cattle demand and prices for the commercial cow operator all while they watched retail prices rise at the grocery store and increasing profit margins for the packer and retailer across the nation. No doubt,

NORTH AMERICAN LIMOUSIN

FOUNDATION REPORT

this economic pressure also spilled over into the seedstock business during bull sale season as commercial cow/calf operators tightened their belt during the peak of the sale season. Regardless of the current circumstances, the agriculture industry continues to move forward. Fed and feeder cattle markets have begun to recover as we move into the fall. The backlog of fed cattle that devasted the feeding industry this summer has been cleaned up with packing houses running again. Through these challenging times NALF and its membership have charged ahead and continue to stay the course of providing commercial cattle operators superior Limousin and Lim-Flex® genetics. NALF has had a successful year is spite of the implications that Covid-19 has brought due to the determination of membership continuing in their mission to provide valuable genetics into the commercial cattle industry. This year, NALF has had an increase of members who have enrolled in the LIMS, whole herd reporting program. The increased interest in LIMS was spurred by the LIMVision Cow Herd Project in partnership with Neogen. This collaborative effort with Neogen enables LIMS members to obtain more affordable 50K testing on their mature cowherds for the price of $24.00 per head versus the regular $55.00 retail price. To qualify, the member must submit DNA on 90% of their mature cows enrolled in LIMS to take advantage of the discounted price and can also


This lets a member genomically test the female portion of their herd or their “Cow Factory” at a more affordable price versus regular retail cost. This also qualifies that member to obtain that discounted rate every year on their replacement females to keep their cowherd current and achieve higher accuracy on their EPDs and expanded progeny equivalents acquired through genomic testing. In the NALF herdbook, genomically enhanced testing has increased dramatically the past three years but the bulk of this has been on bull sale offerings, A.I. sires and donor dams. To reach our full potential in an effort to increase expected mating accuracy, genotyping the female portion of our herd book is just as important. The increased progeny equivalents of 15-20 head on weight trait EPDs that are achieved with the IGS cattle evaluation when also incorporating performance and pedigree data has been a game changer for the seedstock industry. As you are aware in Canada, IGS recently released the long awaited new EPD set with adjustments to growth trait predictions referred to as “Work Order 1”. The updated marker panel subsets were applied to growth trait prediction models in addition to adjusting the milk EPD that was previously hurting our high growth young sires along with the exclusion of genomic marker effect on the milk EPD. This has been adjusted beneficially to not be as detrimental to those young, high growth low accuracy sires. Over the last couple of years, the massive research undertaking has been going on to modernize the evaluation of growth traits (Birth Weight, Weaning Weight, Yearling Weight and Milk). Below, is a brief description of each update followed by the impact of these collective changes on NALF EPD. These changes are expected to be incorporated into the production run generated from IGS back on the week of August 17th. The changes made include: 1. A new definition of contemporary groups based on the age of the dam. Calves born to first-calf females will be placed in a separate contemporary group. 2. Setting the genetic correlation between weaning weight maternal (milk) and weaning weight direct to 0 (compared to - 0.3). There has been debate in the scientific literature about the degree and direction of genetic correlations between direct and maternal weaning weight. Previously, the IGS evaluation used a moderate negative correlation. This meant that young, unproven animals with high growth potential often saw negative impact on their milk EPD when their own growth data was submitted or when a genomic test was done. The correlation in the new model will be set to zero. This should impact animals with low accuracies the most.Different variances for different

sexes (heterogeneous variance). Bull calves typically have higher growth potential than heifers, which means the variation in their weights is also greater. The new model will account for this difference. 3. New DNA Marker subset. Since BOLT-powered EPDs were released, many more animals have been genotyped, and many more performance records have been submitted. As a result, new, more informative markers were able to be deciphered. The new EPDs will employ this new, larger marker set on the growth traits. 4. Accounting for different birth weight collection methods. Upon closer analysis of birth weight data, it became apparent that different reporting and collection methods were being used. These methods ranged from reporting in 2lb or 5lb increments, to data that was obviously from hoof tapes instead of scales, to clearly fabricated data. New methods allow for the identification and proper accounting for these various collection methods. 5. Not including genomic effects for Weaning Weight Maternal (Milk). The current genetic evaluation marker effects for both WW and Milk. However, in the new evaluation the ability for the genomic part of the EPD calculations for Milk to be performed caused problems with the overall efficiency of the weekly evaluation. Therefore, the decision was made to remove the genomic component for Milk. Even with the removal of this information, work done to judge the efficacy of EPDs, shows that the resulting EPDs from the updated model are an improvement over the previous evaluation. Thanks to Wulf Cattle, NALF is also in the process of an exciting project to incorporate thousands of records of actual carcass data harvested through Wulf’s BeefBuilder® program that will dramatically increase utilized sire accuracy of carcass trait data into the evaluation. Actual carcass trait data of cattle harvested to a logical slaughter endpoint is rare in seedstock evaluations. Until now, these phenotypes have mainly relied on ultrasound data for inclusion into the EPDs of yield Grade, back fat, marbling and ribeye and carcass weight. Incorporating this actual kill data along with pedigree information will dramatically increase EPD accuracy for those traits and over time, increase progeny equivalents on genomically enhanced carcass EPDs as well. The cattle business, and in particular the seedstock industry continues to evolve and improve at a rapid pace given the leap forward in DNA testing (genomics) and improved single-step national cattle evaluations that have given the serious seedstock breeder the tools to make rapid genetic progress. NALF looks forward to working with the Canadian Limousin Association as we move ahead into a new era of seedstock cattle production over the next decade!

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

receive an additional $3/head discount by submitting body condition scores and weights on their mature cows.

45


CANADIAN CATTLEMEN'S ASSOCIATION

PRESIDENT'S REPORT

Photo from Canadian Beef "Gratitude Video" produced in collaboration with the Canadian Roundtable for Sustainable Beef

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

It’s a privilege to address you for the first time through this column as President of the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA). In the five months since taking over CCA’s leadership from David HaywoodFarmer, much has changed with the arrival of confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Canada in March 2020. The Canadian beef industry quickly mobilized and had to adapt to new protocols to help limit the spread of this virus and navigate these uncertain times one day at a time.

46

The CCA quickly pulled together a number of working groups consisting of representatives from CCA and our partners within the Canadian beef industry to manage and coordinate the response. To help keep cattle producers and the industry informed during these uncertain times, a COVID-19 resources section was developed on the CCA website. In addition, CCA launched a number of virtual events such as media town halls, producer town halls and the Virtual News Roundup to enhance information sharing. CCA also developed and submitted to the Government of Canada recommendations and asks to provide meaningful assistance to Canada’s beef producers during the COVID-19 pandemic. Following the Prime Minister’s announcement of an initial investment in the agriculture sector on May 5, 2020, CCA has continued to meet with Parliamentarians regarding the impacts of COVID-19.

WRITTEN BY

Bob Lowe President, CCA

Since this announcement, our recommendations and discussions have focused on changes to business risk management programs (BRM) programs, set-aside programs to address the backlog of cattle, continual investment in resiliency within the packing industry, as well as economic resiliency, specifically related to international trade. I believe that agriculture and the Canadian beef industry are well-positioned to help Canada with its economic recovery and future growth, but strategic investments are needed to support our industry, cattle producers and food system. On August 6, 2020, CCA provided input into the next federal budget through written submission for the Finance Committee’s pre-budget consultations. Below is a snapshot of the some of the key recommendations shared in our submission. The temporary processing plant shutdowns in May 2020 and extreme market volatility due to COVID-19 have presented cattle producers with significant challenges. These unforeseen challenges highlight the critical importance of cattle producers having access to well-designed and sufficiently funded business risk management (BRM) tools. Aspects of the BRM programs, including program spending, design, and lack of availability, provide inequitable coverage across the different agricultural sectors and regions.


CCA continues to recommend enhancements to the AgriStability program, including the removal of the reference margin limit (RML) and addressing the $3 million payment cap. To bring more tangible evidence to federal and provincial governments that demonstrate why these program changes are needed, CCA has partnered with the Alberta Cattle Feeders’ Association, Beef Farmers of Ontario and New Brunswick Cattle Producers to conduct a number of AgriStability modeling exercises with MNP to show the impact of reference margin limiting, trigger percentages and payment caps.

CAA continues to strongly support and encourages the continued expansion of free trade and the optimization of current agreements as well as efforts to maintain and strengthen the World Trade Organization (WTO). Of particular importance is advancing the Canada-United Kingdom (U.K.) trade relationship prior to January 2021, when the U.K. officially parts from the European Union (E.U.). We are a world leader in the production of high-quality beef, with 50 per cent of our total production being exported to 58 countries around the world. CCA is pleased that our access into world markets has improved in recent years thanks to new trade agreements such as the Canada-United States (U.S.)-Mexico Agreement (CUSMA), the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA), and the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for TransPacific Partnership (CPTPP). We look forward to continuing our engagement and dialogue with the federal government following the Federal-ProvincialTerritorial (FPT) meetings this fall and offering real solutions to policymakers on issues facing cattle producers during these uncertain times.

ANNUAL BULL & FEMALE SALE

MARCH 6, 2021 AT THE RANCH

LARGE SELECTION OF 2 YEAR OLD & YEARLING BULLS AND SELECT HEIFERS

Character is like a tree and Reputation is its shadow

RAYMOND & CORINE VERBEEK HOME (780) 939-2173 | RAYMOND (780) 982-2176 COLIN, TESSA, & RYLIN VERBEEK COLIN (780) 982-1676 | TESSA (403) 636-1066 Morinville, Alberta | crverbeek@xplornet.ca | www.hillviewfarmslimousin.com

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

In addition, CCA recognizes the value of the Western Livestock Price Insurance Program (WLPIP) as a risk management tool to cattle producers and continues to advocate for price insurance to be a permanent program and available to all cattle producers across Canada. A lack of risk management tools available in the maritime region increases the price risk and limits the options for young producers in accessing financial support. We are eager to work with provincial and federal governments to create an Eastern Settlement Index under WLPIP, which would contribute to national price insurance coverage. In June, the Eastern Price Insurance project started and has two phases. The first phase will assess data availability for developing feeder and calf price indices utilizing data from Ontario and Quebec. This requires lot level data from auction markets, similar to what is used in the west. The second phase will develop the feeder and price indices and complete a historical analysis to evaluate years with big swings in prices. The project is scheduled to be completed in April 2021.

47


SOCIAL NEWS

STOCKING THE HERD

1

2

1 Curtis

Bielecki and Brittney Hofer welcomed Olivia Mae-Lynne Bielecki 4 weeks early on March 25, 2020 at 3:09 pm weighing 5 lbs 1 oz. After spending some time in the NICU she was able to go home and is strong and healthy.

4

CONDOLENCES

2 TaDomi

and Madeleine Hunt welcomed their second child, a baby boy, Henry William Kenneth Hunt, on July 21, 2020 at 3:52 am. Weighing 7lb 4oz and 21 inches long, he joins big sister Everly as the youngest farm hand at Carlsruhe Cattle Company, Hanover, Ont.

6 Our

condolences to the Black family of Loyal Line Limousin, Goderich, Ont. on the passing on Bryon George Black on May 26, 2020 at 73 years of age. A celebration of Bryon’s life will be held in the future when everyone can gather and share stories in remembrance of such a great man.

3 Congratulations to Keith Boon and Ryley

Bielecki who welcomed their first child, a boy, Kohen Delaney Boon, on March 26, 2020 at 5:08 am in Lloydminster, Sask. He weighed 9 lbs 2 oz. and was 21.5 inches long.

4 Brent and Vicky Black along with big sister

3

5

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

Rachel of Loyal Line Limousin, Goderich, Ont., welcomed twins Rebecca Eileen (6 lbs 13 oz) and Robert George (5 lbs 9 oz) on July 18, 2020.

48

TYING THE KNOT

5 Congratulations

to Bryce Stewart of Stewart Limousin, Stettler, Alta. and Annie Christiansen of Diamond C Ranch, Ponoka, Alta, who were married at Diamond C Ranch on August 2, 2020.

6


STOCKER

LIMOUSIN INFLUENCE FALL FEEDER SALES ONTARIO OCT 2 OCT 30 & NOV 6 OCT 26

NOV 5

NOV 9 & 16 OCT 26 & NOV 2

MARKET REPORT

ALBERTA

Special yearling sale • Cargill Auction Market, Cargill, ON Special Limousin calf sales • David Carson Farms & Auctions Services Ltd., Listowel, ON • Contact Calvin Anstett, 519-881-6623 Commercial calf sale featuring groups of Limousin calves • Ontario Livestock Exchange (OLEX), St. Jacobs, ON • Contact 519-291-2049 Limousin Influence calf sale • Contact 519-884-2082

WEIGHT

STEERS

HEIFERS

900+

177.00 – 186.00

165.00 – 174.00

800 – 899

182.00 – 197.00

171.00 – 182.00

700 – 799

191.00 – 205.00

177.00 – 190.00

600 – 699

199.00 – 212.00

180.00 – 194.00

500 – 599

210.00 – 220.00

186.00 – 197.00

400 – 499

224.00 – 235.00

195.00 – 207.00

WEIGHT

STEERS

HEIFERS

900+

178.94 – 195.00

151.96 – 165.79

800 – 899

181.64 – 203.90

160.73 – 178.95

700 – 799

182.55 – 207.26

169.92 – 190.40

600 – 699

166.80 – 228.99

160.76 – 205.63

500 – 599

199.33 – 247.74

157.31 – 211.32

400 – 499

184.01 – 252.79

164.25 – 216.36

ONTARIO

ALBERTA NOV 6

For week ending Sept 18, 2020

Calf sale featuring Limousin calves • Stettler Auction Mart, Stettler, AB • Contact 403-742-2368 Calf sale featuring Limousin calves • Dryland Cattle Trading, Veteran, AB • Contact 403-575-3772 Calf sale featuring Limousin Calves • Bow Slope Shipping, Brooks, AB • Contact 403-362-5521

“Striving to produce the finest Limousin feeder cattle on the planet”

BULL SALE AT BOW SLOPE SHIPPING AT 2PM, BROOKS, AB

COMMERCIALLY ORIENTED

Limousin

Thank you to our 2020 Buyers

B BAR CATTLE Lucky Lake, SK RICK BARCLAY Erskine, AB BARROWS FARM & RANCH Foremost, AB CONNERS BROTHERS Hanna, AB KETCHMARK RANCH Brooks, AB BETTY AND RANDY LANDIS Hanna, AB

ANDREW RANCHING ANDREW RANCHES

Greg & Linnea Tim, Lois & Clayton

403.377.2572 403.779.2273

LEROY NELSON Scandia, AB NOR-ALTA LIMOUSIN Kinuso, AB R & L FARMS Youngstown, AB RIDGE RANCH Hanna, AB LARRY TANASCHYK Veteran, AB TWISTED K LIMOUSIN Byemoor, AB TYE FEEDYARDS New Brigden, AB

glandrew@eidnet.org tlandrew@netago.ca

YOUNGSTOWN, AB @AndrewRanches

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

DEVELOPING 25 TWO-YEAR OLD BULLS FOR OUR TUESDAY, MARCH 9, 2021

49


WRITTEN BY

Tessa Verbeek

HOW COMMERCIAL HERDS CAN UTILIZE

DIGITAL BEEF

D

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

igitalBeef has served as the online registry and herd management tool of the Canadian Limousin Association (CLA) since 2015. Beyond the multitude of tools DigitalBeef offers CLA members, it is also a valuable resource for commercial cattlemen and women who have an interest in the Limousin breed.

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Anyone can access DigitalBeef through the link on the CLA website www.limousin.com. You do not need to be a CLA member to utilize the DigitalBeef search tools. From the main page you can search for a ranch and obtain their contact information and a listing of their herd, from which you can further view each animal individually if you so choose. An EPD search can be done whereby you can generate a list of animals that fall within EPD criteria of your choosing. The main task most producers wish to accomplish on DigitalBeef is searching for a specific animal. A search can be done by registration number, tattoo, or name (ensure the appropriate search field is checked off). If you are searching by name and having difficulty, try just using part of the name. As DigitalBeef is sensitive to any errors in the name, sometimes just typing one part of the name (i.e. for a bull named King’s Golden Ticket 12G you might want to just search for Golden – you will get a comprehensive list of all animals with


51 When viewing an individual animal’s information, the ‘Performance’ tab contains all of the performance data that has been entered for that animal such as birth, weaning, and yearling weights as well as 205-day and 365-day adjusted weights, scrotal measurement, and carcass ultrasound information, if applicable. This tab will also show how that animal ranked within its contemporary group (herd mates of the same sex, similar in age, and have been raised under the same management conditions, and therefore have had an equal opportunity to perform). The Performance tab is also where ratios can be found. A ratio is the performance on an individual animal relative to the average performance for his or her contemporaries. For example, 10 bull calves at weaning weighed an average of 600 lb. One calf weighed 630 lb., so he is 5% above the average of his contemporaries. His ratio is 105. Ratio = (630 ÷ 600) x 100 = 105

The Canadian Limousin Association assigns registration numbers with prefixes that are specific to the registration type of that animal. CPM  Canadian Purebred Male CPF  Canadian Purebred Female CFM  Canadian Fullblood Male CFF  Canadian Fullblood Female CXM  Canadian Lim-Flex or Percentage Male CXF  Canadian Lim-Flex or Percentage Female URM  Unregistered Male URF  Unregistered Female

If there is an N in place of the C (i.e. NPM or NPF) this indicates an animal from the United States of America’s North American Limousin Association (NALF) herdbook. Bear in mind that NALF does not calculate breed percentages the same as the CLA, and therefore animals that are designated as purebred in the USA may not classify as purebred in Canada. The percentage that is shown on the Canadian DigitalBeef site is the Canadian calculated percentage, but if you view the same animal on the NALF DigitalBeef site or in a catalogue from the United States of America, you may find that the animal has a different Limousin percentage. Whether you are a purebred or commercial producer, you are always welcome to check with the Canadian Limousin Association as to what a specific animal’s percentage would be if it was imported into Canada. The CLA staff can do the math for you and let you know if the animal will be considered purebred (90% or greater Limousin blood) in Canada or not.

While ratios can be a very useful tool for commercial cattlemen and seedstock producers alike to see how an animal stacks up against its peers within a herd, more advanced selection tools, like Expected Progeny Differences (EPDs), provide comparisons among all animals in the breed with greater accuracy. The ‘EPDs’ tab contains the EPD values for each trait, as well as accuracy (closer to 1 indicates higher accuracy), and percentage rank within the breed (i.e. 10 indicates this animal is within the top 10% of the breed for that trait). There is also a visual chart that shows how the animal compares to breed average for each trait. If you have your eye on a yearling or two year old bull, you may wish to pull up the profile of his sire or dam on DigitalBeef and click on the ‘Progeny’ tab. This will give you a listing of all of the progeny of that animal, by year, along with some accompanying data such as birth, weaning and yearling weights (if entered) and ratios in brackets as well as their current status. This can also be useful when researching an AI sire. Finally, the tab titled ‘Pedigree’ will show you the full five generation pedigree of the animal. Each animal within the pedigree can be clicked on and their profile viewed. Should you have any questions, we welcome you to contact the Canadian Limousin Association. The staff is available and more than happy to help commercial producers with navigating the site. They are also able to check for you if your animal’s ownership has been transferred and if the registration paper has been sent. Furthermore, if you are a commercial producer who is interested in utilizing the DigitalBeef platform for record keeping, data recording and submission to the Association, we invite you to please contact the Canadian Limousin Association office for more information. CANADIAN LIMOUSIN ASSOCIATION

Phone: 403.253.7309 Email: limousin@limousin.com

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

that word in their name). You must click the search button on the screen, hitting ‘Enter’ on your keyboard does not work on DigitalBeef.

Another calf weighed 570 lb., which is 5% below the contemporary group average of 600 lb. His ratio is 95. Ratio = (570 ÷ 600) x 100 = 95


HERD HEALTH

WHY VACCINE ADMINISTRATION MAY FAIL WRITTEN BY

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

Dr. Roy Lewis DVM

52

I have always said farmers make a lot of effort along with their veterinarian in selecting their yearly vaccination protocol. The vaccines cost money and effort is required to administer them. We must maximize the immune response to get maximum protection of our livestock, ensuring protection from disease. This is good from both a bio-security standpoint as well as an economic one. Clinical disease such as scours, pneumonia outbreaks or abortions all affect our bottom line. This article will closely outline where vaccine failures happen. Often a small effort or pre-planning and adhering to a few principles can assure you get maximum benefit from your vaccination program.

blustery winter days in a heartbeat so an insulated container can save the day. Depending on how hot or cold it is even the syringe loaded with the vaccine needs to be protected. We ideally want it in the 5-15 degrees Celsius range before administration. Keep in mind, it is going into an animal with a 38-39 degrees Celsius (approximately 100 degrees Fahrenheit) temperature so warmer is better than cooler. If any freezing or crystallization occurs the vaccine is lost and must be disposed of. It is no use giving inactivated substandard vaccine when so much depends on it working properly. Storing vaccines in an insulated container also keeps them out of sunlight which is also a good thing.

Gone are the days when farmers only administered blackleg. This was a fairly tough vaccine – efficacy was fairly high and level of immunity high. In short it was hard to muck it up unless the vaccine expired or was exposed to the elements. Nowadays with multiple vaccines given in any weather and with some being fragile extra care absolutely must be taken. We can all improve how we vaccinate.

If more that one person is vaccinating split the shots over both sides of the neck. Give vaccines subcutaneously wherever possible. It is absolutely imperative that the automatic guns don’t get mixed up half way through processing. With the majority of vaccines now a 2cc dosage, guns are often refilled at the same time and mix-ups can occur. As an example, if you were giving a blackleg vaccine (they often have formalin in the bacterin) and then refilled it with a 4-way modified live vaccine even a very small amount of blackleg vaccine left would inactivate the viral vaccine. The next full syringe of 25 doses would be useless. To avoid this, I closely note the color of the vaccine plus I mark the syringe with the vaccine name. I keep the refill bottles together with the vaccine gun and if two or more shots are given on the same side make a definite separation on the table shelf where they are placed. Likewise, separation on the table needs to be followed by separation at the site of injection. I recommend at least 10 cm distance (hand width) between injection sites and the farther the better. In order to follow up with vaccine reactions, if they occur, always give one vaccine, for

With multiple shots now given it is best to first establish which diseases you are most concerned about and then establish which vaccines give you this combination with the least amount of shots. Multiple shots do increase the chances of mistakes happening. If multiple vaccines are given, I adhere to several principles which minimize chances of muck ups. First off, depending on the weather, have a cooler or Styrofoam box which prevents overheating in summer and more importantly freezing in winter. You can place ice packs in for the summer and warm water bottles in the winter. You know the saying about the weather changing so quickly, so be prepared. Warm sunny days can turn into


THE COLOURS OF 24, 2O2O AUTUMN SALE OCT

SHE SELLS IN

instance, high on the neck the other low. The secondary site is behind the shoulder or elbow. Be cognisant of the times there is lots of backflow of vaccine or you go in and out and squirt vaccine in the air. If in doubt, revaccinate right then. Monitor the usage to make sure the gun is dispensing the right amount, make sure air is out of the syringe and as always change bent, burred, dull or dirty needles. Vaccine reactions (lumps or swellings) are normal, what we want to avoid are infected sites or putting the vaccine intradermal (between the skin layers) or intramuscular if it is recommended subcutaneously. A number of vaccines can be given either subcutaneously or intramuscular so what’s nice here if an attempted subcutaneous shot ends up intramuscular that is still okay. When cleansing syringes just use warm water no soaps or disinfectants unless they are thoroughly washed and dried afterwards. Needles used should have metal hubs and usually ¾ inch used for subcutaneous and as small a bore as possible for the vaccine to flow into which is usually 18 gauge or 16 gauge for thicker products.

Carlsruhe

HANNA

ET (CCC 5H) Sire Wulfs Urban Cowboy Dam TMF Miss 721W (Wulfs Tailor Made)

With modified live vaccine, don’t mix up more than you are going to use in the next hour and discard unused product at the end of the day. If drawn out sterilely, killed vaccines and bacterins can be kept for a period (I use one week) and used up later. One must be cognisant of how the vaccine has been stored before you purchase it and on the way home. We send purchases home with ice packs in the summer and only use pharmaceutical suppliers we can trust. One fault in this supply chain can render vaccine inactive. Many producers bring in their cooler if purchasing large quantities of vaccine so this temperature integrity is maintained.

the limousin

event of the summer 2021 Canadian Junior Limousin Impact Show

Everyone welcome

2021

July 28–31 Spencerville, ON

Please plan to join us next summer in Ontario! impactshow2020@gmail.com

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

With so many different combinations of vaccines out there make sure the diseases you want to protect are in the vaccines. Producers may say, “I thought everything was in the eight way vaccine”. Vaccinate according to label instructions, have the cattle healthy and you can expect maximum protection. Vaccines form, in my mind, the most integral part of any biosecurity program and are like an insurance program. Each calf is valuable and purebred ones even more so; so set a good example for your clients vaccinate and don’t forget to pass that information on in the case of a new owner. If you hold back on vaccinations for diseases in your area eventually there will be consequences.

TaDomi Hunt • Hanover, On 15193731798 • bar3c@hotmail.ca

Photo credit: Jill Renton with Cattlevids

When handling cattle try and be diligent and vaccinate everyone. With escapees try your best to rerun them as they have not been treated. In order to develop an immune response cattle must be healthy in good nutrition and as stress free as possible. The vaccine is only as protective as the response the animal can muster. This is another common reason vaccinating can fail to protect. Always watch closely for expiry dates as these can sneak up on you.

dob jan 22’20 BW 94lbs adjWW 648lbs

53


EXTENDING THE

Jason Hurst

As many producers start to think about pulling cattle in off grass, and many in drier parts of the country already have pulled cattle, our thoughts should go to how could we keep cattle out longer. Extending the grazing season can have a significant positive financial impact on our operations. Though trying to extend our grazing season is not a new concept, it can be a change to many producers. The longer cattle can graze, the lower the requirements on stored feed for the winter will be, this will help to bring costs down on the operation by reducing the need to harvest more crop.

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

One option to extend grazing is to look at the calf crop. Often time producers will hold the calves on the cows until they are marketing them. Weaning calves while there is still significant pasture left can reduce the intakes of the cows. In many cases this can result in a 16% reduction in dry matter intake on the cow’s side and what the calves were eating can help to add extra weeks on the grazing side of things. This is often the simplest way to help reduce the demands on the pasture and the cows alike.

54

Beef Feed Technical Sales Masterfeeds, an Alltech Company

Photo courtesy Jill Renton

GRAZING SEASON

WRITTEN BY

Grazing stubble and other already harvested crops can be a viable option as well. The important thing to remember when looking at doing this, is that that the feed out there for the cattle is usually small weeds, spilled grain, and the dried out dead plants. Usually there isn’t much of the first two and lots of the left-over plant material. When feeding straw or corn stalks, it is important to remember what is in the feed for actual nutrition. Most of these will come back on a feed analysis in the 4-5% crude protein range and a TDN range of 35-45%, this meaning that if we don’t supplement the animals out there, they will have to use any reserves they have. If we dip too far into their reserves this will have a negative impact on either the animal’s growth or the calves they are

carrying. In the case of bred heifers and first calf heifers both attributes will be affected. When using this as a strategy supplemental protein and energy will be needed. Supplementing out in field can be difficult. Extra high-quality hay or silage can work but when doing it in a crop field, extra care should be given as to not create any lasting damage to the soil structure. Other options for supplementation would be grains and lick barrels. Moving the supplementation sites around in the field can help to move the livestock to areas they typically wouldn’t go to graze. In many cases lick barrels or grain rations make the most sense from the standpoint of labour and being easier on the fields. Stockpiled grass can help to extend grazing period as well. This might not be possible on overly dry years but taking a break to give more of a rest period to the pasture can help save feed reserves. What is done in this case to extend the grazing period is to let the forage get ahead of the cattle and slowly graze it off once the grass is dormant, after a killing frost. Typically, what a producer would do is near the end of July or early August, the producer would leave some grazing cells and leave them for late fall. At this point they could look to graze stubble and come back to the stockpiled grass later in the year. Of course, many of these strategies depend on a few factors. Grazing fall born calves and their mothers on corn stalks, will quickly use up reserves and limit rebreeding and calf growth. That said for many producers that calve in the winter or spring, these can be good options to save some money and hay. When looking to employ any or all these strategies, it is best to have a plan for what to do. For more information on extending the grazing season feel free to reach out to your local Masterfeeds representative.


Dave & Linda Harvey Box 1469 100 Mile House, BC Canada V0K 2E0 Phone 250.397.2306

Limousin

ALBERTA

BRITISH COLUMBIA

Hi-Valey

hivalleylimo@gmail.com www.hivalleylimo.com

Specializing in Fullbloods & Purebreds Box 149 Carmangay, Alberta Canada T0L 0N0 jaapcanada@eidnet.org

Scott & Lesley Hansen

Ph: 780-727-4557 Cell: 780-202-0607

Home: 403.897.2264 Jaap’s Cell: 403.363.5587 Carla’s Cell: 403.363.7857 www.dejagerlimousin.com

Box 248 Entwistle, Alberta T0E 0S0 Blue Heeler Dogs

55


Richmond Ranch

Stewart Limousin

ALBERTA

MURRAY & BEV STEWART BOX 1326 STETTLER ALBERTA T0C 2L0 STEWARTLIMOUSIN@GMAIL.COM TEL 403-742-5226 CELL 403-742-9813 IMPERIAL RANCH LTD.

LIMOUSIN • BLACK ANGUS • RED ANGUS Jim & Stephanie Tiffany Samantha & Brandon 403-323-8433 403-740-3748 403-741-2675 Box 58 Rumsey, Alberta T0J 2Y0 www.richmondranch.com

QUALLY-T LIMOUSIN Rose Valley, Saskatchewan Alvin 306-322-7563 Chris 306-322-7554 Bulls for sale by private treaty

Q T Canada’s largest herd of registered Limousin Females

Raising Limousin for over 30 years MANITOBA

Stan & Pat

COCHRANE STOCK FARMS 56

204.855.2214 204.729.1772 Kyle & Erin 204.855.2633 204.724.0892 Darby & Kelly 204.855.2191 204.573.6529 RR#1 Alexander MB R0K 0A0 Fax 204.855.2472 Email csf@westman.wave.ca www.cochranestockfarms.com

SASKATCHEWAN

ALBERTA

Lazy A Limousin


Specializing in Polled Fullbloods and Purebreds P.O. Box 3, St. Lazare, MB R0M 1Y0 HOME PHONE 204.901.2353 CELL 780.719.3894 EMAIL lionelfouillard@yahoo.ca

Hockridge Farms Dauphin, Manitoba • gghock@goinet.ca

Limousin

MANITOBA

FORT ELLICE

Brad Hockridge 204-648-6333 Glen Hockridge 204-648-5222 204-638-8554

Lionel & Sharon, Brody Fouillard

Poplarview STOCK FARM

Lloyd & Joan Atchison H 204-854-2947 Trevor & Melisssa Atchison H 204-854-2510 C 204-522-5542

RR#1 Pipestone MB R0M 1T0 poplarviewfarm@gmail.com

triple Your Source

for

r* limouSin

*

QualitY GeneticS

Since

1982

ONTARIO

Art & Maria Rodgers Box 156 MacGregor, MB R0H 0R0 Home: 204-685-2628 Art Cell: 204-856-3440 email: triplerlimo@yahoo.ca We’re located west of MacGregor 69026 Rd 62W

R.R.#4 GLENCOE, ONTARIO N0L 1M0

Haystack Acres Ron & Rita Gardiner Phone 519.287.3147 Fax 519.287.3697 Email gardinerlimousin@hotmail.com

Purebred Limousin Cattle – Bulls & Heifers for Sale

John & Michelle McLean Res 519.738.0453 haystacklimousin@yahoo.ca

3114 Walker Road RR#2 Harrow, Ontario N0R 1G0 57


ONTARIO

Specializing in Polled Fullblood Genetics E. JOHN & ENA POST 7396 20TH SIDEROAD, RR #2 ALMA , ON N0B 1A0 ejpost@posthavenlimousin.com | FARM: (519) 846-9320 | CELL: (519) 766-7178

www.posthavenlimousin.com

Garry & Sheila Smart

519-538-4877 Cell 519-372-7459 Email smartlimo@bmts.com 137606 Grey Road 12 R.R.#2 Meaford, ON N4L 1W6 Ph/Fax

Industry accepted for over 40 years

www.smartlimousin.com

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Check one of the following  Q Canada $30.00 (tax included) Q United States $50.00 (tax included) Q International $50.00 USD (tax included)

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Please complete and return to the Canadian Limousin Association via mail, fax or email: Canadian Limousin Association #13, 4101-19 Street NE Calgary, Alberta T2E 7C4 Phone: 403-253-7309  Fax: 403-253-1704 E-mail: limousin@limousin.com


SERVICE MEMBERS

ONTARIO

SERVICES

www.bova-tech.com

In-Clinic & On Farm Services Embryo Collection, Freezing & Transplants

PO Box 80142

Donor Care Facility

T4B 2V8

Recipient Programs

Tel: 403-332-1567 Fax: 403-980-3498 Email: info@bova-tech.com

Export Certified

Airdrie, AB

International Marketing

Alberta – Saskatchewan – Manitoba

Embryo Transfer Services IVF Certified for Exportable Embryo Production Export Qualified Semen Collection & Bull Stud Owner’s Use Semen Embryo & Semen Storage & Distribution 587.887.1934 embryos@bowvalleygenetics.com www.bowvalleygenetics.com 59


HAVE CONTENT?

THE LIMOUSIN VOICE TEAM

Publisher & Creative Director Katie Songer publisher@limousinvoice.net 587.802.3110 Editor & Advertising Representative Tessa Verbeek tverbeek@limousin.com 403.636.1066 UPCOMING ISSUES

Issue Book by Published Winter October 9 November 4 Spring January 8 February 3 Fall TBA TBA ADVERTISING RATES

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LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

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60

The Limousin Voice is published three times per year. One year subscription costs $35.00 per year ($36.75 with GST) in Canada, $50.00 USD per year in the USA and internationally. The Limousin Voice hereby expressly limits its liability resulting from any and all misprints, errors and/or inaccuracies whatsoever in the advertisement and editorial content published by The Limousin Voice and its said liability is here by limited to the refund of the customer for its payment for said advertisement, or the running of the corrected advertisement, or editorial notice. Notification by the customer of any error must be made within 30 days of the distribution of the magazine. Advertising copy received after the deadline may not be returned for proofing. Changes to advertising copy made after the deadline date will be allowed only if time permits, and will incur the appropriate charges according to time and materials involved in the changes. The opinions or views expressed in the editorials are those of the persons interviewed in the article and not The Limousin Voice magazine. The Limousin Voice does however reserve the right to edit or refuse all material which might be objectionable in content. No material or part thereof may be reproduced or used out of context, without prior specific approval of a proper credit to The Limousin Voice.

Have an article idea, Limousin story, social news or event to share with the Limousin Voice? Please contact Tessa Verbeek at tverbeek@limousin.com or 403-636-1066

CONTRIBUTORS JASON HURST Jason Hurst grew up on a cow/calf operation in Ontario, then attended the University of Guelph. After graduating Guelph he started in the feed business and has been advising beef customers since 2009. He works with feedlots, commercial cow calf producers and purebred operations. Together with his wife and family they also manage a cow calf operation in Ontario.

ROY LEWIS, DVM Dr. Roy Lewis has been a large animal veterinary practitioner for over 30 years with a cattle practice in Westlock, Alberta. His interests were herd health and bovine reproduction. Since 2012, Roy has been working part time for Merck Animal Health as a Technical Services Veterinarian.

BOB WEABER, PH.D, PROFESSOR Dr. Bob Weaber joined the faculty of the Department of Animal Sciences and Industry at Kansas State University in August of 2011 as Cow-Calf Extension Specialist and faculty coordinator of K-State’s Purebred Unit. Weaber also serves on the faculty management team for K-State’s Beef Cattle Institute. Dr. Weaber is the Executive Director of the Beef Improvement Federation in addition to providing genetic evaluation consultancy for the Canadian Limousin Association and North American Limousin Foundation.


AD SIZES & SPECS Ads requiring a bleed should be built to trim size and have images or graphics extended 0.125in beyond each edge. All text and critical elements should be at least 0.5” inside trim edge. We accept ads in PDF or JPG format built to 300 dpi resolution or greater. We do not accept ads built in Microsoft Word, Excel, Powerpoint, Publisher or Adobe Pagemaker. For full specifications, see our online media kit at www.limousinvoice.net

NO CELL PHONE PHOTOS

Cell phone photos will not be accepted, as their poor optical quality, bad light sensitivity, and wide angle lenses generate blurry, noisy or distorted photos that do not accurately represent your cattle. Cell phone cameras do not capture a sufficient number of pixels (enough image data) to use that photo in print.

HOW DOES IMAGE RESOLUTION WORK?

Full Page W 9.75”

11.5” BLEED 0.125”

Half Horizontal

Half Vertical

W 8.55”

W 4.15”

5.03in” BLEED none

H

H

BLEED

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Digital images are composed of individual dots of stored data, called pixels. Your computer screen or cell phone can display 72 pixels per inch (called display resolution). 300 pixels per inch is the minimum size required by a printing press to produce clear, crisp images (called print resolution). The more pixels an image has, the more detailed it is.

1 inch

at display resolution

Double Page Spread W 19.5”

H

11.5”

BLEED

Quarter Banner 0.125”

W 8.55”  BLEED

Half Double Page Spread W 18.3”

H

5.03”

BLEED

H 2.388” none

(contains 72 pixels)

1 inch

at print resolution

(contains 300 pixels)

Each blue dot at left is a pixel. The dark blue square represents the largest a 1 inch² picture at display resolution could be printed on a printing press and remain crisp.

Images taken at a low resolution (eg. Taken by a cell phone camera) or images that have been downsized cannot be enlarged again and remain crisp. When they are enlarged, the computer ‘makes up’ the missing or deleted pixels, resulting in blurry or ‘pixelated’ images.

Business Card

none

W 4.15”  BLEED

H 2.25” none

IMAGE TAKEN AT WRONG RESOLUTION

IMAGE TAKEN AT RIGHT RESOLUTION

Minimum image size at print resolution

YOUR DIGITAL CAMERA  Set your camera 1 USE to take the highest resolution images.

At display resolution (72 pixels per inch)

SIZE should be 1.5 MB or more! 2 FILE Send as a high resolution JPG. Do Not Resize.

(300 pixels per inch) Width: 8.75in  Height: 6.25in

Width: 36.458 in  Height: 26.042 in

Total Minimum dimensions

2625 pixels wide by 1875 pixels high (regardless of image resolution) Supplied images must be 300dpi. Although we will advise you when your images are low quality, the Limousin Voice is not responsible for blurry or pixelated images.

(1MB = 1000KB)

Do not allow your email to resize or 3 EMAILING down-sample your image.

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

DIGITAL IMAGE SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS

61


CALENDAR ADVERTISERS, WANT TO ADD YOUR EVENTS TO THIS CALENDAR?

Email them to publisher@limousinvoice.net

COMING EVENTS

NOVEMBER 28 QUALLY-T LIMOUSIN 2ND ANNUAL PRODUCTION SALE

Saskatoon Livestock Sales, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

DECEMBER 10 WESTERN SELECT 9TH ANNUAL LIMOUSIN SALE Lloydminster, Saskatchewan

15 B BAR CATTLE ANNUAL BULL & FEMALE SALE at the Ranch, Lucky Lake, Saskatchewan

31 NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTION FROZEN GENETICS SALE: VOLUME IX Olds, Alberta

SEPTEMBER 26 POSTHAVEN LIMOUSIN NEIGHBOURHOOD APPRECIATION DAY at the Ranch, Alma, Ontario

OCTOBER 5 CLA ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

Zoom Virtual Meeting – e-mail link to the Virtual AGM will be sent to all CLA members

10 OJLA 50 YEARS FORWARD SCHOLARSHIP Application deadline

22 AGRIBITION EVOLUTION SERIES

Entry Deadline at www.agribition.com (Limousin Results posted November 26; Agribition Evolution Supreme Champions posted November 28)

24 ALBERTA LIMOUSIN ASSOCIATION ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

Stettler Community Centre, Stettler, Alberta

62

24 COLOURS OF AUTUMN LIMOUSIN SALE Cookstown, Ontario

31 CJLA SCHOLARSHIP & AUSTRALIAN/ CANADIAN LIMOUSIN YOUTH EXCHANGE Application Deadline at www.limousin.com

FEBRUARY 15 STEWART LIMOUSIN BULL SALE at the Ranch, Stettler, Alberta

22 J. YORGA GARMS PRODUCTION SALE at the Ranch, Flintoft, Saskatchewan

MARCH 3 HILLVIEW FARMS BULL & FEMALE SALE at the Ranch, Morinville, Alberta

9 ANDREW RANCHES BULL SALE WITH GUEST CONSIGNOR DEJAGER LIMOUSIN Bow Slope Shipping Association, Brooks, Alberta

12 RICHMOND RANCH BULL & FEMALE SALE at the Ranch, Ponoka, Alberta

15 DIAMOND C RANCH BULL SALE at the Ranch, Rumsey, Alberta

15 NORTHWEST BULL SALE North Battleford, Saskatchewan

18 BAR 3R LIMOUSIN BULL SALE Crossroads Centre, Oyen, Alberta

20 HIGHLAND STOCK FARMS BULL SALE at the Ranch, Bragg Creek, Alberta


ADVERTISERS INDEX B

C

D

Amaglen Limousin Andrew Ranches Arcon Cattle Company

11

E

Eden Meadows Farm

4

49

F

Fort Ellice Limousin Fouillard Limousin

57

57

B Bar Cattle Bar 3R Limousin Bar-Dale Limousin Bee Zee Acres Bova-Tech Ltd. Bow Valley Genetics

IFC

Canadian Junior Limousin Impact Show Carlsruhe Cattle Co. Cherway Limousin Cochrane Stock Farms Corad Farms

53

Dan Skeels Davis-Rairdan de Jager Limousin Diamond C Ranch Double B Cattle Co

59

Photo courtesy Jenna Loveridge

G

55

Gardiner Limousin Greenwood

57

Hansen Limousin Hawkeye Land & Cattle Haystack Acres Highland Stock Farms Hillside Farm Hillview Farms Hi-Valley Limousin Hockridge Farms Houghton Boston Printers

56

43

J

J. Yorga Farms

65

L

Lazy A Limousin

56

55

N

New Life Limousin

64

30

P

Payne Livestock Pinnacle View Limousin Plains Limousin Poplarview Stock Farm Posthaven Limousin

56 55 47

H

59 59

53 56 56 57

59 55

41

15 57 10 58 47 55 57

BC 1, 55 55 57 58

Q

Qually-T Limousin

39, 56

R

Richmond Ranch Smart Limousin Southbridge Limousin Stewart Limousin Stockmens Insurance

31, 56 58 56 56 59

T

Triple R Limousin

57

V

Venture Livestock Enterprises

64

W Windy Gables Limousin

5, 59

LIMOUSIN VOICE / FALL 2020

A

63


AVAILABLE ON LIVEAUCTIONS.TV


THE FIRST GET & SERVICE OF ANCHOR B GOLD RUSH

Sells

A Piece

of the Pie

Female sale

Mark your calendars OCTOBER 16, 2021 Fall and April born Heifers • Fall cows bred for Jan 1 • Proven producers

Remember O U R A N N UA L B U L L S A L E F E B 2 2 , 2 0 2 1

KELLY AND NORMA YORGA (H) 306-263-4432 (C) 306-642-7023 (F) 306-263-4473 yorgakelly@gmail.com BOX 14, FLINTOFT, SK S0H 1R0

JEFFREY AND KRISTEN YORGA (H) 306-531-5717 jeffyorga@yahoo.ca WH

ERE

LIMO

USIN KEEP GET TING

BET

TE

R


RPY 63H

SIRE LFLC DOLLAR BILL 764D

RPY 34H

SIRE HUNT CREDENTIALS 37C

RPY 50H

HOW THEY LOOKED on Grass RPY 9H

RPY 25H

RPY 6H

SIRE JYF CHUNK 35C

RPY 28H

SIRE RPY PAYNES DILLINGER 43D

SIRE RPY PAYNES EVEREADY 73E

RPY 38H

SIRE RPY PAYNES DIESEL 37D

SIRE LFLC DOLLAR BILL 764D

RPY 49H

SIRE RPY PAYNES DILLINGER 43D

RPY 15H

SIRE JYF CHUNK 35C

HERDSIRE PROSPECTS AVAILABLE PRIVATELY

RPY 67H

RPY 1H

SIRE LFLC DOLLAR BILL 764D

SIRE RICHMOND CRUSADER

SIRE JYF CHUNK 37C

WE ALSO HAVE QUALITY FEMALES FOR SALE. Please contact us for more information. Stop in anytime for a visit and tour. Rocky & Debbie Payne

P 306.825.4056 F 306.825.4025

Cole 780.870.8335 Kyle 639.840.2530 E paynelivestock@hmsinet.ca Box 1997 Lloydminster Saskatchewan Canada S9V 1R5