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O C TO B ER 2 018 VO L 14 N U M B ER II

Official Publication of the Canadian Limousin Association

IN THIS ISSUE FUTURE OF THE BREED Corad Farms Conners Brothers put self-sufficient Limousin cattle to work for their COMMERCIAL OPERATION FROM PRAIRIES TO PEAKS The 2018 International Limousin Congress Ontario Family finds success using Limousin Genetics at LEGGE BEEF



PINNACLE’S FRENCH KISSES 4F

PINNACLE’S EYE FOR LOVE 14E

PINNACLE’S DONOVAN 49D X PINNACLE’S BUTTERFLY KISSES 34B (YIP X WISTERIA LANE) DOB: JANUARY 15TH 2018

PINNACLE’S CRUSHIN IT 18C X PINNACLE’S BLIND LOVE 16B (YIP X CJSL XCITE 353X) DOB: JANUARY 29TH 2017 | SERVICE SIRE: PINNACLE’S EAST END 28E (WULF’S BLACKHAWK) VET’S OPINION DUE END OF JANUARY 2019

We are excited to offer these two elite females in the Solid Gold National Limousin Sale at the Canadian Western Agribition!

Thank you to everyone who attended our Open House and helped make it such a resounding success. Your confidence and interest in our program is truly humbling! CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CALF WINNER HAROLD GOULD OF VANDERHOOF, B.C. Save the date for our next one coming September 12, 2020 where we will celebrate 30 years as Limousin Breeders.

THE SWAANS & KISHKANS

Rob: 250-991-8229 | Erin: 250-991-6654 | Quesnel, BC | kishkan@quesnelbc.com | www.pvlimousin.com


sells in the Solid Gold Limousin Sale at Canadian Western Agribition on November 22

combining

FORCES

Sire of Embryos

A package of embryos from Reserve National Champion Ivy’s Sweet Touch 29Z and sired by National Champion RPY Paynes Diesel 37D

CED

BW

WW

YW

MK

TM

CEM

SC

ST

DOC

7

2.1

89

132

13

58

4

1.3

18

16

CED

BW

WW

YW

MK

TM

CEM

SC

ST

DOC

12

0.2

63

88

19

50

8

0.50

17

18

Attention Juniors

We will have cattle available for you to show at the 2019 CJLA impact Show! Contact us for details!

For

Donor Dam

GREATNESS

TERRY & LYNETTE HEPPER & FAMILY R.R.#1 Zehner, SK, S0G 5K0 306.781.4628 or 306.536.7075 Find us on Facebook Eden Meadows Farm


SHE SELLS AT THE ROYAL ELITE ALL BREEDS SALE

SATURDAY NOVEMBER 3 Dam

Sire

WGL Front and Centre 17F WGL Crowley 1C x WGL Xclusive 18X Born Feb 20, 2018 • Double black/double polled • Homo Polled test pending

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GREAT SALES OUTSTANDING OPPORTUNITIES FIND OUR GENETICS AT THE ROYAL AND COLOURS OF AUTUMN

SATURDAY DECEMBER 1, 2018 1PM COOKSTOWN STOCKYARDS • COOKSTOWN, ONTARIO

Genetics by WGL Crowley 1C, TMF Redwood 322A, Wulfs Zolt X421Z, Wulfs Spring Loaded • Service by Paynes Cracker and WGL Crowley 1C

Bryce and Nathan Allen PO Box 189, RR#4 Warkworth, Ontario K0K3K0 Bryce 705-924-2583 brycea@alleninsuraance.ca Nathan 705-761-9426 nathana@alleninsurance.ca


CONTENTS

18

18 LEGGE BEEF

Ontario family finds success using Limousin genetics in their 1,000 head feedlot

38 FUTURE OF THE BREED

Corad Farms – The Hunt Family

44 COMMERCIAL PROFILE

Conners Bros put self-sufficient Limousin cattle to work in their operation

38

52 FROM PRAIRIES TO PEAKS

The 2018 International Limousin Congress

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

Contributors Ad Sizes & Specifications CLA Presidents Report CLA Office Update

4

8 9 12 14

FAQ: MULTI-BREED GENETIC EVALUATION powered by Bolt

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CJLA News Special Report – CJLA Impact Show Ontario Junior Limousin News Australian Exchange Masterfeeds  MYCOTOXINS IN FEED Canfax Market Report Provincial News British Columbia Alberta Saskatchewan Manitoba Ontario Québec Maritimes CCA President’s Report Herd Health  VACCINE SELECTION FOR CATTLE Livestock Gentec  3 REASONS TO ADD ACCURACY VALUES TO YOUR EPDS Social News Upcoming Events

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44

28 35 37 48 50 60 60 61 62 63 64 66 68 70 72 74 76 82

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T H E M O S T E C O N O M I C A L LY I M P O R TA N T T R A I T W E C A N PA S S O N TO T H E C O M M E R C I A L C AT T L E M E N

polled

HIGHLAND IS AN ALL POLLED COWHERD

81.3%

ARE HOMOZYGOUS POLLED WITH A GOAL OF 100%

PLUS WE ARE

66.7%

BLACK COW HERD

40%

OF THOSE ARE HOMOZYGOUS BLACK

breeding bull sale for Traits that matter S AV E T H E D AT E

MARCH 16, 2019 AT T H E R A N C H I N B R AG G C R E E K

Rob & Marci Matthews 403.585.8660 Amanda & Chris Haywood 403.470.1812 Chris’ Cell 403.850.9665 highlandstockfarms@gmail.com Bragg Creek, Alberta

highlandstockfarm.ca


Richmond Ranch Limousin • Black Angus • Red Angus

CALL FOR

EXCITING

FROZEN GENETICS

SRD 8D

Bull & Female Sale

FRIDAY

MARCH 8

~ 2019 ~ AT THE RANCH, RUMSEY, AB

SRD 29Z

THE RICHMOND FAMILY Jim & Stephanie | 403-323-8433 | sam@richmondranch.com Brandon, Samantha & Cole | 403-741-2675 Tiffany 403-740-3748 | Tiffany@richmondranch.com

~Branded for Success~

richmondranch.com

SRD 53C


PRIVATE TREATY HERD DISPERSAL

Females for sale to strengthen an existing herd or become the foundation of a new operation. We have spent countless hours researching bloodlines and EPDs – selecting on structure, phenotype, and docility – and culling hard to produce an excellent herd of top quality females. Our calves see no creep feed. Our cows work hard and get the job done. Proven cows, bred heifers, and heifer calves on offer. Don’t miss out on getting in on some of the best females in the industry! Now is your chance!

36 Years Ago...

Females bred AI to Hunt Credentials, Wulfs Billy the Kid, Wulfs Dial Pad, and by natural service to Anchor B Columbus (Paynes Elvis), Amaglen Canadian Sunrise (#4 WW Trait Leader by Wulfs Xtractor), Amaglen Curious George (Wulfs Xcellsior), and CAM Poll Aristocrat (TMF Westwood).

WE SET ROOTS

in the Limousin Industry.

WE WORKED HARD

and it became a passion.

AND NOW YOU HAVE THE CHANCE

to reap the fruits of our labour.

AMAGLEN LIMOUSIN

Ian & Bonnie Hamilton • Amanda & Clint Seward Box 55, Darlingford, MB R0G 0L0 Ph: 204-246-2312 • Cell: 204-823-1240 amaglen@inetlink.ca

Since 1982 www.amaglenlimousin.ca

One of the Platinum Elite Herds in Canada What you measure, you can manage! Follow us on Facebook!


CONTRIBUTORS JASON HURST Jason Hurst grew up on a cow/calf operation in Ontario, then attended the University of Guelph. After graduating Guelph he started in the feed business and has been advising beef customers since 2009. He works with feedlots, commercial cow calf producers and purebred operations. Together with his wife and family they also manage a cow calf operation in Ontario. THE LIMOUSIN VOICE TEAM

Publisher & Creative Director Katie Songer publisher@limousinvoice.net 587.802.3110

DELANIE KNULL Delanie Knull hails from a cow/calf operation near Crossfield, Alberta. An avid 4-H member, Delanie is currently attending Olds College as an Agricultural Management student and has agriculture journalism aspirations in her future. The Canadian Limousin Association was pleased to have Delanie as their Summer Student in 2018, where part of her duties were writing articles for the Limousin Voice.

Advertising Representative & Editor Tessa Verbeek tverbeek@limousin.com 403.636.1066 UPCOMING ISSUES

Issue Book by Published December Nov 20 Dec 19 February Jan 8 Feb 11 October TBA TBA ADVERTISING RATES

Double Page Spread Full Page Half Double Page Spread Half Vertical / Half Horizontal Quarter / Quarter Banner Business Card

$1800 $1000 $1200 $650 $375 $250

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

All ads are full color. 5% GST not included. Yearly contract discount 10% (Card Ads Exempt)

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The Limousin Voice is published three times per year. One year subscription costs $35.00 per year ($36.75 with GST) in Canada, $50.00 USD per year in the USA and internationally. The Limousin Voice hereby expressly limits its liability resulting from any and all misprints, errors and/or inaccuracies whatsoever in the advertisement and editorial content published by The Limousin Voice and its said liability is here by limited to the refund of the customer for its payment for said advertisement, or the running of the corrected advertisement, or editorial notice. Notification by the customer of any error must be made within 30 days of the distribution of the magazine. Advertising copy received after the deadline may not be returned for proofing. Changes to advertising copy made after the deadline date will be allowed only if time permits, and will incur the appropriate charges according to time and materials involved in the changes. The opinions or views expressed in the editorials are those of the persons interviewed in the article and not The Limousin Voice magazine. The Limousin Voice does however reserve the right to edit or refuse all material which might be objectionable in content. No material or part thereof may be reproduced or used out of context, without prior specific approval of a proper credit to The Limousin Voice.

ROY LEWIS, DVM Dr. Roy Lewis has been a large animal veterinary practitioner for over 30 years with a cattle practice in Westlock, Alberta. His interests were herd health and bovine reproduction. Since 2012, Roy has been working part time for Merck Animal Health as a Technical Services Veterinarian.

BRIAN PERILLAT, B.SC. M.SC. P.AG Brian Perillat has been the Manager at Canfax since April 2010. Brian grew up on a mixed farming operation near Duck Lake, Saskatchewan and continues to be involved with the family farm. Prior to working at Canfax, Brian worked as a livestock production economist with Alberta Agriculture, and also spent over 4 years working with MNP as a farm management consultant.

DAWN TRAUTMAN, B.SC., M.SC Dawn Trautman is an agricultural economist with a B.Sc. in Biological Sciences and a M.Sc. in Agricultural and Resource Economics, both from the University of Alberta and she is currently working on her MBA part-time. Dawn is Director of Knowledge Translation at Livestock Gentec at the University of Alberta. Her role involves technology and knowledge transfer for practical applications in the livestock industry; project management; market research and development; coordinating communications; and management of strategic performance indicators.


AD SIZES & SPECS Ads requiring a bleed should be built to trim size and have images or graphics extended 0.125in beyond each edge. All text and critical elements should be at least 0.5” inside trim edge. We accept ads in PDF or JPG format built to 300 dpi resolution or greater. We do not accept ads built in Microsoft Word, Excel, Powerpoint, Publisher or Adobe Pagemaker. For full specifications, see our online media kit at www.limousinvoice.net

NO CELL PHONE PHOTOS

Cell phone photos will not be accepted, as their poor optical quality, bad light sensitivity, and wide angle lenses generate blurry, noisy or distorted photos that do not accurately represent your cattle. Cell phone cameras do not capture a suffience number of pixels (enough image data) to use that photo in print.

HOW DOES IMAGE RESOLUTION WORK?

W 9.75”

11.5” BLEED 0.125”

Half Horizontal

Half Vertical

W 8.55”

W 4.15”

5.03in” BLEED none

H

H

BLEED

H 10.3” none

1 inch

at display resolution

Double Page Spread W 19.5”

H

11.5”

BLEED

Quarter Banner 0.125”

W 8.55”  BLEED

Half Double Page Spread W 18.3”

H

5.03”

BLEED

H 2.388” none

(contains 72 pixels)

1 inch

at print resolution

(contains 300 pixels)

Each blue dot at left is a pixel. The dark blue square represents the largest a 1 inch² picture at display resolution could be printed on a printing press and remain crisp.

Images taken at a low resolution (eg. taken by a cell phone camera) or images that have been downsized cannot be enlarged again and remain crisp. When they are enlarged, the computer ‘makes up’ the missing or deleted pixels, resulting in blurry or ‘pixelated’ images.

Business Card

none

W 4.15”  BLEED

H 2.25” none

IMAGE TAKEN AT WRONG RESOLUTION

IMAGE TAKEN AT RIGHT RESOLUTION

DIGITIAL IMAGE SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS

Minimum image size at print resolution

YOUR DIGITAL CAMERA  Set your camera 1 USE to take the highest resolution images.

At display resolution (72 pixels per inch)

SIZE should be 1.5 MB or more! 2 FILE Send as a high resolution JPG. Do Not Resize.

(300 pixels per inch) Width: 8.75in  Height: 6.25in

Width: 36.458 in  Height: 26.042 in

Total Minimum dimensions

2625 pixels wide by 1875 pixels high (regardless of image resolution) Supplied images must be 300dpi. Although we will advise you when your images are low quality, the Limousin Voice is not responsible for blurry or pixelated images.

(1MB = 1000KB)

Do not allow your email to resize or 3 EMAILING downsample your image.

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

Full Page

Digital images are composed of individual dots of stored data, called pixels. Your computer screen or cell phone can display 72 pixels per inch (called display resolution). 300 pixels per inch is the minimum size required by a printing press to produce clear, crisp images (called print resolution). The more pixels an image has, the more detailed it is.

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CLA PRESIDENT

12

PRESIDENTS REPORT

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

Erin Kishkan

G

reetings everyone! I hope this report finds everyone happy and healthy and had a great summer season and start to your fall. I know some of you have already been battling the dreaded white stuff, so I send my blessings that your crops and your calves fair it okay. I am honoured to be re-elected as your President for the 2018-2019 year and look forward to celebrating Limousin’s 50th anniversary with you all. We are coming off a very successful summer for our breed and I think we as breeders should be very proud of the recognition we are receiving and the direction Limousin is heading. I was very excited to be a part of some new and exciting changes with the Association including the new face of the Limousin Voice. This is the first issue from our new publishing company and I think you will be thrilled with this fresh new look! 2018 was also the first year we implement the new mail in voting system for electing directors. With a 10% increase in membership voting, I think we can say it was a resounding success! Congratulations to returning directors Mike Geddes and Matthew Heleniak, and new director Amanda Matthews-Haywood. In July I was fortunate to attend the International Limousin Congress in Denver, Colorado to represent the Canadian Limousin Association alongside Tessa. It was a great experience filled with lots of Limousin fellowship. I was only able to attend the 5-day agenda, but went on some great tours, saw lots of great cattle, and most importantly made some excellent international contacts for our breed. Canadian genetics are extremely sought after on the international stage and we can be proud of what we have to offer. Immediately following my USA tour, I jetted off to Nova Scotia for the CJLA Impact Show and CLA AGM. That experience was nothing short of amazing. I am so proud of our juniors and how well they represent our breed, but more importantly, our breed’s future! It's very refreshing to see how enthusiastic these young people are about Limousin, and how supportive our breeders are of them. Thank you to all of the volunteers, sponsors, exhibitors, parents, and breeders who helped make that show such a resounding success. A special thank you to Balamore Farms for hosting and putting on such a prestigious event! That is all I have to report for now, my new Executive and I are very excited to lead you into the 50th year of Limousin in Canada and very much look forward to celebrating with everyone across the country! Regards,

Erin Kishkan CLA PRESIDENT


CANADIAN LIMOUSIN ASSOCIATION

#13, 4101 – 19 Street N.E. Calgary, Alberta T2E 7C4 Phone: 403.253.7309 Toll Free: 1.866.886.1605 Fax: 403.253.1704 www.limousin.com

CLA STAFF

General Manager

Tessa Verbeek 403.636.1066 tverbeek@limousin.com

Registry/Member Services

Canadian Junior Limousin Association Coordinator Laura Ecklund 403.559.9849 cjla@limousin.com

Dallas Wise, Laura Ecklund & Shayla Chappell 403.253.7309 limousin@limousin.com

CLA BOARD OF DIRECTORS PRESIDENT Erin Kishkan British Columbia 250.747.3836 kishkan@quesnelbc.com

CLA DIRECTORS

VICE PRESIDENT Bill Zwambag Ontario 519.287.3219 bzwambag@execulink.com

Joe Cooper 902.893.0744 cooperboys@bellaliant.net

TREASURER Cody Miller Alberta 780.349.0644 codymiller8@gmail.com PAST PRESIDENT Terry Hepper Saskatchewan 306.536.7075 tlhepper@gmail.com

Saskatchewan

Eric Boon 306.280.8795 bbarcattleco@gmail.com

Nova Scotia

Ontario

Dan Darling 905.375.4019 dmdarling13@gmail.com Mike Geddes 519.375.6230 mikegeddes@jfm.ca Matthew Heleniak 519.537.1451 matth@norpacbeef.com

Alberta

Amanda Matthews-Haywood 403.470.1812 amandagracematthews@gmail.com

British Columbia

Ontario

Alberta

Quebec

Saskatchewan

Maritimes

Erin Kishkan 250.747.3836 kishkan@quesnelbc.com Chris Haywood 403.850.9665 diamondhindustries@gmail.com

Mike Geddes 519.375.6230 mikegeddes@jfm.ca Serge Dethier 450.454.6456 dianejoly19@hotmail.com

Rhett Jones John-Calvin Siddall 306.629.3200 902.664.8008 jonescattlecompany@hotmail.com jfsiddall@nsac.ca

Manitoba Photo taken at Corad Farms

Bill Campbell 204.776.2322 cam.limousin@gmail.com

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

PROVINCIAL ASSOCIATION PRESIDENTS

13


OFFICE UPDATE/ NOUVELLES DU BUREAU DE L’ALC Photo taken at Conners Bros.

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

Welcome to the all new look of the Limousin Voice magazine! This Fall 2018 edition is the first with our new publisher, Five Gallon Creative, and we couldn’t be happier. Our intention is that you will find this to be an even more worthwhile advertising vehicle with every issue reaching every buyer of a Limousin bull in the past 3 years plus our list of 400+ subscribers. The more advertising support the magazine receives, the more quality content we can include to make the Limousin Voice a magazine both members and commercial cattlemen alike look forward to receiving in the mail.

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The summer of 2018 has been full of Limousin excitement. CLA President, Erin Kishkan and myself, along with a delegation of other CLA members, attended the International Limousin Congress in July. This year’s ILC was hosted by the North American Limousin Foundation in Colorado. The Canadian Junior Limousin Association Impact Show was, without a doubt, the highlight of the Limousin summer! This year’s event was hosted, for the first time ever, in Nova Scotia. Joe and Carolyn Cooper and family, along with a team of staff and volunteers from the Maritimes, were integral to hosting this tremendously successful event that saw 97 head and 79 juniors and their families descend upon Balamore Farm Ltd. Our thanks cannot be expressed enough to each of the individuals and sponsors that gave of their time, expertise, and money to support our 2018 CJLA Impact Show. A heartfelt thank you also goes out to CJLA Coordinator, Laura Ecklund, who went well above and beyond to make the show a success and has been doing phenomenal work with the CJLA Board of Directors. Finally, thank you to all of the juniors and their families who made the trip East to take part in what is now being described as a ‘once in a lifetime’ experience. Your continued involvement and support of the junior program does not go unnoticed. The Canadian Limousin Association Annual General Meeting was held in conjunction with the CJLA Impact Show in Great Village, Nova Scotia at the beginning of August. Prior to the meeting, the following directors were elected to the CLA Board of Directors via mail in ballot:

Mike Geddes (ON), Matthew Heleniak (ON), and Amanda MatthewsHaywood (AB). As of the end of August, the CLA is now producing weekly EPD updates on all animals through the new single-step genetic evaluation powered by BOLT. CLA is one of 12 Canadian and US breed associations that work in collaboration under International Genetic Solutions to share their data. It is imperative that breeders continue to submit phenotypic data to the Association as well as continuing to utilize genotyping for improved EPD accuracy. Please keep in mind that because EPDs are updating on a weekaly basis, you should always look to an animal’s DigitalBeef online profile instead of their printed registration paper, for the most up to date EPD information. Fall is upon us and upcoming feeder calf sales will be a measure of the year’s success for most cattle operations. We congratulate and thank all producers who have invested in Limousin genetics and encourage you to share successful sale results with the CLA to further promote the real-world value of Limousin genetics. You can also list commercial calves coming up for sale at auction or privately via our free listing service on the CLA website. Fall also means that many breeders have been busy preparing their show strings for the upcoming fall show run. The time and expense that these breeders invest in showing is not only a promotion for their own operation but also for the breed as a whole and we are eagerly looking forward to seeing the cream of the crop from each of these respective breeding programs. This year’s National Limousin Show & Sale will be held on November 22nd at Canadian Western Agribition in Regina, Saskatchewan. We invite you to please join us! All the best with your fall work. We hope you will take pride in tagging your Limousin influence calves with the pink Limousin RIFD tags – buyers will be seeking them out at auction. May your Limousin influence calves pound down the scales when it comes time to ship and may you reap the benefits of cross-breeding with Limousin again this year!


BY / PAR

Plusieurs activités ont eu lieu durant l’été 2018 dans le monde de l’élevage Limousin. En juillet, j’ai assisté en compagnie de la Présidente de l’ALC, Erin Kishkan, ainsi que d’une délégation d’autres membres de l’ALC, au Congrès International Limousin. Ce Congrès était organisé cette année au Colorado par la Fondation Limousin de l’Amérique du nord (NALF). Sans aucun doute, le concours “Impact Show” organisé par l’Association des jeunes éleveurs Limousin du Canada a constitué le fait marquant de l’été ! Pour la toute première fois, cet évènement était organisé en NouvelleÉcosse. Joe et Carolyn Cooper et leur famille, appuyés par toute une équipe d’employés et de bénévoles des Maritimes, ont fait en sorte que cet évènement ait connu un formidable succès, avec la présence de 79 membres juniors et de leurs familles qui ont présenté un total de 97 sujets à la ferme Balamore Farm Ltd. Nous ne pourrons jamais remercier suffisamment

chacune des personnes et des commanditaires qui ont donné de leur temps, de leur expertise et de leur argent pour supporter le concours “Impact Show 2018” organisé par l’Association des jeunes éleveurs Limousin du Canada. Nous remercions également très sincèrement notre coordonnatrice de l’Association Junior Limousin, Laura Ecklund, qui a fait tous les efforts en travaillant avec le conseil d’administration de l’Association Junior Limousin, pour que cette compétition soit un succès sur toute la ligne. Enfin, merci à tous les membres juniors et à leurs familles qui ont fait le voyage vers l’Est afin de prendre part à ce qu’on désigne maintenant comme « l’expérience d’une vie ». Votre implication et votre support du programme des membres juniors ne passent pas inaperçu. L’Assemblée Générale Annuelle de l’Association Limousin du Canada s’est tenue conjointement avec le concours “Impact Show 2018” de l’Association des jeunes éleveurs Limousin du Canada, au début d’août à Great Village en Nouvelle-Écosse. Avant l’Assemblée, les administrateurs suivants furent proclamés élus comme nouveaux membres du Conseil d’Administration de l’ALC suite à un vote postal : Mike Geddes (ON), Matthew Heleniak (ON), et Amanda Matthews-Haywood (AB). En date de la fin d’août, l’ALC publie maintenant des ÉPD mis à jour hebdomadairement, grâce à la nouvelle évaluation génétique en une étape générée par le système BOLT. L’ALC fait partie du groupe de douze associations de races au Canada et aux États-Unis qui travaillent de concert et partagent leurs données avec le groupe International Genetic Solutions. Il est

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

Bienvenue à la toute nouvelle apparence de la revue Limousin Voice! On ne pourrait pas être plus fier de ce numéro spécial d’automne 2018, lequel est la première parution avec notre nouvelle maison d’édition, « Five Gallon Creative ». Nous souhaitons que ce véhicule de promotion renouvelé vous soit encore plus utile, alors que chaque numéro sera envoyé à tous les acheteurs de taureaux Limousin au cours des trois dernières années, ainsi qu’à une liste de plus de quatre cents abonnés réguliers. Plus la revue sera supportée par de la publicité, et plus nous pourrons inclure un contenu de qualité, de telle sorte que tous les membres et les producteurs commerciaux auront hâte de recevoir la revue Limousin Voice dans leur courrier.

CLA OFFICE UPDATE

Tessa Verbeek

15


NOUVELLES DU BUREAU DE L’ALC LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

16

primordial que les éleveurs continuent de soumettre des données phénotypiques à l’Association, ainsi qu’ils poursuivent l’utilisation des analyses génomiques, ce qui permettra d’obtenir des ÉPD encore plus fiables. Puisque les ÉPD sont mis à jour à chaque semaine, si vous voulez utiliser les ÉPD les plus récents, n’oubliez pas de toujours consulter le profil en ligne d’un animal donné via le système DigitalBeef, au lieu de simplement regarder le certificat d’enregistrement. L’automne est déjà arrivé et, de nouveau, les ventes de veaux d’embouche de l’automne permettront à plusieurs entreprises bovines de mesurer leur succès de l’année. Nous tenons à féliciter et à remercier tous les éleveurs qui ont investi dans la génétique de race Limousin, et nous vous encourageons à partager les résultats de vos ventes avec tous les membres de l’ALC, ce qui contribuera à promouvoir la vraie valeur de la génétique Limousin. Vous pouvez aussi faire paraître la liste des veaux croisés qui seront vendus lors de futurs ventes, grâce à notre service gratuit de publication sur le site internet de l’ALC. Pour plusieurs éleveurs, l’automne

signifie également qu’ils sont occupés à préparer leurs sujets d’exposition en vue des expositions de l’automne. Le temps et l’argent investis par ces éleveurs à exposer leurs animaux ne sont pas uniquement un véhicule de promotion de leurs propres élevages, mais également cela permet de faire la promotion de la race. Nous avons très hâte de pouvoir apprécier la crème de la crème des sujets de tous ces élevages. Le Concours et la vente Nationale Limousin se tiendront cette année le 22 novembre lors de l’Exposition « Canadian Western Agribition » de Régina, en Saskatchewan. Nous vous invitons tous à y participer! Tout le succès avec vos travaux d’automne. Nous espérons que vous serez fiers de poser les étiquettes roses Limousin chez vos veaux croisés Limousin – ils seront recherchés par les acheteurs aux encans. Souhaitons enfin que vos veaux croisés Limousin fassent pencher la balance lorsque vous les enverrez au marché et que cela vous fasse pleinement profiter cette année des bénéfices associés au croisement avec la race Limousin !


RED MAPLE ENCORE 18E

[HOMO POLLED]

Wulfs Zion x Clarks Zap of Creativity (Willard) • DOB March 13, 2017

S A T U R D A Y DEC 1, 2018 • 1PM Cookstown Stockyards Cookstown, Ontario Sale Managed by Indian River Cattle Company Billy & Juanita Elmhirst Auctioneer Carl Wright Blockman Wayne Burgess

BW 1.2 WW 66 YW 99 Milk 20 REA 1.03 MB -0.44 Bred April 13th to Wulfs Bank Robber

W ATC H O N L I N E AT RED MAPLE FOXY ROSE 3F

[HOMO POLLED]

Wulfs Compliant x DKC Yellow Rose (Trailblazer) DOB Jan 5, 2018 BW 3.1 WW 69 YW 102 Milk 20 REA 0.97 MB -0.32

www.liveauctions.tv RED MAPLE FLAMINGO 8F

JYF Chunk x Anchor B Poll Jeopardy (MTO) DOB Jan 18, 2018 BW 1.0 WW 64 YW 98 Milk 18 REA 1.39 MB -0.50

RED MAPLE ELEGANT ROSE 2E

RED MAPLE ECHO 13E

RED MAPLE E HARMONY 8E

[HETERO POLLED]

[HOMO POLLED]

Wulfs Willard x Red Maple Amber Rose (Nobel Prize) DOB Jan 3, 2017 BW 2.6 WW 69 YW 97 Milk 15 REA 1.32 MB -0.41 Bred May 29 to Wulfs Dial Pad

Red Maple

FA R M S

The Hollingsworth Family

4240 Concession Rd 4, Orono ON L0B 1M0 C 905-718-2185 P 905-786-2425 brh_eggman@hotmail.com

[HOMO POLLED/HOMO BLACK]

Wulfs Billy the Kid x Wulfs Ada (Nasa) DOB March 1, 2017 BW 2.0 WW 72 YW 112 Milk 16 REA 1.05 MB -0.19 Bred April 13 to Wulfs Walcott

BLACK] Wulfs Yankee

[HOMO POLLED/HOMO

x DKC Ulrica (Secret Weapon)

DOB Feb 2, 2017 BW 3.4 WW 61 YW 89 Milk 23 REA 1.34 MB -0.35 Bred May 3 to Wulfs Dial Pad


LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

Taylor, Ann, Murray, Colton, Scot and Jen Legge on their 5th generation farm north of Chesley, Ont. Image courtesy Jen Legge.

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PHOTOGRAPHY WRITTEN BY

Delanie Knull

The Limousin Voice, Jen Legge, Brandy Meyers Photography

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COMMERCIAL PROFILE

LEGGE BEEF Ontario family finds success using Limousin genetics in their 1,000 head feedlot.

Take a step away from how impressive the involvement of this family is, and remain impressed with the quality of Limousin beef they raise. At capacity, Legge Beef can have upwards of 1,000 head of feedlot steers, as well as operating 1,000 acres of cropland that consists of hay, corn, wheat, and soybeans. To add some history into the mix of this operation the land that those crops are on has been in the family and farmed on since the 1800’s.

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

T

he 5th generation farm located near Chesley, Ontario known as Legge Beef is an operation that carries a deep history as well as wide spread industry and community involvement. Currently the father/son team of Murray and Scot along with Murray’s wife Ann, and Scot’s wife Jen, run the farm, along with Scot and Jen’s two children; Taylor and Colton. Murray is a founding director of the Ontario Cattle Feeders’ Association and son Scot is President of the grassroots organization, the Bruce County Cattlemen, and an active member of the Ontario Beef Producers. The involvement doesn’t stop there, as Jen works with the Bruce Country IPM, and volunteers with fundraising projects and Taylor is the Fall Fair Junior Ambassador for Chesley this year. In addition, the farm as a whole is a member of the Ontario Corn Fed Beef Program.


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LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

“HIGH YIELDING, FINISHED ANIMALS GET US A PREMIUM FROM BUYERS.”

Mixed farming has always been a part of the Legge family but in the late 70’s there was a shift in the operation to become more cattle oriented. Since 2014, the Legge family has opened its doors to the public to sell a variety of Limousin beef products. They keep their consumers in mind when they are running their day-to-day operations. Legge Beef has an open-air barn set up to assist in maintaining their feeder cattle’s health and well-being. They ensure no animal by-products or unnecessary antibiotics are used and monitor and track their animal’s health by

checking their feeders twice a day. It is imperative to the Legge family that they maintain excellent animal health in order to produce their premium beef. The Legge’s cattle consistently meet AAA grade and Scot says this has been easy to attain with Limousin genetics, “High yielding, finished animals get us a premium from buyers.”

Colton gets friendly with a Limousin feeder. Image courtesy Brandy Meyers Photography

It is an impressive sight to look into the pens of feeder steers at Legge Beef and view a sea of nothing but Limousin influence cattle. It is this dedication to sourcing Limousin influenced feeders that has made Legge Beef’s products extremely successful and have made them a feeder and Limousin supporter that the breed is very proud of.



FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

MULTI-BREED GENETIC EVALUATION

POWERED BY BOLT The new genetic evaluation, Multi-breed Genetic Evaluation powered by BOLT, offers groundbreaking advances in the prediction of EPDs for the IGS group. Here are some frequently asked questions and answers to help you better understand the new evaluation. 1. WHAT ARE THE KEY FEATURES OF THE MULTI-BREED GENETIC EVALUATION POWERED BY BOLT?

ɐɐ Faster and more automated system allowing for frequent genetic evaluations. ɐɐ Improved use of genomic data with Single-step. ɐɐ Improved methodology for predictions of all traits. ɐɐ More accurate accuracy. ɐɐ More flexibility to add additional traits or change methods for future improvements.

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

2. HOW IS IGS’S SINGLE-STEP APPROACH DIFFERENT FROM BLENDING FOR GENOMIC EVALUATION?

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The blending approach uses separate steps to calculate genomically enhanced EPDs. This approach requires two steps. The first step is to estimate the effects of DNA markers through a process called “training” or “calibration”. These effects are then used to calculate molecular breeding values (MBVs) on genotyped animals. The MBVs are then combined with traditionally calculated EPDs to enhance the accuracy of the traditionally calculated EPDs. The blending process is only performed on genotyped animals. Befitting its name, the single-step approach calculates genomically enhanced EPDs in one step — using DNA, pedigree information, and

phenotypes simultaneously. As a result, the DNA information not only improves the accuracy of prediction on genotyped animals, but also on the relatives and contemporaries of the genotyped animals. In a sense, all animals are genomically enhanced under the single-step approach. There are also issues inherent in the blending process that are solved with single-step. Similar to the fact that only reporting phenotypes on a selected group of animals in your herd can lead to less informative (and more biased) EPDs with traditional evaluation, problems can exist with blending as it only involves genotyped animals — and genotyped animals tend to be highly selected. However, because single-step includes information from nongenotyped as well as genotyped animals, the issues are corrected. 3. HOW IS THE MULTI-BREED GENETIC EVALUATION POWERED BY BOLT DIFFERENT THAN OTHER SINGLESTEP MODELS USED IN OTHER GENETIC EVALUATIONS?

It is well established that DNA markers vary greatly in their effect on traits — ranging from a large to no impact. To leverage this biological fact in a statistically advantageous manner, the BOLT single-step method only utilizes markers that have a meaningful impact on the traits of interest, while ignoring those that have little to no effect. By using this approach, BOLT reduces the statistical “noise” and thereby increases the accuracy of prediction. By circumventing the “noise,” BOLT-generated EPDs tend to be more accurate than EPDs generated by organizations that are relegated to using all markers in their single-step evaluation. 4. HOW MANY DNA MARKERS ARE BEING USED?

The Multi-breed Genetic Evaluation powered by BOLT uses a subset


WRITTEN BY

IGS Genetic Evaluation Team

Photo taken at Conners Bros.

The Saatchi and Garrick research also found that utilizing genotypes on animals of multiple breeds consistently increased the accuracy of prediction within a particular breed when compared to limiting DNA utilization to only animals of a particular breed. 5. WHY ARE SOME TRAITS INFLUENCED BY MARKERS AND OTHERS ARE NOT?

The genetic architectures of various traits are different. Some are controlled by few genes with large effects and some are controlled by many small effects genes. In the current DNA profilers, there are some markers with high correlations with corresponding genes for some traits and low correlations with others. That’s why we see the different DNA added values for different traits. It is hard to change the genetic architecture of a trait. But, new DNA profilers or future technologies may help to improve the value of DNA information for such traits. Furthermore, some maternal traits, like Maternal Calving Ease and Milk, are difficult to predict with genomics because there are so few females genotyped. Increasing the number of cows and heifers genotyped will improve the ability to use genomics to predict maternal traits.

6. WILL GENOMIC TESTING REPLACE THE NEED TO SUBMIT PHENOTYPE RECORDS?

No, reporting actual records is critical. The value of genomic predictions increases as the amount of phenotypic information increases. Furthermore, at this point, animals cannot achieve high accuracy with genomic data alone. High accuracy EPDs are only achievable by collecting many phenotypic records on offspring. 7. HOW DO WE KNOW PREDICTIONS VIA BOLT ARE BETTER THAN THE PREVIOUS SYSTEM (CORNELL SOFTWARE)?

The IGS evaluation team has conducted a series of validations to compare the BOLT system to the Cornell system. BOLT-derived EPDs had higher correlations to birth, weaning and yearling weights (0.34, 0.29, and 0.26, respectively) than the Cornell derived EPDs (0.27, 0.19, and 0.20, respectively). Furthermore, there was a larger difference in average progeny performance (birth, weaning, and yearling) of the top 1% compared to the bottom 1% animals in the BOLT derived EPDs compared to the Cornell calculated EPDs. Both validations suggest the BOLT EPDs align better with the actual phenotypes than the Cornell EPDs. 8. WHY DO SOME ANIMALS HAVE SUBSTANTIAL CHANGES IN THEIR INDEXES?

Though the correlations between the previous (Cornell derived) EPDs/ indexes and the BOLT derived EPDs/indexes are relatively strong, there will be some animals that happen to move in a consistently favorable or unfavorable direction in a number of EPDs. Because indexes are comprised of several EPDs, even though movement in individual EPDs may be considered small, movement in the same direction across EPDs may yield sizable movements in the index value. This is particularly true

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

of weighted markers based on a research study performed by Drs. Mahdi Saatchi and Dorian Garrick, while they were scientists at Iowa State University. Drs. Saatchi and Garrick first used the 50,000 markers to determine a subset of weighted markers that are highly associated with economically relevant traits in beef cattle with consistent effects across breeds. Because the IGS evaluation is for multiple breeds, it is important to remove markers with inconsistent effects or no effects in different breeds.

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for animals that have consistent movement in traits that are drivers of a particular index. Though in a large population like ours we would expect to see several animals with substantial index movement, these animals will be the exception to the rule. 9. HOW DOES BOLT IMPROVE OUR CALCULATION OF ACCURACY?

“True” accuracy can be thought of as the gold standard of accuracy. It is statistically unbiased, and therefore the ultimate measure of accuracy. True accuracy is the accuracy resulting from direct calculation. Unfortunately, even with the massively powerful computing capacity now in existence, the direct calculation of accuracy is not possible on datasets the size of ours. Because we cannot calculate accuracy directly, other approaches to accuracy calculation have been developed. In our Cornell evaluation platform, and all others in existence other than BOLT, the calculation of the accuracy associated with each EPD is achieved through “approximation” methods. It has long been known these methods are a very crude approach to the calculation of accuracy — tending to overestimate accuracy.

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

Another approach to the calculation of accuracy is via “sampling” methodology. Sampling is shown to be a more accurate predictor of accuracy. In fact, the results of this method were reported to be virtually

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identical to true accuracy. Unfortunately, due to its computationally intense nature, sampling has long been thought an infeasible approach to the calculation of accuracy on large databases. BOLT, however, has changed the landscape in this area. By employing unique computing strategies that leverage both software and hardware efficiencies, BOLT performs what was previously unthinkable — utilizing a sampling methodology to calculate what is essentially true accuracy. Because BOLT can calculate true accuracy, we can put more confidence in our accuracy metrics. Put another way, unlike with approximation, we can count on the predicted movements associated with possible change holding true over time. This was not the case with our Cornell system nor any other system in existence. 10. WHY DO THE CARCASS EPDS GENERALLY HAVE AN INCREASE IN ACCURACY WITH BOLT WHILE THIS IS NOT A CASE FOR OTHER TRAITS?

You will notice that while the Multi-breed Genetic Evaluation powered by BOLT will generally produce lower accuracies than the Cornell system for growth and calving ease traits, the opposite is true for carcass traits. One reason behind the differing accuracy outcomes is several years ago the evaluation team developed a way to temper inflated accuracies in


the Cornell carcass evaluation. Unfortunately, this was not possible for growth traits. Another reason is that the Cornell system only used the carcass and its corresponding ultrasound trait (e.g., marbling score and IMF) to predict carcass EPDs, while records on several additional correlated traits are leveraged with the BOLT system. A new feature of the BOLT evaluation is a new approach to the calculation of Carcass Weight EPDs. Due to limitations, our previous Carcass Weight EPDs did not incorporate actual carcass weights. They were predicted through an index of birth, weaning, and yearling weights. Besides using prior growth records (weaning, post weaning), the new approach also includes actual carcass weights. This feature will undoubtedly lead to a more accurate prediction of carcass weight. 11. WHAT CAN I DO TO IMPROVE THE PREDICTIONS ON MY HERD?

I. Whole Herd Reporting

If you haven’t already, you should consider enrolling your entire herd with a breed association total herd reporting program as it offers the most complete picture of the genetics involved in your herd.

THANK YOU TO OUR BUYERS FOR YOUR SUPPORT

BULLS

Conners Bro. • Hawkeye Land & Cattle (2) • R&L Farms (2) • Ketchmark Ranch (2) • Kevin Rath • Ed Roseneau • Justin Berry • Max Tateson

"BECAUSE BOLT CAN CALCULATE TRUE ACCURACY, WE CAN PUT MORE CONFIDENCE IN OUR ACCURACY METRICS."

II. Proper contemporary groups

It is important for the genetic evaluation that you group, to the best of your ability, animals that were treated uniformly. Proper reporting of contemporary groups ensures better predictions for all. III. Take data collection and reporting seriously

Phenotypes are the fuel that drives the genetic evaluation. Take pride in collecting accurate data. If possible, try to collect additional phenotypes like mature cow weight, cow body condition score, feed intake, and carcass data. IV. Use genomics

DNA testing adds more information to what we know about an animal. The more genotypes we collect, the better we can predict DNA-tested animals in the future. Also, the more relatives genotyped, the better we can predict their relatives in future generations. Therefore, to ensure your bloodlines are well represented in the predictions, genotype your animals.

“Striving to produce the finest Limousin feeder cattle on the planet”

COMMERCIALLY ORIENTED

Limousin

FEEDER CATTLE

Developing 20 coming 2-year-old bulls to be offered March 12, 2019 at the

DEJAGER LIMOUSIN BULL SALE

Bow Slope Shipping Association, Brooks, AB

Thanks to everyone who stopped by our display at Ag In Motion. See us at next year’s show from July 16-18, 2019, Saskatoon, SK

ANDREW RANCHES Tim & Lois 403.779.2273 tlandrew@netago.ca  @AndrewRanches ANDREW RANCHING Greg & Linnea 403.377.2572 glandrew@eidnet.org

YOUNGSTOWN, AB

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

Legge Beef Farms • John Dekroon/ Ewart McLaughlin • Chaffe Beef Farms

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Check her out at LLOYDMINSTER STOCKADE ROUNDUP CANADIAN WESTERN AGRIBITION

HLC HEWSON LAND & CATTLE CO.

Larry & Jean & Dayton Hewson Box 502 Cut Knife, SK Larry (306) 398-7457 Dayton (306) 398-7624 email: hewsonlandcattle@gmail.com

07F

She sells at the Solid Gold Agribition Limousin 45th Annual Sale

Sire B BAR SOOT 25B X Dam RCN COFFEE CRISP

Two additional daughters sell at the Western Select Sale in December!

BLACK HOMO POLLED PENDING (we are awaiting testing) BD JAN 28/18 HEW 07F

Maternal sister sold in the Western Select Sale to Balamore Farms, NS

Excellence

Annual

bUll & femAle sAle At the fArm, Westlock AlbertA

mArch 14

Exciting New Genetics by:

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

romN cadillac Jack, Diamond c Dark knight, excel Polled Dmitri, flemington legend, Nmcc Polled black Powder

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of

50 + lots limoUsiN limflex ANgUs

The Miller Family

rr1 site 1 box 5, Westlock Ab t7P 2N9 cody: 780-349-0644 | codymiller8@gmail.com www.excelranches.com | www.facebook.com/excelranches



SPECIAL REPORT

SUBMITTED BY

The 2018 Show Committee

2018 CANADIAN JUNIOR LIMOUSIN IMPACT SHOW Madilyn and Alyssa Mills of Nova Scotia give Richard Heleniak of Ontario a ride. Image courtesy Jill Renton.

C

lam digging. Lobster Rolls. Bonfires on the beach. Does this sound like a cattle show or a Maritime vacation? For 79 Limousin juniors, their families and friends from all across Canada who travelled to the tiny village of Great Village, Nova Scotia, this summer, it was both! For the first time ever, the Canadian Junior Limousin Impact Show was held in a Maritime province, and for many who made the effort to attend, it was their first time visiting the East Coast. With that in mind, the organizers wanted to make sure that all who took time out of their busy lives to participate were given the opportunity to experience some Maritime culture along with the all of the joys a cattle show brings. After successfully hosting three Maritime Junior Limousin Shows involving between 35 and 40 juniors each year, the Coopers and the Maritime Limousin Association were approached to host the 2018 CJLA Impact Show. During these discussions, it was unanimous that every attempt should be made to hold the event at the Cooper’s to take advantage of the beautiful setting and to help create a friendly, relaxing atmosphere. So, that is what happened! Balamore Farm was transformed into show grounds, with an outdoor ring under a tent and all available barns converted to hold 97 Limousin cattle and clipping chutes. The shop became the registration desk, meeting area, display area for the photography competition and auction items. Another tent was set up for food service and seating, all in the Cooper’s backyard, overlooking the Bay of Fundy.

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

Luckily, the weather was beautiful and made the decision to hold it there seem like the right one.

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Juniors and their families and guests started arriving on Sunday, July 29th, including Laura Ecklund, the Junior Coordinator, who spent endless hours planning and organizing in the months leading up to the event and arrived at the Cooper’s a few days ahead to help pull it all together. By Wednesday, August 1st, everyone was ready to start the show! Over the next four days, 77 juniors participated in many of the traditional elements of a junior cattle show including judging, team fitting, oral marketing, showmanship and conformation. There was also a photography competition, and some “just for fun” activities including ice breakers, strawberry picking and clam digging. While the juniors were busy with their activities, the parents and other guests could hop on board the tour van with Robert Cooper who was kept busy driving guests around the farm, giving commentary along the way.


After the Individual Judging Competition on Wednesday, juniors and their guests were treated to a Lobster Roll supper with strawberry shortcake for dessert, all prepared and served by Balamore Farm staff. During supper and throughout the evening, there was a live local band that played traditional Maritime fiddle music – a great welcome and start to the show. After supper, juniors were invited to watch a fitting demonstration facilitated by Tessa and Colin Verbeek of Crossing Creek Cattle. Thursday was a big day! After a quick grab and go breakfast (homemade muffins included), juniors and their guests boarded four buses to make their way “down the shore” to Economy. The Bay of Fundy has the highest tides in the world, and each day, the tide flows in and out,

CONFORMATION JUDGE

PHOTOGRAPHY

Scott Nesbitt

Jill Renton Photography

2018 Bee Zee Acres Sportsmanship Award winner Taylor Stewart presented by Bill and Mary Anne Zwambag

CHAMPION AGGREGATE

RESERVE AGGREGATE

SIENNA BOHRSON

IAN KITTILSEN

JULIE DARLING

ERYN LORRAINE

SAMANTHA KENNEDY

WILLIAM COOPER

CHAMPION JUDGING

RESERVE JUDGING

PEEWEE

GRACE KING

BRYCE CLEVELAND

JUNIOR

IAN KITTILSEN

KENDRA SEARS

INTERMEDIATE

JULIE DARLING

CAMERON LOWE

CHEYENNE PORTER

EMILY SMITH

CHAMPION ORAL

RESERVE ORAL

MARKETING

MARKETING

PEEWEE

GRACE KING

BRYCE CLEVELAND

JUNIOR

JOCELYN KENNEDY

AUSTIN PORTER

RILEY BOHRSON

JULIE DARLING

CHEYENNE PORTER

ASHLEY HIGGINS

JUNIOR INTERMEDIATE SENIOR

SENIOR

INTERMEDIATE SENIOR

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

Guess the Weight Competition winner Grace King, presented by John-Calvin Siddall, Maritime Limousin Association President

SHOWMANSHIP JUDGE

Brian & Dora MacKinley

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Grand Champion Showman & Champion Intermediate Showman Eryn Lorraine

taking approximately six hours one way. The excursion was timed so that the group arrived at the beach as the tide was going out, exposing the mudflats, where everyone was greeted by a local professional clam digger, Alonzo, and he demonstrated the proper way to dig clams. He does this for his livelihood and there is a good market for clams, as they are a very popular dish. Once the juniors watched how it is supposed to be done, they were divided up into teams and each team was given a shovel and a container to try their hand at digging clams. The team who found the biggest clam won. There were lots of laughs and lots of muddy people by the end!

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

After the clam digging, the group headed out further to a fish weir, following the tide. A fish weir is a fence that the fisherman rebuilds each spring, and as the tide goes out, the fish are trapped inside this fence. Wayne and Vicky, who own the weir, kindly agreed to let us watch what they do to collect their catch, which they do at every low tide from April

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Grand Champion Showman & Champion Senior Showman William Cooper

to August each year, regardless of what time of day that low tide is. As they gathered their catch, they explained what each fish/sea creature was and why they keep some and why they put some back to the tide. Once they had collected what they needed, they let some of the juniors (whoever wanted to) go inside the fence and examine what was left. There were many fun moments as the braver juniors picked up crabs and many different kinds of fish. The muddy, wet crew made their way back to shore, where a local seafood diner had delivered some fried clams, so that everyone could taste a sample of what they had been digging earlier. Lunch was waiting for everyone back at the farm – another specifically Maritime meal – donairs! Now it was time to go back to some cattle show activities! Juniors were divided up into teams for the fitting competition and right after that,

CHAMPION PHOTOGRAPHY

RESERVE PHOTOGRAPHY

PEEWEE

RICHARD HELENIAK

OWEN ZWAMBAG

JUNIOR

MEGAN CONNERS

IAN KITTILSEN

INTERMEDIATE

GILLIAN LORRAINE

BIANCA BYERS

ASHLEY HIGGINS

SAMANTHA KENNEDY

SENIOR

CHAMPION TEAM FITTING

RESERVE TEAM FITTING

PEEWEE RICHARD HELENIAK, BRYCE CLEVELAND, ANDIE KISHKAN

OWEN ZWAMBAG, GRACE KING, AUSTYN KISHKAN

JUNIOR KENDRA SEARS, SIENNA BOHRSON, MEGAN CONNERS

AVERY BOHRSON, MEGAN SHEARER, CASEY KING

INTERMEDIATE

RILEY BOHRSON, KAYLEE COMEAU, ERYN LORRAINE

SENIOR ASHLEY MCCONNELL, JACKIE WISMER, SYDNEY PATTON

JULIE DARLING, CAM LEWIS, ETHAN BUSHELL NICOLE SCOTT, SAMANTHA KENNEDY, ALYSSA MILLS


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2

3

4

1. Champion Junior Showman Sienna Bohrson 2. Reserve Junior Showman Ian Kittilsen 3. Reserve Intermediate Showman Jarrett Bacon 4. Reserve Senior Showman Samantha Kennedy

After a catered pulled pork supper under the tents, four tractors and wagons pulled up and everyone got on board for a trip around the farm and through the pastures of Limousin cattle. The final destination for the evening wagon ride was a beautiful beach and as everyone climbed up over the dyke, they were met with six bonfires already lit and handed a roasting stick and marshmallows for roasting. The grand finale was an incredible display of fireworks. Day two came to an end with some tired but happy people. Friday started off with showmanship, and it was so inspiring to see all of the juniors do an incredible job. It was obvious that everyone had worked hard to become their best in the ring. Cattle were well-behaved and the participants made everyone proud to be part of this wonderful Limousin community. In the afternoon, the CLA held their annual meeting at the local school gym and the juniors went to the strawberry field to compete in the “Pick the Biggest Strawberry” contest, and of course enjoying some delicious strawberries in the process. That evening, everyone gathered at the Holiday Inn in the nearby town of Truro, where prime rib dinner was served. This was an opportunity for everyone to get cleaned up and sit down to a nice dinner and relax. After dinner, there was a guest speaker and then some awards were presented. A live auction finished off the evening and there were many generous donations and bidders and buyers who joined in the spirit of raising funds to help pay for the Junior Show.

Saturday, August 4th, was the last day, with conformation classes in the morning and closing ceremonies and awards in the afternoon. It was wonderful to see everyone gathered to watch quality Limousin cattle and to come together to celebrate the juniors. The atmosphere during the four days was positive and friendly – a time to make new friends and re-connect with this great community. The effort that people made to travel to Nova Scotia from 8 provinces was really appreciated by the show committee and made the show a success. It was a bittersweet afternoon as people loaded their trailers and packed up to leave, along with their many great memories of the week.

Save the

Date

2019 Canadian Junior Limousin Impact Show

July 18-21 2019 For more information cjla@limousin.com

Prairieland Park Saskatoon, SK

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

it was the Oral Marketing event. While the Juniors were busy, the other guests could play a game that Joe made up called “Guess the Weight”. For $20.00 per guess, one could guess the total weight of four bulls and whoever was closest would win half the proceeds with the other half going to the juniors to help pay for the show. Juniors also participated, and they were allowed one guess for free and it was a junior who won!

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SHOW RESULTS CJLA IMPACT SHOW 1

2

1. Grand Champion Bull & Champion Yearling Bull Balamore Endeavor 701E, William Cooper 2. Reserve Champion Bull & Champion Bull Calf Balamore Fortress 823F, Christian Shearer 3. Grand Champion Female & Champion Cow/Calf RPY Paynes Blossom 20B & East Coast Flower 829F, Keigan Macdonald 4. Reserve Champion Female & Reserve Cow/Calf Lazy A Desire Me & Lazy A Forever Desire, Brittany Hirschfeld

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3

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

5

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5. Reserve Bull Calf Champion Balamore Fully Auto 806F, Olivia Heleniak


SHOWMANSHIP JUDGE

CONFORMATION JUDGE

PHOTOGRAPHY

Brian & Dora MacKinley

Scott Nesbitt

Jill Renton Photography

1

3

4

2 5

1. Senior Yearling Heifer, Arcons Extra Charmed, Connor Wiley 2. Champion Heifer Calf, East Coast Flower 829F, Brennan Hoare 3. Reserve Senior Yearling Heifer, Loyal Line Eleaner, Connor Rodger 4. Champion Heifer Calf, Balamore Famous 832F, Megan Smith 5. Reserve Junior Yearling Heifer, Balamore Ethnic 776E, Camryn Patton

8 7

6. Champion Bred & Owned Female & Champion Junior Yearling, McConnells Ella Enchanted, Ashley McConnell 7. Champion Bred & Owned Bull McConnells Ernie, Ashley McConnell 8. Reserve Champion Yearling Bull Balamore Elite 763E, Taylor Stewart

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

6

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NEWS

CANADIAN JUNIOR LIMOUSIN ASSOCIATION

SUBMITTED BY

Naomi Best

1 2

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

2018-2019 CJLA Board of Directors (l tor) Madi Lewis, Cheyenne Porter, Connor Rodger, Samantha Kennedy, Jackie Wismer (missing Naomi Best, Kaitlyn Davey).

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The Canadian Junior Limousin Association held their board meeting as well as the Annual General Meeting on August 1st in conjunction with the Impact Show in Nova Scotia. The current board shared information about the CJLA including scholarships and travel opportunities. The CJLA decided at their annual general meeting in January to look into getting a new logo for our Association. We revealed the logo at the Impact Show so be sure to check it out on social media. Ideas for CJLA swag featuring our new logo were discussed with the membership – watch for new items coming soon. We would like to thank our outgoing directors; Angus Smyth, Brittany Hirschfeld, Carolyn Darling and William Cooper for their time and dedication to the board over the last few years. The CJLA is happy to welcome one new director to the board, Madi Lewis from Ontario. Madi joins returning directors, Naomi Best, Kaitlyn

Davey, Samantha Kennedy, Jackie Wismer, Connor Rodger and Cheyenne Porter to make up the 2018/2019 CJLA Board of Directors. We would like to thank Eric Boon of B Bar Cattle for taking care of our donation female and her progeny over the last two years, and a special thanks to Terry and Lynette Hepper of Eden Meadows Farm who will be looking after the pair for the next year. Our heifer calf, CJLA Foxy Lady 1F is now with the Porter Family of Plains Limousin for the 2018 show season and will be sold at the National Limousin Sale at Agribition in November! All proceeds from her sale will go directly to support the CJLA scholarships and opportunities. Watch for her in the upcoming sale catalogue. Finally, we thank everyone who supported and attended the 2018 CJLA Impact Show in Great Village, Nova Scotia. This was a very successful CJLA event! See you down the show road this fall!

3


NEWS 4

ONTARIO JUNIOR LIMOUSIN ASSOCIATION

SUBMITTED BY

Madi Lewis

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4. Nicole Scott holding a skate in the Bay of Fundy. 5. From left to right (back row); Taylor Brush, Bianca Byers, Ashley McConnell, Cam Lewis, Connor Wiley, Megan Priddle, Laura Scott, Madi Lewis, Jocelyn Kennedy, Nicole Scott. From left to right (front row); Olivia Heleniak, Margaret Darling, Julie Darling, Owen Zwambag, Carson Zwambag, Lucas Zwambag, Jackie Wismer, Samantha Kennedy. From left to right (ground level); Connor Rodger, Richard Heleniak 6. Cam Lewis and Connor Wiley competing in the strawberry picking contest, looking for the biggest strawberry!

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Ontario was well represented at the 2018 Canadian Junior Limousin Associations Impact Show, with 20 juniors attending, we were one of the largest provincial representations there. Juniors were able to experience a once in a lifetime opportunity as we became true Nova Scotians – clam digging on the Bay of Fundy, strawberry picking, and enjoying fresh clams prepared by a local diner. On behalf of the Ontario juniors I cannot thank the Cooper family enough for their hospitality and for the opportunity to tour their amazing property.

To raise funds for OJLA projects the juniors are currently selling tickets for our annual “Goin’ Shown’ Raffle”, this year’s prizes are as followed; 1st prize – a $1,000 shopping spree at RK Show Supplies, Moorefield, Ontario, 2nd prize – 2 ski tickets at Blue Mountain Ski Resort, $164 Value, 3rd prize – Jobsite Radio. Tickets are $10.00 each or 3 tickets for $25.00, Ontario Junior Limousin kids will be selling tickets at the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair and the draw will be made on Sunday, November 4th, 2018 during the Limousin show at the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair.

1. 79 juniors and 97 head of purebred Limousin cattle made this the largest Impact Show to date. 2. The CJLA released a brand new logo at this year's show 3. Happy smiles from Sadie Ecklund of Alberta and Hudson Meekins of Nova Scotia

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

OJLA members participated in the Ontario Junior Limousin Provincial show held at Markham Fall Fair on September 30th. Members will also be showing their cattle at the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair on November 5th.

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West of MacGregor at Rd. 62W 4 1/4 miles North

3 & 4 year old cows

bred heifers carrying AI services

2018 heifer calves

Plus several groups of select commercial bred heifers

AUCTIONEER: TRIPLE “R” LIMOUSIN THE RODGERS LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

Art, Maria & Family Box 156, MacGregor, MB R0H 0R0 Ph: (204) 685-2628 Cell: (204) 856-3440 triplerlimo@yahoo.ca

YOUR SOURCE FOR QUALITY LIMOUSIN GENETICS

DAN SKEELS

SALE MANAGEMENT:

BOHRSON MARKETING SERVICES

Scott Bohrson: Martin Bohrson: Darryl Snider: Taylor Richards:

(403) 370-3010 (306) 220-7901 (780) 385-5561 (306) 821-4169


THE AUSTRALIAN

EXCHANGE WRITTEN BY

Megan Wynn

For the month of August, I was given the incredible opportunity to travel to Australia through the Canadian Limousin Association. While I was there I was able to travel along the east coast and visit Limousin breeders, as well as participate in the Ekka Royal Queensland Show. I had the privilege of staying with the families that bred some amazing cattle and helping the St. Johns College with the 20 steers they had finished for the Ekka. The farms I had visited included Graneta Limousin and Angus stud, Birubi Limousin and Lim-Flex stud, Flemington Limousins, Summit Livestock, Universal Livestock, La Valla Limousin Stud, and Mandalay Limousins. Travelling from Brisbane to Wagga and stopping at Bell, Dubbo, Narromine, and several other stops along the way. From this experience I gained a better understanding of Australia’s Limousin studs, as well as the importance of having good genetics.

While over there it was common to see Canadian genetics being used to produce outstanding offspring and to further develop the Limousin breed. I was overly impressed when it came to the quality of cattle I was able to see, along with the exceptional people involved in the Australian beef industry. I think this exchange is a great opportunity for youth interested in the Limousin breed, or who are potentially considering breeding cattle in the future. This exchange is a good way to meet people and have contacts in another country to continue to produce outstanding cattle and expand Limousin genetics. This trip truly benefits the Limousin breed by showing youth the importance of genetics and demonstrates how valuable artificial insemination is in terms of the sharing of sires from half way across the world. The people I have met in Australia have left a large impact on my life, and I cannot wait to continue experiencing the wonderful world of Limousins. Thank you to the Canadian Limousin Association for giving me this lifechanging opportunity.

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

M

egan Wynn was selected in 2017 as the sole recipient of the Australian/Canadian Limousin Youth Exchange trip in 2018. Applications for this opportunity in 2019 are available on the CLA website. The deadline to apply is October 31st.

37


LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

38


WRITTEN BY

PHOTOGRAPHY

Tessa Verbeek

The Limousin Voice

39

FUTURE OF THE BREED

CORAD FARMS C

Judy was a true Limousin lover. She organized and promoted a local Limousin Breeders Club, created and maintained newsletters, and organized annual gettogethers for its members. Sadly, on July 11, 2018, Judy lost her battle with cancer. Judy was the glue of the Hunt family – she organized everything, and forgot nothing. She was happiest when she was out with the cattle, and loved a drive along the backroads to admire the farms and countryside. “There are no words to describe the void that losing her has left in our hearts,” says Sarah, “But, we are determined to work tirelessly in her honour. Her love for the Limousin breed will remain a big part of her legacy, and will live on through our love for her and for the breed.” Mervin remains an integral part of the day to day activity of Corad Farms’ cow/ calf operation with sons Cory and Chad and their families all working together to

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

orad Farms at Pakenham, Ont. is home to the Hunt family – Mervin and the late Judy Hunt started their Limousin herd shortly after purchasing the farm in 1969. Mervin was a shop mechanic and Judy was a school teacher. Together, they worked to expand their herd over the years. Sons Cory and Chad were born in 1970 and 1975, respectively. As with most every farming family, the boys grew up involved in the day to day operations. Judy claimed they would often create a makeshift playpen for Chad in the barn out of square bales to keep him safe while they were handling cattle. Originally, the Limousin breed was chosen for its calving ease and calf vigour to use over their Charolais and Hereford influenced cows. The calves were up quickly and nursing without assistance. In 1983, the Hunt’s began actively breeding and registering their purebred herd. As the years went on, Cory and Chad participated in 4-H and the family travelled to most of the local fairs and the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair with their Limousin animals.


40 make the operation tick like clockwork. In addition to the cattle, the family farms approximately 1,000 acres and grow hay, soybeans and corn. There are two main farm locations. The original farm, purchased in 1969, and a second farm purchased in 2011, only 3 kilometers away, where Chad, Sarah and their four sons, Jacob, Caleb, Wesley and Tyler reside. The Corad Farms crew will be growing in December, with the addition of Chad and Sarah’s fifth child. The family calves out 150-160 cows and run 6-7 bulls over their cowherd. The spring calving cows are kept at Chad and Sarah’s and start calving mid-April with the remaining cows calving in September and October on pasture and overwintering at the original homestead. They have been keeping the majority of their heifers for the past four years to help keep their cow herd young and productive.

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

The other division of Corad Farms is freezer beef sales. They have had great success with marketing their hormone, steroid, and antibiotic free beef through their website www. coradfarms.com, at multiple seasonal farmer’s markets and through word of mouth. “I love the pride that selling our own beef product direct to the consumer brings,” Sarah remarks, “I know we have a topquality product, and we all work really hard to ensure that each animal is well cared for and overall humanely raised. When we receive the kind of fantastic feedback we have been receiving about the taste and quality of our beef, then I know we’re doing a great job and it makes it all worthwhile.” In addition to farming full-time, Cory is a licensed mechanic and operates a small shop repairing farm equipment – which serves as a big asset to the farm. Cory’s wife Glenna and their son Corlen are also essential members of the operation. Glenna works full-time as a dental assistant in


Perth, Ont., and helps with evening chores when she gets home. Corlen spends his evenings after school and his summer days helping on the farm. He is also a member of the local 4-H beef club. Today, Chad also works full-time on the farm and is a part-time contract employee at the RCMP Horse Farm in Pakenham, Ont. Previously, he worked for 17 years at the John Deere dealership in Richmond, Ont. and later for the local Case IH dealerships in Carp, Ont. while continuing to help on the farm on evenings and weekends. Sarah worked for 11 years in Human Resources for the OttawaCarleton District School Board before transferring to the Business Learning Technologies Department, where she is currently employed as Learning Support Specialist and trains school board staff on technology. Corad Farms currently markets 10-12 bull annually, and they would like to be in a position to purchase calves off of their bull customers. They have plans to expand the

operation and erect a new barn where they will be able to background their own cattle as well as purchased calves in a controlled environment. This will also allow for larger groups of similar type and size cattle to be more easily fed together. Their bull customers often return for repeat purchases, commenting on how pleased they are with the relaxed nature of their bulls. The Hunt’s attribute the strides the Limousin breed has made in improving docility, especially over the last five years, as well as good handling, to the quiet pen of bulls they have to offer. “We feel the future of the breed is very bright,” says Chad, “Limousin offers high yield with minimal feed input, that’s what the beef business is all about. We have always based our success on the price per pound on sale day. Consistently our cattle will be at the top of the market, which tells us that there is a strong, steady demand for our type of cattle.”

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

41


LIMOUSIN BULLS

SIMMENTAL BULLS march 30th 2019

ON THE FARM AT PINNACLE VIEW LIMOUSIN. QUESNEL, BC T he Swaans & Kishkans

Reanne Sanford

ROB CELL: 250.991.8229 ERIN CELL: 250.991.6654

REANNE CELL: 250.991.9496 HOME: 250.249.5332

kishkan@quesnelbc.com www.pvlimousin.com

reanne@krssimmentals.ca www.krssimmentals.ca

PAYING THE BEEF CHECK-OFF

Packer Remits

PACKER REMITS PACKER

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

SELLS TO

42

AUCTION MART REMITS AUCTION MART

BUYER REMITS OTHER PRODUCER

BEEF PRODUCER

DEALER REMITS DEALER

For ease in private treaty sales, the seller may opt to remit. However, in all instances, if the purchaser fails to deduct the levy, the seller must remit. For more on rates and levies, contact your provincial cattle association.


Genetic

December 2018

1

COOKSTOWN, ONTARIO

for Colours of Autumn Greenwood Canadian Made sends a powerful open heifer DAM:

Venture Coco Flavour 16F Excel Polled Coco 506C

MGS:

Hollee’s Avalance

Wulfs Compliant

sends a very stylish heifer calf DAM:

New Life Franny 9F

Excel Polled After Facts

MGS:

SISTER TO A SALE TOPPING HEIFER FROM 2017

Wulfs X Factor

Ivy’s Bubba Watson sends a powerful bred heifer and a

SERVICE SIRE

“FEATURE LOT” of embryos

Revolution’s Extra Tender 3E

DAM:

Ivy’s Awfully Tender 9A

MGS:

Ivy’s Under Pressure 43U

B Bar Cognac

sends balance & style in this bred heifer from a past Royal Champion

DAM:

Payne’s Cracker

VLE Equitably Perfect et 103E

Venture You’re Perfect

MGS:

AHCC Worthwhile W595

Payne’s Diesel From a past ROYAL GRAND CHAMPION, with the style to repeat

DAM:

N L L

New Life Fleur 17F Ivy’s Bianca 17B

New Life Limousin

Gary & Justin Burgess and Melissa Koch 261269 Concession 18, Hanover, ON 519-270-5415 new.life.limousin@gmail.com

MGS:

ROMN Justice

V L E

Venture Livestock Enterprises Wayne & Anne Burgess Box 1654, Carstairs, AB 403.813.8416 vle.burgess@gmail.com


44

WRITTEN BY

Delanie Knull PHOTOGRAPHY

COMMERCIAL PROFILE

CONNERS BROS. LTD

I

t makes sense that the commercial operation of Conners Bros is run by Darryl Conners and his brother Bryon Conners, along with their wives Holly and Leanne, respectively, and their mother Kay. The brothers, who grew up on an acreage, started their herd in 1992 with 100 cows and now they have grown their Hanna, Alta. operation to 1,000 mother

The Limousin Voice Jill Renton

Brothers put self-sufficient Limousin cattle to work for their commercial operation.

cows. They started with Limousin cattle and have yet to find anything that meets that quality, so over the years they have grown their roots deeper into the breed. In addition to the merits of the breed itself, the Conners’ say that they have also chosen to continue to purchase Limousin because of the people they get the opportunity to interact with in the breed.

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

Keegan, Darryl, Kiptyn, Holly, Taylor, Kay, Mandy, Megan, Leanne and Bryon Conners


LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

45


Within their operation the Conners’ background 1,000-1,500 calves and grass around 700 yearlings. Approximately 800 of their cows are bred to Limousin bulls annually. In addition to using Limousin bulls they also use a range of Angus bulls on their heifers. The brothers have also added 100 purebred Limousin females to the herd to build up their Limousin maternal base. The next generation of Conners’ also have a passion for the Limousin breed. Bryon and Leanne’s daughters Megan and Mandy both participated in their first CJLA Impact Show, in Nova Scotia, this past summer. Megan has begun to grow her own herd of Limousin females through the 4-H program and has done very well with these females. Just

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

46

Taylor and Keegan Conners with their Grand and Reserve Champion Steers at the 2017 Hanna District 4-H Show

“THE CATTLE ARE SELF-SUFFICIENT AND KNOW HOW TO MAKE THINGS WORK, AND THEY SURE DO WORK.”


47

Darryl and Bryon take pride in the quality of their cattle and what they have to offer buyers. Buyers from across Canada know that the Conners’ cattle are among the best of the best and as such their stock is highly sought after. Their success comes from a great deal of hard work, putting in the time and hours that are needed and continually pushing through the many obstacles that come with running an agricultural operation. Darryl and Bryon appreciate numerous qualities that they feel the breed processes. Mainly, the Conners’ find that their Limousin cattle are low maintenance and minimal input is needed to upkeep the herd. This attribute is essential given the large tracts of land that their herd runs on in southeast Alberta without intensive management during calving or at any time of the year. They also find that they have the ability to be easily crossed with different types and kinds of cattle and the result is always a quality calf. In Darryl’s words, “The cattle are self-sufficient and know how to make things work, and they sure do work.” These attributes, combined with the fact that the Conners’ find Limousin genetics to be very affordable, make Limousin an easy choice for this large commercial operation. After working so hard and building the reputation that they now have, they have created a market in both the west and the east. Coupled together with the fact that they strive for efficiency and longevity in the land, the Conners’ are creating a legacy that will be able to last into the future for the next generation.

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

Megan Conners shows a Balamore Farms heifer at the 2018 CJLA Impact Show in Nova Scotia. Image courtesy Jill Renton.

across the yard, the household of Darryl and Holly Conners is a busy one with the eldest children, Keegan and Taylor, each showing Limousin 4-H projects each year. Younger brother Kiptyn prefers sports, especially hockey, but that just means there is one less sibling to squabble with when choosing 4-H projects. Considering the quality and size of the Conners’ herd, there is no shortage of excellent home-grown options for 4-H! Taylor and Keegan had a particularly exciting end to their 4-H year in 2017 when Taylor won Grand Champion Steer and brother Keegan won Reserve Champion Steer at the Hanna District 4-H Show! Both steers were high Limousin influence, had quiet dispositions and were a great representation of what fed Limousin steers should be.


MYCOTOXINS

IN FEED

WRITTEN BY

Jason Hurst

Beef Feed Technical Sales Masterfeeds, an Alltech Company

Photo courtesy Canada Beef

Over the past several years mycotoxins have been an increasing issue in beef cattle production. Mycotoxins are defined as a harmful secondary metabolite produced when a fungus is stressed. Mycotoxins by their very definition, are therefore very difficult to detect. Often molds and other funguses can be knocked or rubbed off during harvest, but the metabolites are still present in the feed. Since Mycotoxins come from molds, they can be found in nearly all feeds. Though more testing is done now than there was before, it is difficult to determine if the problem is getting worse or not.

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

In the past these toxins were thought to have been only a grain issue, however they are also present in forages. Since our grain crops are closely related to grasses the issues can be found almost everywhere. The source of mycotoxins can be boiled down to two sites of origination; the field and in storage. Each fungus has their own sets of toxins associated with them. For this article we will look at just a couple of the over 400 identified unique mycotoxins.

48

Fusarium is a mold of major focus when it comes to mycotoxins. This is because the mycotoxins produced from this mold can be very harmful at low levels. Trichothecenes are metabolites that are produced by the fusarium mold. They have been tested for a while and usually run under the name DON or Vomitoxin as well as a separate metabolite labeled as T-2 toxin. DON is often associated with poor feed intake or outright feed refusal. This often results in lower milk production and lower weight gains. Although sometimes with DON, the cattle can have good intakes, but the lower milk production and the lower rates of gain can still be present. Levels of risk can vary between source to source, but generally it is thought that below the 5 ppm level is safe, but issues have

been seen at lower levels. These lower levels get to be higher risk when other toxins like the T-2 toxin are present. T-2 toxins are very harmful in cattle diets, even at low levels. Typically, below the 0.25 ppm level are in the safe range, but after seeing the effects, no T-2 is ideal. T-2 can cause a whole host of problems like DON, but also add on bloody manure and a severely reduced immune system. Characteristically, with T-2 toxin producers have seen weak calves and then pneumonia sets in and the problems gets misdiagnosed as a different bug. Testing feed when issues show up is the best way to make sure the diagnosis is right. The effects of these toxins can be seen in calves straight up to strong mature cows. Sticking with Mycotoxins that are the result of Fusarium mold, Zearalenone is the next biggest toxin seen. Zearalenone often goes unnoticed until preg check time or calving time. Zearalenone based on its composition mimics estrogen in the animal and can therefore cause a lot of reproductive issues. Abortions and early embryonic mortality are often the result of Zearalenone levels above the 0.5 ppm level, though issues with more complex breeding (AI and ET) has been seen at lower levels. Other symptoms with an increase in the levels are prolapses in females and general infertility in both males and females. Though mycotoxins can all be issues on their own, often multiple toxins can be present in a feed source. The best way to know before a wreck happens is to test feed early and get a handle on what you have on farm. Every year can be different and from what has been seen is that “good” years can result in elevated levels. For more information please contact your local Masterfeeds representative for strategies to help with this challenge.


November

22, 2018

}{ Agribition Regina, SK

Wednesday Dec. 5, 2018 in Lloydminster, SK

December 31, 2018 at the Pomeroy Inn & Suites in Olds, AB


CANFAX

MARKET REPORT

WRITTEN BY

Brian Perillat

Manager/Senior Analyst, Canfax

$/COW

COW/CALF RETURNS

Source: CanFax Research

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

Depending on the strength of calf prices this fall, producers may be looking at returns this year that are closer to the long-term average. Although calf prices remain historically strong, one of the biggest challenges producers are facing right now is the rising cost of feed. Producers chewed through a significant amount of feed stocks given the extended winter last year. The low feed carryover combined with a

50

CDN $/LB

disappointing hay crop across a large portion of the prairies has many cow-calf producers reviewing feed supplies, ration alternatives, and herd inventory management. Do you buy feed? Sell cows? Sell calves? Move cattle to feed? Or a combination of these different alternatives? While most discussions focus on hay costs, it is important to consider the power of the rumen, and the wide range of rations that can be used to most efficiently feed a cow through the winter. Many producers will be facing higher feed costs this year, but it is still critical for each producer to understand their total cost of production in order to make economic decisions focused on profitability rather than just costs. This can also be used to decide if it may be more economical to feed the cows, the calves, both, or neither. Looking at a basic scenario for a cow-calf operation, assuming a feeding period of 210 days this winter, at 35 lbs of hay fed at eight cents a pound,

AVERAGE COST/COW $950

$1,000

$1,050

$1,100

$1,150

$1,200

AVERAGE

450

$2.29

$2.42

$2.54

$2.66

$2.78

$2.90

WEANING

500

$2.07

$2.17

$2.28

$2.39

$2.50

$2.61

WEIGHT

550

$1.88

$1.98

$2.08

$2.17

$2.27

$2.37

(LBS)

600

$1.72

$1.81

$1.90

$1.99

$2.08

$2.17

650

$1.59

$1.67

$1.76

$1.84

$1.92

$2.01

Source: CanFax Research

CDN $/CWT

The cow-calf sector has been generally profitable over the past several years. But after some years of very large returns, a year with average profitability can seem rather lackluster. According to the Canfax Alberta Cow/Calf Returns model, the long-term average return has been about $85/cow (assumes 95% weaning rate and 550 lb calf weight). Keeping in mind that there is a large variation between producers given different cost structures and marketing windows, profits can easily vary by over a hundred dollars per cow between operations.

ANNUAL ALBERTA 660 LB FEEDER STEER PRICE


and $1.25/pair/day grazing, feed and grazing costs for the upcoming year are approximately $782/cow. Based on Alberta Agriculture benchmarks, costs for vet, marketing, fuel, repairs, utilities and labour are another $245/cow, plus overhead costs of $95/year equates to a total cost of $1,122/cow. Again, depending on your feeding season, ration, and overhead, it is important to understand your own specific costs. Knowing your cost per cow is important, but cost information is most useful when it is broken down to per unit cost, which is done by applying your productivity factors. From the cows you winter, do 90% wean calves, or 95%? Is your average weaning weight, 625 lbs or 500 lbs? Consigned by Lazy A Limousin and Hollee Limousin

Lazy A Forever Desire EDW Desirabull x Lazy A Desire Me (at right) Pair crowned 2018 Ontario Provincial Grand Champion Female

BEAUTIES

Even though feed costs may have increased substantially, it gives you a basis to decide if you should buy feed or sell the cows. Even if your cost of production for your calves will be over $200/cwt weaned, would you be willing to take that risk if it meant keeping your cow herd together, rather than risk selling the cows into a depressed market and replacing breeding stock at higher costs? There are no simple answers, but without knowing your costs you are making decisions in the dark, and have no way to really incorporate a marketing plan. Predicting calf prices for the fall of 2019 is next to impossible, given changing market dynamics, but also because of additional risks with currency changes or potential trade issues. We can try to use past prices to create some ranges. The lowest price in the last four years was October 2016, when 550 lb steers averaged $176/cwt, while this year calf prices have averaged $225/cwt. Over the last five years, October and November 550 lb steers have averaged $228/cwt, and since 2010 fall steer prices have averaged $198/cwt. Steer calf prices have shown solid strength over $200/cwt the last couple of years, and should have support at $200/cwt, but there are certainly no guarantees in these markets. It is also important to remember these are just steer prices, and given where your cost per pound weaned lines up, you must remember to incorporate the heifer prices in your calf sales.

THESE TWO

NOV 3, 2018

SELL

Hollee's Fern

Hollees Yucatan x Greenwood Pld Baby Doll

Holli & Brian Lee

705-340-5944 Brian’s Cell 905-477-5173 hmacsand@hotmail.com Box 6179 • 29 Neals Drive • Janetville, Ontario L0B 1K0

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

Your productivity is critical when doing this analysis. In this basic example, if a producer has a cost of $1,122/cow, and weans 90% of their calves with an average weaning weight of 500 lbs, their cost of production is $249/cwt weaned, while if a producer has this same cost per cow, but weans 95% of their calves with an average weaning of 625 lbs, their cost of production is $189/cwt weaned. These per unit costs are now more useful when trying to incorporate market information into your decisions. The following sensitivity table shows the cost per pound weaned with varying costs per cow and weaning weights. It is based on a 92% wean rate. For example, if your cost is $1,000/cow, and your average weaning weight is 550 lbs, your cost of production is $198/cwt ($1.98/lb) weaned.

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LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

52

Branding at Running Creek Ranch. Image courtesy Mallory Blunier, NALF.


WRITTEN BY

PHOTOGRAPHY

Tessa Verbeek

Mallory Blunier, NALF

FEATURE

FROM PRAIRIES TO PEAKS T

he International Limousin Congress occurs every other year, and each year a different country devotes enormous time and financial resources to hosting delegates from around the globe. For the dates of July 19-28, 2018, the North American Limousin Foundation (NALF) hosted the 23rd edition of the International Limousin Congress in Colorado. Events kicked off with the opening ceremony at the Grand Hyatt in Denver. CLA President, Erin Kishkan, was tasked with carrying the Canadian flag during the flag ceremony where each country in attendance was introduced. 21 countries were represented by 150 attendees. Canada had 8 delegates in attendance for the

initial 5-day program. We enjoyed an evening of making new acquaintances and catching up with old friends. Many of the ILC attendees have rarely missed an ILC and the trip offers a chance to reconnect with Limousin friends from around the globe. The first full day was spent at the National Western Stock Show grounds where the AllAmerican Limousin Futurity Show was taking place. The National Junior Limousin Show had just wrapped up, so the barns were still abuzz with juniors for this open show. NALF has a thriving junior program and showing a Limousin or Lim-Flex animal has become particularly more appealing given the recent successes of Limousin heifers in all-breed

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

53


shows south of the border. Chris Mullinix, Manhattan, Kan., sorted the Limousin and Lim-Flex females, cow-calf pairs, and bulls. A representative from each ILC country in attendance was given the opportunity to speak to the audience about Limousin in their respective country and present a division award. By the next day, it was time to load up into buses to see some country. The first stop was the tourist town of Estes Park, high in the Colorado Rocky Mountains. It is known as the base for the Rocky Mountain National Park. The afternoon saw us touring Magness Ranch at Platteville, Colo. Participants socialized in the show barn and then took a bus tour around the ranch. Magness Land & Cattle market about 300 bulls each year. July 22nd was a full day of touring with stops at Ochsner Limousin, Five Rivers Cattle Feeding, 70 Ranch, and Greeley Hat Works. The Ochsner family has been involved with Limousin cattle since the 70’s and today Kevin and Julie and their three children operate Ochsner Tenderlean Beef selling all-natural, premium beef directly from their ranch to consumers, in addition to managing their own Limousin herd. Five Rivers Cattle Feeding is a 100,000 head capacity feedlot at Kersey, Colo. They pride themselves on keeping cattle health as a number one priority by having four hospitals on the property and a mortality rate of only 0.25 percent. On an average day about 3 million pounds of feed are distributed across 56 miles of bunk, with feed trucks making about 100 trips to and from the feed mixer to the cattle a day. As lack of water is a huge issue, the water

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

54

Running Creek Ranch. Image courtesy Mallory Blunier, NALF.


dinner. Attendees had some fun during dinner as the Colorado State University Meat Science Department presented three rounds of different kinds of steaks and had them score the three options on each round for a variety of characteristics. These ‘blind samples’ included grass fed, grain fed, dry aged, wet aged, and numerous other variations. This was the final evening of ILC for attendees on the 5-day program, which was approximately half the group. The remaining attendees on the full program made their way by bus to Cheyenne Frontier Days in Wyoming on July 23rd. International guests were thrilled by the rodeo and many sites of the Cheyenne Frontier Days. The day concluded with a few cold brews at the Budweiser Brewery where delegates were toured

Garden of the Gods. Image courtesy Mallory Blunier, NALF.

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

from run-off is maintained and tested to be used on some of the crops they own to make silage for the cattle. At The 70 Ranch, a hamburger lunch was supplied by Ochsner Tenderlean Beef. At this stop, attendees learned about the Subsurface Irrigation Efficiency Project (SIEP), which focuses on finding innovative solutions to balance the state’s increased demand for water while still preserving agriculture by using new technology to increase water efficiency. The group toured a section of the ranch where this irrigation system is being used on some alfalfa. The final tour stop was the famous Greeley Hat Works where guests had the opportunity to see how Greeley Hat Works makes cowboy hats, and many other types of hats by hand as well as refurbishing old hats. The group ended the evening at the Platte River Fort where they were able to socialize, play games, listen to music, and eat

55


LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

56

through the facility and enjoyed supper together. The technical session took place on July 24th at the Antlers Hotel, Colorado Springs, Colo. Presentations were made by representatives from GeneSeek and Hubbard Feeds, a division of Alltech. Dr. Tonya Amen, a geneticist for NALF, discussed NALF’s transition to BOLT single-step genetic evaluations and the use and application it will have for the members. There was a panel discussion on the success of Certified Angus Beef (CAB) and branded beef products in the United States and where Limousin cattle fit into that. The panel was moderated by Brett Spader, the CEO for National Center of Beef Excellence (NCBE). In the afternoon, speakers included Kenny Stauffer, Director of Beef Sales with GeneSeek and past General Manager of Top Dollar Angus; Brian Bertelsen, Vice President of Field Operations of U.S. Premium Beef; and Mark Anderson, Executive Director of NALF. After the sessions, the ILC General Meeting took place where discussions were had around plans for the 2020 ILC in France and Australia was approved as the host country

for the 2022 ILC. In the evening, all guests traveled to Spruce Mountain Ranch, Larkspur, Colo., to enjoy dinner and speakers from sponsors Neogen GeneSeek and Hubbard Feeds. July 25th saw attendees travelling to Boone, Colo. for a tour of Fillmore Ranch. Fillmore Ranch was established in 1917 and is now run by Brent and his father, Larry. In the early 2000’s the Fillmore’s purchased some Limousin cows that turned out to be wild. However, they couldn’t help but notice that the Limousin calves off those cows weaned off better than the other breed’s they were running at the time. After that, they culled hard for attitude and have been raising Limousin and Lim-Flex cattle since. With little to no rain in their area of Colorado, they have to be very conscious of the number of cattle they keep in each pasture, and in severe drought years, have had to ship their cattle out of state. Attendees toured the ranch, and heard from their long-time veterinarian about his experiences with

Ochsner Limousin. Image courtesy Mallory Blunier, NALF.


2018 ILC Attendees. Image courtesy Mallory Blunier, NALF.

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On the final day of ILC tours, tour guides joined the buses for tours of the Garden of the Gods and the Air Force Academy, where approximately 4,000 cadets are enrolled. Guests toured the iconic chapel that houses four chapels for the respective religions; Protestant, Catholic, Jewish and Buddhism, within one building. The final stop for the morning were the Castle Rock Outlets shopping mall. The afternoon and evening were spent at Running Creek Ranch, Elizabeth, Colo., run by the Freund family. Running Creek Ranch is one of the largest Limousin operations in the USA, with about 1,200 cows, 400 yearling heifers, and 200 bulls. They own or lease 30,000 acres. Running Creek is mainly a commercial operation and focuses on polled, docile, low-maintenance and functionally sound genetics in their Limousin cattle. The ranch also maintains a 1,000-cow satellite herd in Kimball, Neb. The cattle are managed on a share program, with the calves marketed through natural beef programs as fed-cattle. The attendees thoroughly enjoyed looking on as Joey Freund and some helpers did

Canadian delegates attending ILC. Image courtesy Tessa Verbeek.

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

battling diseases in cattle. After lunch, the group toured the Olympic Training Center. As the largest of three training centers in the USA, the center houses up to 300 full-time athletes training for various events in the Olympic and Paralympic games.


a branding demonstration with a small pen of their spring calves. The Freunds hooked up a couple teams of their draft horses, that they use to feed the cattle in the winter, and took the guests on a hayride through some of their cow/calf pairs. When the hayrides were over, Joey rang the dinner bell and a chuck wagon dinner was served. The guests had a great time getting to experience some of the cowboy way and getting to see some great Limousin cattle at this final stop!

Running Creek Ranch. Image courtesy Mallory Blunier, NALF.

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The closing ceremony took place at the Antlers Hotel, Colorado Springs, Colo. on July 27th. There were many thanks to be made to sponsors, the host ranches, the planning committee and the management team that organized and executed the program. On behalf of myself and the entire Canadian delegation that took part in ILC 2018 I would like to extend my gratitude to the North American Limousin Foundation and all of the staff and volunteers who worked tirelessly to put on an outstanding event!

NOVEMBER 8 & 9

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

PRESENTED BY

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IMPROVE PRODUCTION AND INCREASE PROFITABILITY IN YOUR BEEF OPERATION. BeefTech is an interactive beef industry learning event that gives you the opportunity to explore and experience emerging technologies and innovative management practices.

Light Green (Logo): Hex 70964E | R - 112 / G - 150 / B - 78 Dark Green (Logo): Hex 56753B | R - 86 / G - 117 / B - 59 Text Colour: Hex 404040 | R - 64 / G - 64 / B - 64 | Font: Arial (Regular)

• Keynote Presentations from Marty Seymour, Farm Credit Canada, the Peterson Farm Bros and Jim Bottomley • Hands-on workshops and labs, technology demonstrations and technical learning sessions • Includes admission to Farmfair International and parking (with full in-and-out privileges) Don’t miss this great opportunity to learn from leading industry experts and increase your profitability. Register today at northlands.com/BeefTech or call 780.471.7300


EAST COAST FLOWER 829F

Morrisvale Lumberjack x RPY Paynes Blossom 20B

BALAMORE FAMOUS 832F

Morrisvale Lumberjack x Othbergs Whisper

She sells in the Royal Elite Sale on Nov 3

BALAMORE FREDA 810F

Wulfs Spring Loaded 3158X x Balamore Cheerleader 564C

BALAMORE ENDEAVOR 701E

RLF Yardley 601Y x Clarks Affective Kiss

GOOD CATTLE GREAT PEOPLE Thank you to all who attended and supported the Canadian Junior Impact Show – 2018. We feel a tremendous appreciation for this wonderful Limousin community that we are proud to be a part of.

JOSEPH & CAROLYN COOPER & FAMILY H: 902-668-2004 | C: 902-893-0744 William Cell: 902-324-2005 | Robert Cell: 902-890-0663 9036 Hwy 2, Great Village, NS B0M 1L0 | Email: cooperboys@bellaliant.net


NEWS BRITISH COLUMBIA Greetings from the West Coast. As fall is upon us and winter quickly approaches, we reflect back on another hot and smoky summer here in BC. Several BC ranches were again affected by wildfire and although cattle losses were kept to a minimum (thank goodness) thousands of acres of timber and range grazing were lost. Thankfully fall has brought rain (and snow in some areas) and the fires are now in the mop up stages. Onto Limousin happenings. It was a relatively quiet summer for Limousin in BC, but the breed was very well represented at some of BC’s premier agriculture exhibitions. Dawson Creek Exhibition, North Peace Fall Fair, and the Interior Provincial Exhibition all saw Limousin

SUBMITTED BY

Erin Kishkan

entries this summer. Limousin influenced 4-H projects were also named Champions at some achievement days around the province. Rounding out the summer was a field day and open house hosted by Pinnacle View Limousin in September. It was very well attended with guests from all over British Columbia, Alberta and Ontario. The weather co-operated and the guests feasted while listening to a presentation by Bianca Bernasconi of Blair’s Ag on the importance of forage testing. It was a great day filled with Limousin fellowship. We hope everyone has a great fall with a plentiful harvest and successful weaning. Cheers!

Raising Quality Polled Breeding Stock

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

DAVE & LINDA HARVEY BOX 1469 100 MILE HOUSE, BC (250) 397-2306 www.hivalleylimo.com hivalleylimo@gmail.com

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We’ve raised our herd for 30 years and have enjoyed every minute. Now it’s time to slow down, and cut back. Check us out on facebook and our website for details. QUALITY POLLED BULLS & FEMALES AVAILABLE BY PRIVATE TREATY


NEWS ALBERTA 1

SUBMITTED BY

Amy Miller

2

3

1. Albertan participants in the 2018 CLJA Impact Show 2 & 3. The Alberta Limousin Association Field day

The 2018 ALA AGM & Field Day was hosted on June 16th by DC Farms and Excel Ranches with guests, Nor-Alta Limousin and Boss Lake Genetics. Thanks to everyone who was able to attend and to all of our generous sponsors. At the AGM we elected three new board members to the ALA, Cameron Olson, Leo Plante and Tyler Stewart. The ALA welcomes them and are excited to have them on board. Thank you to out-going directors Carriann Johnson, Jackie Payne and Jim Symens. The 2019 Field Day will be held in the Stettler area, if you want to be part of a display of cattle or have an idea, please contact a director. Our hopes are to have it be a big celebration of 50 years for Limousin in Canada! Again, this year our calendar auction was a great success and raised $16,400, which is our main fundraising effort for the year. Thank you to all of the bidders and buyers who supported the auction again this year. We will be sending out our calendars with the Christmas issue of the Limousin Voice so stay tuned! Our second annual bull buyer draw was a great success and is getting noticed by buyers! Congratulations to our winners: ($1000) Curtis

Perry purchased from Richmond Ranches; ($500) Kulyk Cattle Co. purchased from Bar-Dale Limousin; ($250) Russell Spearin purchased from Excel Ranches. We plan on continuing this promotion but it will look a little different and we have raised the stakes! Buyers can now win one of three credits of $1000 to be used towards purchasing a Limousin animal. More details and draw dates will be announced. New this year was our junior buyer incentive. Three juniors in attendance at the field day won cash towards the purchase of a Limousin female or steer from an ALA member. We look forward to seeing what they purchase and hearing about their success: ($1000) Cheyenne Symens, Claresholm, AB; ($500) Tate Marquette, Westlock, AB; ($250) Aiden Zacharias, Tofield, AB. Also, thank you to junior members from Alberta who went all the way to Nova Scotia to participate in the CJLA show. We were proud to have you represent our province. The ALA had a record year giving out prizes to 4-H members who had a Limousin project. Show harnesses were sent to over 70 members who exhibited Limousin and have shared many stories of their success on our Facebook page. If you have any suggestions please feel free to use the submission form on our website, or contact any of the directors. We look forward to catching up with everyone at events this fall. Especially, at Farmfair on November 8th at 9 am for the Limousin show!

2018-2019 ALBERTA LIMOUSIN ASSOCIATION BOARD President: Chris Haywood ♦ Vice-President: Tiffany Richmond

Secretary: Amy Miller ♦ Treasurer: Lois Andrew ♦ Directors at large: Anne Burgess, Brad Annett, Cameron Olson, Leo Plante, Tyler Stewart

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

Check out our brand-new logo and website www. albertalimousin.ca. It is easy to navigate, easy to contact us and easy for customers to find ALA members, with a fully functional map and each breeders location.

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NEWS SASKATCHEWAN

SUBMITTED BY

Carey Hirschfeld

Greetings from Saskatchewan!! Weather and lack of rain was front and center across the province. Searching for feed has been a challenge for producers this fall, as in many areas cattle feed is scarce. Making bales at a quarter bale per acre or less was a common thing. Hopefully everyone is able to find enough feed before the snow flies. Prices are strong for the fall calf markets and cull cow and bull prices remain steady.

Saskatchewan is proud to host the 2019 Canadian Junior Limousin Show

Be sure to mark your calendars for the 2018 Canadian Western Agribition National Show and Sale on November 22, 2018 in Regina, SK. Show will begin at 9 am and the sale is at 5 pm. Visit the CWA website for show details and updates. Any questions on the show and sale can be directed to any SLA board member. Updates can also be found on the SLA Facebook page.

as more information becomes available.

from July 18-21, 2019 in Saskatoon, SK. Junior members from across the province and the country are invited to attend. Not a CJLA member? Not a problem! Any young commercial and purebred cattle enthusiasts are welcome! Contact the CJLA or the CLA office to sign up today! Stay tuned to the CLA website, CJLA Facebook page and SLA Facebook page

As this year’s show season starts to draw to a close, please remember to take the time to thank all of the sponsors and volunteers who help make these events a success! Without their support many of these events would not be possible. Have a safe and bountiful harvest.

2018-2019 SASKATCHEWAN LIMOUSIN ASSOCIATION BOARD President: Rhett Jones ♦ Vice-President: Eric Martens

Secretary: Carey Hirschfeld ♦ Treasurer: Janet Hale ♦ Past President: Kevin Rea ♦ Directors at large: Ryley Beleicki, Jay Bohrson, Lee Carpenter, Ashton Hewson, Jeff Yorga

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

Forging Relationships

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OCT 14, 2018 OCT 18, 2018 OCT 23, 2018 OCT 27, 2018 OCT 28, 2018 NOV 4, 2018 NOV 6, 2018 NOV 8, 2018 NOV 14, 2018 NOV 20, 2018 NOV 27, 2018 DEC 4, 2018 DEC 8, 2018 DEC 11, 2018 DEC 15, 2018 DEC 18, 2018

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Heart of Missouri Limousin Sale - Lebanon, MO Magness Land & Cattle Video-Only Online Fall Production Sale Tubmill Creek Laurels Of The Valley Online Heifer Sale Thomas & Sons Halloween Hunnies Online Show Heifer Sale P Bar S Annual Production Sale - Sand Springs, OK Linhart Limousin Annual Fall Harvest Production Sale - Leon, IA Fosdick’s Winner’s Circle III Online Female Sale Red Revival Online Sale IV The NAILE Limousin Sale - Louisville, KY Edwards Annual Online Sale Diamond Hill Annual Online Female Sale ATAK Limousin Online Sale A Night On The Town Sale - Las Vegas, NV B-Bar Annual Production Sale - Saskatoon, SK The Eastern Select Sale - Mt. Sterling, KY Stockman’s Holiday Classic Online Sale KILEY McKINNA

402-350-3447 mcmarketingsales@aol.com 648 W Sawgrass Trail - Dakota Dunes, SD 57049 mcmarketingmanagement.com

PROUDLY SERVING LIMOUSIN SEEDSTOCK PRODUCERS IN BOTH CANADA AND THE U.S.


NEWS MANITOBA

SUBMITTED BY

Bill Campbell

As we age the seasons seem to pass quicker every year and 2018 is no exception. Autumn is upon us. The leaves are changing colour and falling, harvest is progressing well and it is time to consider what to do with our 2018 calf crop. 2018 thus far has been another year of challenges for livestock producers as minimal rainfall has left many producers searching for adequate feed for their herds. Early feeding of cow herds and shortage of water sources are great concerns for producers. This issue seems to be a problem throughout western Canada. The positive side is that annual crop production seems to be a pleasant surprise. Rainfall was quite varied and localized so hopefully you were able to source extra silage, straw or greenfeed to address your herd's winter feed requirements.

showcase the Limousin breed at Manitoba's largest livestock show. The show will be broadcast live on Live Auction at liveauction.tv. Contact Kyle Wright for more details.

The Ag-Ex Limousin Show is scheduled for October 26, 2018 in Brandon, Manitoba. Please consider participating in this annual event to help

Good luck with your feed requirements this fall and winter, with your harvest and with your calf sales.

Take Douglas Bull Test into account and consign your best bull calves. This is a great opportunity to compare your bull calves to other consignors’ and is an excellent venue for marketing these future herd sires. Once again, I urge producers of Limousin calves to contact their marketing agents, buyers and auction marts to make them aware of your good Limo calves. Marketing will enhance your returns on sale day. These people need adequate notification to help you achieve your best results.

2018-2019 MANITOBA LIMOUSIN ASSOCIATION BOARD President: Bill Campbell ♦ Vice-President: Travis Hunter ♦ Secretary:

As Alberta’s largest agriculture show, Farmfair International has been helping you buy, sell and connect for 45 years and will continue to be part of your big deal. • Legends of the Fall – Nov. 7 • Limousin Show – Nov. 8 • Prospect Steer & Heifer Show – Nov. 10 • Bull Pen Show & Commercial Cattlemen’s Day – Nov. 10 • NextGen Day – Nov.11

farmfairinternational.com

#FARMFAIR | Edmonton EXPO Centre

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

Jay-Dean Smyth ♦ Treasurer: Sherry Grandmont ♦ Directors at large: Kyle Wright, Tim Davey, Bob Davey, Art Rodgers, Scott Stewart, Leonard Gertz, Mark Angus

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NEWS ONTARIO

SUBMITTED BY

Mike Geddes

out and about be sure to take in the Limousin activities at the Lindsay Exhibition, Markham Fair (Ontario Provincial Show) and The Royal Agricultural Winter Fair. These are all excellent opportunities to view Ontario breeders’ programs and some of the fresh genetics in the breed. The Royal Agricultural Winter Fair will be offering some top Limousin genetics at the Royal Sale. Ontario breeders will be offering some of the top calves from their 2018 crop as well as some very exciting bred females. The Colours of Autumn group of breeders are also getting their animals ready for their annual sale held in December at the Cookstown Sales Yard. This has become the “end of the year” event that you do not want to miss!

The OLA is in full swing making plans for the 50th Anniversary celebrations. Agendas are being finalized and plans developed to host what will truly be a “Limousin Celebration” at the 2019 Royal Winter Fair.

attended shows behind us and several just around the corner. If you are

The OLA is also involved in hosting a Limousin Steer competition at Broniek Family Farms just outside of Grand Valley. Steers will enter the competition the end of October 2018 and will be marketed through Norwich Packers at harvest time. More details can be found on the OLA Facebook page or contact mike@topmeadowfarms.com

YOUTH FORUM

JUNIOR BEEF EXPO

April 28–29, Lindsay, ON

March 17–18, London, ON

Details will be available in the near future regarding tentative schedules, hotel headquarters and sponsorship opportunities.

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

We are at the midway point in the fall fair schedule with many well

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Emily Gibson is busy organizing and selecting all kinds of promotional clothing/ideas to celebrate the 50th next year. She will have product available to purchase/order at the Royal Winter Fair. Plans are underway to get items out to some of the western Canadian events this fall. To order products contact Emily at stockyardswesternapparel@gmail.com

Champion Limousin Heifer Paul Twiss

Reserve Limousin Heifer Carolyn Darling

Champion Limousin Female Brinley Miller

Photos: Barn Girls Photography

Reserve Limousin Female Carolyn Darling


POSTHAVEN ENTICE

December 22nd 2017 | Fullblood Ronick InstagramX Cedar Patch PP Amelia

Sold with her dam as the highselling cow/calf pair at the Foundation IV Sale, Kentucky.

PEJ 113E

POSTHAVEN EMERALD

April 11th 2017 | Homo Polled Posthaven P Zansibar X Posthaven P Alexis

Sold as the high selling bred heifer at the Foundation IV Sale, Kentucky

PEJ 107E

E. JOHN & ENA POST

602L

Flair

RLF

FARM: (519) 846-9320 CELL: (519) 766-7178

370F

g r a n d da m T m F

www.posthavenlimousin.com

7396 - 20TH SIDEROAD, RR #2 ALMA , ON N0B 1A0 ejpost@posthavenlimousin.com

S a t u r d a y N ov . 3

Rail Line Farms

P au l a n d B r a d M ac I n t y r e 5 1 9 . 3 5 7 . 0 8 8 4 or 5 1 9 . 3 5 7 . 5 4 6 9 E p c m a c i n t y r e @ h u r o n t e l . o n . c a 2 2 1 B ru c E r o a d 1 L u c k n o w , o n Ta r i o

T

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

BuLLs • FEmaLEs L E a d i n g E m B ry o s & s E m E n

sirE wa sy Ba kEr s m a n

629B

C o n s i g n i n g t o t h e Ro y a l E l i t e A l l B r e e d s S a l e

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NEWS/NOUVELLES DU QUÉBEC

SUBMITTED BY / SOUMIS PAR

Diane Joly

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1. Tim Andrew and family hosted Quebec student Jeanne Durivage (Tim Andrew et sa famille ont accueilli Jeanne Durivage, étudiante au Québec) 2. Limousin breed well represented at UPA Open House (La race Limousin bien représentée aux portes ouvertes de l'UPA) 3. From left to right: Jeanne Durivage (étudiante au GTEA à l'ITA de La Pocatière), François Poirier (président of the Station), Serge Dethier et Diane Joly (owners of the bull) et Philippe Roy (buyer of the bull). Sale price of the bull: 5800$

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

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The citizens of Montreal recently had the pleasure of getting in touch with the rural sector during this annual one-day event. Livestock, plants and regional products were the taste of the day for that special gathering at the Olympic Park in Montreal. In addition, agricultural producers were in attendance to share their know-how, while the visitors could also enjoy the specialities of the various food trucks, and enjoy street artists performances. Serge Dethier and Diane Joly of SDJ Farm were again proud to participate with three cow-calf pairs and a young bull being on display all day. The Quebec beef producer’s veterinary advisory consultant, Dre Lucie Verdon, was also active on site as she was getting the children to hear the heart beat and the ruminal activity of the young bull, while their parents were being informed about the specificities and qualities of the Limousin breed. Nowadays, thousands of customers are very concerned by the foods they eat and by the production conditions of the farm animals. This year's great success of the UPA Open House clearly demonstrates the priority and interest of all citizens to the foods they eat every day. ATQ LIMOUSIN EAR TAGS

We would like to remind you of the importance of ordering your Limousin ear tags from ATQ. Please visit the following link where you will find all pertinent ordering instructions: https://www.atq.qc.ca/fr/ producteurs-intervenant/formulaires. YOUNG BULLS ENTRY TO THE TEST STATION

On Tuesday, September 18th, a new group of young bulls of various breeds made their entry for the 22nd year to the St-Martin Bull Test Station, in the Beauce region. Anyone interested would be able to easily follow the progress made by the Limousin bulls on test by visiting: https://www.agrireseau.net/. There is going to be a bull sale on February 16th, 2019. CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR YOUTH

Last summer, Mrs Jeanne Durivage, a young student in agriculture at the ITA La Pocatière had the great privilege of making her eight weeks program stage to TL Andrew Livestock Ltd of Youngstown, Alberta. We want to thank them very much for having hosted her on their farm. In addition to being involved in the daily activities on this beef farm, she could also enjoy the western hospitality. Jeanne, who is an excellent rider, had the privilege of moving cattle on large pastures, an experience which she will never forget. All the success with the balance of her schooling program.

RENDEZ-VOUS ANNUEL AUX PORTES OUVERTES DE L’UNION DES PRODUCTEURS AGRICOLES DU QUÉBEC LA FERME S’INSTALLE EN VILLE

Le temps d’une journée, les Montréalais ont eu la chance de retrouver l’ambiance de la campagne au cœur de la métropole. Le Parc olympique de Montréal a accueilli des animaux, végétaux, produits régionaux, restaurateurs de rue, spectacles pour la famille et, bien sûr, tout le savoir-faire des productrices et producteurs agricoles de chez nous. La Ferme SDJ (Serge Dethier et Diane Joly) était fière de participer à cet événement en exhibant trois vaches et leurs veaux ainsi qu’un taurillon. Accompagnés du vétérinaire de l’UPA (Lucie Verdon), les enfants ont adoré pouvoir écouter le cœur et le rumen du taurillon, pendant que leurs parents s’informaient sur les caractéristiques et spécificités de la race Limousin. De nos jours, l’alimentation est une préoccupation majeure pour des milliers de consommateurs et leur curiosité quant aux conditions dans lesquelles les animaux sont élevés est bien naturelle. Le succès des Portes ouvertes témoigne donc de l’intérêt des citadins pour ce qu’ils mettent dans leur assiette. BOUCLES ATQ LIMOUSIN

Nous aimerions vous rappeler l’importance de vous procurer des boucles d’identification ATQ Limousin. Vous retrouverez toute l’information concernant la façon de les commander sur le site ATQ à l’adresse suivante: https://www.atq.qc.ca/fr/producteurs-intervenant/formulaires. ENTRÉE DES TAUREAUX EN STATION D’ÉPREUVES

Mardi, le 18 septembre dernier, la Station St-Martin en Beauce accueillait pour la 22ième année de jeunes taureaux pour leur évaluation. Il vous sera facile de retrouver l’évolution des taureaux Limousin sur le site de Agri Réseau sur le lien suivant: https://www.agrireseau.net/. Les taureaux seront en vente lors de l’encan du 16 février 2019. FÉLICITATIONS À LA RELÈVE

Nous aimerions remercier la Ferme TL Andrew Livestock Ltd de Youngstown en Alberta d’avoir accueilli cet été Jeanne Durivage, une jeune étudiante de l'Institut de technologie agroalimentaire (ITA) de La Pocatière dans le cadre de son stage de première année d’une durée de huit semaines. Cette magnifique opportunité lui a permis de vivre une expérience inoubliable en participant à tous les travaux de la ferme ainsi qu’aux différentes étapes de la production bovine. De plus, Jeanne, qui est une excellente cavalière, a parcouru plusieurs kilomètres à cheval dans les prairies pour le déplacement du troupeau vers de nouveaux patûrages, une expérience qu’elle n’est pas prête d’oublier. Nous lui souhaitons un beau succès dans la poursuite de ses études.

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

ANNUAL OPEN HOUSE OF THE QUEBEC FARMER UNION – THE FARM COMES TO TOWN

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NEWS THE MARITIMES

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

What a summer! The long anticipated 2018 Canadian Junior Limousin Impact Show went off with huge success. The Maritime Limousin Association would like to thank every junior, every parent, every breeder, and every spectator that came out to Balamore Farms in Great Village, NS to participate and enjoy our maritime hospitality. Joe and Carolyn Cooper were our gracious hosts to 79 juniors and 97 head of Limousin cattle, from almost every province in Canada! What a huge success for us here in the Maritimes.

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Guests enjoyed a clam dig, tours around the farm, freshly picked strawberries (before and after the strawberry picking contest) and fireworks on the beach, along with ice breakers, a fitting demonstration put on by Tessa & Colin Verbeek of Crossing Creek Cattle, fitting competition, showmanship and conformation classes. A huge thank you goes out to Joe and Carolyn, their boys and employees for their tireless hours put in prepping and working all weekend to put on such an event, to Laura Ecklund for all her hours planning before and coordination during the event, and to Barb McLaughlin for doing all the behind the scenes score tallying throughout the weekend. Where would we be without our sponsors? Thank you to our sponsors of the 2018 Canadian Junior Limousin Impact Show: Central Equipment,

SUBMITTED BY

Jill Renton

Truro Agromart, Jill Renton Livestock Photography, Municipality of Colchester, Atlantic Stockyards, CIBC, ASB, Greenworld, Master Packaging, NS Department of Agriculture, Green Diamond, T.O. Plastics, Antigonish Farmers Mutual, Norwich Packers, Lindencrest Farm, Pinnacle View Limousin, Greenwood Limousin, Clark Cattle, B Bar Cattle and Andrew Ranches, Bee Zee Acres, Payne Livestock, Top Meadow Farms, Rail Line Farms, Superline Fuels and Petro Canada, Keltic Transport, Donnelly Farms, Theriault & Hachey, Blue Diamond Polled Limousin, Metzger Vet, Sansom Equipment, Top of the Hill Farms, Balamore Farm Ltd., Hummingbird Farms, Clarence’s Farm Services, Agropur, Kittilsen’s Honey, Tony’s Meats, Northern Pulp, Wildflower Promotions, Wilson’s Fuels, Great Village, and Masstown Hardware. Our annual general meeting for the Maritime Limousin Association also took place during the weekend’s events, where Barb McLaughlin, long time member, secretary and Limousin breeder, stepped down from her secretary position. Jill Renton has replaced her as secretary. From New Brunswick, we would like to congratulate Jesse Thorne on qualifying for the 2018 NB Royal Beef team with his heifer Othbergs Exquisite 79E (Greenwood PLD Zambuka). We wish you all the luck in Toronto this November!

2018-2019 MARITIME LIMOUSIN ASSOCIATION BOARD President: John-Calvin Siddall ♦ Secretary: Jill Renton

Treasurer: Sandra Othberg ♦ CLA National Director: Joe Cooper ♦ Directors at large: Manfred Zillig, Victor Horsnell, Fred Porter


PHOTOGRAPHY

Jill Renton Photography

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CJLA Impact Show exhibitors experienced one of a kind hospitality at Balamore Farm: 1. Participating in a strawberry picking competition 2. Experiencing an east coast clam dig 3. Ashley McConnell shows her bull in the conformation show 4. Fireworks to end the evening 5. A marshmallow roast on the beach 6. Casey King participates in the fitting competition 7. A Limousin pair looks on as participants enjoy a wagon ride

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4

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

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CANADIAN CATTLEMEN'S ASSOCIATION

PRESIDENT'S REPORT

I am pleased to report to you as President of the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA). Since being elected President at CCA’s annual general meeting in March, my focus has been on progressing key files including trade and environment and ensuring a sustainable future for beef production. The work myself and Vice President Bob Lowe do on behalf of industry builds on a path forged by past CCA leadership, and I am determined to keep the momentum going as we blaze the trail forward. I want to thank Dan Darling for his service to the industry and look forward to his continued involvement as CCA Past President. The CCA is pleased that Bill C-79, to pass the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP), proceeded to second reading in the House of Commons on September 17, the first day of sitting following the summer break. With the distinction of being the first government bill to be debated this fall, Bill C-79 passed second reading by a vote of 242 to 48, was adopted and referred to the Standing Committee on International Trade. This is excellent progress and the CCA will continue to advocate for a swift ratification and implementation of CPTPP.

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

The CCA applauds Minister of International Trade Diversification Jim Carr and the Government of Canada for taking such decisive action towards ratifying and implementing this landmark agreement. In his speech, Minister Carr signaled that the Government understands the importance of Canada being one of the first six to ratify.

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The CPTPP will start to come into force once six of the 11 signatories complete their domestic ratification procedures. Canada must be among the first six countries to ratify the CPTPP if Canada’s beef and red meat and agricultural sectors are to have a leg up on competitors. In July, Singapore became the third country to ratify the CPTPP, following in the footsteps of Mexico and Japan. With just three additional member countries required to ratify the CPTPP to trigger the process to bring it into force, time is of the essence for Canada. The tremendous market diversification promise of the CPTPP has been a steadying influence during the latest round of North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) renegotiations led by the U.S.

WRITTEN BY

David Haywood-Farmer President, CCA

The CCA travelled to Washington, DC twice in September to monitor the Canada-U.S. talks. The CCA and other red meat groups continue to press for improvements through the NAFTA renegotiation on regulatory issues, advocating for a “meat annex” of provisions to remove burdens and smooth trade. CCA uses these meetings to advocate for these improvements and meet with long-time key contacts and stakeholders and even the Canadian media, who seemingly have taken up semi-permanent residence outside the U.S. Trade Representative’s (USTR) building. Negotiators appeared to be focussed on getting a deal done, with Canada’s Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland and USTR’s Robert Lighthizer holding a number of meetings with a few senior officials accompanying them. There is a general sense that the process is constructive, and Minister Freeland has said as much. Overall, CCA is cautiously optimistic that there will be a trilateral deal including Canada, once a Canada-U.S. “handshake” occurs, then Mexico will rejoin for negotiations to continue trilaterally. Later in September, I participated in the International Beef Alliance (IBA) annual conference and tour. In addition to a meeting of the IBA leadership in Vancouver and business meetings in Calgary, participants were exposed to beef operations in British Columbia and Alberta. My wife Bonnie and I were pleased to host one of these visits at our family ranch and demonstrate how we raise cattle in B.C. The IBA, which represents producers from countries that account for 46 per cent of global beef cattle production and 63 per cent of global beef exports, remains supportive of the CPTPP and looks forward to a future when all IBA member countries might participate in the agreement. Trade is indeed the lifeblood of Canada’s beef industry and it must be supported by a robust regulatory and policy framework. The CCA continues efforts to advance areas of Canada’s Business Risk Management (BRM) and has identified key areas we hope to advance while engaging in the BRM review in the upcoming year.


You won't find us on the show road this fall due to mitigating circumstances, but you will find the same quality we always exhibit in our pens at home. We would welcome a visit and we would love to take you for a tour through some of our most promising genetics to date! We also have a few heifers offered for sale!

QUALITY with

PREDICTABLE CONSISTENCY for over

30 years

BULL SALE MARCH 2018 Jim & Laura Symens & Family

BOX 3209 CLARESHOLM ALBERTA T0L 0T0 PHONE: (587) 728-1004 EMAIL: symens@platinum.ca


HERD HEALTH

VACCINE SELECTION FOR CATTLE WRITTEN BY

Dr. Roy Lewis DVM

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

There are a multitude of diseases to consider vaccinating for and these diseases come in a multitude of vaccine combinations with different types of administration routes (subcutaneous or intramuscular) as well as different dosage amounts (usually two-five cc). These possibilities should all be considered when choosing vaccines. First and foremost, use the advice of your local veterinarian. He/she will have chosen the most appropriate vaccines for your geographic area in the best combinations available to minimize the number of needles to be given. Veterinarians are an invaluable resource when it comes to vaccine selection, a very critical point of biosecurity for your commercial or purebred operation.

72

Vaccine companies generally speaking are producing more and more vaccines in multiple combinations. This is because there are now several diseases, which are routinely vaccinated for on most farms. By having less choice, it is less confusing to producers, less needles are necessary and the cost per disease treated actually comes down. Veterinarians make the choices as to which vaccine lines to carry based on several things, effectiveness, route of administration, dosage amount and dose size per container. Availability, price, timing of administration and service given by the sales force are all considered when making the selection. All reputable companies have data to support the effectiveness of their vaccine over others. We are really almost comparing apples to apples when comparing the numerous vaccines available from the reputable companies if they cover the same diseases. Make sure the vaccines you use cover the diseases you need to prevent and administer them properly. A few misconceptions are changing vaccine lines and the thought of needing to start the whole vaccine protocol over again. Different vaccine

lines will generally booster the immune response from a previous vaccination from a different line of vaccines. Of course, the diseases in the vaccines must be the same. The important thing to remember whether it be from previous vaccination or exposure to the real disease revaccination stimulates the bodies immune system to develop further protection from sickness. Generally speaking this is where the modified live vaccines (mixing the powder and the fluid together) will give longer lasting immunity than the killed viral vaccines. Certain geographic areas in Canada have a higher incidence of specific diseases and vaccination may be considered. An example of this would be Clostridium Hemolyticum in west central Alberta. Horses are vaccinated for rabies in certain regions of eastern Canada. Herds that have had prior history of leptospirosis may vaccinate and in outbreaks of Anthrax the contact herd as well as neighbouring herds may be vaccinated in the current year and forward in subsequent years. Other diseases, which are reportable in Canada such as, foot and mouth disease or brucellosis, even though a vaccine exists for them they are not allowed to be used in Canada. That’s because we are free of these diseases and want to keep the disease out. If we were to vaccinate the protection the vaccine affords could mask symptoms and carrier animals might develop. Tests for disease exposure often cannot differentiate between exposure to the real disease or vaccination so eradication is therefore difficult. Now in most herds across western Canada vaccination for the diseases of IBR, BVD (types 1 and 2), PI3, BRSV, clostridial (blackleg group 8 way or now 9 way), histophilus (the former hemophilus), are pretty much commonplace. For young calves up to and past weaning the two respiratory


pathogens Pasteurella and Mannheimia are becoming commonplace as well. With some companies’ vaccines all these organisms are protected for in two needles. Some other products even come as intranasal vaccines which offer quick protection to the diseases and no needles. Intranasal technology is becoming more common even in very young calves and watch for more intranasal technology in the future from one of the big pharmaceutical companies. With these intranasal vaccines you get quicker immunity without a bothersome needle. Many purebred producers give intranasal vaccinations such as Once PMH, Inforce 3 or both vaccines before they head down the show road. This enhances pre-existing immunity at a time when they need maximal protection.

SELLS IN THE 2018 NATIONAL LIMOUSIN SALE NOVEMBER 22 AT AGRIBITION

MAKING Dreams

Scours vaccination is becoming commonplace for the breeding animals in especially the larger herds and there are now three main scours vaccines to choose from Scour Bos, ScourGuard & Guardian. One of the scours vaccines can even be given subcutaneously. A multitude of other vacccines, foot rot especially in the breeding bulls, pinkeye vaccines and leptospirosis vaccines are being more commonly used if necessary. Don’t forget to vaccinate the breeding bulls and many take advantage of semen evaluation to complete this task.

If selling purebred cattle especially out of area, make sure the purchaser indicates if there is anything specific to vaccinate for. Vaccination programs vary slightly across the country and this is good information to know so you can vaccinate the cattle before they go. Eastern Canada often will vaccinate for leptospirosis, but it is very rare in the west. Preimmunization which is vaccinating before exposure to allow maximum protection to develop. This generally will take ten days to two weeks. There are no magic bullets of vaccination replacing good management. Proper nutrition, parasite control and sanitation go a long way to preventing disease itself. All this augmented with a properly thought out and implemented vaccination program will severely reduce the incidence of those diseases on your farm. Talk to your veterinarian as new products and ways of administration are coming out all the time. Also, many producers look to their purebred supplier of bulls for advice on what vaccination program to use. Purebred breeders should think of indicating their vaccination programs in their sales catalogues for others to follow. Have a great fall everybody with minimal sickness and maximum growth.

COME True CJLA FOXY LADY 1F

Limolyn Colette x Ivy's Bubba Watson 24B All proceeds will go directly to the CJLA for scholarships, trips and opportunities. Your support of the CJLA and their donation female program is appreciated.

Canadian Junior Limousin Association @CDNJuniorLimo

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

Also, storage of vaccines (almost all need to be refrigerated) and handling when administered are critical to getting the maximum effect. Freezing or overheating of the vaccine before administration cannot be tolerated. Label your syringes so as not to mix different vaccines and make sure and give the vaccines a handbreadth apart preferably on opposite sides of the neck. Only mix up enough of the modified live vaccines to use in one hour. Take your time and administer the vaccines properly. They are insurance against the calves not getting sick, so take your time and insure the best immunity. Make sure your cattle are also treated for worms and lice to minimize these parasites. With parasites removed the calves will develop that much better protection from the vaccines. The fall is the ideal time to totally review your vaccination program, so you can add in further protection if it is available.

73


WRITTEN BY

Dawn Trautman Director of Knowledge Translation Livestock Gentec, University of Alberta

3

REASONS TO ADD ACCURACY VALUES TO YOUR EPDS

Think accuracy ratings on your EPD values aren’t for you? That your customers won’t want yet another number to think about? Think again! Accuracies are nearly as important as the EPD values themselves. A complaint that might be unfortunately familiar to many bull breeders is that their customers aren’t seeing what they expected in their calf crop. It’s important that producers purchasing bulls realize that EPDs are ‘expected progeny differences’. That is, on average, it is the outcome we expect, based on the data we have. However, in real life, there are literally billions of outcomes possible when breeding two animals together. If you were to take an average of the hypothetical billion, you would get to the EPD that is reported. But this means that it’s very possible that there will be some calves that don’t fit within the expected outcome from mating a particular pair of animals. This is where accuracies come in – they help minimize the unexpected outcomes, or at least help understand the variation possible in a new light.

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

74

On the other hand, an accuracy value closer to zero means that the reported EPD is less reliable. This might be for a variety of reasons, including that the EPD trait itself is difficult to measure, there is not a lot of performance or pedigree information on the animal (for example, the animal might be young and unproven), or the information is not of high quality. In these cases, the EPD value is still useful and informative, but it should be applied in a more cautious manner. SO WHY SHOULD YOU ADD ACCURACY VALUES TO YOUR REPORTED EPDS?

I. It’s more informative

WHAT IS ACCURACY?

Accuracy values are published for EPD values for your animals. It’s the relationship between the estimated and “true” EPD value of the animal. EPDs are predicting the average progeny performance, so accuracy reflects how close, or confident we are in that prediction of true genetic merit. Simply put, it adds a weight to that expectation, expressed in a value between 0 and 1.0.

1

An accuracy close to 1.0 means that the reported EPD is more likely to be representative of the true genetic merit of the animal. This means that even as we collect more information and information of high quality on the animal and its relatives, the EPD is less likely to change, because it is already highly accurate (that is, it has already been estimated correctly).

Adding accuracy gives you and your customers more information to make better choices. It will also improve your understanding of your herd and help inform your own decisions. For example, consider the following table, which considers the birth weight EPDs of two bulls1:

BW EPD

ACCURACY

POSSIBLE EPD CHANGE

“TRUE” EPD RANGE

BULL 1

+2.0

0.25

±2.4

-0.4 TO +4.4

BULL 2

+2.0

0.90

±1.2

+0.8 TO +3.2

Greiner. 2009. Understanding EPDs. Available at: https://pubs.ext.vt.edu/400/400-804/400-804.html


Recall that EPDs are our best estimates of the genetic worth of the bull. While we don’t know the “true” EPD for any traits on any animals, high accuracy EPDs get us as close and confident as possible to this true genetic worth, estimated from EPDs.

OKAY, BUT HOW DO I EXPLAIN EPD ACCURACIES TO MY CUSTOMERS?

Your customers already understand EPDs and that they help them make better breeding decisions to match their breeding goals to their herd. Accuracies are only one simple addition, next to the listing of the EPD. A snapshot descriptor to include in your bull catalogue might read: Accuracy is a value between 0 and 1 that reflects how close the EPD (the prediction) is to the true genetic merit or breeding value of the animal2.

ACCURACY

MEANING

RISK LEVEL

Less than 0.40

Likely to change with more information

High

0.40 to 0.80

Some to small changes possible; records on some progeny

Moderate to Low

Greater than 0.80

Not likely to change much; records on numerous progeny

Low

II. It will help manage risks

When you have information on the accuracy of your EPDs you can make better breeding decisions for your herd. Using the table example above, this is straightforward to see. If you’re thinking to use one of these bulls on your heifers and didn’t want to risk calves with too high a birth weight, you would choose Bull 2 because the risks are much lower since the “true” EPD range is much less. Bull 1 might sire offspring with substantially higher BW than the reported BW EPD, but when you have the accuracy information, you can make more informed decisions. It’s also important to remind yourself that younger animals with less information will have lower accuracies (perhaps only for the time being), compared to older animals with more information. One thing to also note, accuracy is not an indicator of expected variation in a calf crop. That variation is a result of the “expected” component of the EPD, where a range of outcomes is always possible. III. Genetic merit will be improved

EPDs, regardless of accuracy, are the most powerful tool to make genetic progress in cattle as they are the most objective indicator of the genetic merit of the animals. When you include and implement the accuracy component of EPDs you get closer to the “true” genetic merit and closer to your breeding objective. Many natural service sires up for sale will have low to moderate accuracy EPDs since they are young animals with zero to few progeny. When considering that the accuracy might change, it might increase or decrease, and impact the EPD. However, for this reason it is important to realize that small differences in reported EPDs might be less important when you consider the range overlap of the “true” EPDs, with the added information of accuracy. Even with these tools available to breed better cattle, it’s all contingent on accurate information submitted. This means that it’s the responsibility of all producers to report all performance data on all animals in the herd, as well as reporting on differences in management between contemporary groups, in order to achieve genetic gains within the breed and for customers.

A value closer to 1 is more accurate and means that the true genetic merit of the animal is less likely to change, even as we collect more information on progeny. A value that is closer to zero is less reliable, but the value may improve as more information is known on the animal (e.g., pedigree, records of the relatives including sire, dam, progeny). WHAT ABOUT BOLT EVALUATIONS?

With the newly available BOLT evaluations, Limousin producers are receiving timelier and more accurate EPDs already! Biometric Open Language Tools (BOLT), software for running single-step genetic evaluations, is now being used by many other Canadian beef breed associations. BOLT incorporates DNA information directly into EPD calculations, at the same time as pedigree and performance data. Previous methods first calculated EPDs with pedigree and performance, and then adjusted with DNA data, with the result being genomically enhanced EPDs. BOLT allows for more frequent evaluations and a faster turnaround time (meaning more updated EPDs). It also means that animals might be reranked and that the accuracies could change. Not many people like change, but in this case, the evaluation will actually be better because there is more high-quality information feeding into the model at once. And even though it sounds odd to say, accuracies are actually more accurate in this model. IV. As a BONUS, the 4th reason to include accuracy values with your reported EDPs: You’ll gain trust with your customers

If it gives you more information, helps to manage your risks, and improves the genetic merit of your animals, think of all the benefit this information might provide to your customers, and even the Canadian herd. If you’re offering this advantage to your customers, they are better able to make bull buying and breeding decisions. If this is something you are able to offer your customers to help them improve their profitability, they’ll know who to trust to buy the next bull to add to their battery when the time comes.

2

BCRC. 2013. EPDs: What do all those numbers mean? Available at: http://www.beefresearch.ca/blog/epds/

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

While both bulls have the same birth weight EPD, the accuracies differ. This means that the possible change in the EPD is much larger for the lower accuracy bull (Bull 1) compared to the possible change in the EPD for the more accurate bull, Bull 2.

75


SOCIAL NEWS 1

NEWSMAKERS 2

2

1 Back in April, at the Youth Forum in Lindsay, Ontario,

3

Brian Lee was presented with a medal for his work with the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair. They named him an honorary Governor of the RAWF.

2 The Limousin breed was well represented once again

this year at Ag in Motion, near Saskatoon, Sask. on the weekend of August 17-19. Tim and Lois Andrew of Andrew Ranches, Youngstown, Alta. brought a pen of docile Limousin bulls for the low-stress cattle handling demonstrations facilitated by Dylan Biggs of Hanna, Alta. A number of other Limousin breeders were on hand to help man the Limousin display throughout the weekend. Thanks to all!

3 In August, Connor Rodger participated as part of

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

Team Canada in the United Kingdom's National Young Stars Competition. Connor received this exchange opportunity from the National Junior Beef Heifer Show at the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair where he won Grand Champion Showperson.

76

7

CONDOLENCES 7 It is with great sadness that the family of Judith

“Judy” Hunt announce that Judy passed away peacefully at the Almonte General Hospital after a courageous battle with cancer on July 11, 2018 at the age of 75. Judy and her husband of 53 years, Mervin, and family operate Corad Farms of Pakenham, Ontario. Judy was also a kindergarten school teacher at Alexander Reid. She was the dearly loved and devoted Mother of Cory (Glenna) Hunt and Chad (Sarah) Hunt of Pakenham and cherished and proud grandmother of Corlen, Jacob, Caleb, Wesley, Tyler and baby to be.


STOCKING THE HERD 4 Congratulations to Manitoba Limousin

Association director Kyle Wright and his wife Krista Wright of Wright Way Limousin, Brandon, Manitoba on the birth of their son Bentley Martin Wright. Best wishes from the CLA!

4

5

5 Congratulations to the Verbeek family

of Hillview Farms – Raymond and Corine Verbeek’s 6th grandchild Owen Raymond Reidy was born on July 4, 2018 weighing 8 lbs 6 oz and measuring 20.5 inches long. Proud parents Bryan and Jessica Reidy and big brother Liam are enjoying their new bundle of joy!

8

6

6 Congratulations to the Lingley family

of Lingley Livestock – William and Glenna Lingley’s 3rd granddaughter Graceyn Chesterman was born on September 13, 2018 in Viking, Alta. Blake and Ashley Chesterman and big sister Janine are all very excited about the new addition!

Our condolences to the family of Grant McRae. Grant passed away on September 25, 2018 at the age of 83 years. Grant taught at Elderslie, Walkerton and as a principal at Rockwood Centennial School for 26 years. Grant and his wife Lois were breeders of Limousin cattle during the late 80's and 90's, with the farm name Sonrae Limousin, Rockwood, Ontario. Grant was a past director of the OLA. In 1999, Grant and Lois received the Margaret Madgett Memorial Award.

TYING THE KNOT

8 Congratulations to Jeffrey Yorga and Kristen Wirth who wed on Sept. 15, 2018. All the best from the CLA to the newlyweds at J. Yorga Farm!

IN APPRECIATION Thank you to everyone who purchased tickets for the Diamond H Industries stall display raffle in support of Ted Andrew. Special thanks to B Bar Cattle for allowing the draw to take place at their sale. Ted was able to return home in June and began chemo treatments in Calgary in July. His cycle is a five-day treatment and then two weeks to recover. This cycle is indefinite at this time. Between treatments, we also travel to Medicine Hat for him to have physiotherapy to work on his mobility. Words can not express how grateful we are to everyone, we feel truly blessed. –Tim, Lois, Ted, Clay, Austin, Cole and Allison Andrew (Andrew Ranches)

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

We are sorry to note the passing of Cal Dixon of Alta Limousin on June 6, 2018. Cal was a long-time member of the CLA and his daughter Amanda was a past Alberta Limousin Association queen. Cal was also the leader of the Spruce Grove 4-H Club for many years and will be missed by family and friends.

77


ALBERTA

BRITISH COLUMBIA ALBERTA

Box 248 Entwistle, Alberta T0E 0S0

Scott & Lesley Hansen

Ph: 780-727-4557 Cell: 780-202-0607

Richmond Ranch LIMOUSIN • BLACK ANGUS • RED ANGUS Jim & Stephanie Tiffany Samantha & Brandon 403-323-8433 403-740-3748 403-741-2675 Box 58 Rumsey, Alberta T0J 2Y0 www.richmondranch.com 78

Blue Heeler Dogs

Stewart Limousin

MURRAY & BEV STEWART BOX 1326 STETTLER ALBERTA T0C 2L0 STEWARTLIMOUSIN@GMAIL.COM

TEL 403-742-5226 CELL 403-742-9813 IMPERIAL RANCH LTD.


Q T

SASKATCHEWAN

ALBERTA

Lazy A Limousin

Canada’s largest herd of registered Limousin Females

QUALLY-T LIMOUSIN Rose Valley, Saskatchewan Alvin 306-322-7563 Chris 306-322-7554 Bulls for sale by private treaty

Stan & Pat

COCHRANE STOCK FARMS

FORT ELLICE Specializing in Polled Fullbloods and Purebreds P.O. Box 3, St. Lazare, MB R0M 1Y0 HOME PHONE 204.901.2353 CELL 780.719.3894 EMAIL lionelfouillard@yahoo.ca

Limousin Lionel & Sharon, Brody Fouillard

204.855.2214 204.729.1772 Kyle & Erin 204.855.2633 204.724.0892 Darby & Kelly 204.855.2191 204.573.6529 RR#1 Alexander MB R0K 0A0 Fax 204.855.2472 Email csf@westman.wave.ca www.cochranestockfarms.com

Hockridge Farms Dauphin, Manitoba • gghock@goinet.ca Brad Hockridge 204-648-6333 Glen Hockridge 204-648-5222 204-638-8554

79

MANITOBA

Raising Limousin for over 30 years


Poplarview

MANITOBA

ONTARIO

STOCK FARM

Lloyd & Joan Atchison H 204-854-2947 Trevor & Melisssa Atchison H 204-854-2510 C 204-522-5542

RR#1 Pipestone MB R0M 1T0 poplarviewfarm@gmail.com

ONTARIO

R.R.#4 GLENCOE, ONTARIO N0L 1M0

Ron & Rita Gardiner Phone 519.287.3147 Fax 519.287.3697 Email gardinerlimousin@hotmail.com

Haystack Acres Purebred Limousin Cattle – Bulls & Heifers for Sale

John & Michelle McLean Res 519.738.0453 haystacklimousin@yahoo.ca

3114 Walker Road RR#2 Harrow, Ontario N0R 1G0

Garry & Sheila Smart

519-538-4877 Cell 519-372-7459 Email smartlimo@bmts.com 137606 Grey Road 12 R.R.#2 Meaford, ON N4L 1W6 Ph/Fax

Industry accepted for over 40 years

80

www.smartlimousin.com


SERVICE MEMBERS

Embryo Transfer Services IVF Certified for Exportable Embryo Production Export Qualified Semen Collection & Bull Stud Owner’s Use Semen Embryo & Semen Storage & Distribution 587.887.1934 embryos@bowvalleygenetics.com www.bowvalleygenetics.com

SERVICES

www.bova-tech.com

In-Clinic & On Farm Services Embryo Collection, Freezing & Transplants

101 Hillcrest Drive SW

Donor Care Facility

T4B 0V8

Recipient Programs

Tel: 403-332-1567 Fax: 403-980-3498 Email: info@bova-tech.com

Export Certified

Airdrie, AB

International Marketing

Alberta – Saskatchewan – Manitoba

81


CALENDAR WANT TO ADD YOUR EVENTS TO THIS CALENDAR?

Email them to publisher@limousinvoice.net

COMING EVENTS

DECEMBER 01 COLOURS OF AUTUMN LIMOUSIN SALE Cookstown, Ontario

05 WESTERN SELECT LIMOUSIN SALE Lloydminster, Saskatchewan

11 B BAR CATTLE BULL & FEMALE SALE

Saskatoon Livestock Sales, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

14-15 MEDICINE HAT ALL BEEF PEN SHOW Medicine Hat, Alberta

31 NEW YEARS RESOLUTION FROZEN GENETICS SALE – VOLUME 7

OCTOBER 24-27 BRANDON AG EX

Brandon, Manitoba  [Limousin Show – Oct 26]

31 CJLA SCHOLARSHIP & AUSTRALIAN/ CANADIAN LIMOUSIN YOUTH EXCHANGE Application Deadline

NOVEMBER 1-3 STOCKADE ROUND-UP Lloydminster, Saskatchewan

2-11 ROYAL AGRICULTURAL WINTER FAIR

Pomeroy Inn & Suites, Olds, Alberta

JANUARY 25-26 CANADIAN BULL CONGRESS Camrose, Alberta

FEBRUARY 25 J. YORGA FARMS PRODUCTION SALE at the Ranch, Flintoft, Saskatchewan

MARCH 02 HILLVIEW FARMS BULL & FEMALE SALE at the Ranch, Morinville, Alberta

Toronto, Ontario  [Limousin Show – Nov 4]

3 ROYAL ELITE BEEF ALL-BREEDS SALE

08 RICHMOND RANCH BULL & FEMALE SALE at the Ranch, Rumsey, Alberta

Toronto, Ontario

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

7-11 FARMFAIR INTERNATIONAL

82

14 EXCEL RANCHES BULL & FEMALE SALE at the Ranch, Westlock, Alberta

Edmonton, Alberta  [Limousin Show – Nov 8]

19-24 CANADIAN WESTERN AGRIBITION

16 HIGHLAND STOCK FARMS BULL SALE at the Ranch, Bragg Creek, Alberta

Regina, Saskatchewan  [National Limousin Show – Nov 22]

22 CWA SOLID GOLD NATIONAL LIMOUSIN SALE Regina, Saskatchewan

27 TRIPLE "R" LIMOUSIN PRODUCTION SALE at the Rogers Farm, MacGregor, Manitoba

JULY 18-21 CJLA IMPACT SHOW & CLA ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING Saskatoon, Saskatchewan


ADVERTISERS INDEX B

C

Amaglen Limousin Andrew Ranches Arcon Cattle Company

E F

25 24, 80

B Bar Cattle Balamore Farm Ltd. Bar 3R Limousin Bar-Dale Limousin Bee Zee Acres Beef Tech Bohrson Marketing Services Ltd. Boulder Land & Cattle Bova-Tech Ltd. Bow Valley Genetics

IFC

Canadian Beef Check-off Canadian Junior Limousin Association Heifer Canadian Junior Limousin Impact Show Cherway Limousin Clark Cattle Cochrane Stock Farms Corad Farms

42

D Davis-Rairdan De Jager Limousin Cattle Co Diamond C Ranch Double B Cattle Co. Eden Meadows Farm Excel Ranches

Highland Stock Farms Hillside Farm Hillview Farms Hockridge Farms Hollee Limousin

7

59

5 80 10 79 51

79

J

J. Yorga Farms

85

78

L

Lazy A Limousin

79

16

M

MC Marketing Management

62

N

New Life Limousin

43

P

Payne Livestock Pinnacle View Limousin Poplar View Stock Farm Posthaven Limousin

56 49 84 81 81

BC 1, 42, 78 80 65

73

Q

Qually-T Limousin

79

31

R

Rail Line Farms Red Maple Farms Richmond Ranch

65

79 11 79 80

S

81 78 78 27 2 26

Farmfair International Fort Ellice Limousin Fouillard Limousin

63

G

Gardiner Limousin

80

H

Hansen Limousin Hawkeye Land & Cattle Haystack Acres Hewson Land & Cattle Hi-Valley Limousin

78

T

Smart Limousin Southbridge Limousin Stewart Limousin Stockmens Insurance Symens Land & Cattle

80

Triple "R" Limousin

36

W Windy Gables Limousin V

17 6, 78

Venture Livestock

79 78 81 71

3, 80 43

79 78

21 80 26, 27 60

LIMOUSIN VOICE / OCTOBER 2018

A

83


GREENWOOD WULFS XCLUSIVE 2457X x GREENWOOD YOUNG & RESTLESS

Introducing

EASY MONEY

generating interest CED

BW

WW

YW

MK

TM

CEM

SC

ST

DOC

11

2.5

72

110

13

49

5

0. 4 0

15

12

PYN 704E ET HOMOZYGOUS POLLED CPM4089344

INQUIRIES WELCOME SEMEN FOR SALE

Owned with GREENWOOD LIMOUSIN & ANGUS

BOULDER LAND & CATTLE COMPANY Ben & Jennie-Ruth Belanger and Family

DAM GREENWOOD YOUNG & RESTLESS

4510 Hwy 7 RR#1 Omemee, Ontario K0L 2W0 Phone 705-875-0020


golD

id l o S

noveMber 22, 2018

liMouSin SAle

JYG Fabiola 207F

born: April 7 2018 bW: 1.9 | WW: 63 | YW: 89 | Milk: 18 | DoC: 15

DAM - JYF 51Y

JYF 2019 ProDuCtion SAle

60 Bulls & 15 open fall Heifers KellY AnD norMA YorgA (H) 306-263-4432 (C) 306-642-7023 (F) 306-263-4473 norma_yorga@yahoo.ca box 14, FlintoFt, SK S0H 1r0

JeFFreY YorgA (H) 306-531-5717 jeffyorga@yahoo.ca

open fall heifers sell

first sons of JYF Chunk 35C sell

February 25, 2019

JYF 504E


They Sell

This Fall

RPY PAYNES FRAN 9F Homozygous Polled Sire RPY Paynes Diesel 37D Dam RPY Paynes Bizzy 37B

RPY PAYNES FLORA 8F

SELLS NOVEMBER 22 SELLS DECEMBER 5 AT THE CANADIAN WESTERN AGRIBITION LIMOUSIN SALE

Rocky & Debbie Payne

P 306.825.4056 F 306.825.4025

Homozygous Polled Sire RPY Paynes Diesel 37D Dam RPY Paynes Wallflower 46W

IN THE WESTERN SELECT LIMOUSIN SALE

Cole 780.870.8335 Kyle 306.830.0557 E paynelivestock@hmsinet.ca Box 1997 Lloydminster Saskatchewan Canada S9V 1R5