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The Boswells College Prospectus

Entry 2014

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The College Prospectus 2014-2015


THE BOSWELLS COLLEGE Dear Student Welcome to The Boswells College Prospectus. The aim of this prospectus is to provide students and their parents with the necessary information required to make the positive choice of studying at The Boswells College from September 2014. 2013 has been another very successful year for the College and most importantly its students. Year 13 achieved an excellent pass rate of 99.4%, with 58.5% of entries at grades A*, A and B. Twenty-six subjects achieved a 100% pass rate with at least 50% of students in English Literature, English Language, Mathematics, Physics, Geography, History, French, German, Spanish, Product Design, Law, Media Studies, Music, Music Technology, Performing Arts, Government & Politics, Psychology, Religious Studies, Sociology and Sport & PE achieving A*, A or B Once again it is pleasing to see the majority of students progressing onto university courses in a wide range of degrees, ranging from Comparative Literature to Computer Gaming and Architecture to Wildlife Care. Outside of the classroom, Charity Week continues to be one of the highlights of the College calendar; this year the students raised over £4500 for the Help Indie Smith Campaign. The Elective programme, offered to students on Wednesdays, also provides a range of activities to improve and develop skills outside the normal classroom environment. These activities include: Mock Bar Trial, Anthropology, Community Sports Leaders Award , a radio station and voluntary work in the community. The Boswells College offers a unique opportunity for aspiring Volleyball performers to combine professional full time training, alongside academic A Level or BTEC studies. Places at the Volleyball Academy are open to students who demonstrate the potential and willingness to succeed at a high national level. The technical programme will consist of ten hours of coaching a week plus national league fixtures. In addition, players will be given guidance on individual fitness programmes which include metabolic and weight lifting sessions and free membership at Fitness First gym. The programme is run by a Level 2/F.I.V.B. qualified national coach. The College has set up links with Leeds Metropolitan, Sheffield Hallam and Northumbria University to further progress students’ academic and Volleyball careers. The most able athletes could be eligible for sports scholarships. At present the Academy boasts junior Great Britain players, plus England Cadet/Junior and regional players. Athletes who show outstanding athletic potential who have little or no Volleyball experience will be considered on merit. Students have 29 A Level subjects to choose from or the option of following the BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma in Sport, equivalent to three A Levels or the BTEC level 2 Certificate in Enterprise and Entrepreneurship. The following pages contain details on the courses offered, entry requirements, extra-curricular activities and the application form. Every effort has been made to provide as much up to date detail as possible. However, if you require any further support or information please contact Mrs Parratt – Head of College. We strongly believe that studying at The Boswells College is an excellent choice that not only provides first rate teaching and learning, but also prepares students for the future challenges of adult life. Students achieve academically, whilst enjoying their time with us too. We very much look forward to receiving your application form.

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Mrs S Parratt Head of College

David J Crowe Headteacher

The College Prospectus 2014-2015


WHY CHOOSE THE BOSWELLS COLLEGE

With 250 students, The Boswells College is a vibrant, friendly and highly successful component of the whole school. College students study hard, but also play an important part in the wider life of the 1118 school community, adding immeasurably to the school’s ethos and its excellent reputation. The College has two simple aims 1. 2.

Academic excellence To prepare students for the transition to adult life

COLLEGE OVERVIEW

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A proven track record of academic success; the College’s A Level pass rate has exceeded 99% over the last six years.

Students have the opportunity to study a wide range of subjects, with 29 A Level subjects for students to choose from or the option of following the BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma in Sport, equivalent to three A Levels, or the BTEC Level 2 Certificate in Enterprise and Entrepreneurship.

A full and wide ranging choice of extra-curricular activities is offered to all of our College students. Activities cater for all interests and develops students beyond the academic.

Excellent pastoral support that is focused on student achievement, progression and well being.

A College Area that includes a large Common Room, a recently refurbished College Library and toilets.

Toshiba Tablet issued to all college students

Professional teaching from teachers who work with students to achieve success.

The majority of our students progress onto Higher Education, with recent College Leavers taking up offers at Top 20 ranked universities, including Kings College London, Leeds, Manchester, Nottingham, Sheffield, Warwick and York.

A College that plays a very active part in the whole school community; from supporting lower school students and organising Charity Week, to involvement in School Productions and International Projects.

A large, successful College that has a welcoming, friendly and sociable atmosphere with a good mix of students who join from The Boswells School and other schools (15% of our students joined from other institutions in 2013).

The College Prospectus 2014-2015


SUCCESS 2013

Once again, our students were celebrating academic success in August, with excellent pass rates at both A Level and AS Level. EXAMINATION RESULTS 2012 A LEVEL (Year 13)

#

AS Level (Year 12)

99.4% Overall Pass Rate#

89% Overall Pass Rate#

58.5% Pass Rate at grades A* to B#

37.6 % Pass Rate at grades A or B#

99.4% Pass Rate at A to E#

89% Pass Rate at A to E#

26 Subjects achieved a 100% Pass Rate

12 Subjects achieved a 100% Pass Rate

excluding General Studies

YEAR 13 DESTINATIONS - Total Number of students – 113 Course of Higher Education 76% Gap Year (Applying to university for 2013 entry)

3%

Employment

10%

Other / seeing Employment

10%

Please note: the above figures may not add up to 100% due to rounding.

The majority of our students choose Higher Education as the next step; the vast majority secure their first choice university. Below is a taste of where recent students have gone: ARU, Birmingham, East Anglia, Greenwich, Hertfordshire, Kent, Leeds, Nottingham, Reading, Southampton, Surrey, Sussex, Warwick, York. OFSTED OFSTED last visited The Boswells School and College in March 2013 and both the School and the Post 16 provision were rated to be Grade 2 Good. The Inspection Report made the following positive comments about the College: “The sixth form is good and improving. Students achieve well in response to effective teaching. Teaching in the sixth form is good, Students are given enough scope to apply what they are learning to their own work. As a result they are learning to work independently in lessons.”

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The College Prospectus 2014-2015


THE COLLEGE OFFER

Students wishing to join The Boswells College have a wide range of subjects to choose from. With 29 A Level subjects offered plus a BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma in Sport and BTEC Level 2 Certificate in Enterprise & Entrepreneurship it is important that strengths, future plans and interests are considered when deciding on the courses to follow.

CHOICE OF COURSES Students wishing to study A Levels in September 2014 must make their choices from the subjects listed below;

Art & Design Biology Business Studies Chemistry Dance Design & Technology Drama English Language English Literature

French Geography German Government & Politics History ICT Law Mathematics Further Mathematics

Media Studies Music Music Technology Performing Arts Philosophy of Religion and Religious Studies Photography Physical Education Physics

Physics Psychology Sociology Spanish

BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma in Sport (Development, Fitness and Coaching) BTEC Level 2 Certificate in Enterprise & Entrepreneurship Courses will only run if adequate numbers of students apply. Please note that the combination of subjects chosen may be restricted if there are timetabling issues. In addition to the academic choices available, students will also study General Studies and have the opportunity to be involved in a number of extra-curricular activities. The Elective programme on Wednesday afternoon enables students to develop key skills through participation in a number of activities. From Sport to the Mock Bar Trial, Community Service to operating a radio station, there is an activity and choice for everyone. SUPPORT ON OFFER TO MAKE AN INFORMED DECISION Making these choices and preparing for the next step is not easy. Therefore students should seek advice and support to ensure an informed and sensible decision is made. The following are some of the people who can help:  Advanced Level Subject Teachers  BTEC Subject Teachers  Current GCSE Subject Teachers  Mrs Parratt – Head of College  Mr Rogers - College Co-ordinator

Other sources of information that may help when choosing A level subjects are:  Universities - Websites, Prospectuses & Admissions Tutors  Russell Group Informed Choices - www.russellgroup.ac.uk 5

The College Prospectus 2014-2015


ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

Entrance to The Boswells College is dependant on academic achievement at Key Stage 4 and all students must satisfy the entry criteria if they are to secure a place at College.

A LEVEL STAGE 1

6 GCSE Passes Grades A* to C Achievement of

STAGE 2

Subject Specific Entry Requirements highlighted in this prospectus

STAGE 3

For students hoping to study 4 Advanced Level subjects (excluding General Studies) we would expect students to attain A* to B grades only.

BTEC Level 3 EXTENDED DIPLOMA IN SPORT (DEVELOPMENT, FITNESS AND COACHING)

5 GCSE passes Grade A* - C including B grade in GCSE PE BTEC Level 2 Certificate in Enterprise & Entrepreneurship 4 Grade D grades in any GCSE subject These entry requirements may seem high to some students, but experience has shown that students who fail to achieve the set entry criteria have struggled to succeed with the academic rigour and demands of College study. Students should be realistic about their potential and the subjects they choose. It would be wise for students, whose predicted grades indicate that our entry criteria would be challenging, to have a back up plan. Although not part of the entry criteria, students should also be able to demonstrate the following:       

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A very good record of attendance and punctuality A positive attitude in lessons Satisfactory and punctual completion of homework and coursework Good relationships with peers and teachers A good behavioural record Contribution to the wider life of the School The ability to work independently

The College Prospectus 2014-2015


COLLEGE INDUCTION

INDUCTION WEEK 2014 : MONDAY 30th JUNE TO FRIDAY 4th JULY 2014 The jump from GCSE study to further education is huge and it is essential that students make a successful transition from Year 11 into The Boswells College. Therefore all students offered a conditional place for September 2014 entry will be invited to attend our College Induction Programme beginning Monday 30th June 2014. The Induction aims to: 

introduce new students to the school, staff and their peer group

allow students to meet the teachers from their chosen subjects, gain an insight into these subjects and receive information, specifications, reading lists, etc.

initiate a respect and enthusiasm for the ethos and community spirit of the College

encourage the year group to work together on a group activity

explain the range of extra-curricular activities available to College students

familiarise all students with the day-to-day routine of the College

impress on the students the demands and standards expected when they study at Boswells College.

During this week we will also visit The Anglia Ruskin University where students will be given the opportunity to experience a campus university for the day. University staff will be arranging a variety of activities to encourage students to think about the future and focus on their goals. On Friday 4th July 2014, there will be a trip to RopeRunners. Students will experience an action packed, multi-activity day which includes a variety of high ropes, low ropes, team challenges, target shooting and Bushcraft activities. A letter giving further details will be sent out to all students who have submitted their College application form by Friday 17th January 2014. Places are limited and conditional on full attendance to the whole Induction Programme.

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The College Prospectus 2014-2015


A MESSAGE FROM THE COLLEGE PRESIDENTS A message from The College Presidents, Alan and Lucy Cousins Without trying to big ourselves up, the message from us Presidents, the other happening to be my sister, may well be the most important part of the prospectus. After re-reading that, I imagine that I could have made a bad first impression, so for that I am sorry! However, after thinking about the difficulties I have had in trying to get down-toearth impressions from prospectuses , I thought it right to give a truthful student's viewpoint, without flaunting the College's (impressive) track record (too much) and missing out the grandiloquent vocabulary that normal prospectususers like to use. Deciding to come to Boswells was , for me, an easy choice as I had already spent 5 years on the site at the secondary school, as well as having my friends in the year above to talk to. The College is conveniently located near the local shops and there is a nice range of tasty food in the school canteen or the vending machines, offering healthy and tasty food, as well as just the less healthy, although more tasty snacks! There is no official dress code, although wearing a shirt and tie each day will undoubtedly bring you strange looks.. Entertainment-wise, there are two table-tennis tables, music speakers and now tablets for each member of the College. Although honestly said, the most fun comes from the daily banter with friends, old or new. Two of my best mates have come from external schools, and they both had no trouble joining in with hiding friends' bags and poster-related pranks - don't worry, you'll find out when you get here. The academic side is, believe it or not, fairly entertaining too. As students attend voluntarily, the relationship in the class room between teacher and student is 100% more relaxed and friendly. Despite the increase in size and difficulty of work, I find it a lot easier to learn as the atmosphere allows the teacher's personality to come out, often in weird and wonderful ways. This gives a much better feeling than having staff talent wasted on controlling a class, and rather than sitting in fear, we students are often sharing a laugh or cracking a joke with a teacher in ways unimaginable to the lower years! Just like the food, the choice of extra-curricular clubs is big. Every Wednesday The College holds 'electives' for 2 hours. Here students choose an activity, from Mock Bar trial for those considering law at uni or want to improve their public speaking skills, right the way up to Film Club. The full list is too long to include in here, but there are opportunities to get extra A-levels, go volunteering or just exercise for 2 hours. Outside of school hours, there are the esteemed sports clubs, like volleyball, football rugby and more, or theatre performances, which my sister will explain in more detail than I ever could! The independence is probably the best part though. Forget detentions, or 5 teaching periods a day; you are left with more time to organize and do your work how you like. Want to start a club that you haven't heard here? It may well exist as I haven't enough room to include it, but if not, you are encouraged to start it! Hopefully this has given you a good insight to our College and at the risk of sounding like a salesmen, I genuinely recommend Boswells as the College you should come to. If you do, I'm sure you will have as great a time as I did. Alan When I was choosing a College in year eleven I did look around at a few places but it was always certain that I was going to stay at Boswells. Although it didn't have the exact combination of subjects I wanted, it gave me the opportunity to do three out of four of the subjects I wanted. Because Boswells has the opportunity for students to study performing arts was one the main reasons I chose to stay. I knew at the time that the students here are expected to work to a very high standard which is difficult, but it helps you to develop as a performer and helps to prepare you for the industry. Because the school is specialised in the performing arts we have excellent facilities including a theatre, two drama rooms with lighting facilities and a larger drama room which doubles as a performing space with a sound system and light desk. The teachers are committed to getting the best out of students and are experienced with all elements of a performance, from marketing and advertising to choreography. The art department is another reason I decided to stay, I had worked with the teachers through my GCSEs and I knew that they would be supportive of my creative ideas and allow me to have some freedom with what I was creating. This is important to me as I like to experiment using mediums that aren't commonly used in the art department, as I prefer to make 3D work. But the teachers also provide a structure, so although you can be creative and different, you still have the development and justification that will pick up marks. The final reason I choose to stay is because of the people, the College as a whole is pretty relaxed and easy to get along with; the new students quickly settle in and make new friends. I really liked that there is a lot on offer in the College, like Charity Committee that organises things like lower school discos and Charity Week (a week spent doing silly things to raise money for charity, ending it with the slave auction, where year 12 dress up, perform a little routine and get auctioned off to year 7 and 8s to be their slaves for a day.) There is also College committee which tries to resolve problems within the College or come up with ideas to have some fun, such as the College Christmas lunch! Lucy 8

The College Prospectus 2014-2015


THE BOSWELLS COLLEGE

CALENDAR OF EVENTS LEADING TO 2014 ENTRY INTO THE COLLEGE 20th November 2013

The Boswells College Information Evening (7.00pm start)

17th January 2014

Initial deadline for Application Form*

Spring Term 2014

Year 11 Boswells School students seen by Mrs Parratt to discuss subject requirements and future plans

End of March 2014

Offer letters sent to students

30th June - 4th July 2014 College Induction Programme Including visits to Anglia Ruskin University and Treejumpers Outdoor Education and Learning Centre 21st August 2014

GCSE Results Day

26th – 29th August 2014

Individual appointments with external College applicants to confirm entry requirements and subject choices

3rd September 2014

Lower College begins (to be confirmed)

* Application forms are accepted after the January deadline, but the College may not be able to guarantee or prioritise places on specific courses until final student numbers are confirmed.

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The College Prospectus 2014-2015


ART & DESIGN

Minimum Entry Requirement: Grade B and above in GCSE Art & Design or a Merit or above in BTEC Art and Design

Course Outline This course is intended for those students who have developed a considerable interest and talent in one or more aspects of Art & Design and who would like to undertake further studies. It is essential that students have an interest in Art and Design and that they are self motivated, committed and prepared to complete work and visit galleries and sites in their own time. An average of 3 hours Home Learning or self directed study is expected per week. During the course students will experience a range of materials and techniques; recording observations and ideas, analysing and researching and developing to produce final outcomes. The AS course will allow students to develop their skills and explore a range of artists in response to a theme. At A2, students will be expected to develop coursework in response to a theme of their own choosing. It is expected that students will have studied Art to GCSE level so that the formal elements that underpin Art and Design can be built upon. Students wishing to join the course who have a C grade GCSE in Art or who have not completed a GCSE or equivalent in Art will be expected to produce a portfolio of work.

Assessment AS GCE

UNIT

COURSEWORK UNITS

A2 GCE

50%

1

COURSEWORK A portfolio of work produced during the year including research, supporting studies and final pieces.

25%

50%

2

EXTERNALLY SET ASSIGNMENT Visual response to an externally set assignment. 8 hours duration.

25%

3

PERSONAL INVESTIGATION A personal investigation based on an idea, issue, concept or theme supported by 1000-3000 words.

25%

4

EXTERNALLY SET ASSIGNMENT Visual response to an externally set assignment. 12 hours duration.

25%

FULL A LEVEL

The structure of the course will be based on a series of projects or themes that allow students to pursue studies through research, development and realisation in Art and Design. Career Opportunities/Progression Art & Design is particularly important for those wishing to choose a career in the design or fine art industries. The folder of work produced during the course will be necessary for those students wishing to apply for a Foundation Course at Art School. This further one-year course, which is essentially diagnostic, leads to BTEC Diplomas or BA courses. For further information, please contact Miss P Wallis, Head of Art The Boswells School (01245 264451) Ext 360 10

The College Prospectus 2014-2015


BIOLOGY

Minimum Entry Requirement: Grade B at GCSE Biology. Students achieving grade B at Double Award Science will be accepted on completion of ‘bridging work’ which must be collected on GCSE Results Day, 22nd August 2013.

Course Outline What is DNA fingerprinting? How is genetic engineering carried out? What are the consequences of deforestation? Should we be able to choose the hair colour of our children? Why should we care? These are questions that will be answered during the Biology A level course which follows the syllabus produced by the AQA. It follows a broad approach, building upon many of the topics covered in the GCSE Science course, and introduces new ones. Practical investigations are an important part of the course. At least 2 individual experiments are carried out. Previous students have carried out investigations ranging from the effect of temperature on Trypsin in our stomachs, to what affects the permeability of the cell membrane in beetroot.

Assessment For examinations in 2014, we are following a scheme, developed by the AQA. Assessment will be by 4 examinations (2 for AS and a further 2 for A2). Each examination lasts between 1¼ - 2¼ hours. Two of these units will be examined at the end of theLower College year. The other two units must be taken at the end of the Upper College year. Each examination accounts for approximately 20% of the final A2 grade. The coursework element also accounts for 20% of the final A2 grade and is comprised of practical skills assessments and investigative skills assignments.

Career Opportunities/Progression It is a vital A level, not only for careers in the medical profession but also for any student hoping to pursue a career or higher education course involving any aspect of the natural world. The higher skills needed for A Level Biology are also widely recognised whatever higher education course is chosen. For further information, please contact Ms M Hellary i/c Biology or Mrs E Bray, Head of Science Skill Area The Boswells School (01245 264451)

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The College Prospectus 2014-2015


BUSINESS STUDIES Minimum Entry Requirement: Grade B at GCSE Business Studies or Business Communication.

Students who have not studied Business Studies should have a grade B in Mathematics and English Language

Course Outline This course has been designed to:  enable candidates to focus on the challenging nature of the contemporary business world  develop independent learning skills such as research and presentation  offer opportunities for the development and application of a full range of academic skills The course is divided up into 4 units: Unit 1: Planning and Financing a Business  Starting a Business - The challenges and issues of starting a business; enterprise; entrepreneurs.  Financial Planning:- Key financial concepts needed to start a business including sources of start up finance; planning cash flow, contribution and break even. Unit 2: Managing a Business  People - communication, motivation, recruitment, HR planning.  Operations Management - adding value, quality, customer service.  Finance - improving cash flow, measuring profit, improving profitability.  Marketing and Competition - planning, 4 ‘P’s (place, promotion, product, price), analysing the competitive environment. Unit 3: Strategies for Success  Financial Strategies and Accounts - financial information, measuring performance, financial decisions.  Marketing Strategies - analysing markets, devising marketing strategies.  Operations Strategies - location, research and development, improving operational efficiency.  Human Resource Strategies - workforce planning, measuring performance, adapting organisational structures, employee relations. Unit 4: The Business Environment and Change  External Influences - the effects of changes in the economic, political, legal, social and ethical, corporate culture, risk strategy, change management and responses of organisations.  Leadership, Corporate Culture, Ethics - leadership styles, role of leaders in responding to change, corporate culture.  Managing Change - planning for change, corporate strategies, managing change, decision making.

Assessment AS Unit Method

Weighting

Duration

1

Written Exam - Multiple Choice questions plus one compulsory multi-part data response question plus short answer questions.

40% of total AS 1 hour marks/20% of total A level marks

2

2 compulsory, multi-part data response questions.

60% of total AS 1 hour 30 minutes marks/30% of the total A level marks

A2 Unit Method

Weighting

Duration

3

5 questions focusing on measuring business performance and 25% of total A 1 hour 30 minutes assessing appropriate functional strategies to achieve success. level marks Unseen case study with a range of numerical data.

4

A two part paper - Section A will contain questions based upon prior 25% of total A 1 hour 30 minutes research. Section B will be a selection of three essay titles from level marks. which the candidate will select one. This will be a synoptic paper and will draw on all the specification.

Career Opportunities/Progression Clear progression on to degree level study in either Economics or Business. Career opportunities include: Marketing, Administration, Accountancy, Banking, Insurance and Economist. 12

For further information please contact Miss P Cater, Head of ICT /Computing & Business Studies The College Prospectus 2014-2015 The Boswells School (01245) 264451


CHEMISTRY Minimum Entry Requirement: Grade B at GCSE Chemistry. Students achieving grade B at Double Award Science will be accepted upon completion of ‘bridging work’ which must be collected on GCSE Results Day, 22nd August 2013.

Course Outline Chemistry is everywhere! Without chemistry our lives would be unrecognisable, for chemistry is at work all around us. It is the job of chemists to provide us with new materials to take us into the future and, by pursuing the subject now, you could make your own valuable contribution to society. Think what life would be like without chemistry - there would be no plastics, or protective paints for our homes. There would be no fertilisers to help feed us. There would be no drugs to cure illness and our clothes would certainly be different, as would be our means of transport without metals, fuels and rubber for cars, ships and planes. The course will be Oxford & Cambridge and RSA Examinations, OCR Chemistry (Salters) Modular: AS level H035 and A2 level H435.

Assessment This course will be assessed as follows: Unit

Length

A level weighting

Date of Examination

Unit F331 Chemistry for Life

1¼ hours

15%

May/June of Year 12

Unit F332 Chemistry of Natural Resources

1¾ hours

25%

May/June of Year 12

Unit F333 Chemistry in Practice

Practical Assessment (10%) under exam conditions April/May of Year 12

Unit F334 Chemistry of Materials

1½ hours

15%

June of Year 13

Unit F335 Chemistry by Design

2 hours

20%

June of Year 13

Unit F336 Individual investigation 5 weeks

15%

Year 13

Career Opportunities/Progression Chemistry at A level is a highly regarded qualification. Whether you already know you want to be a Chemical Engineer or you have no idea at all what you want to do, a Chemistry A level could be for you. The skills you acquire to analyse and manipulate data, to plan ahead and to work independently are valued in all areas of employment as well as Higher Education. Students who obtain GCSE grade A or above on the higher paper may take this course. Unit tests 1 and 2 and the assessment in Unit 3 forms the first half of the two year A level course, and can be certificated as an Advanced Subsidiary (AS).

For further information, please contact Mr R Coxhead, Head of Chemistry The Boswells School (01245 264451)

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The College Prospectus 2014-2015


DANCE

Minimum Entry Requirement: Grade B in Dance GCSE level or Merit in Performing Arts BTEC Course Outline Building on the skills acquired at either GCSE Dance or BTEC Performing Arts, students will develop their technical and expressive performance skills through intensive practical classes and workshops, working with staff from The Boswells Dance Department and outside professional practitioners. The focus of the course is on developing each student as a choreographer and a performer and broadening their understanding and appreciation of the dance world. Students will watch both live and recorded performances of established professional performances to develop and underpin their knowledge of a variety of choreographers, dance styles and genres. Assessment Students will be assessed in practical dance examinations that allow them to showcase their choreography and performance skills within solo, duet/trio and group scenarios. Students’ understanding of professional dance works, safe dance practice and theoretical approaches to dance training will be assessed through written examinations in the summer at the end of both the AS and the A2 course. Units of Assessment Unit

Level

Coursework Units

Number

Mode of Assessment

1

AS

Understanding dance

Written Exam

2

AS

Performance in a duo or trio

Practical Exam

2

AS

Choreograph and perform a solo

Practical Exam

3

A2

Dance appreciation

Written Exam

4

A2

Composition of a group dance

Practical Exam

4

A2

Performance of a solo

Practical Exam

Career Opportunities/Progression The AS/A2 in Dance has been designed to provide a basis for further education or for moving into employment and training within the Dance and/or Performing Arts sector. This is achieved by ensuring that learners develop the technical skills, general skills, knowledge and understanding needed to work within the sector. For further information, please contact Miss C Noble, Head of Expressive and Performing Arts Skill Area The Boswells School (01245 264451)

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The College Prospectus 2014-2015


DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY

Minimum Entry Requirement: Grade B in GCSE is the minimum requirement for starting the course. Students with a grade C at GCSE with a record of good coursework management and meeting project deadlines will be considered.

Course Outline Design Technology : Product Design: Resistant Materials Technology: Edexcel AS (8RM01) - A2 (9RM01) Product Design: Resistant Materials Technology is the course for students who wish to pursue Design and Technology based GCSE courses (eg. Product Design, Graphic Products or Resistant Materials), to Advanced Level. At AS level, the course includes a Materials and Components theory element and students complete a Portfolio of Creative Skills that incorporates product analysis, graphical design work and some workshop practice. A2 level embraces a theory section entitled “Designing for the Future” and a design & make project entitled “Commercial Design”. The nature of coursework projects is flexible and therefore can be adapted to suit a student’s particular expertise or interests. However, evidence of using at least two different resistant materials is a requirement of the course. A suitable student is someone who has a genuine interest in the world of product design and wants to solve problems and meet needs using materials in original and imaginative ways. A good student will have the capacity to identify design needs with minimal help and the drive and determination to complete extended coursework tasks to a tight schedule. Furthermore, a good student will be able to present research findings, on technological topics, in the form of illustrated essays to a good academic standard. Finally, a competent sketching ability is desirable and the capability to convey design concepts through a range of graphical techniques.

Assessment and Unit Weighting AS Unit

Title

% of AS

% of GCE

1

Portfolio of creative skills (project work)

60%

30%

2

Design and technology in practice (formal paper)

40%

20%

Title

% of A

% of

A2 Unit

GCE 3

Designing for the future (formal paper)

40%

20%

4

Commercial design (project work)

60%

30%

Career Opportunities/Progression This A level contributes to courses that include: Product Design, Architecture, Graphic Design, Furniture Design, Interior Design, all types of Engineering, etc. For further information, please contact Mr S Goodridge, Head of Technology Skill Area or Mr R Townsend The Boswells School (01245 264451) or visit: www.edexcel.com

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The College Prospectus 2014-2015


DRAMA & THEATRE STUDIES

Minimum Entry Requirement: Grade B in GCSE Drama. Grade B in GCSE English is advisable. If students have not studied Drama then by negotiation with Head of Drama.

Course Outline

This course is heavily based on performing with written coursework to support the practical work completed. You will be involved in devising drama in order to present issues and ideas to an audience. It requires you to apply your knowledge and understanding of drama within the devising process and to apply your performance skills in presenting the work. You will also explore the ways in which playwrights and practitioners use drama to communicate their understanding of the world. Analysis of your own work and the work of others will enable you to demonstrate your understanding of dramatic form. You will also be required to perform a text to an audience.

Assessment AS Units Unit 1 – Exploration of Drama and Theatre

40% of AS. Internally assessed and externally moderated.

Requires students to explore two contrasting play texts in a practical and active way. These must be explored in the light of theatre practitioners. A set of exploration notes based on individual research and response to the practical work must also be submitted. Students are also required to experience a live theatre performance and submit an evaluation.

Unit 2 – Theatre text in performance

60% of AS. Externally examined.

Requires students to contribute to a performance of a professionally published play. Additionally students must offer either a monologue or duologue from a different play. Students must also provide a rationale of their interpretation of their chosen roles or designs. Students may offer either acting or a design form. These may be different in each of the two sections of this unit.

Unit 3 – Exploration of Dramatic performance

40% of A2. Internally assessed and externally moderated.

Requires students to create an original and unique piece of theatre. Their starting point may be a stimulus material, themes, ideas and issues or a professionally published play. Students will be assessed on the research and development of their work as well as the final performance in front of an identified audience. They will also be required to complete an evaluation of both the process and performance of their work. Written evidence will be required reflecting the research and development of work.

Unit 4 – Theatre text in context

60% of A2. Externally examined.

This externally assessed unit takes the form of a two and a half hour written paper. There are three sections to the paper. In section A and B, one play should be studied and explored from the point of view of a director from a choice of three set texts. It will be expected that students will explore the play in both an academic and a practical way. In section C, a selection must be made of one from a choice of three historic periods in theatre history. The choice must be different from the period represented in Sections A and B. A live performance of a play from the chosen period must be experienced and evaluated and a comparison made with the original staging conditions of the play.

A2 Units

Career Opportunities/Progression Drama and Theatre Studies A level is obviously a useful course for those students wishing to pursue a vocation in Drama, or the Arts or Media related professions. It helps to prepare students for further qualifications in acting, stage management, directing or designing. However, Drama is also a beneficial stepping stone to a variety of 'people orientated' careers. 16

For further information, please contact Miss L Willcox, Head of Drama The Boswells School (01245 264451)

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ENGLISH LANGUAGE Minimum Entry Requirement: Grade B in GCSE English Language and grade B in GCSE English Literature. This course is on offer in Block A.

AS Course Outline Candidates will further develop their analytical and own original writing skills and their understanding of grammar, phonology, semantics and lexis throughout the course. AS Candidates will: 

develop their ability to express themselves in speech and writing, producing texts for different audiences, purposes and in different genres.

explore language and representation through analytical and creative work.

gain insight into the importance of social contexts in language.

develop their skills as producers and interpreters of language .

The AS specification has 2 units:

Unit 1: ENGB1Categorising Texts This unit introduces candidates to methods of exploring and understanding spoken and written language in use. Candidates will be examined on their understanding of the way purposes, audiences and contexts impact upon language production and reception. Candidates will be required to use linguistic methods such as lexis, grammar, semantics and phonology to analyse and investigate a variety of texts taken from everyday sources. They will also study how spoken and written texts reproduce ideas about cultural values and assumptions with particular focus on Language and Power, Language and Gender, and Language and Technology.

Assessment Written Examination: 2 hours Weighting: 60% of total AS/30% of total A level marks. Text Varieties and Language and Social Contexts.

Unit 2: ENGB2Creating Texts This unit allows candidates the opportunity to develop and reflect upon their own writing expertise. The coursework comprises of two pieces of original writing, differentiated by primary audience, purpose and genre, and two commentaries which explore the writing process and assess the success of the individual pieces. For example, candidates could choose to write to instruct by writing a guide to texting for novices, write to inform by writing a piece of travel journalism or write to entertain by writing a soap opera script.

Assessment Coursework Weighting 40% of total AS/20% of total A level marks. Candidates produce writing in different genres and for different audiences (2500-3500 words)

Cont'd ……. 17

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ENGLISH LANGUAGE A2 Outline A2 Candidates will:  engage creatively and independently with a varied programme of English from the past to the present day.  develop and apply their understanding of the concepts and methods appropriate for the analysis and study of language,  explore the developments of and changes in English over time.  explore the language development of children.  carry out independent research on topics of their own choice related to language in use.  develop their skills as producers and interpreters of language. The A2 specification has 2 units:

Unit 3: ENGB3 Developing Language Candidates will develop their understanding of the key concepts and theories surrounding language study. The Language Acquisition section teaches candidates about the nature and functions of language acquisition and the social development of children from 0-11 years. The Language Change section explores historical and contemporary changes in English Language from Late Modern English (1700+) to the present day, alongside explanations of their causes and their impact.

Assessment Written Examination: 2 hours 30 minutes Weighting: 30% of total A level marks. Child Language Acquisition and Language Change.

Unit 4:ENGB4 Investigating Language The Language Investigations task develops candidates’ ability to investigate language independently, enabling them to pursue an area of individual interest. The Media Text task allows candidates to use the broad subject focus of their Language Investigation task to produce a media text (e.g. a newspaper or magazine article) highlighting the language ideas and issues surrounding their chosen topic. This writing task allows candidates to build upon their writing and editorial skills and to demonstrate a conceptualised understanding of the language ideas surrounding their chosen investigation topic. Example tasks include - Men vs. Women: who talks the most?; How do children learn to read? A parents’ guide.

Assessment Coursework Weighting: 20% of total A level marks. One Language Investigation and one informative media text (2500-3000 words)

Career Opportunities/Progression English Language complements so many other AS/A level subjects, such as Sociology, Psychology and Media Studies. It is a prestigious qualification and can lead to careers in commerce, publishing, public relations, law, media and teaching. For further information, please contact Mrs A Crickmore, Head of English Skill Area. The Boswells School 01245-264451

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The College Prospectus 2014-2015


ENGLISH LITERATURE Minimum Entry Requirement: Grade B in GCSE English Language and grade B in English Literature. Course Outline This specification has been designed to encourage candidates to: Read widely and independently both set texts and others that they have selected for themselves. Engage creatively with a substantial body of texts and ways of responding to them. Develop and effectively apply their knowledge of literary analysis and evaluation in speech and writing. Make a logical and enjoyable transition from GCSE study, developing students’ critical analysis skills for onward progression into Higher Education. AS Units (F661 & F662) Unit 1: Poetry & Prose 1800 -1945 Poetry & Prose 1800 – 1945. Critical analysis of poetry by one named poet. Text could include selections by Robert Browning, Emily Dickenson, Edward Thomas & WB Yeats A Prose text from the period 1800 -1945, focusing on narrative methods and effects and linking to other readers’ interpretations.

Assessment Text could include ‘Frankinstein’ by Mary Shelley. ‘JaneEyre’ by Charlotte Bronte, ‘The Turn of the Screw’ by Henry James. ‘The Picture of Dorian Gray’ by Oscar Wilde, ‘The Secret Agent’ by Joseph Conrad & ‘Mrs Dalloway’ by Virginia Woolf Written examination of 2 hours (closed text) Unit 2 (Written coursework): Literature post 1900 Close critical analysis of a section of a chosen post 1900 text. In 2013 this essay was based on the poems of Wilfred Owen (40 lines approx). OR Recreative writing based on a post 1900 text, with candidate commentary. AND An essay exploring connections between texts informed by other readers’ interpretations. In 2013 this essay was based on World War One Literature: Journey ‘s End by RC Sherriff, Regeneration by Pat Barker (post 1990 text). 2 tasks with a total of 3000 words

Cont'd …….... 19

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ENGLISH LITERATURE

A2 Units (F663 & F664) Unit 3: Drama & Poetry pre-1800 (closed text) Section A The focus of this section is the study of a Shakespeare play. Two essay questions are offered on each text; candidates answer one question on the play they have studied. Each question presents a view of the play; candidates are required to present a sustained literary judgement in response to the question’s proposition and demonstrate critical understanding in analysing ways in which the play’s structure form and language shape, meaning and effects. Shakespeare: an essay requiring critical analysis of structure, form and meaning and consideration of others’ interpretations Drama & poetry pre-1800: an essay exploring contrasts and comparisons between two different texts

Assessment: Written examination of two hours (closed text) The Shakespeare set texts for June 2014 are: ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’, ‘Antony and Cleopatra’, ‘King Lear’ and ‘The Tempest”. Section B This section requires candidates to explore contrasts, connections and comparisons between different literary texts. In the exam answers candidates must refer to one drama text and one poetry text Unit 4 (coursework) In this unit candidates are encouraged to further develop research skills acquired at AS level and to synthesise knowledge and understanding acquired through their studies in an extended individual study of literary text across at least two of the genres of poetry, prose and drama. Candidates are required to cover three texts of their choice. This must include one prose and one poetry text. The third text can be from any genre. Texts can be selected fro any period and also across periods, depending on candidates’ interests. Teachers and candidates will select texts in groupings that facilitate links or contrasts, in order to develop the ability to explore how texts illuminate and connect with each other. Candidates are required to produce one extended essay of a maximum of 3000 words.

Career Opportunities/Progression English complements so many other AS/A level subjects. It is a prestigious qualification and can lead to careers in commerce, publishing, public relations, law, media and teaching. For further information, please contact Mrs A Crickmore, Head of English Skill Area. The Boswells School 01245-264451

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FRENCH

Minimum Entry Requirement: Grade B in GCSE French. Course Outline A foreign language to A2 & AS level will quite naturally be the choice of students whose main interest lies in this area, but it is equally a profitable part of the College studies. These language courses require a good grasp of the language to have been achieved during the GCSE course. Students should show a genuine interest in the civilisation of the country as well as the language, whether they intend to use it for career purposes or as a means of personal development through the enjoyment of friendship and travel. During the College years or in the summer holidays, students studying French are encouraged to experience an exchange or extended visit and will be offered a chance to accompany the Year 9 Paris Trip if places are available. Boswells has forged international links and set up new and exciting European projects. What a golden opportunity! Students will also be provided with a self-study package to undertake during the summer months along with personalised access to the online AQA resource Kerboodle.

Assessment AS Level In the French AS level course, which represents 50% of the full A2 level and takes place during Year 12, the study of the four language components is continued and a sound standard in writing and speaking skills is expected. The end of Year 12 examination comprises a 15 minute speaking assessment, plus 20 minutes preparation time (15% of the total A2 level mark), as well as a 2 hour listening, reading and writing paper (35%) - the essay will be based on an AS topic. The topics studied will focus on Media, Popular Culture, Healthy Lifestyles and The Family and Relationships. A2 Level The topics studied are: The Environment, The Multicultural Society, Contemporary Social Issues and Cultural topics and students are advised to keep informed in matters concerning French and world-wide current affairs. This is best achieved through the use of a varied reading programme that includes newspapers and magazines in the target language, as well as accessing the Internet. The examination includes a 15 minute 'oral' plus 20 minutes preparation time (15% of the final mark) and the other language paper is set in a mixed skill framework of listening, reading and writing, including translations (2 hours 30 mins) (35%) - the writing element consists of an essay (1 hour recommended time) on one of the prescribed Cultural Topics. The Examination Board used is AQA.

Career Opportunities/Progression There are more and more careers requiring a knowledge of French and such knowledge is a considerable advantage in a very broad range of occupations - for example the Travel and Leisure Industry, Commerce and Trade, Broadcasting Industry, Journalism, the Police, Education, the Armed & Diplomatic services, Law and all aspects of Business and Marketing. For further information, please contact Miss S Dulais, A Level French Teacher The Boswells School (01245 264451)

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GEOGRAPHY

Minimum Entry Requirement: Grade B in GCSE Geography Course Outline The AQA Geography Syllabus tackles up-to-date issues across the Geographical spectrum. Over the two years we study a wide variety of topics; Rivers and Coasts, Population Change, Health Issues, Ecosystems, World Cities and Plate Tectonics & Associated Hazards. It dovetails well with other AS and A2 level courses such as Law, English and History.

Assessment Fieldwork is an important and compulsory part of the study, and in October of Year 12 a week's residential programme takes place to the Peak District. This fieldwork builds on similar field studies at GCSE level and clearly draws together the ideas and values that are explored in the classroom. From the residential work, as well as other sections of the course, Geographical Skills will be tested in an examination. This modular course will be studied in four modules. Two modules are assessed in Lower College and two in the Upper College. All assessments are by examination. The Modules are: AS Unit 1: Physical and Human Geography Unit 2: Geographical Skills

2 hour examination 1 hour examination

June June

2 hour 30 min examination 1 hour 30 min examination

June June

A2 Unit 3: Contemporary Geographical Issues Unit 4: Geographical Issues Evaluation

Career Opportunities/Progression Beyond A level, Geography is advantageous for entry into many courses at university; the 16-19 syllabus is particularly popular with admission tutors in higher education. Careers followed by Geographers include Commerce, Banking, Teaching, Conservation and Land Resource Management. The sheer diversity of skills acquired by Geographers (oral, graphic, IT group/individual, fieldwork, etc.) is highly respected by employers. For further information, please contact Mr M Hayes, Head of Geography The Boswells School (01245 264451)

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GERMAN

Minimum Entry Requirement: Grade B in GCSE German. Course Outline A foreign language to A2 & AS level will quite naturally be the choice of students whose main interest lies in this area, but it is equally a profitable part of the College studies. These language courses require a good grasp of the language to have been achieved during the GCSE course. Students should show a genuine interest in the civilisation of the country as well as the language, whether they intend to use it for career purposes or as a means of personal development through the enjoyment of friendship and travel. During the College years or in the summer holidays, students studying German are encouraged to experience an exchange or extended visit and will be offered a chance to accompany the Year 10 Rhineland trip if places are available. Boswells has forged international links and set up new and exciting European projects. What a golden opportunity! Students will also be provided with a selfstudy package to undertake during the summer months along with personalised access to the online AQA resource Kerboodle.

Assessment AS Level

In the German AS level course, which represents 50% of the full A2 level and takes place during Year 12, the study of the four language components is continued and a sound standard in writing and speaking skills is expected. The end of Year 12 examination comprises a 15 minute speaking assessment, plus 20 minutes preparation time (15% of the total A2 level mark), as well as a 2 hour listening, reading and writing paper (35%) - the essay will be based on an AS topic. The topics studied will focus on Media, Popular Culture, Healthy Lifestyles and The Family and Relationships. A2 Level

The topics studied are: The Environment, The Multicultural Society, Contemporary Social Issues and Cultural topics and students are advised to keep informed in matters concerning German and world-wide current affairs. This is best achieved through the use of a varied reading programme that includes newspapers and magazines in the target language, as well as accessing the Internet. The examination includes a 15 minute 'oral' plus 20 minutes preparation time (15% of the final mark) and the other language paper is set in a mixed skill framework of listening, reading and writing, including translations (2 hours 30 mins) (35%) - the writing element consists of an essay (1 hour recommended time) on one of the prescribed Cultural Topics. The Examination Board used is AQA.

Career Opportunities/Progression There are more and more careers where a knowledge of German is useful; it is the number one language in Europe, and Germany is our main European trading partner. Such knowledge is a considerable advantage in a very broad range of occupations - for example the Travel and Leisure industry, Commerce and Trade, Broadcasting, Science, Electronics, Engineering, Industry, Journalism, the Police, Education, the Armed/Diplomatic services, Law, Finance and all aspects of Business and Marketing. For further information, please contact Mrs J Proud, Head of German The Boswells School (01245 264451)

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GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS Minimum Entry Requirement: Grade B or above in GCSE History. If History was not studied at GCSE then a Grade B in English Language is required.

Course Outline Politics is largely about who gets what, and exists because people disagree on this. Do you think the government is doing a bad job? Do you think people are becoming more frustrated at their politicians? Do you think the EU has too much power? Is human nature essentially cooperative or competitive? If you are interested in these questions then politics is for you! The course sets out to provide students with an understanding of the political world in which they live, At AS level, students study British political institutions and themes relating to the nature and use of power. At A2 we specialise in an in-depth appraisal of political ideologies and their associated core principles. Students invariably undergo a political journey over the course of the two year qualification, questioning, defining and re-defining their political principles and assumptions. AS level candidates take 2 units: Unit 1:

People and Politics: Issues such as party policies and ideas, elections, pressure groups and democracy and political participation are scrutinised.

Unit 2:

Governing the UK: Includes topics such as the Constitution, Parliament, the Prime Minister and Cabinet, Judges and Civil Liberties.

A2 level candidates take 2 further units: Unit 3:

Introducing Political Ideologies: Topics included liberalism, conservatism, socialism and anarchism.

Unit 4:

Other Ideological Traditions: Topics include the study of topical ‘soft’ ideologies or political phenomena including nationalism, feminism, multi-culturalism and ecologism.

Assessment Politics is an essay-based subject. In Year 12 and Year 13 you will sit two examination papers; one in January of each year and one in June. AS AS A2 A2

Unit 1

Students are required to complete 2 questions from a choice of 4. There is a 5 mark, 10 mark and 25 mark question.

25% 1hr 20mins

Unit 2

Students will be required to answer one stimulus question from a choice of 2. There is a 5 mark, 10 mark and 25 mark question.

25% 1hr 20mins

Unit 3

Students are required to answer three short answer questions from a choice of 5. They then complete one essay question from a choice of 3.

25% 1hr 30mins

Unit 4

Students are required to answer three short answer questions from a choice of 5. They then complete one essay question from a choice of 3.

25% 1hr 30mins

Career Opportunities/Progression Government and Politics is viewed very favourably by employers and universities. It is seen as a difficult, traditional and rigorous subject which provides candidates with analytical and communication skills prized in adult life. Government and Politics does not mean you will end up being a politician, but opens up a huge range of careers and opportunities. In particular, this subject will strongly compliment the other Humanities subjects of History, Sociology and Law. Possible career opportunities: Law, Civil Service, Local Government, Police, Researcher, Journalism, Education, Graduate Management Schemes, Media. For further information, please contact Mr S McConnell, Head of Humanities The Boswells School (01245 264451)

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The College Prospectus 2014-2015


HISTORY

Minimum Entry Requirement: Grade B in GCSE History or a grade B in English Language if History was not studied at GCSE.

Course Outline The A Level History course aims to provide you with a broadly-balanced framework of the 21st Century world in which you live. We aim to do this by studying a wide range of British, European and World History over the two years of College study. The course covers the key themes, people and events of the Twentieth Century whilst aiming to develop your conceptual understanding of key historical themes such as causation, change and continuity and interpretation. AS level candidates take 2 units: Unit 1: The Rise and Challenge of Nationalism: Mussolini's Italy and Hitler's Germany In this European unit you study the rise of Fascism in Europe during the interwar period and analyse why Hitler and Mussolini were able to access power. You then go on to study the key policies that they introduced whilst leaders of their respective countries. Unit 2: Conflict and Consensus: Britain from Churchill to Blair; 1945-1997 In this British unit you study the main political developments in post-war Britain. The course begins with an analysis of the Labour government of 1945 and ends with an appraisal of Thatcher’s governments. A2 level candidates take 2 units: Unit 3: Boom, Bust and Recovery: America 1917-1954 In this American unit you study the history of America from World War 1 until President Eisenhower. We look at key topics such as Prohibition, the KKK, The Wall Street Crash, Roosevelt and the New Deal and Pearl Harbour. Unit 4: Coursework Unit The coursework unit consists of two pieces of extended writing, each of 2000 words. The first is completed by early December, while the second is completed by Easter. The focus of both pieces of coursework is on Tudor society, change and rebellion. One piece focuses on long-term causation, while the other centres upon short-term significance.

Assessment 25%

 1 hr 20 min examination  Examined in January  Essay based examination

25%

 I hr 20 min examination  Examined in June  Source based examination

30%

 2 hr examination  Examined in June  Source and essay based

20%

 2 x 2000 word assignments  Synoptic Unit over 100 years  Submitted in March

Unit 1 The Rise and Challenge of Nationalism

AS Unit 2 Conflict and Consensus

Unit 3 Boom, Bust and Recovery

A2 Unit 4 Coursework Unit: The Tudors

Career Opportunities/Progression History is viewed very favourably by employers and universities. It is seen as a difficult, traditional and rigorous subject which provides candidates with analytical and communication skills prized in adult life. History does not just lead to being an Antiques Dealer or Archaeologist, it cultivates analytical and expressive skills that form the bedrock of many graduate professions. Possible career opportunities: Law, Civil Service, Police, Researcher, Journalism, Education, Graduate Management Schemes. For further information, please contact Mr S McConnell, Head of Humanities The Boswells School (01245 264451) 25

The College Prospectus 2014-2015


APPLIED INFORMATION & COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY (SINGLE AWARD) Minimum Entry Requirement: Grade B in Maths, Science or ICT or Distinction in OCR National ICT. Course Outline GCE Applied ICT (OCR) awards are part of a suite of vocationally-focused qualifications. predominantly coursework based. All units have an equal weighting. The course is offered as a single (6 units) or as part of the double (12 units) qualification.

The course is

Assessment In Year 12 the students will study the three mandatory units for the AS qualification. A breakdown of the units is given below. In Year 13 students take three more units for their A2 qualification. The first is a mandatory project unit set by the board but assessed internally. There is also a choice of two, from the optional practical units, that are assessed by assignments set and marked within school. Unit

Type of Assessment

Year 1 Using ICT to communicate

Internal

How organisations use ICT

External

ICT solutions for Individuals and Society

Internal

Year 2 Working to a brief

External

Creating and developing websites or Interactive Multimedia Product

Internal

Publishing

Internal

Career Opportunities/Progression After successfully completing the ICT qualification there are a number of options open to you including: Further or Higher Education, work-based training or employment. Career opportunities within the ICT industry that this qualification will enable you to go into include:  Help-desk support  Web-page designer The qualification will be useful for any administrative post. You will be able to get employment straight away in some areas at a junior or trainee level, however others will require further qualifications. The course is suitable for students who want to go on to study one of the practically based ICT courses, Media or Business at University. It will also develop useful skills to help when studying most other subjects in Higher Education. For further information, please contact Miss P Cater, Head of ICT /Computing& Business Studies The Boswells School (01245 264451)

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LAW

Minimum Entry Requirement: Grade B in GCSE English Language, English Literature or a grade B in a comparable written subject such as a Humanities subject is accepted.

Course Outline This course aims to stimulate a study of the general principles of English Law, to further the students' education by creating a critical interest in legal matters and to encourage an understanding of the law and the legal system as it relates to everyday life. We encourage debate both orally and by use of structured written arguments. Many of our students have achieved 100% in individual AS and A2 papers with a great deal of hard work. There will be the opportunity to participate in a "Mock Trial" against other schools and colleges; this takes place in a Crown Court with real judges, and could be very useful for UCAS/employment applications. We also arrange court visits, including a visit to the Old Bailey and a number of visits to watch sentencing in the magistrates court. It is necessary to have a command of the English language in order to succeed in Law, and for this reason we require the above entry grade in English language or a Humanity such as History, Geography or RE.

AS Examination Unit 1

1½ hours 3 questions from 8

50% of AS

How laws are made e.g. by Parliament and Judges. The Legal System including consideration of the courts, the jury, judges, magistrates and alternatives to the courts, such as tribunals. Unit 2

1½ hours Scenario based questions on Criminal and Tort law.

50% of AS

An introduction to criminal law, sentencing and court procedure. An introduction to tort law (negligence), the court procedure and damages. This paper gets you to deal with real life situations, to give advice as if you were a solicitor. It may involve scenarios where people have been fighting (criminal law) or injured themselves through the fault of another (negligence) e.g. falling down a hole in the road.

A2 Examination Unit 3

1½ hours 3 questions on a criminal scenario

50% of A2

An in-depth study of criminal law including murder, manslaughter, GBH, ABH and defences. Unit 4

2 hours 2 questions on a tort scenario and an essay

50% of A2

Tort Law of negligence, occupiers liability, nuisance (e.g. noisy, smelly and dangerous neighbours). Liability for explosions and for children and animals. Tort defences and remedies. An essay on morality, justice etc, areas of discussion will include prostitution, homosexuality, terrorism, racial and gender issues. This paper encourages great debate and helps to develop argumentative skills.

Career Opportunities/Progression This is a useful subject for anyone, but particularly those thinking of a career in Banking, Insurance, Accountancy or the legal profession. Many of our A level Law students go on to study Law at university; we will of course help you with your application. Many students taking A level Law have received reduced offers from strong universities (for example rather than ask for AAB, because our students have impressed at interview, they were offered BBC for that university). We have also had a number of students join Solicitors' firms directly after their A level. We discovered that at least seven students from one year group of A level Law students had gone on to become solicitors, there are now over 50 in total. Our students have also gone on to work in other legal careers e.g.we have several who now work in the Police service We have had two students obtain 100% in most of their A Level modules and finish in the top five in the country. 27

For further information, please contact Mr A Rogers, Head of Law or Mrs A Flanagan, Law Department.

The College Prospectus 2014-2015


MATHEMATICS

Minimum Entry Requirement: Grade A at GCSE Mathematics. Students with a grade B at GCSE will be considered in exceptional circumstances.

Course Outline Mathematics at A level is challenging but interesting. It builds on work you will have met at GCSE, but also involves new ideas produced by some of the greatest minds of the last millennium.     

use mathematical skills and knowledge to solve problems solve problems by using mathematical arguments and logic. You will also have to understand and demonstrate what is meant by proof in mathematics simplify real-life situation so that you can use mathematics to show what is happening and what might happen in different circumstances. use the mathematics that you learn to solve problems given in a real-life context use calculator technology and other resources effectively and appropriately, understand calculator limitations and when it is inappropriate to use such technology.

Assessment You will be studying the specifications offered by the EDEXCEL examination board. The course is divided into a number of modules in Pure (Core) Mathematics and Applied Mathematics which are each assessed by a 90 minute external examination. For AS level you will study two Pure Mathematics modules (Core 1 and Core 2) and one Applied Mathematics module (Statistics 1), each worth approximately 33% of the marks. For A level you will study a further two Pure Mathematics modules (Core 3 and Core 4) and one Applied Mathematics module (Mechanics 1), each worth approximately 33% of the A2 marks. Calculators may be used in all module examinations except Core 1. The specification is designed to encourage the appropriate use of graphical calculators and computers as tools by which the teaching and learning of Mathematics may be enhanced. Calculators with a facility for symbolic algebra, differentiation and integration are not permitted in any examination.

Career Opportunities/Progression An AS in Mathematics is very valuable as a supporting subject to many courses at Advanced GCE and degree level, especially in the sciences and geography, psychology, sociology and medical courses. Advanced GCE Mathematics is a much sought-after qualification for entry to a wide variety of full time courses in higher education. There are also many areas of employment that see a Mathematics Advanced GCE as an important qualification and it is often a requirement for the vocational qualifications related to these areas. Higher Education courses or careers that either require Advanced GCE Mathematics or are strongly related include: economics, medicine, architecture, engineering, accountancy, teaching, psychology, physics, computing, information and communication technology.

For further information, please contact Mr P Boreham, Mathematics Key Stage 5 Co-ordinator The Boswells School (01245 264451)

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MATHEMATICS WITH FURTHER MATHEMATICS DUAL AWARD Minimum Entry Requirement: Grade A* at GCSE Mathematics Course Outline Maths with Further Mathematics Dual Award at A level is only suitable for very able mathematicians. Successful completion of this course leads to two A levels - ‘Mathematics’ and ‘Further Mathematics’. The course covers a broader range of topics than the standard A level as well as pursuing the subject to a greater depth. An AS in Mathematics and an AS in Further Mathematics will be completed in Year 12, followed by A2 Mathematics and A2 Further Mathematics in Year 13.

Assessment You will be studying the specifications offered by the EDEXCEL examination board. The course is divided into a number of modules in Pure Mathematics and Applied Mathematics which are each assessed by a 90 minute external examination. For A level Mathematics you will study four Pure Mathematics modules (Core 1, Core 2, Core 3 and Core 4) and two Applied Mathematics modules each worth approximately 17% of the marks. For A level Further Mathematics you will study two Pure Mathematics modules (Further Pure 1 and Further Pure 2) and four Applied Mathematics modules each worth approximately 17% of the A2 marks. Calculators may be used in all module examinations in Further Mathematics. The specification is designed to encourage the appropriate use of graphical calculators and computers as tools by which the teaching and learning of Mathematics may be enhanced. Calculators with a facility for symbolic algebra, differentiation and integration are not permitted in any examination.

Career Opportunities/Progression Further Mathematics is of particular benefit to students who go on to study Mathematics or a Mathematics related degree at University level. For further information, please contact Mr P Boreham, Mathematics Key Stage 5 Co-ordinator The Boswells School (01245 264451)

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MEDIA STUDIES

Minimum Entry Requirement: Grade B in GCSE Media Studies. Students who have not taken Media Studies at GCSE should have a grade B in English Language.

Course Outline In recent years the mass media has become an important focus for exploration by students in an increasingly media -saturated world. This course offers candidates a framework through which they can study the distinctive contributions which the mass media make to their understanding and enjoyment of the world in which they live. The course builds on the knowledge, understanding and skills established in GCSE Media Studies, and it will be of advantage to candidates to have progressed from such a course in which the basic concepts and approaches, which this course seeks to extend and develop, will have been established. It is not, however, a condition that candidates should have followed a course in GCSE Media Studies, as this specification has been designed to attract candidates with a broad based set of qualifications. Candidates new to the basic requirements of Media Studies will need to be introduced to the basic framework for the understanding of media concepts early in the first unit. This will be extended in the AS level units by a deeper understanding of the dynamic relationship between texts and representations, the media institutions and industries which produce them and the audiences which use and enjoy media products. Candidates will progress to extend their abilities to respond critically to media forms, the debates about representations they raise and to consider them in relation to their own media pre-production and production work.

Assessment The specification for AS Media Studies is divided into two assessment units:

AS ( 2 units) MS1 25% External Assessment: 2½ hour Written Paper 100 marks. Media Representations and Responses Three compulsory questions (40, 30 & 30 marks), including one question on unseen audio-visual or print based material (digital media will be presented as print-based). MS2 25% Internal Assessment 100 marks Media Production Processes Three components: one pre-production (20); one production which develops from the pre-production (40); and one report on the production process (40). (Group work permitted for audio-visual productions only).

Advanced (A2) The 2 AS Units above plus the A2 units below: MS3 25% Internal Assessment 100 marks Media Investigation & Production Three components: a written investigation into the media based on one or more of the key media concepts - genre, narrative and/or representation (45); a media production (45); and an evaluation into how the production is informed by the investigative research (10). (Group work permitted for audio-visual productions only). MS4 25% External Assessment 2½ hour Written Paper 90 marks Media - Text, Industry and Audience Three compulsory questions (30 marks per question). Candidates must answer each question on a different media industry. The examination board used is WJEC.

Career Opportunities/Progression Media Studies has been an expanding subject area within Higher Education for some years. Beyond lie possible careers in TV, film, newspapers, publishing - in fact, any work situation which requires analytical vigour and creativity in equal measure.

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For further information, please contact Miss T Lister, i/c Media Studies at Key Stage 5 The Boswells School (01245 264451) The College Prospectus 2014-2015


MUSIC

Minimum Entry Requirement: Grade 4 instrument and grade B in GCSE Music. Course Outline In this course you will develop your skills in performing, composing and listening. You will encounter a great variety of music, particularly from the western classical traditions and from jazz but, in your own performing and composing, you will have considerable freedom to choose your own repertoire. If you are interested in Music Technology, you will have ample opportunity to use it and develop your skills.

Assessment The subject is made up of 6 units. For AS Music you have to complete 3 AS units, to gain A2 you will need to have completed the 3 AS units and 3 A2 units. The 3 AS units can be taken at the end of one year, or can be deferred and all 6 units can be taken at the end of two years. Each unit can be retaken once only, the better result counting towards the final grade. A good standard of performance is required and The Boswells provides instrumental tuition for half an hour a week to help with this. You are tested on your practical, interpretative, creative and aural skills, and on your knowledge and understanding of music. The table below details the 6 units together with a brief description of what is required for each one. Level Unit

Unit Title

Details

Assessment AS

AS

A2

Weighting A2

1

Performing

Perform one or more solo pieces lasting 5 - 6 minutes. Perform at least 4 times during the course, one of which must be your own composition.

External

40%

20%

2

Composing

Produce a portfolio of composition exercises and a completed Instrumental composition.

Internal

30%

15%

3

Intro to Historical Study in Music

2 hour paper, responding to structured questions.

External

30%

20%

4

Performing

15 minute recital

External

40%

20%

5

Composing

One composition and 8 composition exercises.

Internal

30%

15%

6

Historical & Analytical Music

2 hour paper

External

30%

15%

Career Opportunities/Progression This course can lead to further qualifications involving Music, Music Technology, Performing Arts, Composing and arranging. It can also lead to careers in the Music and Music Publishing industries. There are also many university courses where a wide range of interests and knowledge are an advantage. For further information, please contact Mr P Lovell, Head of Music The Boswells School (01245 264451)

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MUSIC TECHNOLOGY

Minimum Entry Requirement: Grade B or above in GCSE Music. Course Outline The new specification for A level is designed to allow candidates to study music through technology. It recognises technology in music as a means of music making in its own right that requires a high level of skills acquisition and application, as well as a high level of knowledge and understanding. The course is designed for musicians to focus their studies in the direction of technology in order to gain a contextual understanding of the impact of technology on a range of music.

Assessment The subject is made up of a variety of units. Due to the nature of the course, 2/3 rd of the course is assessed practical work completed during the course as coursework. For AS Music Technology you have to complete three AS tasks and a log, and complete a listening examination on the areas of study. To gain A2 you must complete the AS units and the three A2 units. The AS units can be taken at the end of one year, or can be deferred and all units can be taken at the end of two years. The table below names the different units within the course and shows their weighting. Unit 1: AS 6MT01

Method of Assessment

Part (a) Practical work 1. Sequenced Realised performance 2. Multi-track recording 3. Creative sequence arrangement 4. Log books Part (b) Written work 1. Listening and analysing Unit 2: A2 6MT03 Part (a) Practical work 1. Sequenced integrated performance 2. Multi-track recording 3. Composing using technology Part (b) 1. Analysing and producing

Time

AS Weighting

A2 Weighting

External

20 hours

20%

10%

External

20 hours

20%

10%

External External

20 hours Not timed

20% 10%

10% 5%

External assessed written examinations

1他 hours

30%

15%

Method of Assessment

Time

A2 Weighting

Externally assessed coursework 20 hours 30% Externally assessed coursework 20 hours Externally assessed coursework 20 hours Externally assessed written examination

2 hours

20%

Career Opportunities/Progression This course can lead to further qualifications involving music, music technology, performing arts, composing and arranging. It can also lead to careers in Music Production (stage as well as studio), Music Publishing and working within Media. There are also many university courses where you can further your education in this subject, or use this qualification to further your studies in Music. For further information, please contact Mr P Lovell, Head of Music The Boswells School (01245 264451) 32

The College Prospectus 2014-2015


PERFORMING ARTS

Minimum Entry Requirement: Grade B in Dance or Drama GCSE level or Merit in Performing Arts BTEC. Students who have not had the opportunity to complete GCSE Dance or Drama but have completed vocational courses within the Arts will be invited to attend an audition. Please note that copies of exam certificates will be asked for prior to the audition.

Course Outline In Performing Arts the students are encouraged to develop broad skills, knowledge and understanding of the Performing Arts sector. The learning approaches and activities are work related, reflecting all aspects of the Performing Arts industry and the course prepares students for further study or training in performing arts related occupations. Students will be expected to develop skills and understanding of the techniques required in one or more areas of study: Dance, Design, Drama, Music, Technical and Production aspects of performances, Arts Administration and Marketing. Students will need to attend professional performances to understand how practitioners approach their work, to critically evaluate performances and acquire knowledge of customer services related to staging a performance.

Assessment The structure of the course will be based on a series of projects that allow students to pursue studies through research and practical involvement. Units of Assessment Unit Number

Level

Coursework Units

Mode of Assessment

1

AS

Exploring skills for performance

Portfolio

2

AS

Planning for an event

Portfolio

3

AS

Performing to a commission

External

4

A2

Employment Opportunities in the Performing Arts

Portfolio

5

A2

Advanced Performance Practice (Optional Unit)

Portfolio

6

A2

Advanced Production Practice (Optional Unit)

Portfolio

7

A2

Production delivery

External

Career Opportunities/Progression The GCE in Performing Arts has been designed to provide a broad educational basis for further education or for moving into employment and training within the Performing Arts sector. This is achieved by ensuring that learners develop the general skills, knowledge and understanding needed to work within the sector. For further information, please contact Miss C Noble, Head of Expressive and Performing Arts Skill Area The Boswells School (01245 264451) 33

The College Prospectus 2014-2015


PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION AND RELIGIOUS ETHICS

Minimum Entry Requirement: Grade B in GCSE Religious Education or grade B in GCSE English if RE was not studied. Students with a grade C in Religious Education will be considered on an individual basis.

Course Outline “The unexamined life is not worth living” (Socrates 469BC-399BC) Philosophy and Ethics demands that students begin to examine life and critically analyse the bigger questions such as: What makes some actions 'right' and others 'wrong'? Who decides which is which? Are suicide and euthanasia wrong? Should pornography be banned? Does society need religion in order to help it decide its laws? Students will have the opportunity to consider these and similar questions for the Ethics paper. This forms one half of the course. The second part of the course looks at the Philosophy of Religion. Some of the topics studied will be the question of the existence of God, the origins of life on earth, life after death, the problem of evil, what makes something good, alternatives to religion, and modern challenges to religion presented by science. The course is based around issues and questions that are important and relevant to today’s society. There are no obvious answers to these questions and students will examine alternative solutions, which will help them to evaluate strengths and weaknesses of different arguments.

Assessment There are two options available for Philosophy and Ethics at Post 16. (i)

Advanced Subsidiary This is a one-year course that is worth 50% of an A level. Candidates have the opportunity to either gain credit for an Advanced Subsidiary or continue to the full A level course. Candidates will study Philosophy of Religion and Religious Ethics.

(ii)

A2 Candidates will build upon their knowledge from the previous year in both Philosophy of Religion and Religious Ethics.

Assessment Breakdown AS

A Level

Two examination papers. These will be assessed at the appropriate standard (between GCSE and A Level).

Two examination papers.

1. Religious Ethics—1½ hour examination

1. Religious Ethics—1½ hour examination.

2. Philosophy of Religion—1½ hour examination.

2. Philosophy of Religion 2—1½ hour examination. It is possible to re-take a unit once.

Career Opportunities/Progression Some say that Religious Studies is only useful if you want to be a priest or an R.E. teacher, nothing could be further from the truth! Religious Studies is an excellent subject to use as a base for higher education. Being an academic, analytical and literary discipline it is recognised as an extremely useful preparation for all arts courses. Religious Studies is also a good A/AS Level to take if you intend to go into industry. Why? Because it is multidisciplinary, trains your mind and gives you insight into human nature and aspirations. These qualities are sought by many employees in areas diverse as the commercial sector, journalism, the legal profession, social services, health care and public services including the police. For further information, please contact Ms L Wigglesworth, Head of Religious Studies. The Boswells School (01245 264451)

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PHOTOGRAPHY - LENS AND LIGHT BASED MEDIA

Minimum Entry Requirement: Grade C and above in GCSE Art & Design and/or Graphics media or Merit in BTEC Art and Design.

Course Outline Students will explore a range of photographic techniques in wet and digital photography through thematic enquiry. This will include; experimental techniques and developing an understanding of the use of light and composition to create an image. Students are expected to have studied an Art based subject at Key Stage 4 such as GCSE Art or Graphics due to the assessment criteria focusing on content, composition and creativity. It is essential that students have an interest in photography and art, and that they are self motivated and prepared to complete work and visit galleries and sites in their own time. An average of 3 hours Home Learning or Self directed study is expected per week. Students wishing to join the course who have a C grade GCSE in Art or who have not completed a GCSE or equivalent in Art will be expected to produce a portfolio of work. Students are required to have their own or have access to a 35mm SLR camera and a digital camera at home.

Assessment AS GCE

UNIT

COURSEWORK UNITS

A2 GCE

50%

1

COURSEWORK A portfolio of work produced during the year including research, supporting studies and final pieces.

25%

50%

2

EXTERNALLY SET ASSIGNMENT Visual response to an externally set assignment of 8 hours duration.

25%

3

PERSONAL INVESTIGATION A personal investigation based on an idea, issue, concept or theme supported by 1000-3000 words.

25%

4

EXTERNALLY SET ASSIGNMENT Visual response to an externally set assignment of 12 hours duration.

25%

FULL A LEVEL

Career Opportunities/Progression The folder of work produced during the course will be necessary for those students wishing to apply for a Foundation Course at Art School. This further one year course, which is essentially diagnostic, leads to BTEC Diplomas or BA courses. For further information, please contact Miss P Wallis, Head of Art The Boswells School (01245-264451) Ext 360 35

The College Prospectus 2014-2015


PHYSICS

Minimum Entry Requirement: Grade B at GCSE Physics. Students who achieve grade B at Double Award Science and grade B in GCSE Maths will be accepted on completion of ‘bridging work’ which must be collected on GCSE Results Day, 22nd August 2013.

Course Outline Physics has its origins in the irrepressible human desire to explore and understand the natural world. It explores questions like how did the Universe start? How will it end? What is a black hole? Is time travel possible? If you have an enquiring mind and are always asking why things happen, then Physics will help you find the answers. It forms the basis of most modern technologies and holds the future to global well being.

Assessment Unit Number

Unit Title

Level

Method of Assessment

Availability

First Assessment

AS/A2 Weighting

GCE Weighting

Unit 1

Physics to Go

AS

External

January and June

January 2014

40% of AS

20% of Advanced GCE

Unit 2

Physics at Work

AS

External

January and June

January 2014

40% of AS

20% of Advanced GCE

Unit 3

Exploring Physics

AS

Internal

June only

June 2014

20% of AS

10% of Advanced GCE

Unit 4

Physics on the A2 Move

External

January and June

January 2015

40% of A2

20% of Advanced GCE

Unit 5

Physics from Creation to Collapse

A2

External

January and June

January 2015

40% of A2

20% of Advanced GCE

Unit 6

Experimental Physics

A2

Internal

June only

June 2015

20% of A2

10% of Advanced GCE

Career Opportunities/Progression Career opportunities for Physicists are excellent. Some Physicists work on problems at the frontier of knowledge; others tackle the challenging problems which arise in the application of physical ideas to industrial and engineering problems. Physics graduates also find themselves employed in occupations such as Medicine, Computing and Finance. How does Physics link to other subjects? To study one of the many Physics or Engineering based courses available at degree level you will require both Physics and Mathematics A levels. There is no escaping the fact that these two subjects are inextricably linked. Although it is not necessary to study Mathematics to take A level Physics, it is necessary to have a sound grasp of GCSE topics such as Algebra and Trigonometry and to have studied for the higher tier examination. Physics and Chemistry together make up the physical sciences. If you study both subjects at A Level you will meet many of the same topics. You will look at them from two slightly different viewpoints and this can significantly help your understanding. Physics and Biology make a useful combination for students interested in careers in Medicine or Sports Science. Physics also makes a good partner to Technology A Level. For further information, please contact Miss Caroline Farrell, Head of Physics The Boswells School (01245 264451)

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PSYCHOLOGY Minimum Entry Requirement: Grade B in GCSE Maths or Science and grade B in either GCSE RE, Geography, History, English or short course Psychology.

Course Outline Psychology is the scientific study of the mind, brain and behaviour. It is an exciting A level that is rigorous and will require you to understand and learn a great deal of material. It requires numerous skills from the individual studying it and for that reason we have the above minimum entry requirement. Students with degrees in Psychology work in Education, Prisons, Probation Services, Counselling, Research, Marketing and Advertising.

Assessment We study the AQA specification A, which is as follows:

AS Examination Unit 1

1½ hour examination including short answer questions and stimulus material.

50% of AS

Cognitive Psychology, Developmental Psychology and Research Methods. Areas studied will include memory and eyewitness testimony. These topics should help with your revision for other examinations. The psychology of attachments, effects of day care on young children. Research methods including considering experiments. Unit 2

1½ hour examination including short answer question and stimulus material.

50% of AS

Biological Psychology, Social Psychology and Individual Differences. Areas studied will include factors affecting stress and how to manage stress. Majority and minority influence and obedience to authority. This will include considering many experiments such as the 'big brother' like prison experiment by Zimbardo. Do look Zimbardo up on the internet. Abnormality of the mind, including definitions, explanations by Freud and others and approaches to the treatment of mental disorders.

A2 Examination Unit 3

1½ hour examination 3 essays

50% of A2

Topics will include: Eating behaviour, including the success and failure of dieting and the clinical characteristics and explanations of anorexia. Relationships including considering why we choose the partners we do e.g. looks, wealth etc. Aggression, including explanations of aggression such as why we become jealous. Unit 4

2 hour examination

50% of A2

Topics that are likely to be covered include: 1. The classification , causes, diagnosis and treatment of depression. 2. The psychology of addictive behaviour. This includes models of addictive behaviour, vulnerability to addiction and ways of reducing addictive behaviour. 3. Psychological Research and Scientific Method. This section builds on the knowledge and skills developed at AS level. Candidates are expected to be able to:  Understand the application of scientific method in psychology.  Design investigations.  Understand how to analyse and interpret data arising from such investigations.  Report on practical investigations. In order to gain sufficient understanding of the design and conduct of scientific research in psychology, candidates will need to practise these skills by carrying out, analysing and reporting small-scale investigations.

Career Opportunities/Progression There are many opportunities within the medical field, particularly with respect to mental health. Opportunities exist within education either as a lecturer or working with children with special needs. There are increasing opportunities in Business, Recruitment, Sport, Marketing and Criminal Law. We have recently had many students achieve 100% in modules, we also had a former student achieve a 1st in Psychology at Cambridge University and another student of ours is currently studying Psychology next at Cambridge. For further information please contact Mr A Rogers, Deputy Head of Humanities or Mrs L Taylor, Psychology Department or Mrs S Hayes, Psychology Department The Boswells School (01245 264451) 37

The College Prospectus 2014-2015


SOCIOLOGY

Minimum Entry Requirement: Grade B in GCSE English Language and/or a B in a Humanities subject, and grade C in GCSE Mathematics.

Course Outline Sociology is the science of society. It is a study of different groups and institutions within society. Particular reference is made to the themes of social differentiation, power and stratification and socialisation, culture and identity. AS Module 1 Module 2

Families and Households A variety of issues/concepts covered on the role of the family. Education/Sociological Methods A variety of issues/concepts covered on the role of education. An examination of the methods of research used by sociologists.

A2 Module 3 Module 4

Beliefs in Society A variety of issues/concepts surrounding the role of religion in our society. Crime and Deviance/Theory and Methods A variety of issues surrounding crime and deviance within society. The application of sociological research methods.

Assessment Module

AS Level

1 SCLY1 2 SCLY2

/ 1191

Module

A2 Level

Families and Households Written Paper, 1 hour

3 SCLY3

Beliefs in Society Written Paper, 1 hour 30 minutes

Education Sociological Methods Written Paper, 2 hours

4 SCLY4

Crime and Deviance Theory and Methods Written Paper, 2 hours

Leading to AS Qualification

/ 2191

Leading to full A level Qualification when combined with the 'AS'

Career Opportunities/Progression Sociology is a subject that allows you to obtain further understanding of human behaviour and, therefore, may be particularly useful in a career working with people, e.g. the Public Sector, Health, Education, Social work and the Legal Profession. However, it also equips you with a number of key skills that may be transferred to almost all occupations. For further information, please contact Ms C Tyson i/c Sociology The Boswells School (01245 264451)

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SPANISH

Minimum Entry Requirement: Grade B in GCSE Spanish. Course Outline A foreign language to A2 & AS level will quite naturally be the choice of students whose main interest lies in this area, but it is equally a profitable part of the College studies. These language courses require a good grasp of both the vocabulary and the grammar to have been achieved during the GCSE course. Students should show a genuine interest in the civilisation of the country as well as the language, whether they intend to use it for career purposes or as a means of personal development through the enjoyment of friendship and travel. During the College years or in the summer holidays, students studying Spanish are encouraged to experience an exchange or extended visit and we hope to be able to offer a place on the planned Barcelona study trip. Students will also be provided with a self-study package to undertake during the summer months along with personalised access to the online AQA learning resource Kerboodle.

Assessment AS Level In the Spanish AS level course, which represents 50% of the full A2 level and takes place during Year 12, the study of the four language components is continued and a sound standard in writing and speaking skills is expected. The end of Year 12 examination comprises a 15 minute speaking assessment, plus 20 minutes preparation time (15% of the total A2 level mark), as well as a 2 hour listening, reading and writing paper (35%) the essay will be based on an AS topic. The topics studied will focus on Media, Popular Culture, Healthy Lifestyles and The Family and Relationships. A2 Level The topics studied are: The Environment, The Multicultural Society, Contemporary Social Issues and Cultural topics and students are advised to keep informed in matters concerning Spanish and world-wide current affairs. This is best achieved through the use of a varied reading programme that includes newspapers and magazines in the target language, as well as accessing the Internet. The examination includes a 15 minute 'oral' plus 20 minutes preparation time (15% of the final mark) and the other language paper is set in a mixed skill framework of listening, reading and writing, including translations (2 hours 30 mins) (35%) - the writing element consists of an essay (1 hour recommended time) on one of the prescribed Cultural Topics. The Examination Board used is AQA.

Career Opportunities/Progression There are more and more careers requiring a knowledge of Spanish, now spoken by more than 350 million people worldwide. Such knowledge these days is a considerable advantage in a very broad range of occupations - for example the Travel and Leisure Industry, Commerce and Trade, Broadcasting, Industry, Journalism, the Police, Education, the Armed/Diplomatic services, Law and all aspects of Business and Marketing. For further information, please contact Mrs R Koro The Boswells School (01245 264451)

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The College Prospectus 2014-2015


PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Minimum Entry Requirement: Grade B in GCSE Physical Education or by negotiation with Course Outline

Head of Skill Area.

AS Units: An introduction to Physical Education. Section A Anatomy & Physiology   

The skeletal and muscular systems. Motion and movement. The cardiovascular and respiratory systems in relation to the performance of physical activity.

Section B Acquiring Movement Skills     

Classification of motor skills and abilities. The development of motor skills. Information processing. Motor control of skills in physical activity. Learning skills in physical activity.

Section C Socio-cultural studies relating to participation in physical activity   

Physical activity. Sport and culture. Contemporary sporting issues.

Practical Performance (2 sports) Evaluating and planning for the improvement of performance (oral analysis exam) A2 Units     

Historical Studies Sports Psychology Exercise & Sport Physiology Practical Performance (1 sport) Evaluation, appreciation (oral analysis)

Assessment A/S Level weightings An introduction to Physical Education. Practical Performance. Analysis of Performance.

45% 40% 15%

Weighting at Advanced Level An introduction to Physical Education. 22.5% Practical Performance. 20% Analysis of Performance. 7.5% Principles and concepts across different areas of Physical Education. 15% Practical Performance. 15% Analysis of Performance and Synoptic. 20% Synoptic = a bringing together of knowledge of principles and concepts across all modules of the subject.

Career Opportunities/Progression Should you wish to follow further courses in PE/Sports Studies or if you want to pursue a career in the Leisure Industry this course is highly advantageous.

40

For further information, please contact Miss S Heaton, Head of Sport and PE Department The Boswells School (01245 264451) The College Prospectus 2014-2015


BTEC LEVEL 3 EXTENDED DIPLOMA IN SPORT (DEVELOPMENT, FITNESS AND COACHING)

Minimum Entry Requirements: Five GCSEs, at grade C and above including a grade B in Sport and PE. In special circumstances, candidates will be considered on merit if they have not achieved the minimum requirements.

Example of the Course Outline in Year 1 1.

Principles of Anatomy and Physiology in Sport

2.

The Physiology of Fitness

3.

Assessing Risk in Sport

4.

Fitness Training and Programming

5.

Sports Coaching

6.

Sports Developing

7.

Fitness Testing for Sport and Exercise

8.

Practical Team Sports

9.

Outdoor and Adventurous Activities

An example of one of our practical units is the trip to Wales for Outdoor Adventurous Activities. Here students go away on a trip and are challenged against the environment, be it altitude, vertical, subterranean, ice, snow or water in nature. Or perhaps what might interest you is the Sport and Exercise massage unit in year 2 with one of our West Ham Football masseurs; in understanding and identifying the massage requirements of different athletes and how to perform the different massage techniques. Over the two years of the course we will give you the support and opportunities you need to gain an impressive portfolio of assignments, practical investigations and oral presentations that you will be assessed in. For each of the 19 units,10 in the first year and 9 in the second, you are graded with a pass, merit or distinction. This is a two year course with 1080 guided learning hours ie. 15 hours per week and is equivalent to three A-levels.

Career Opportunities/Progression You have chosen to continue your education in the growth areas of sport and leisure. The National Diploma opens up a career opportunity or entry into further education in the areas of Physical Education, Sports Science, Sports Studies and Sport Administration. The course will open up employment opportunities in Health Clubs, Leisure Centres, Fitness Industry, PE Teaching, Sports Coaching and Sports Therapy.

For further information please contact Mr D Lewis, PE Department The Boswells School (01245-264451)

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The College Prospectus 2014-2015


NVQ LEVEL 3 ADVANCED APPRENTICESHIP IN SPORTING EXCELLENCE Minimum Entry Requirements: Five GCSEs at grade C and above are preferable.

Course Outline The Advanced Apprenticeship in Sporting Excellence (AASE) programme is designed to meet the needs of young people, aged between 16 and 18, who have the potential to achieve excellence in Volleyball whilst studying for A Levels or a BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma. The demands placed upon the students are kept to a minimum and the course delivery each week is completed within the allocated 10 hours of training. Should you wish to follow a career in professional Volleyball, or want to learn about all the aspects that elite Volleyball players encounter when representing their country at an international level, then this course is highly recommended. The AASE programme offers an extensive programme for players by offering access to high quality coaches (Darren Lewis – FIVB Level 3), well equipped training facilities, key speakers and educational resources. The programme is also delivered to students by Rachel Laybourne, a current GB Women’s Indoor Volleyball Player and 2012 Olympian. The scheme comprises the following elements: 1.

Level 3 Certificate in Understanding Sports Performance made up of nine units covering technical; tactical; mental skills; physical conditioning; nutrition; career, planning; communication skills; lifestyle management; and health and safety.

2.

Level 3 Certificate in Achieving Excellence in Volleyball, made up of nine units covering technical; tactical; mental skills; physical conditioning; nutrition; career, planning; communication skills; lifestyle management; and health and safety.

3.

Functional Skills in Application of Number and Communication (Please note that if GCSE grade C or above in English and Maths has been achieved, students are exempt from this element).

Playing ability and criteria Players on ASSE are expected to compete in a National League team on a regular basis and complete a minimum of 10 training hours per week (including physical conditioning and matches).

For further information please contact Mr D Lewis, PE Department, The Boswells School (01245-264451)

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The College Prospectus 2014-2015


BTEC LEVEL 2 ENTERPRISE & ENTREPRENEURSHIP

Minimum Entry Requirements - Four D grades in any GCSE subject area Course Outline This course has been designed for students: 

who have a keen interest in planning to set up a business of their own, everything on this course looks at helping people to plan for the establishing of a new business.

Students must enjoy studying in an active environment and must be very interested in becoming self-employed.

Students learn how to develop a vision, research the market, create a financial model and pitch to investors.

Throughout the course, students will gain the confidence to react and adapt to change and reflect on their own experiences.

The qualification enables students to interact with entrepreneurs and take responsibility for their actions within a supportive framework.

Level 2 What will you study? Unit 1

The Entrepreneurial Mindset - what does it take to be a successful entrepreneur? The aim of this unit is to enable students to develop the mindset and skills that a successful entrepreneur needs for business.

Unit 2

Creating a Vision for your Business Plan - turning ideas into a product or service. The aim of this unit is for students to understand how business ideas are created and gain the skills and confidence to generate their own ideas.

Unit 3

The Business Environment - monitoring changes and adapting business plans for a successful business.

Unit 4

Researching your Market - finding out if there is a potential market and interpreting the results.

Unit 5

The Marketing Plan - This unit aims to give students the understanding and skills needed to develop a marketing and promotion plan for their own micro start-up business or social enterprise.

Unit 6

Financial Modelling and Forecasting - gaining the essential knowledge and skills to develop a robust financial model to meet the aims of the business.

Unit 7

Preparing and Pitching a Business Plan - delivering a convincing and professional presentation.

Assessment Continuous assessment, no formal examination - Grades awarded are Pass, Merit or Distinction.

Career Opportunities/Progression The course will prepare and develop entrepreneurial skills to take forward to the Level 3, 2nd year of the course. For further information please contact Miss P Cater , Head of ICT/Computing & Business Studies The Boswells School (01245) 264451

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Boswells College Prospectus 2014/15