Top Empowerment 22nd Edition

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BONANG MOHALE CHANCELLOR OF THE UFS

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4 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION REGULAR 6 Featured Organisations 7 Contributors 9 Editor’s Letter 224 Post-Event Report
10 Yolisa Phahle - CEO: Connected Video, Multichoice Group 14 Alistair Mokoena - Country Lead for Google South Africa 18 Lillian Barnard - CEO at Microsoft SA 22 Eustace Mashimbye - CEO of Proudly SA 26 Bonang Mohale - Chancellor of UFS ARTICLES 30 Impactful change and transformation require collective, practical action 33 Developing leadership capital for a better future 86 BEE, job creation and procurement 90 New regulations to give departments more discretion in procurement 92 The duties of a designated employer 96 Diversity and Inclusion: Multinationals in SA 98 Influence through inspiration: Meet Avril Campher 134 What’s the difference between transactional and transformational B-BEE? 138 High impact ways to spend your leftover B-BBEE budget 142 Transforming the tech sector with B-BBEE 144 Diversity and inclusion are good for business 146 How to move from diversity to inclusion 148 A glance at four government empowerment initiatives 210 Ntsiki Biyela - South Africa’s iconic winemaker 214 The Black Cellar Club 222 Leading the way: A snapshot of three Top Empowerment Award winners CONTENTS 18 88 Driving business success through digital transformation New regulations to give departments more discretion in procurement
THOUGHT LEADERSHIP

SECTOR OVERVIEWS

PODCASTS

84 Are you creating value for your brand? Meet Nedbank’s Khensani Nobanda

184 9 tips from Takealot’s CEO: How to break into retail with e-commerce

185 She’s hacking companies to help them: Meet Joylynn Kirui

221 Angel investor Lelemba Phiri explains how profit and impact can go together

INDEX

240 Listing of SA’s Top Empowered Companies 2022

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22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 5 CONTENTS & CREDITS
36 Finance 60 ICT 76 Mining 100 Transport 110 Manufacturing 116 Healthcare 126 Education 150 Construction 168 Automotive 174 Property
Agriculture
Retail
178
182
136 84 216 130 142 204 94
6 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION FEATURED ORGANISATIONS A 74 Aberdare Cables 157 Afrigen Biologics 73 Analytics Advertising 112 AQS Liquid Transfer 207 Assurecloud 218 Atlantic Apara O Tlale B 172 BAIC 164 BVI C 176 Choprop SA 198 CSVR D 192 Diversifi E 133 eStudy F 102 Fleet Horizon Solutions G 190 Gold Circle 202 GRIPP Advisory I 124 iMED 128 INSETA 68 Interconnect Systems K 204 KMAKH Consultancy 104 KNG Transport & Logistics 38 Kunene Makopo Risk Solutions L 50 Lithemba Investments M 194 M-Parent 208 Mariva Advisory 170 Masslift Africa 64 Mbulase Group 123 Medilac 152 Methano Group 186 Modern Centric 161 Movidna Services 118 Msanda Labs 196 Musetsho Law N 62 Nashua 30 Nedbank 54 Naspers Labs 166 Nghilazi Engineers 200 Nkome Incorporated 72 Novosense 162 NTGR Engineering Projects O 81 Otic Projects P 106 Protours Coaches 80 Purpleglaze 3 Q 201 Qunu Staffing R 66 Reverside 158 Ricts Holdings S 43 Sakha-Isitjhaba 44 Sanlam 106 Sashal Enterprises t/a Titan Cargo 48 SkX Protiviti 180 ST Tshabalala Agri Consulting 109 Steam Generation Africa T 78 Tau Matla 59 TEG 70 Tendai ICT 114 Toronto Group U 82 Ukwazi Mining Studies V 209 Vogue Hygiene Services Y 52 Yard Insurance

CONTRIBUTORS

EUSTACE MASHIMBYE CEO of Proudly SA FEROZA AITKEN Entrepreneur & Systemic Wellness Coach FRIK BOONZAAIER Human Capital Specialist at the BEE Chamber ALISTAIR MOKOENA Country Lead for Google South Africa BONANG MOHALE Chancellor of the University of the Free State EMMA MONTOCCHIO Corporate Consultant at Decusatio KATLEGO MASHISHI Managing Director at Idea Engineers LILLIAN BARNARD CEO at Microsoft SA KEBALEPILE MATLHAKO Transformation Specialist at the BEE Chamber YOLISA PHAHLE CEO: Connected Video at Multichoice Group
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YUNEAL PADAYACHY Member Support Executive at the BEE Chamber
Brainfood for business. Take a journey away from short termism and start looking at a better future. Meet the interesting people changing Africa – and the way we work, think and live.

DIVERSITY, EQUITY AND INCLUSION

#DOING BETTER BUSINESS

Just like “zoom”, the words “level” and “stage” took on added significance during the course of the last couple of years. From 2020 to 2022 we dug deep to push through the levels of lockdown in the pandemic - anxiously checking the differing strictures applied from 1 through to 5 - which seemed to stretch interminably, and felt far longer than two years. So many Rapunzels in so many towers. Then, for those of us fortunate enough to emerge from that dystopian nightmare, just as we started looking forward to the future with renewed hope, we were catapulted back into anxiety, this time linked to stages of loadshedding – sometimes having to factor in three different stretches in one day. Planning became a shot in the dark – literally! And yet, lest we forget, all of this forms a backdrop to South Africa’s Vision 2030 to end poverty and discrimination and celebrate diversity, equity and inclusion.

My purpose for invoking the pandemic and loadshedding at the start of this letter was to highlight how tenacious and resilient South Africans are, although in the mass media we do have a tendency, as a country, to dwell on what is wrong - which is why this publication is so important – more than 250 pages honouring empowerment achievements and successes.

This is our 22 nd edition of Impumelelo Top Empowerment - #gratitude for still going strong; our theme this year is Diversity, Equity and Inclusion #DoingBetterBusiness and on the cover we celebrate the

thought leaders who penned the articles you will find at the beginning of the publication: Yolisa Phahle, CEO: Connected Video, Multichoice Group; Alistair Mokoena, Country Lead, Google South Africa; Lillian Barnard, CEO: Microsoft SA; Eustace Mashimbye, CEO of Proudly SA; and Bonang Mohale, Chancellor of the University of Free State; they are joined by Mamongae Mahlare, CEO of Takealot Group, whose podcast makes for fascinating listening.

The BEE Chamber contributed three articles looking at BEE, job creation and procurement; the duties of a designated employer and new rules regarding supply chain; we also zoom in on high impact ways to spend your leftover BEE budget; the difference between transactional and transformational BEE; how to move from diversity to inclusion and government empowerment projects.

For your edification, there are overviews of 10 empowered sectors, including Finance, Manufacturing, Automotive Industries and Agriculture – and it is our pleasure to highlight Top Empowerment Award winners leading the way: Talifhani Banks, Top Empowered Entrepreneur of the Year; Tshegetsang Sebeela, Top Empowered Business Leader and Dr Felleng Yende, Top Empowerment Public Sector Leader. Joining Takealot Group CEO Mamongae Mahlare in the podcast selection are angel investor Lelemba Phiri, Microsoft’s Joylynn Kirui and Nedbank’s Group Executive for Marketing and Corporate Affairs, Khensani Nobanda.

As our head office is in Western Cape, it would be remiss not to celebrate our fantastic wine industry which we do in two articles covering the journey from the vine to table by focusing on the first black South African woman winemaker, Ntsiki Biyela – and The Black Cellar Club.

A huge vote of thanks goes to the 60-plus clients whom we feature in these pages. We have thoroughly enjoyed putting together this celebration of empowerment for you (completely sans ChatGPT)none of which would have been possible without our amazing team: Director, Van Fletcher; Assistant Editors, Koketso Mamabolo and Sinazo Mkoko; Designer Tashwell Brown and Traffic Manager, Daniël Bouwer.

We hope you enjoy the read – and look forward to seeing you during the course of 2023.

EDITOR'S LETTER
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FIONA WAKELIN GROUP

THOUGHT LEADERSHIP

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EMPOWERMENT AND THE MEDIA IN SOUTH AFRICA AND THE REST OF THE AFRICAN CONTINENT

Ibelieve there is a relationship between countries with strong economies and a thriving creative arts sector that also makes a meaningful contribution to a country’s gross domestic product or GDP. I grew up watching how great storytellers like John Kani, Mirriam Makeba, and Hugh Masekela used their creative voices to inform the rest of the world and garner support for our country during our fight for democracy. I have also seen how film and television have documented important periods in our history, provided invaluable information, and created a view of not just how things are but how things should and can be.

Collectively, Africa presents one of the fastest-growing economies in the world but lags in the necessary capacity to take advantage of the opportunities this presents, with over 20% of the continent’s population not equipped to participate in its growth.

There are many suggestions on how this continent, often described as the “last growth frontier”, can catapult itself to become a force worth reckoning on a global scale. These suggestions often include increasing the use of technology in vital sectors such as health and education, increasing financial access to the underserved and unbanked and,

even increasing smart methods in agriculture. Yet little research has truly looked at how media plays a powerful role in shaping and empowering communities across the continent.

As a company that is truly passionate about the growth of this continent, MultiChoice has developed and been involved in a number of initiatives over the decades that have yielded impressive results and continue to do so.

MultiChoice uses the power of entertainment to enrich lives. What do we mean when we say we enrich lives? It means we do business in a way that delivers shared value. We get behind initiatives that have a scalable impact, broaden economic participation, and ensure diversity and inclusion.

We are the biggest funder of local content across the continent and as such, we connect over 100 million people across the continent via more than 120 channels, offering the best local and international content programming in 40 different languages.

Firmly rooted in the African continent, we have built an enviable ecosystem of storytellers, creative entrepreneurs, trainers and mentors, installers and

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EUSTACE MASHIMBYE | THOUGHT LEADERSHIP

have even partnered with the world’s largest social organisations such as the United Nations, using our platforms for good.

Deep diving into some of our initiatives, we launched the MultiChoice Talent Factory (MTF) in 2014 to enable Africans to tell their own stories. Through the MTF, we use the power of video entertainment to grow the next generation of storytellers, helping them to hone their talents and connect them with the people who will be pivotal in their career ambitions.

Almost 300 storytellers from across the African continent have been trained through the MTF over the past seven years - a recent survey found that most MTF alumni are economically active, with the vast majority working in the entertainment industry. While some alumni are self-employed, others own production companies that produce content for M-Net channels and Showmax.

To give a tangible example, as part of our commitment to creating and nurturing new talent for the we entrusted our MTF class of 2021 with a major task: assisting with shooting our ninth season of the Survivor South Africa franchise. 15 new interns were

moved into in-personal training and professional production placements, with 10 interns placed on professional productions, including 40 days on

You will also have the opportunity to watch the work of one of our MTFza alumni, Thembalethu Mfebe when Adulting premiers on Showmax. Adulting is a show with four

of equal length - that each explores one aspect of modern masculinity, through four male leads. The premier for Adulting will be announced in

MTF includes a 12-month filmmaking internship programme offered film academies, masterclasses for training and upskilling industry professionals, and a panAfrican digital networking portal for creatives. The MTF Academy in South Africa also launched a scriptwriting

a first for Africa.

Value creation is a holistic process, especially in a business environment that is constantly evolving, and is influenced by rapid changes and socioeconomic factors

Indeed, Africans have a large appetite for locally conceived and produced audio-visual content that features our own stories. Research has found that as soon as more local content becomes available, A fricans view considerably less imported content – with that said, this appetite is not satisfied by ‘one size fits all’ generic African content. The more ‘hyperlocal’ the setting and story, the more it will be followed by local cultures and communities.

Content is at the core of what we do, which is why we developed a hyperlocal content strategy. We invest heavily in the local television production industry and are the biggest funder of local content in Africa. We now spend 47% of our total general entertainment spend on local content.

In the past year alone, we produced more than 6 000 hours of local content taking our local content library to almost 70 000 hours.

Local content is also proving to be a key differentiator on platforms like Showmax, with local content viewership up significantly in 2022, and four of the top five titles on Showmax being local productions.

Our local shows are also popular with global buyers too. We sold 172 movies and series seasons to international buyers, which is 10 times more than in 2021. This is a testament to the quality of our productions.

This concerted investment and interest in African stories and programmes has reinvigorated film and television industries across the continent, resulting in a proliferation of exceptional original local

productions and the discovery of talent in front of the camera and behind the scenes.

When we invest locally, we create both direct and indirect opportunities to help grow the industry. Through the hyperlocal strategy MultiChoice not only creates a platform for telling African stories, but the company helps create jobs and grow the economy.

Africa is a diverse continent with huge potential to deliver prosperity for its people. As an African company, we are deeply invested to contribute to that prosperity. The role of the media is so much more than about delivering entertainment - it is about empowering and enriching lives through delivering content that addresses the issues in communities and make a lasting impact.

It is crucial that businesses operate in communities and impact several stakeholders and sections of society to enable shared value creation. Value creation is a holistic process, especially in a business environment that is constantly evolving, and is influenced by rapid changes and socioeconomic factors amongst other things.

These dynamics are further exacerbated by global macro volatility and the increasing complexity of the regulatory environment; however, it is important for the private sector to remain focused on ensuring it has the agility and foresight to adapt accordingly to be able to contribute to the development of skills, creation of jobs and small businesses, promotion of discipline and wellbeing, and building of strong foundations to empower communities - the backbone of any business.

EUSTACE MASHIMBYE | THOUGHT LEADERSHIP
“It is important for the private sector to remain focused on ensuring it has the agility and foresight to adapt”
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THOUGHT LEADERSHIP

14 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION REQUIRES CONSISTENT AND CONCERTED EFFORT

Diversity and inclusion have become buzzwords in the business world over the past few years, and while the conversation is important, we need to move beyond words and into actions that bring about real change.

Workplaces have a responsibility to represent and support the diversity and talent in the world, and create a space where everyone can thrive. This work is not a one-off effort. Positive and systemic change, both in the workplace and in the world, requires consistent, concerted and proactive effort.

Over the past year at Google South Africa we have focused on five key areas to ensure that we are not only an employer of choice for top talent, but that we have a lasting impact in the communities we operate in, and respond to the needs of our users.

1. HIRING

The path to working in the tech industry starts long before someone is hired so efforts to develop talent from under-represented groups need to start early.

Globally, we have implemented a number of programmes and practices to ensure that we are growing the number of employees from

underrepresented communities and that our hiring efforts prioritise equity. One of the concrete ways we have done this is to expand training to hiring managers and recruiters to help them eliminate personal biases in hiring and adopt an inclusive mind set.

We have also amplified our efforts to support gender equity in a number of countries in Africa, for example across sub-Saharan Africa, we partnered with the Graça Machel Trust to provide digital skills training for more than 5 000 women entrepreneurs.

In practice these efforts are working - for instance, the data from the Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA) region shows that between 2020 and 2021, we recorded an overall increase of 14% in the hiring of women. Specifically, women made up 28% of our tech hires, 49.2% of our non-tech hires and 47.1% of our leadership hires.

It’s good to see progress, but there is definitely more that our industry can and should do.

2. RETENTION AND PROGRESSION

The flip side of the hiring coin is ensuring that the people that businesses hire, stay, and are able to grow and progress in their careers.

DR ALISTAIR MOKOENA- COUNTRY LEAD, GOOGLE SOUTH AFRICA | THOUGHT LEADERSHIP
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Understanding why people leave an organisation is an integral element of the retention process. We take a data based approach by studying attrition rates and designing programmes based on that data. In 2021, our Stay & Thrive team launched a new way to help leaders better understand their team’s attrition data. This new process is more comprehensive and relatable, offering leaders a story with meaningful—and actionable— insights. In addition to providing each team lead with quantitative attrition data, the team humanises the numbers by offering insight on the day-to-day employee experience.

Armed with the “why” around attrition, leaders are better placed to implement the recommended solutions, such as manager upskilling, more defined progression plans, and greater support for internal mobility.

3. REPRESENTATION

We’ve all heard the phrase ‘’representation matters”, which is regularly used when talking about the media. But representation in the workplace is also key. Which is why it is important that businesses help to develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes that help foster a personal—and shared—sense of belonging.

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“Belonging is a universal human need—and it’s the responsibility of business leaders to help foster it. This means building a culture in which everyone feels that they belong”

Achieving representation requires regular diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) progress tracking but in addition to this, we have also developed concrete leadership actions to make sure we deliver on our racial equity commitments in all our regions.

In South Africa, we have recently moved from a Level 8 in the B-BBEE ratings to a level 3, this shows that we are moving in the right direction.

Having set actions and commitments means that a business can track its progress in areas like building more knowledge around diversity, equity, and inclusion, and creating more digital learning opportunities.

Another way Google has committed to representation is through our products and programmes. For instance, our Black Founders Fund has just awarded a combined $4mn in funding to 60 black-led startups in Africa.

4. FLEXIBILITY

The COVID-19 pandemic really made us all think about the real meaning of the word flexibility and showed businesses across the world that being in the workplace does not necessarily equate to productivity. But beyond simply being a choice of where a workforce gets their work done, policies and practices can make hybrid work more inclusive and accessible.

For example, when contemplating a return to work, and what that would look like, we heard from our employees who come from underrepresented communities, who said they appreciate having the flexibility to work from parts of the country that are more diverse and in communities where they feel most at home. Importantly, people have varying reasons for embracing remote work- such as allowing them to balance extra caretaking responsibilities for children or family members.

5. BELONGING AND INNOVATION

Belonging is a universal human need—and it’s the responsibility of business leaders to help foster it. This means building a culture in which everyone feels that they belong— and that they can meaningfully contribute to building helpful, universally accessible products and services.

In the workplace, this means creating a culture where people feel respected and supported. Mentorship initiatives can also provide an opportunity to create a sense of belonging - by matching experienced people with less experienced ones who are looking to grow and advance their careers.

When it comes to product innovation, it is important for businesses to reach out to build with communities, and not just build for them.

An example of this in practice is the announcement of Google’s African product centre based in Kenya, hiring people from Africa to help solve African challenges and build products that are helpful for people on the continent. And in 2022, Google Translate also introduced 24 new languages-including Sepedi and Tsonga, allowing millions more people to access technology in their own language.

The tech industry still has a lot more to achieve when it comes to diversity and inclusion but a more diverse and inclusive business is also a better performing one - with research showing that they’re more innovative, creative and productive. Building towards inclusion requires consistent and concerted effort but we are committed to building a Google that’s for everyone, everywhere.

DR ALISTAIR MOKOENA- COUNTRY LEAD, GOOGLE SOUTH AFRICA | THOUGHT LEADERSHIP
“The COVID-19 pandemic really made us all think about the real meaning of the word flexibility”
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THOUGHT LEADERSHIP

18 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

DRIVING BUSINESS SUCCESS THROUGH DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION

Technology today plays a fundamental role in helping businesses and industries transform. Its ability to do this has been augmented by the pandemic, which has fast-tracked the pace of digital and cloud transformation significantly.

This wave is continuing to gain momentum – fuelled by the continued adoption of hybrid work models that mean that people can connect and work from anywhere, at any time, and on any device. This has implications for businesses, who are increasingly seeing the need to use technology to optimise efficiencies, empower employees, accelerate innovation and translate insights to differentiate their offerings and add value to customers. What has become more clear over the past two years, however, is not just the quickening pace of digital adoption and transformation, but the shift towards organisations building and developing their own digital solutions and capabilities in order to gain a competitive advantage and unlock business value.

The rate at which companies are able to adopt technology as well as build and develop their own solutions and capabilities – by the business for the business –is called tech intensity. And it is rapidly becoming a defining feature of companies: building on the foundation of the underlying, core technologies, structures and

systems put in place as a result of digital transformation, and then using these new capabilities to innovate, drive growth and transform their business at speed.

This tech intensity is becoming ever more apparent in South African businesses and is translating to the areas they are investing in when it comes to technology. According to the 2021 South African Science, Technology and Innovation Indicators Report, nearly 70 percent of firms in the country are using technology to innovate. Our own research found that tech intensity has been a critical consideration for businesses going back as far as 2019. Three-quarters of modern companies believe that harnessing tech intensity is the most effective way to build competitive advantage today, as well as in the future –and 73 percent are already creating their own first-party intellectual property using next-generation technologies such as machine learning (39%), the Internet of Things (37%), Artificial Intelligence (32%), blockchain (29%) and mixed reality (21%).

CREATING UNIQUE VALUE BY ADDRESSING BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY CHALLENGES

Mixed reality, for instance, has the unique ability to create value for businesses. The technology addresses specific industry challenges by enabling capabilities that help companies become more competitive and innovative –

LILLIAN BARNARD, CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER AT MICROSOFT SOUTH AFRICA | THOUGHT LEADERSHIP
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“Three-quarters of modern companies believe that harnessing tech intensity is the most effective way to build competitive advantage”

particularly in the manufacturing, health and retail sectors. There is a growing body of evidence of global use cases that show that mixed reality has the ability to help solve for current and future business and industry challenges, by enabling simulated on-the-job training, optimising operations, efficiencies, productivity and collaboration through real-time insights and visual guidance, and driving innovation to create a competitive advantage and return on investment.

A Forrester Total Economic Impact Study found, for example, that the HoloLens 2 mixed reality holographic headset offered a 177 percent return on investment (ROI) over three years, as well as improvements to employee health and safety, business continuity, customer experience, and customer outcomes.

This is simply one of a burgeoning number of technologies that have the capability to enable tech intensity. And for Microsoft, tech intensity lies at the heart of how we empower our customers.

We are building the platforms that enable customers to combine the best of human creativity and technological advancements to build their own digital capabilities – all underpinned by trust that the highest standards of security and control are built into these capabilities.

This then allows businesses to develop solutions that are able to address their unique business landscape and challenges, augment existing platforms, improve operational efficiencies and productivity, and enable better customer and employee engagement.

The organisations that embrace the opportunities that tech intensity offers will ultimately be the ones to benefit from its competitive advantage and impact by allowing them to differentiate their offerings.

More companies are responding to this growing demand to accelerate their innovation levels and embrace technology to act as a differentiator. They are, for example, building out hackathons, as well as executive briefing sessions to educate and empower their boards, executives, management and teams to understand new and emerging technologies and their use cases so they can use these to improve and accelerate themselves ahead of their competitors.

HOW SHOULD BUSINESS GO ABOUT INVESTING IN TECHNOLOGY TOOLS?

For businesses everywhere, technology now acts as more than just an enabler. It forms part of corporate DNA and provides the platform on which businesses operate – and many of the opportunities that organisations are able to harness come as a direct result of technology.

So it stands to reason that when businesses consider investing in technology tools, platforms and systems, top of the agenda is business value and the return on investment they will provide. More and more, modern organisations look at the three horizons model developed by McKinsey.

This framework gives businesses a way to approach growth, innovation and digital transformation by balancing the demands of the present through core systems with the needs of the future by way of new products and solutions. It means accelerating

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“In a world defined by change and growing pressures, digital is without a doubt the key building block of businesses today – allowing them to pivot and deliver innovation, productivity, and flexibility”

investment beyond the building out of core systems to transforming at speed through customisable solutions, platforms and systems. The three horizon approach measures the time and value of digital innovation and transformation projects that businesses invest in –although how long each horizon lasts depends on the industry that the business is in, and the degree to which it needs the innovation to make the business successful.

Horizon one innovations are typically short-term and yield results in one to three years. These projects optimise the systems, platforms and solutions that the business already has, and enable intelligent processes to help build agility, resilience and flexibility. Horizon two projects usually take two to five years, and focus on transforming the business by adapting and customising solutions, platforms and systems rather than building them from scratch.

Technology has evolved from being just components to entire solutions – and business leaders are embracing this ongoing mindset shift because they have seen how this allows faster transformation, and the ability to scale solutions in an environment with significant market pressures.

EXPONENTIAL ACCELERATION TO VALUE THROUGH A CULTURE SHIFT

The majority of business leaders today understand, and are adapting to, this reality. However, horizon three innovations are a very different construct. Horizon three projects are long-term, often taking between five and 12 years to produce results. These projects focus on the ability to digitally transform at scale because of an encompassing cultural transformation – when the foundation of the core systems is already in place, and businesses have started accelerating the building out of certain of these strategically selected systems.

This essentially means embedding a value system within the business to keep digital transformation going at scale. And that is often the hardest part – because if

businesses are not able to get that right, then the other investments they have made will likely fail to translate into tangible business value.

It is for this very reason that we are sharing our own journey and cultural transformation as Microsoft with our partners: to help them reap the value of their investments in digital transformation as they adapt to evolving business and market needs, and navigate the move to the three horizons model.

Sharing the insights and learnings of the company’s shift to a growth mindset culture and how it is possible to translate an investment in digital solutions that enable business innovation and empower businesses to do what they need to, at scale, has the power to help businesses across sectors become more competitive, resilient and agile.

In a world defined by change and growing pressures, digital is without a doubt the key building block of businesses today – allowing them to pivot and deliver innovation, productivity, and flexibility.

But to truly realise this return on investment, organisations must ensure that they lay a solid foundation of core systems and platforms, build on these systems to transform at speed and then overlay these efforts with a cultural transformation and mindset shift – and collaboration with the right partner. Only then will they unlock the real business value of investing in digital solutions and platforms.

The three horizon model offers the approach to unlock this value. To realise this potential, companies will now need to look at their investments through these lenses. This will ensure that when they are making strategic decisions around the way in which they use technology, they consider the measure of success they will be working towards and how they can find the right partners to enable and accelerate these capabilities.

LILLIAN BARNARD, CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER AT MICROSOFT SOUTH AFRICA | THOUGHT LEADERSHIP
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LOCALISATION: THE PERFECT INGREDIENT FOR ECONOMIC GROWTH

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THOUGHT LEADERSHIP

Locally manufactured products and services begin with an idea. Through that idea, a product or service is created with the aim of solving an existing issue or closing a gap for consumers or the communities in which the business operates. Finally, the supply chain comes into full-swing – sourcing raw materials or components, manufacturing, packaging, marketing, wholesale, retail, delivery, and plenty of other links that form this chain.

In its simplest term, localisation is the ability of a country to manufacture and procure its products locally in order to boost the economy and help create jobs.

Job creation and economic growth rely heavily on local procurement efforts driven by stringent localisation policies by entities both in the public and the private sector. In South Africa, localisation has many economic benefits with no limitations when exercised correctly. For many years, localisation has been a part of the economic recovery strategy because it is the main ingredient for creating a sustainable economy and eradicating unemployment.

Since its inception 21 years ago, Proudly South African has been at the forefront of promoting localisation as its core mandate. Our efforts are motivated and derived from helping the economy to grow and assisting with curbing unemployment in the country.

Over the years, localisation has been the star child needing attention. But much like an infant, localisation depends on key growth drivers to fully develop into what it can really become. Through our efforts to drive change and transformation for the livelihoods of the people of South Africa, we issued a report titled Revitalising SA’s Manufacturing Sector that indicates the key drivers of a possible boost to the economy.

Revitalising SA’s Manufacturing Sector is an analysis of the huge impact manufacturing can provide in job creation and boosting the economy. The report conducted by top economist Dr Iraj Abedian of the Pan-African Investment and Research Services suggests that the manufacturing sector has great potential to boost job creation and economic growth.

It highlighted industries that are at the forefront of creating positive change in the country. The highlighted sub-sectors that play a massive role in driving localisation that we focused on in this study are agro-processing (including meat products such as poultry), sugar, furniture, automotive, steel, and pharmaceuticals, which positively impact South Africa and its people.

An extract from the Revitalising SA’s Manufacturing Sector report expressed that; “against the backdrop of the evolving manufacturing environment, current elevated risks, and potential opportunities for the sector, it is of paramount importance that government policy plays a vital role in supporting South African manufacturing. One of the proposals made by the government through the NDP 2030 regarding the stimulation of the country’s manufacturing sector is “leveraging public and private procurement to promote localisation and industrial diversification”.

The manufacturing industry is labour intensive and one of the highest job creation sectors in South Africa. The sector’s contribution to the economy is significant; with a high number of jobs created across various industries. The role of manufacturing in the economy is evidently demonstrated in Dr Abedian’s findings indicating investment scenarios depicting how a mere 10% increase in investment into the manufacturing

EUSTACE MASHIMBYE | THOUGHT LEADERSHIP
22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 23

sector could lead, in the medium term, to 13% GDP growth; 8% more jobs created; 8.3% overall boost to investment across the economy, and a 9% jump in tax revenues.

The calculations of actual numbers of jobs created across all skill levels reveal potential medium-term gains of 75 300 new direct jobs in manufacturing, 11 500 new jobs in mining, and 10 100 new jobs in agriculture, over and above the indirect jobs that will be created.

One of the many leading organisations in the manufacturing industry is SAB. SAB has been an essential role player in adding value to the agro-processing sub-sector and the broader economy. In 2022, SAB committed R4.5-billion in investment towards the South African economy and confirmed that it contributes 1.3% towards the national GDP.

The company’s investment doesn’t only stimulate the economy, it also impacts job creation, taxes, and excise and procurement spending. SAB further demonstrated a promising tomorrow for our country through their brand logo relaunch and tagline ‘To A Future with More Cheers’. The brand’s relaunch didn’t take me by surprise. In fact, I was intrigued by it because it speaks directly to what Proudly South African has been proclaiming for years – buy local to create jobs; buy local to boost the economy; buy local to help improve the livelihoods of the people of Mzansi.

SAB’s efforts speak to how the private sector can play its part in driving transformation and localisation, both of which are important to the success of the country’s economy.

The bottom line is that localisation is more than just a stand-alone activity that can come into its full

24 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION
“Localisation is the solution we need for our economy, country, and the people living in it”

effect alone. It is an activity of change that relies on various touchpoints and elements to function fully. If the private and government sectors make localisation their number one priority, the possibilities of a transformed and revitalised nation will become endless, resulting in a positive chain reaction.

Regardless of how we view it, localisation is the stepping stone for a much more financially independent country. Localisation can ultimately help address current South African issues and social ills affecting all those living in the country. If it is not the main ingredient for critical economic strategies meant to help the country address poverty, inequality and unemployment, we run the risk of sinking further into our issues as a nation. Our beloved country faces problems far more significant than our boardroom talks as decision-makers. These ongoing problems affect us beyond what we ever imagined. Many people have become hopeless, and others are working on migration opportunities only because the future of South Africa seems bleak, to say the least. Localisation is the necessary restoration ingredient at times like these, where we can see a deepening energy crisis, unemployment, crime, and rising interest rates.

According to Statistics South Africa, the third quarter of 2022 saw a GDP expansion of 1.6%. The manufacturing sector led the growth and with localisation taking the lead in manufacturing, there is a likelihood that the economy of South Africa will continue to recover gradually, especially due to its labour-intensive nature. An increase in manufacturing as a result of an increase in aggregate demand for local produce will lead to the retention of jobs and the creation of much-needed new

is the domino effect we look forward to seeing.

Essentially, the government needs to turn these stats on its head by making localisation the game changer in driving the economy’s growth and leveraging off the ongoing manufacturing successes to achieve better results for the South African economy.

Decision-makers, especially through their procurement policies, regulations, and practices, need to be more deliberate about buying locally because its economic impact is enormous for the country. Nevertheless, localisation is the ‘reason to believe’ that many South Africans are searching for, and its successful adoption across all sectors of society can help sustain our nation for generations to come.

The implementation of a buy local campaign is not exclusive to South Africa; there are buy local campaigns for countries, regions or even towns globally, and each of these are implemented as movements that seek to heighten localisation efforts that effectively and positively impact their respective economies.

A robust localisation strategy will be the saving grace that will equip all industries in South Africa with the necessary tools and equipment to beat the odds beyond any crisis, including rising levels of imports (both legal and illegal; imports), and in turn, boost the economy and create jobs.

Localisation is the solution we need for our economy, country, and the people living in it.

EUSTACE MASHIMBYE | THOUGHT LEADERSHIP
“The manufacturing industry is labour intensive and one of the highest job creation sectors in South Africa” job opportunities. This
22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 25

THOUGHT LEADERSHIP

26 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

IT MUST LOOK DIFFERENT TO BREAK THE CYCLE!

It must look different to break the cycle that a poor mother begets poor children, that poverty has a black and feminine face, that the place of work is in town, that townships are underdevelopment and suburbs are prosperous, that supervisors and managers are generally white males and janitors are largely black and women, that landlords and farm owners are white and tenants and farm workers are black, that the owners of capital are white and borrowers are black, that the public sector is unprofitable, corrupt, inefficient and ineffective and the private sector is profitable, effective and efficient, etc. It is common cause that before democracy, the public sector had the best resources, albeit exclusively reserved for the white minority. With the advent of the democratic constitutional dispensation in 1994, South Africa has not succeeded in dedicating more resources to extend coverage to the hitherto excluded black majority. And yet, we knew that no people can be helped by, nor benefit from institutions that are not a direct result of their own character. Twenty-nine years into democracy, it is self-evident that we, collectively, have not succeeded in

eradicating the legacy of apartheid. South Africa is the only African country that, after independence, did not substantially increase both its educational outcomes and ownership of the economy by its indigenous people, by double digits. We are still expending far less resources on educating a black child, even though we know that education is the surest way of transcending social classes. The little economic activity that was present in townships and former homelands including the national infrastructure inherited from the apartheid government has been allowed to decay and go to waste. We built more rickety, less robust, unstable RDP houses than the four roomed houses of apartheid townships that are still standing to this day. When shopping malls mushroomed in the townships, the world was replete with examples that it is the black shop owners that will be decimated. And yet we did not insist on these shopping malls be owned by the very same black shop owners. As the old South Africa prohibited casinos except in the former homelands, we had an opportunity to issue new casino licenses to black businesses rather than these also going to the usual suspects.

“No
people can be helped by, nor benefit from institutions that are not a direct result of their own character”
BONANG MOHALE | THOUGHT LEADERSHIP 22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 27

Structural impediments to economic participation clearly affect the efficient functioning of markets and the attendant effective redistributory mechanisms were held to be the panacea of post-apartheid economic redress. This has often served to reinforce the marginalisation of the majority from participating in the economy rather than effectively facilitating it. This is despite the myriad of transformative legislation like the 22nd Employment Equity (EE) Report for 2021 which still shows Females at 26% (African Females at 6%) of top management and Males at 74% (African Males at 11%), White people at 63%, Indian at 11%, Coloured at 6% and African at 17%! To ensure that everyone enjoys equal opportunity and fair treatment in the workplace, the Employment Equity (EE) Act, No. 55 of 1998 was enacted into law with the purpose to remove discrimination, implement affirmative action and to promote equity, equality, opportunity, remuneration and development for all employees in the workplace. The newly amended Employment Equity Act which will aid workplace transformation, will come into effect in

28 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION
“The Employment Equity (EE) Act, No. 55 of 1998 was enacted into law with the purpose to remove discrimination, implement affirmative action and to promote equity, equality, opportunity, remuneration and development for all employees in the workplace”

2023 to empower the Employment and Labour Minister to regulate sector specific EE targets and to regulate compliance criteria to issue EE Compliance Certificates in terms of Section 53 of the EE Act.

In June 1993, the Black Management Forum (BMF) set up an Affirmative Action Commission, consisting of twelve members to look at key aspects of affirmative action! This found expression in our Constitution as the Employment Equity Act. Chief among South Africa’s political success is the country’s Constitution, which was written in 1996. Early Black Economic Empowerment (BEE) focused on increasing black ownership of large businesses. However, white-owned companies entered into BEE transactions to diversify the demographics of their shareholders only voluntarily, and, in the absence of organised sources of capital, many of the black participants relied on highly-geared financing structures and special purpose vehicles (SPVs). Several BEE deals thus collapsed during the Asian financial crisis of the late 1990s. According to estimates, black control of business had risen to about 10% of shares on the Johannesburg Sock Exchange by 1998, but, following the financial crisis, fell dramatically to between 1% and 3.8% by 2000. Meanwhile, the promotion of black empowerment in areas other than ownership was pursued piecemeal, especially through a series of laws including the 1998 Skills Development Act and the 1998 Employment Equity Act. Amid dissatisfaction with the progress of existing initiatives, in May 1998 the Black Management Forum (BMF) under the aegis of the Black Business Council (BBC) appointed Matamela C. Ramaphosa to chair a BEE Commission. The Commission proposed a broad definition of BEE as an integrated and coherent socio-economic process. It is located within the context of the country’s national transformation programme, namely the RDP. It is aimed at redressing the imbalances of the past by seeking to substantially and equitably transfer and confer the ownership, management and control of

South Africa’s financial and economic resources to the majority of its citizens. It seeks to ensure broader and meaningful participation in the economy by black people to achieve sustainable development and prosperity. The Commission also proposed the passage of focused BEE legislation and the adoption of an integrated national strategy on BEE, comprising a set of simplified and coordinated guidelines and regulations applicable across the economy, to be implemented by an oversight body reporting to the cabinet. On some views, the Commission was influential in bolstering support for the broader approach ultimately taken by the government to BEE. The BroadBased Black Economic Empowerment (B-BBEE) Act 53 of 2003 intended to establish a legislative framework for the promotion of black economic empowerment; empower the Minister to issue codes of good practice and to publish transformation charters; establish the Black Economic Empowerment Advisory Council and provide for matters connected therewith.

“The Commission also proposed the passage of focused BEE legislation and the adoption of an integrated national strategy”

BONANG MOHALE | THOUGHT LEADERSHIP 22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 29
“The Commission proposed a broad definition of BEE as an integrated and coherent socio-economic process. It is located within the context of the country’s national transformation programme, namely the RDP”

Impactful change and transformation require collective, practical action

we believe we have the greatest ability to deliver meaningful impact through innovation in our banking products as well as lending and investment practices.

These SDGs include affordable and clean energy, clean water and sanitation, sustainable cities and communities and climate action, to name a few.

is currently experiencing. Nedbank has made strides in addressing this through initiatives such as the Youth Employment Services (YES) programme, a government-led initiative, which seeks to address youth unemployment. To date, the Nedbank programme has given over 5 000 graduates an opportunity to develop critical skills that will allow them to find sustainable employment.

SUGAN KRISHNA NAIDOO

It is every country’s goal to achieve continuous and consistent socio-economic development for the well-being of the community, businesses, and society at large. While focus is largely on the government to enable an environment conducive to development through favourable economic and social policies, there is a strong expectation that the private sector should be an active participant in driving transformation and contributing to the betterment of society. With Nedbank’s purpose being to use its financial expertise to do good for individuals, families, businesses and society in mind, we spoke to Linda Makalima, Nedbank Board Member and Chairperson of the Nedbank Group Transformation, Social and Ethics Committee, about how the bank is living its purpose by providing practical solutions for impactful change in the country

Q: Financial institutions play an important role in creating sustainable development in communities. What approach has Nedbank taken to advance socio-economic empowerment?

With the many challenges in our country in mind (from climate change to access to clean water and sanitation and financial exclusion) we prioritised nine of the 17 United National Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) where

We understand that banks play a crucial role in facilitating economic activity and enabling sustainable growth and development as we have the expertise and resources. We examined the challenges faced by our communities which include a lack of jobs, lack of funding and resources and lack of essential skills and proposed practical, accessible, and sustainable solutions to address them. These solutions include the development of programmes that support emerging enterprises and provide small, micro, and medium enterprises (SMMEs) with access to markets and growth opportunities, transforming our supply chain and working to uplift communities through our CSI initiatives.

Q: When we look at the challenges communities face, we note that the burden of unemployment is concentrated amongst the youth – with 65% of youth being unemployed. Have we identified a solution for this?

There is consensus between government and the private sector on the need for urgent and collaborative interventions to reduce the youth unemployment crisis that the country

Nedbank is leading within the financial sector with a total of 7 080 youth participation in the last four years (including the 2022 intake).

The first year’s intake of youth were, for the most part, qualified university graduates who were of such a high calibre that Nedbank’s absorption rate of this cohort into permanent roles or continued contract employment was much higher than the prescribed requirement, and exceeded all of our expectations. Our overall absorption rate, inclusive of our implementation partners, was 20% - which is eight times over the gazetted target of 2.5%.

In 2021, more than 1 900 youth entered Nedbank's YES programme. Out of the nearly two thousand, Nedbank hosted 150 young people who aligned with our focus on addressing future critical capabilities. The balance of the intake was spread amongst our implementation partners WILDTRUST, ORT SA, Youth@work, Conservation SA, and RLabs.

With Nedbank embracing the value that the programme provides for both the company and young people, 103 of the 150 youth hosted by Nedbank in 2021 were offered

30 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

formal employment – a staggering 67% absorption rate which represented life-changing career opportunities.

For the 2022 intake, more than 2 000 youth have entered the year-long YES programme to date. In this intake, Nedbank is hosting more than 600 candidates into its own clusters - a substantial increase from 2021, with the balance being placed with suitable implementation partners.

Q: In reference to the need for sustainable employment - how can the private sector support individuals who create their own employment through SMMEs?

I truly believe that SMMEs can thrive when they are provided with the opportunity to develop their skills and given access to promote their products and services in markets where they are needed. As the private sector, we have the resources and networks to facilitate this. The role that SMMEs have to play in the creation of much-needed employment opportunities requires the provision of business support, including access to funding and markets, has never been more critical.

At Nedbank, we embrace our responsibility to contribute towards economic growth and job creation. Some of the ways we do this include supporting emerging enterprises; providing small, micro, and medium enterprises with access to markets and growth opportunities; transforming our supply chain; and working to uplift the communities in which we operate. Nedbank’s policies and practices in preferential

procurement remain a key strategy for enabling transformation, job creation and community upliftment. They are designed to maximise the group’s contribution to the development and economic transformation of the country, by giving preference to local suppliers over foreign suppliers, with emphasis on SMMEs.

As part of this focus, Nedbank entered into a strategic partnership with SAP Ariba to empower and develop small black-owned suppliers. Selected suppliers received a standard Nedbank business account, which gives them access to the Ariba platform to market their businesses and participate in the sourcing opportunities it provides.

Nedbank remains a signatory to the Prompt Payment Code, which means that smaller suppliers (exempted microenterprises) are paid within seven days, and all other SMEs within 30 days of receiving their invoices. This gives SMMEs quicker access to their funds to help them remain operationally viable.

We’ve also supported various enterprise development initiatives over and above our enterprise supplier development programme, to contribute to the growth and sustainability of SMMEs. These include but not limited to:

RLabs

Nedbank provided RLabs with R3.6-million to implement the Innovation and Enterprise Programme (IEP) with entrepreneurs from peri-urban, township and other marginalised communities across Cape Town. The IEP provides a variety of leadership, entrepreneurship, design, incubation, technology, and innovation programmes offering support, advisory services, resources, mentorship and incubation to women and youth-led ventures.

AWIEF Business Growth Accelerator –

Nedbank provided R2.6-million to the African Women Innovation and Entrepreneurship Fund Growth Accelerator (AWIEF) to support 50 women-owned businesses across SA. The accelerator programme is designed to suit the unique needs of early-stage and high-growthoriented enterprises with business modelling and growth strategy training, business leadership skills, corporate advisory, mentoring, coaching, networks, and orchestrating strategic partnerships.

The Riversands Incubation Hub

The Riversands Incubation Hub is a large-scale black business incubator. A registered nonprofit company, the hub was established in 2014 through a partnership between Century Property Developments and The Jobs Fund, with the purpose of incubating businesses for growth and expansion so that they can become sustainable, job-creating entities. The hub also offers rental premises for businesses at subsidised rates.

Nedbank provided R2.9-million to enable 60 businesses to receive support from the hub. A total of R64.4-million in revenue was generated in 2021, and the businesses paid a total of R1.9-million in salaries. A total of 139 jobs were created in the year under review.

Fix Forward

Fix Forward is an incubation programme focusing on equipping tradespersons from lowincome communities with the necessary skills

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22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 31

and to transition them from the informal to the formal arena. The objective of the programme is to empower the tradesmen to realise their potential as entrepreneurs, and to help them grow successful businesses.

Nedbank provided R3.5-million for 100 contractors to participate in Fix Forward’s 12-month Enterprise Development Programme. Over and above the 100 contractors supported through the workshops, coaching and mentoring, a further 67 contractors were afforded increased access to markets.

In 2021 these businesses created 116 permanent jobs and 71 temporary opportunities for employment. The contractors earned over R8.5-million in revenue.

critical to both the economy and the wellbeing of communities: agriculture, water, energy, and waste. By linking our traditional CSI focus areas of education and skills development to the four key elements of the green economy, we envisage a refreshed approach to job creation and enterprise development that will help to drive socio-economic empowerment in communities.

In terms of the green economy, one of the projects we have invested in is the Siyavuna Abalimi Development Centre (SDC). The centre, located in the south of KwaZulu-Natal, is implementing a Bulbine frutescens farming project. The project aims to grow Bulbine as a raw material input into the skin and cosmetic industry and has already secured an offtaker for their produce. The funding from the Nedbank Foundation has enabled SDC to secure five hectares of land for production, purchase Bulbine seedlings, and train SDC employees, youth and farmers on all aspects of Bulbine production. A three-hectare section of the land was planted in 2021 and 17 smallholder farmers and six youth were employed to work on the farm, bolstering local employment and knowledge.

Q: In closing, what would you say to other organisations regarding the drive to grow our country’s socio-economic capital?

Q: Does Corporate Social Investment play a role in socio-economic empowerment?

CSI initiatives must improve the economic ecosystem and the community’s skills set to enable people to gain employment or start their own enterprises. In 2021, Nedbank revised their CSI strategy to ensure that the initiatives we get involved in grow our socio-economic impact. Our revised CSI strategy invests in the green economy and focuses on four key areas that are

There is an African proverb that says, “If you want to go far, go together.” Transformation, inclusive growth and socio-economic development cannot be the responsibility of the government or that of one single company. We all need to cumulatively put in our energies, resources, talents, and skills for the upliftment of our communities.

The reality is that the challenges and problems of the world, and the threat to the future sustainability of our environment are too colossal for governments and only a set number of companies to tackle on their own.

32 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

The world of businesses is undoubtedly experiencing the biggest transformation in centuries. The Fourth Industrial Revolution, life beyond the pandemic and a shift towards a purpose-led approach to business is undoubtedly shaping industries. Businesses that will lead, navigate and sustain themselves for years to come require strong leadership capital to captain them through the wave of change that the world is experiencing. We caught up with Nedbank’s Chief Operating Officer, Mfundo Nkuhlu, to reflect on leadership capital.

Q: Strong leadership is associated with driving successful transformation and sustainability. Looking at Nedbank’s approach to leadership, what would you point out as critical success factors that have developed leadership capital within the organisation?

I think the main key takeout is that Nedbank views leadership not to be the exclusive responsibility of a handful of senior management or executives.

We strongly believe that every person within the organisation has the potential, and certainly the responsibility, to be a leader. Therefore, in developing leadership capital, we have taken a holistic view of leadership that leadership is a state of being, achievable by all.

We exemplify this ethos through our transformational approach to leadership capital that embraces a strong leadership culture, organisational leadership and a commitment to leading through a strong brand, ethics, compliance and good governance, and stakeholder engagements that deliver shared value.

Q: You mention that ‘every person in the organisation has the potential to lead.’ How is Nedbank enabling this leadership-based culture across the organisation?

One of the outcomes targeted in our culture transformation journey is embedding humancentred leadership to unlock the culture shift towards leadership being part of the DNA of every individual in the organisation.

We launched our human-centred leadership approach in January 2021. It is the outcome of a collaborative exercise with our leaders that resulted in a future-fit leadership

NEDBANK | INTERVIEW
22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 33

framework that defines what differentiates a Nedbank leader and challenges all leaders to #BeTheDifference. Following the launch, various initiatives were implemented to promote human-centred leadership.

Leaders at Nedbank now have a clear understanding of what our core leadership beliefs, attitudes, values, and principles are; what is expected of them; and what they should focus on. Leadership at Nedbank harnesses the power of the collective; everyone has the ability to be a leader.

Furthermore, as a bank that takes money seriously, Nedbank is focused on enabling people to improve their financial well-being and guiding them to make better and more sustainable money choices. This is key to not only transforming the lives and futures of individuals, but also enabling the sustainable growth and development of the South African economy. This is one of the reasons we have taken a leading role to ensure financial inclusion of the unserved and underserved communities.

Q: Has this approach to leadership capital yielded positive results for Nedbank?

Certainly - by making leadership a collective responsibility of all Nedbank employees, we have inspired a spirit of camaraderie where the entire organisation is embracing the opportunity to lead and take charge of their outputs. Because of this buy-in, we are able to live our purpose which is to use our financial expertise to do good for individuals, families, businesses and society.

Q: How does Nedbank extend this leadership approach in its industry and the market in general?

We strive to entrench this shared leadership culture not only in our business, but also in our industry, because we know that the more people there are in SA’s financial services sector who have strong, principled and empowered leadership mindsets, the more effective the sector will be in supporting and driving transformation in all areas of society and business.

In 2021, Nedbank was ranked the eighth most valuable brand among top 50 SA companies for the second year in a row. The value of the brand-by-brand finance is estimated at R15-billion. During the 2021 financial year, Nedbank saw a continuation of this trend through brand sentiment rankings, having consistently ranked as the number two bank in social media brand sentiment as measured by Salesforce Social Studio.

While these and other accolades are notable acknowledgements for our hard work and commitment to living our purpose in everything we do, we are proud that our inspiration to be better stems from the culture of collective leadership which has been entrenched in the business by our human-centred approach.

Company Details: 135 Riviona Road Sandown 2196, Sandton Tel: +27112944444

General enquiries: 0860555111

www.nedbank.co.za

Social Media: @Nedbank

NEDBANK | INTERVIEW
34 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION
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FINANCIAL SECTOR OVERVIEW

CREATING ACCESS TO FINANCIAL SERVICES Financial sector works toward transformation

South Africa’s financial sector is large and sophisticated and boasts a GDP ratio above most emerging markets. The sector is made up primarily of banks, pension funds and insurers, along with other financial service providers.

The banking sector especially remains highly concentrated, with the largest banks holding over 85% of the industry’s deposits in 2020, but is seeing increasing competition from technology-based start-ups and retailers increasing their financial services offering.

A CRITICAL EMPLOYER

The financial services industry pays 30% of all corporate tax (R63-billion in 2021) and makes up 23% of GDP.

Banks remain key employers in the South African economy, employing more than 154 000 people. However, the sector has seen extensive job shedding in recent years, in part due to cost-cutting measures in an attempt to keep up with new entrants to the market.

In addition, increased digitisation has seen the skill set of employees in the financial sector changing, with demand for those with higher technological skills increasing. More and more banks are looking to recruit data scientists, behavioural economists and engineers in line with the increase in artificial intelligence solutions the sector is employing.

For the last ten years, the financial sector has focused on digitisation and a move to customer self-service.

This has seen the introduction of banking apps and digital payment options. This investment has, in part, been driven by the need to reduce costs and has enabled banks to reduce the costs of collecting, storing, processing, and exchanging information.

Digital solutions have also reduced the need for branch infrastructure, and between 2012 and 2019, 695 branches were closed by traditional banks.

36 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

MOVING TOWARDS DIGITISATION

Digitisation has improved access to banking services for many, but many low-income households remain largely dependent on physical facilities. The financial services sector has been increasingly providing financial products to those previously unable to access them. Today, banks provide access to transaction points to 88% of South Africans in low-income households within a 10km radius. However, real access to financial services remains low, and there are low levels of account usage.

ACCESS TO FINANCIAL SERVICES

20 million products that contribute to financial inclusion are provided by the financial services sector

In 2021, over 81% of South Africa’s population above the age of 16 had access to a bank account

40% of dormant accounts were held by individuals from lowincome households

In this segment, another 19% withdrew all funds as soon as they were deposited

WORKING TOWARDS TARGETS

The financial sector has long been regarded as a vital driver of transformation. To further this role, the Financial Sector Conduct Authority (FSCA) recently published a draft strategy to better drive transformation in the sector and meet commitments made by financial institutions under the Financial Sector Code.

According to the Sanlam Gauge Report, the financial sector is on a Level 4 B-BBEE contribution.

However, the vastness of the sector means that there are a number of smaller financial service providers who, while licensed, do not have to be measured because of the size of their turnover.

The Gauge Report found the sector had failed to meet most of its targets and scored an overall contribution score of 88 points.

The sector achieved 81% of its ownership target and only 62% of its management control target for skills development. Banks spent R4.7-billion on skills development for black employees.

The financial sector achieved 76% of the target and 71% of the target for enterprise and supplier development. The sector exceeded its socio-economic development target, achieving 154% of the target.

However, the findings of the Transformation in Banking 2022 Report refuted the “narrative that banks are falling far short of their FSC targets”, saying that with “the right conditions in place and an enabling regulatory framework, banks are capable of playing a … transformative role” in various sectors of the economy.

MANAGEMENT CONTROL IN THE BANKING INDUSTRY

In 2020, black people held 28.4% of voting rights in banks

87% of junior bank managers were black in 2020

41% of bank directors were black in 2020

45% of senior managers were black in 2020

BEE PROCUREMENT AMONG BANKS

82% of goods and services procured by banks in 2020 were from Black Economic Empowerment (BEE) compliant businesses

The procurement from Black Economic Empowerment (BEE) compliant businesses were valued at R136-billion in 2020.

41% of bank directors were black in 2020

Banks provided R270-billion in empowerment financing for black business deals in 2020

FINANCIAL | SECTOR OVERVIEW
Sources: FSCA Financial Sector Outlook Study 2022 | ASISA | BASA Transformation Report 2022 | PwC | Business Tech | Engineering News
22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 37

KUNENE MAKOPO CREATING INSURANCE AWARENESS SINCE 2006

It was in 2006 when three members with broad and diverse skills and competencies came together and started Kunene Makopo Risk Solutions (KMRS). Today, two members, Siyanda Kunene and Dumi Makopo are continuing with their mission to provide comprehensive insurance risk management solutions to their clients and to create insurance awareness in historically disadvantaged communities through KMRS. The company has a unique footing in the market, because of its multiple licenses in Short Term insurance, Long Term insurance and Medical Aid insurance, which allows it to provide a comprehensive service to its clients and partners.

developing products for specific clients. And slowly we then moved into short term where we still had a license by partnering with certain brokerages. But then we decided to stand on our own and found a niche in the guarantee space. So that is how the company got started.

Q: What is your role at the company and what do you enjoy most about what you do?

sector, specifically, what has limited the rise of black management or of people who are previously disadvantaged is that there is not enough skills transfer in those communities when it comes to financial services. So, for this industry to transform, there should be an effort to focus on developing skills and identifying potential in people from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Q: Please provide the background and history of KMRS

Kunene Makopo was first established by Siyanda Kunene and me and we got our FSP license in 2006. We had a third partner who resigned two years after starting the company. From the onset, we had two licenses- short-term and life.

And our focus point, in the beginning, was to start with life where we pursued over-the-shelf products like it normal whole life cover investment products, but then found ourselves dealing mainly with group skins. And that's when we changed our tract to focus on

We have shared responsibilities. The roles I perform are partly a bit of administration and largely working more on business development. What I enjoy is actually seeing the business grow and seeing the staff as the years go past mature and generally become more professional and also seeing growth in their personal lives.

Thank you for participating in the Top Empowerment virtual conference – please share your views on advancing transformation through skills development in South Africa

Skills development is an important pillar of transformation. What I found out last year was that within the insurance

Q: As a 100% black-owned business do you have advice for companies who are on their own journey of diversity and inclusion?

Yes, not only as as a black-owned business, but as a business, you should strive to first have a transformational agenda. Yes, but secondly, do look for skills more than you would want to look for a particular colour or race. Skills must be paramount but always bear in mind that you have an obligation to transform the industry.

Q; What would you say were your greatest challenges over the last 17 years, how did you solve them – and what do you see as the biggest hurdles in the future?

38 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

Insurance is such an intangible product and when you come in as an independent, not flanked by a big brand, it's actually building goodwill in the markets. That's the most challenging part of it. And I'd say to overcome that is to stay consistent, to stay aggressive and to be persistent in the pursuit of new opportunities.

Q: Does KMRS focus on local clientele or do you also have an international portfolio?

We have clients also in other countries. We do some work in Mozambique and we're currently establishing a branch in the U.K. and in the DRC.

Q: How would you describe your leadership style and has it changed over the years?

In the beginning, I was more of a micromanager, but I think where I am now, I try, maybe not as best as I should, to give people space and allow things to happen, but I still think there's still a level of micro-management.

Q: What were your “AHA” moments in the company?

There have been a few of those moments and every time we've overcome a challenge that literally threatened the existence of the business, those have been moments of confirmation that one is just the right space.

Q: What are you looking forward to in 2023?

I would like to see more of our guys growing in their personal lives, buying properties for themselves and seeing their kids through school. I really would like to see them prosper.

Please share a message with our readers

We want to be the company most desired to work for in the insurance space.

We were both working in corporate and then we had the same idea at the same time. We thought, you know, insurance is one space we can make a big difference and have a big impact and grow a sustainable business. And we basically had the same idea at the same time. And so we decided, let's do this and like I said, the advantage of being young then is we did not see how it could fail regardless of what was happening in the macro or microeconomic space.

Looking back now, we are happy with the progress but we believe that we still have so much more to do.

Q: What have been the most interesting changes you have seen in your sector over the last 17 years?

Please take us back to 2006, when you started the company and the importance of the services that your company offers.

Back in 2006, we were both still young, so I think the younger you are, the more you might not know what's going around, but you feel whatever you want to do is possible regardless of what's happening.

The financial industry, especially the insurance industry, is a traditional industry with dominant players. And what has happened over the years is that we have seen a few more new entrants into the markets that consider us as one of them in the booking stage. So, there have been a few others we have come to notice, which is a good thing because it provides more opportunities for the users of the markets, and more variety.

But also what we are noticing is the more we are involved in the industry is the more we engage and understand better the value chains. So the longer that many of them, but you can see it.

KUNENE MAKOPO RISK SOLUTIONS | INTERVIEW 22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 39

But we are also seeing more need and realising more need for some of the value chain of businesses or items within the space which helps improve the quality of service we then provide to clients.

We don't need as much space to store documents because then you're storing them and you're still scanning and storing stuff electronically, but also as a function of better service delivery, technology definitely improves service to clients and it also improves administration and it helps also shorten the time to get things done.

Q: Please share some of your most innovative products and solutions

There’s a product we will be having a big launch on which will be more consumed by the masses as opposed to how we operate currently. We can’t share more about it until the launch but it will benefit many individuals in South Africa and beyond.

Q: What have been some of your most memorable milestones at the company?

cleaning to admin because we couldn’t afford to hire. It’s also a great milestone to watch our staff improve in their personal space because we offer them bursaries if they are studying anything insurance-related.

We try to encourage our staff to better themselves, and we provide them with bursaries each year and a lot of the staff take it up. Their improvement improves our business.

Lastly, the growth in the business itself, we are happy with it in the sense that we've been able to grow in South Africa and expand outside of the country.

Q: How did COVID-19 affect KMRS?

Q: How has technology impacted your business model?

It has had a great impact on our company, without technology, I don't know how we would function, in the sense that servicing clients, you need systems to make sure you are able to administrate, monitor and refer everything.

The first milestone was actually getting the license from the FSCA, which back then was the FSB (Financial Services Board.) That was a bit of a challenge getting it to be licensed to operate but when we got it, it was a great milestone.

But having a license doesn't mean now you have a business. The second milestone is looking at where we are right now, having staff of over 60 people across the country when we started with just the two of us doing everything from

COVID-19 was an interesting time for us as we had to start working remotely. So for us, I think we were fortunate in the sense that we already were working on systems that our staff could log on online, we just had to make sure we provide them with routers for the internet. But they had laptops, they had access points and they had access to systems so we could continue servicing our clients.

In terms of the business itself, most of our clients are commercial clients, businesses, corporates, institutions etc and what we found is that with the uncertainty that COVID-19 came with, no one knew what was going to happen and a lot of people were looking to minimise risk, and with that, it

40 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION
KUNENE MAKOPO RISK SOLUTIONS | INTERVIEW 22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 41

meant that they really wanted to ensure the insurance is in place. So we had growth in that period because a lot of entities wanted to make sure they got proper cover or they wanted to extend their covers and so we had quite a busy time during COVID-19. And also coupled with that, and because it happened during COVID-19 as well, the riots also led to clients, and corporates wanting to make sure they are insured.

So I'd say we were one of the fortunate companies to actually experience growth in the period because the need for insurance for corporates increased.

Q: Please unpack the important role that partnerships play in your business model.

Between us, the founding members of the company, partnerships help in the sense that we both have strengths and weaknesses. So there are things that one is able to do that the other probably does not need to do and then can focus on other things. So it helps the company do better and achieve better because you are able to succeed on different playing fields at the same time instead of doing one thing at a time of failing at one thing at a time. When it comes to partnerships in the

industry, they go a long way because once you work well or deliver with certain partners, clients, service providers, there is that confidence in you that enables the ability to do business better.

KUNENE MAKOPO RISK SOLUTIONS | INTERVIEW 42 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

The name “Sakha Isitjhaba” is derived from the Nguni language. It originates from the IsiNdebele language which means “build the nation”. Sakha Isitjhaba Chartered Accountants is made up of professionals who have taken it upon themselves to use their skills ad expertise to deliver essential financial and advisory services needed by SMMEs to contribute meaningfully towards the economy. This is how we build the nation.

Sakha-Isitjhaba Chartered Accountants is a purpose led Chartered Accountants firm that provides essential Compliance (Accounting and Tax) and Business Advisory Services. We focus on serving the needs of small, and medium size businesses. Ours is a call to build a nation using our skills and expertise, one business at a time. We are a digital savy firm that offer solutions for SMME’s growth and sustainability.

For all your Accounting compliance needs

It is imperative for the business to ensure that financial information is recorded timeously and accurately to enable management to measure the business performance and make informed decisions. This information has to be conveyed to different stakeholders of the business, to ensure this capability following services are offered.

We help with compliance

Businesses have to comply with the regulations such as Income Tax Act and also have to contribute their share to the country’s fiscus, therefore tax compliance is essential for every business.

Monthly Payroll Services

We assist with the compilation and the submission of the monthly and yearly PAYE Returns, including generating monthly payslips

VAT Returns Submissions

We compile and submit the vat returns as required by SARS.

Income Tax Submissions

We assist with the estimations of the provisional tax, yearly tax returns compilation, submissions and good standing tax clearance.

Business Advisory

Every business has to have a strategy which underpins its existence and future, we are here to help you with the strategy formulating creating a business model for growth. The following are our business advisory services.

Strategy Formulation & Business Model Design.

Scenarios Analysis, we contribute to the analytical process of selecting the best suitable course of action to achieve the organisation’s vision and objectives.

IFRS and Tax Advice

We provide Technical Tax and International Financial Reporting Standards advise for Small Businesses.

Business Valuations

We assist in determining the value of the business.

Good Governance and Effective Control Environment

We conduct business process design, ensuring that your business activities, policies, procedures and decision comply with the principles of good governance.

CFO Services to Meet Your Business Finance Needs

Contact us to contract a CFO if your answer to the following questions is yes:

• Are you entering a new market or perusing vertical integration?

• Are you pivoting a new business plan and results are uncertain?

• Are you raising outside equity capital?

• Have you acquired an investment and need to manage cash smartly?

• Is your growth limited by cash tied up in inventory or receivables?

• Are you need of debt funding or need to refinance old debt?

• Are you about to merge with another entity or about to acquire another entity?

A part-time CFO will contact you and assist you with your specific business needs.

Company Details

Clearwater Office Park, Building 3 Ground floor, Millenium Road & Christiaan de Wet Rd, 1735

44 Melrose BLVD, Melrose Arch, Johannesburg, South Africa

Kwaggafontein Section A, Mpumalanga

Willowbridge Centre, Cronje Dr Belleville Park, Cape Town, 7530

+27837420568 / +27105937754

connect@sakha-isitjhaba.co.za

www.sakha-isitjhaba.co.za

SAKHA-ISITJHABA | ADVERTORIAL

As the largest non-banking financial services group on the African continent, we believe shared value is demonstrated through non-financial performance activities that play a key role in uplifting the quality of lives of people across the continent. Shared value is achieved through our contribution to the United Nation’s Sustainable Development goals (UN SDGs), economic growth and social investment activities and practices.

Inequality remains pervasive in our country and on this continent. As a group with a significant presence in 33 countries in Africa, we have the opportunity to really make an impact on the lives of millions. We have prioritised seven of the UN SDGs (3,4,8,10,11,13 and 17) and embedded them as part of our organisational objectives at multiple-levels.

Here is an overview of our own empowerment journey and work in progress.

Our internal strides

Our internal journey to transformation has been a long and rigorous one – and we know just how far we still have to go. This is where we currently stand: Of our 20 066 employees in South Africa,

77% are black and 62% female.

We will continue to focus on deliberate transformation, particularly at a senior management and executive level. We are 49% black owned, and 23% black-female owned, far exceeding industry targets. This sets us ahead of the ownership targets for our industry. Last year,

we also became the largest black-owned asset manager in South Africa, via our asset management arm, Sanlam Investments. We want to see both our employee and ownership diversity figures continue to improve, so we place huge emphasis on training and developing our people.

We spent just over R908m on training and development in 2021.

2 000 managers participated in the Group leadership enablement initiative, aimed at empowering leaders to successfully lead and engage high-performing teams in a hybrid work environment.

Impacting our suppliers and enterprises

As a major corporate entity, we are dependent on our supply chain to fulfil our clients’ needs, and we are also deeply aware of the need for a sustainable supply base.

Procurement spend with Blackowned businesses amounted to R5-billion.

Small, medium and micro enterprises (smmes)

Globally, SMMEs are the main drivers of job creation, hence we know that this is where our focus must be placed. At every level of our organisation we are investing heavily in giving SMMEs access to the finance, market and skills they need to thrive.

One of our highlights is our long-running Sanlam Group Enterprise and Supplier Development Programme which has helped create 502 sustainable new jobs, while supporting 2 964 jobs in total, since its inception in 2013.

Our enterprise and supplier development efforts have seen us provide loan funding of R146-million. Additionally, we allocated R13-million for business development support in 2021.

with half of that being awarded to black women-owned enterprises.

As part of our supply chain support our intermediaries and brokers play a key role in sustainability of our business.

44 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 ST EDITION
At Sanlam, our purpose is to empower future generations to be financially confident, secure and prosperous.
In 2021, R5-billion of our procurement was awarded to black owned enterprises,

For this reason, we are supporting 15 financial planning practices and 144 black intermediaries. We have also invested R5.2-million in Black Broker Development support.

Funds such as Sanlam Investments’ Investors’ Legacy Range and the Resilience Fund - which preserved or created desperately needed jobs over the past two years - will be enhanced shortly with further SMME initiatives. As approved recently by our board.

Education

Building a robust economy starts with well-educated children. We consider the foundational work we are doing among young South Africans to be one of the cornerstone pillars of empowerment and transformation.

In 2021, we invested R40-million in educational programmes through the Sanlam Foundation.

We have created 292 jobs in the educational sector through this investment. In addition, 247 schools and 38 269 beneficiaries benefited -

of which 92% were black.

From a business perspective, our long-term sustainability depends on more and more people understanding how to successfully manage their finances in order to become financially resilient

Resilience through financial inclusion

Financial resilience requires a well educated society around risks and solutions as well as access to meet their needs. At Sanlam, we have provided access to 500 000 clients with relevant risk solutions within the emerging markets through our products designed specifically for financial inclusion. As the continent’s largest non-banking financial services group, in many ways our ‘north star’ is financial education.

We also believe in looking for novel approaches to financial education, so have introduced a savings app for young children, called the Sanlam Savings Jar, and commissioned South Africa’s first financial education TV quiz show, the Sanlam

Moola-Money Family Game show, as fresh, modern ways to engage audiences. At Sanlam we remain proud of our contribution to transformation and empowerment to date. However, as a purpose-led group, we know just how much work still needs to be done and remain committed to serving the communities in which we operate.

We have never been more energised by our mission to empower Africans to live with financial confidence.

Reporting period: As at 31 December 2021, unless otherwise stated. The report for 2022 will be available in April 2023.

Sanlam Limited is the Licensed Controlling Company of the Sanlam Limited Insurance Group

22 ST EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 45
We have never been more energised by our mission to help Africans live with financial confidence.
So financial education continues to be a pivotal focus, with R18.4-million being spent in 2021, reaching 16 776 participants directly and 2 807 379 people through awareness initiatives.

Sanlam's Empowerment & Transformation Journey

Support towards SDG Goals

It is essential that Sanlam is intentional and prioritises SDG’s that provide the biggest opportunity for shared value creation. The Sanlam Group focuses on all the following

with the

work feeding into

and 13

R2.5bn

R908m

Male Spend: R283m

Female Spend: R408m

2 000 managers participated in Group leadership enablement programmes

programmes and Management Development Programmes introduced

1 2 3 4 5 6
Access to financial products:
Economic Development Providing access to 500 000 policyholders through products
specifically for financial
Education Investment in the Blue Ladder Schools (BLS) Programme focusing on maths, literacy, and leadership: R178m Over invested through BLS since 2016 2021 R40m Invested 73 BLS schools supported over five years 3 provinces covered 2021 beneficiaries included: 390 educators and 70 735 learners Procurement Spend with Black -owned businesses Qualifying small enterprises Exempt micro enterprises Spend with Black women-owned businesses Supplier Procurement spend with SMEs Spend with Black-owned SMEs R3.2bn R1.7bn R626m
7
Socio
designed
inclusion
Ownership
SDG 3, 4, 8, 10
Impumelelo Top Empowered Company * Accredited by Topco Media Employees in South Africa 20 066 Black Employees 77% Female Employees 62%
Inclusion
SDG’s,
Foundation’s
People, Diversity and
Black
Black
Transformational leadership programmes introduced Mentorship programmes – 32 mentors trained Digitisation
Sanlam UCT Online High School Scholarship Programme:
Approximately
Black owned Industry target 49% 25% Black-female owned Industry target 23% 10% R5bn
Training and Development Total Spend:
90 students from disadvantaged backgrounds awarded five-year scholarships

Impact of other educational programmes supported by Sanlam Foundation in 2021

292 jobs created 92% black beneficiaries

247 schools beneficiaries

269

37 879 of the beneficiaries were learners Partnerships for Risk and Resilience (P4RR)

Other educational programmes supported by Sanlam Foundation in 2021

88% of them were female beneficiaries

390 educators were supported

54% of the learners who participated were female

264

Special projects

Sanlam Words Open Worlds (WOW) Spelling Festival: 2905 learners from 397 schools participated. 68% of the schools were rural, 57% of the learners were young female learners.

40 educators trained on Covid protocols.

63

275 130 school safety o cers trained with six schools receiving virtual and physical risk assessment training in partnership with the Department of Basic Education (DBE), and the National Disaster Management Centre (NDMC)

municipalities supported through P4RR initiatives R10.2m invested in vulnerable communities through the Emthunzini BBBEE Community Trust R3.7m contributed towards commercial risk reduction in municipalities

leaners reached through the partnership with the National Sea Rescue Institute of South Africa to conduct water wise training for learners

16 776

R18.4m consumer financial education spend

participants reached though the Wage Wise and Money Fo Sho programmes.

22 Grants disbursed from the Small Grants Fund

R13.2m spent on grant contributions and R2.3m in support of socioeconomic development.

Grants totalled R2m and funded grassroots NPOs

9 Bursaries awarded to potential CA’s through Thuthuka Bursary Fund

40 community coaches

Takalani Sesame: 130 episodes in 5 languages, voted the Best Children’s Programme at the 2021 South African Film and Television Awards (SAFTAs).

16 schools in Kroonstad received sports equipment

R9bn invested in various structured finance deals

R5.6bn

invested in various tranches for black-owned property and equity acquisition deals

Black Female Participants based in rural areas Participants were between 18 and 35.

2 807 379 of people reached through CFE awareness initiatives

144 black intermediaries empowered through the BBD programme

8 learners trained through the BBD learnership programme.

R5.2m invested in Black Broker Development (BBD) support

22 ST EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 47
R14.6bn invested in empowerment financing
R13m
38
beneficiaries 8 Empowerment Financing 9 Consumer Financial Education 10 Enterprise and Supplier Development R146m in loan funding towards Enterprise Supplier Development
Enterprise and supplier development grant funding
The
new
2 964 jobs in total since
inception in 2013.
Sanlam Group Enterprise and Supplier Development Programme helped create 502 sustainable
jobs while supporting
its
Supported 26 black owned SME’s and 15 financial planning practices.
Sanlam Limited is the Licensed Controlling Company of the Sanlam Limited Insurance Group Reporting period: As at 31 December 2021, unless otherwise stated. The report for 2022 will be available in April 2023. 97% 72% 45% 57%

SkX is a Level 1 B-BBEE supplier. We are 100% black-owned and 50% womenowned and one of the only professional services firms of our size in South Africa that specialises in the provision of Advisory and Transaction Advisory services. We pride ourselves on applying international best practice to deliver the highest standard of service. Women represent 54% of the firm’s employee count and we take great pride in this.

Sekela

Consulting and Xabiso Chartered

Accountants started in 2004 and 2003 respectively, with similar origins. SkX was created in 2012, bringing together two highly qualified teams of professionals with vast experience and impressive credentials. The combined knowledge and business acumen of SkX directors puts us as a firm in an ideal position to deliver world-class, client-focused business solutions to a growing range of clients in both the private and public sectors.

S k X PROTIVITI BUILDING VALUE THROUGH TAILORED SOLUTIONS

development of our executives and employees to be able to cope with the increasing demands of a client list growing in size and scope.

The long list of high-profile clients which is now housed within SkX is testament to our combined strength, our customerfocused approach and the excellent service which we deliver. We are proud of our work, the talent of our people, the depth of their experience and our ability to respond to our clients’ needs. We further uphold our commitment to add value through enhancing governance, risk management and financial controls for our clients.

Corporate Responsibility:

SkX is committed to the strong ethos of corporate responsibility. Our approach is simple: empowering people by harnessing their potential, providing them with skills and opportunities and improving the quality of life of ordinary citizens from disadvantaged backgrounds. The core elements of our strategy include:

1. Preferential Procurement and Enterprise Development

Having attracted highly skilled and committed professionals from the industry, we achieved steady growth by investing in the training and

We adopt a procurement policy to source most of our goods and services from entities that

demonstrate an unwavering effort to uplift the disadvantaged communities of our society.

2. Employment Equity

We create equal opportunities for all our employees and will accelerate the development, at all levels, of those previously excluded from meaningful employment. This will include targeted development plans and mentorship programmes.

3. Training and Development

As part of our mission to uplift our communities, we provide financial support for learners at secondary and tertiary institutions. We empower historically disadvantaged individuals through a variety of training programmes specific to our profession. These initiatives include:

• Learnerships registered with various industry associations such as SAICA and IIA

• Financial support and mentorship for students completing BCom (Accounting) degrees at university through the South African Institute of Chartered Accountants

Thuthuka Bursary Fund

• Support for social development programmes run by the Association for the Advancement of Black

48 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

Accountants (ABASA) who undertake school visits and presentations to promote our profession

• Support for African Women Chartered Accountants (AWCA) which has established a fund for black women wishing to become chartered accountants

CSI Initiatives:

The SkX Foundation is a non-profit company (NPC) that was founded with the primary objective of assisting the youth of South Africa in addressing some of the gaps that stand in the way of achieving their dreams and ambitions due to being underprivileged in one or more areas of their lives.

The SkX Charity Foundation was formed by the Executive Chairperson of SkX Protiviti, Mr Abel Dlamini. After having encountered various challenges that affect the youth in our society and some of the staff members employed at SkX Protiviti. The Executive Chairperson then set out on a journey to formulate means through which there would be a form of outreach and a helping hand, leading to the formation of this charity foundation.

As SkX, we do these charitable efforts to impact and improve the living and learning standards of scholars from impoverished families. We have been involved in a number of initiatives to support this statement.

Alexandra High School situated in Alexandra township in Gauteng with scholars as beneficiaries and Adams College in KZN, kwaMakhutha also with five beneficiaries. Lastly KwaHluzingqondo High School in KZN, in uMkomaas with ten beneficiaries.

After realising that the mathematics pass rate from rural schools is very low, SkX committed itself by employing full-time mathematics and accounting tutors, who were previously unemployed graduates from the surrounding villages, to assist learners with maths and accounting extra classes.

This initiative is benefiting all learners across the school and is assisting learners to obtain better pass rates. Through this initiative, we are indirectly reducing the unemployment rate.

The added scholar support is building the boys' and girls' toilets and adding the best student awards as a form of motivating the learners and teachers in working towards achieving a 100% pass rate.

The charity foundation continues to grow in leaps and bounds through the unwavering support that emanates annually from the golf fundraising tournament.

Company Details

Head Office - Gauteng Building 1, 15 Forest Road, Waverley Office Park, Bramley 2018, South Africa

Kwazulu Natal Suite 1A, 100 Armstrong Avenue, La Lucia Ridge, Durban 4051, South Africa

To date and mainly through the support borne out of the annual SkX Golf Tournament, we have adopted

Head Office - Gauteng

+27 (011) 797 6800

Kwazulu Natal

+27 (031) 562 1700

info@skx.co.za

www.skx.co.za

SKX PROTIVITI | ADVERTORIAL

BRINGING HOPE TO THE

MARGINALISED GROUPS IN SOUTH AFRICA

Lithemba Investments was conceptualised in the year 2000 by a group of South African Black women with the intention of encouraging the meaningful participation of women in the Black Economic Empowerment legislative.

Lithemba participates in the economy by forming partnerships with established businesses and other empowerment groups. Our investment in companies is accompanied by active participation at both the strategic and operational level. Our investments are currently within the mining and energy sectors.

Activities and operations

Lithemba Investments has secured a presence in the liquid fuels sector. This, combined with the directors’ and shareholders’ knowledge of the business, promises to foster a strong and enduring partnership.

We are formidable players in the coal mining sector having two major investments presently. We are continually striving to be a valuable partner to corporate and government through these ventures. Our company is also a major stakeholder with a valve manufacturing business that supplies ESKOM.

CSI initiatives

At the start of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, there was a lot of change for which the world had not prepared for.

Lithemba Investments identified the need to partner with a local school – Ebenezer Majombozi High School in East London. This, we did by sponsoring enrolment to Google Classroom, the WI-FI connectivity as well as the printing needs of this school for three years to 2023. This enrolment was preceded by training for the teachers and the students on the utilisation of these facilities.

This initiative has become vital in ensuring the competitiveness of these scholars by enabling access to research and easing their application processes for tertiary study.

Changes in the sector in last 5 years

The liquid fuels sector has seen a complete overhaul with most players reverting to importing finished products as opposed to refining crude oil in the country. This is necessary for the effective management of cost and sustainability in the sector.

We are excited about the initiatives to solve the country’s energy crisis by generating electricity through a mix of sources, with renewable energy accounting for a generous portion. Coal will continue to play a significant role in electricity generation as South Africa has the resource in abundance. There is however some scope in using renewable energy to generate electricity. This will go some way towards a future that is free from loadshedding with less environmental impact.

50 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

“WE ARE EXCITED ABOUT THE INITIATIVES TO SOLVE THE COUNTRY’S ENERGY CRISIS BY GENERATING ELECTRICITY THROUGH A MIX OF SOURCES, WITH RENEWABLE ENERGY ACCOUNTING FOR A GENEROUS PORTION. COAL WILL CONTINUE TO PLAY A SIGNIFICANT ROLE IN ELECTRICITY GENERATION AS SOUTH AFRICA HAS THE RESOURCE IN ABUNDANCE.”

Company Details 21 Stewart Drive, Baysville, East London, 5241

+27 (0)43 726 8875

admin@lithembainvestments.co.za

www.lithembainvestments.co.za

LITHEMBA INVESTMENTS | ADVERTORIAL
22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 51

Yard Insurance was acquired by Yard Investments in 2019. Yard Investments is a 100% blackowned investment holding company which was started in 2005 by Leslie Maasdorp and Yogesh Narsing. It has held a number of investments, including Robor, Pangbourne, Prescient, Fujitsu and Sanitech. After a number of years, it exited those investments and in 2018 the company was revived. It has concluded four major transactions to the value of R600-million to date. The management team of Yard Investments have a demonstrable track record of investing and managing assets. Investing in a financial services company is a natural progression. Yard Insurance’s CEO, Farad Kajee, tells us more.

FARAD KAJEE, CEO OF INTERVIEW WITH

YARD INSURANCE

Q: WHAT PRODUCTS AND SERVICES DOES YARD INSURANCE OFFER?

Yard Insurance is a licenced cell captive insurance company. It is licenced for all classes of businesses (except for aviation) in the short term/non-life space. It is unlike a direct insurance company as it operates only via cell structures or ring-fenced arrangements. We further develop bespoke solutions for companies that wish to self insure. These solutions enable companies to transfer risk away from their balance sheets thus freeing up capital. In addition, we provide solutions for affinity groups. Our strategy is to work with underwriting managers, corporates, affinity groups and any developers of insurance products.

from our business partners to the reinsurance companies that support us. Both benefit from a scorecard perspective and in terms of socio-economic development. In partnering with us our clients are making a difference to the insurance landscape.

Q: YOU HAVE SPENT 20 YEARS IN THE FINANCIAL SERVICES SECTOR –WHAT HAVE BEEN SOME OF THE MOST SIGNIFICANT CHANGES OVER THE LAST TWO DECADES?

Q: HOW DOES BEING BEE

LEVEL 1 BENEFIT YOUR CLIENTS?

Our entry into the cell captive space achieves a number of objectives. The barriers to entry in insurance are high as it is a regulated industry. Our role is to enable new participants, acting almost as an incubator for newer entrants. Being Level 1 benefits our stakeholders -

South Africa probably has one of the most well regulated financial services sectors in the world, and changes in legislation to protect policyholders are one of the most significant changes. Financial inclusion has always been a priority in our history. With income inequality where it stands, it is critical that the financial services industry changes that dynamic and, to a large extent, it has done that. It has the ability to include a large proportion of the population and allow them to benefit from the products and services on offer. The insurance industry accounts for 18% of the financial sector due to high penetration and density of insurance products.

52 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 ST EDITION
FARAD KAJEE Chief Executive Officer of Yard Insurance

Q: HOW DO YOU ENSURE THAT YARD INSURANCE MAINTAINS ITS LEVEL 1 STATUS?

Our focus as a 100% black-owned company is to provide innovative and world class solutions to our client base. As a meritocracy we attract the necessary talent. We do not believe that there is a “lack of skills”, rather a lack of opportunity. A natural outcome of our operating model ensures that our status remains. If a company is demographically representative, all facets of the business will meet the requirements of any scorecard.

Q: WHAT HAVE BEEN SOME OF YOUR GREATEST CHALLENGES AS CEO AND HOW DID YOU SOLVE THEM?

The CEO of a regulated entity is always under pressure in terms of regulation. A startup in a very competitive environment requires balancing costs and revenue optimally. In a market like South Africa issues such as size of balance sheet, ratings, reputation and, most importantly, having a team the market believes in is critical and our greatest challenge thus far. Our approach has been iterative. We have chosen to build organically with a strong focus on operational excellence. Most startups are truly tested once the first ‘product’ is sold. A large part of our time has been spent on developing a seamless operation.

Q: WHAT EXCITES YOU ABOUT WHAT YOU DO?

When you start a company like ours, you do so with the idea that you want to make a difference. This is paramount. We are a company that deals with different ideas and people on a daily basis. We are regularly surprised by all the fantastic ideas that walk though our door. It excites me to create a culture that allows a business to be agile and flexible so that it can respond to changes in the market. We are making a difference. Companies want to deal with us.

Q: DO YOU HAVE ANY ADVICE FOR COMPANIES LOOKING TO IMPROVE THEIR BEE STATUS?

At a fundamental level if a company wishes to tick a box on a scorecard it will struggle. The workforce of a successful company reflects the demographics of the market it services. Empowerment is necessary to create a vibrant, dynamic, sustainable and competitive environment. More participants are needed to grow any economy. Competition is necessary and South Africa is

typified by monopolies, so encouraging new entrants is critical. Empowerment should not be considered a threat in any way whatsoever. Rather we should paint a picture of what this economy should look like over the next decade and then plan accordingly. Empowerment is in that picture.

Q: PLEASE SHARE YOUR EXCITING PLANS FOR 2023.

Our company has started from a zero base. We have spent the last 3 years solidifying our base, operations, processes, people. As with all companies achieving financial targets is key. Further to that, whilst almost all of us are dealing with an energy crisis, it is obvious that there are many new opportunities. The South African economy is at an inflection point. Climate change, sustainable energy, the electricity crisis and changing demographics all provide opportunities. Some may say I am naïve - I say I am a South African. Let’s fix this, and move on.

Q: DO YOU HAVE A MESSAGE FOR OUR READERSHIP?

Whether you are a corporate, ex-corporate (with scars), a startup or just someone thinking of doing something, we must impact the societies we service. As a ‘startup democracy’ with millions of untapped customers we must make a difference. We are all emerging from a horrendous past, a somewhat unfathomable current political climate but we all have the ability to create a future that makes sense only if we apply ourselves. Breaking from the past is key and including all in this new picture is vital.

22 ST EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 53
YARD INSURANCE | INTERVIEW Company Details One on Ninth Cnr 9TH Street & Glenhove Road, Houghton Estate 2198 (011) 749 3130 info@yardinsurance.co.za www.yardinsurance.co.za

GrindstoneX

NASPERS LABS PARTNERS WITH GRINDSTONE ACCELERATOR

The Problem

Did you know that the World Health Organisation recommends that there should be 1 doctor per 1 000 people? Africa has 24% of the world’s burden of disease but only 3% of the world’s healthcare workers (Eichbaum et al, 2015) and a doctor to population ratio of 0.2 physicians per 1 000 people (Worldbank, 2017). Poor patient outcomes are also prevalent. These outcomes are directly affected by the number of doctors available, a patient’s ability to access healthcare, and the current quality of undergraduate and postgraduate training. Additionally, there are plans to build over 100 new medical schools on the continent (Eichbaum et al, 2015). What if it is possible to use evidence-based learning strategies to improve the quality of training of our current doctors and quantity of doctors trained on the continent?

Our solution

Four Minute Medicine is an online medical education platform that supports blended learning. We help medical schools better train doctors by providing a turnkey solution for medical students’ learning needs during their clinical years of training.

Features:

• Clinical one-page summaries with management and diagnostic decision trees

• Short four-minute instructional videos with interactive elements

• Short courses (1-10 hours) that can be completed in one or multiple sittings

• The 4MM platform which hosts the content and tracks learning with gamification elements

Value proposition

For medical schools, we provide a turnkey solution for their online clinical training needs without each being required to make expensive and duplicative multimedia training resources. For medical students, we provide high quality multimedia clinical content delivered in small digestible chunks so that students can get further faster with their learning.

Driven by her passion for economic transformation and contributing to a healthy economy that leads to a better life for all, Aasiyah Adams founded Abaguquli4IR in 2020.

Abaguquli4IR, a 100% Level 1 B-BBEE, women-owned business was started after they identified a gap in the market. Digital and technology training gives rise to more diverse access to markets, both locally and internationally. The return on investment of the training offered is that it can reach a broader audience, across the globe, and has a huge all-round impact.

Abaguquli is our giving back non-profit organisation that provides unemployed individuals with skills that create opportunities and revenue.

Abaguquli is a Level 2 B-BBEE, registered public benefit organisation (PBO).

Purpose

Our purpose is to provide trendy, applied technical and digital skills, tips, tools, and knowledge to individuals and business owners to prepare for the fourth industrial revolution and improve their financial status.

Abaguquli4IR strives to be the driving agent for a healthy, growing economy in the future!

Mission

To provide digital and technology skills in all sectors across all industries and professions toimprove lives, and economically transform the economy.

Vision

To make a meaningful difference on content and the rest of the world.

What we offer

For women in business, unemployed graduate students, creatives and artists and kid entrepreneurs:

• Digital Entrepreneurship training and workshops online or hybrid –we provide digital entrepreneurship training, by giving entrepreneurs, digital tools, tips and skills to:

- Digital Business Conferences: We provide expert panel and speakers and 4IR experts to enlighten our guests about the trends and future of technology

• Digital strategies and digital transformation – we advise companies on digital strategies and assist them to migrate for the best solution for their specific business as well as project management service

• Entrepreneurship matchmaking events and conferences – small businesses present themselves to corporates

NASPERS LABS | PROFILE 22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 55

SEPONONO AFRICA

Seponono

Africa was established in August 2016, but has been in operation for 2 years. It started out as a corporate gift company, selling African print head-wraps whilst sharing the story path of innovative empowerment. This was inspired by the journey of the founder, Ms Tebogo Petlele, after resigning from her full-time employment in the medical field and embarking on a self-discovery journey whilst wearing a headwrap daily for a year. The company has since evolved, but the head-wrap remains the company’s signature.

The company has expanded its services into tech and branding specialising in website development branding and corporate gifts. We are a 100% female and youth-owned company. We are a beneficiary of the Academy For Women Entrepreneurs (AWE) South Africa 2022 cohort, the Anglo American-Zimele Enterprise Development Programme 2022 cohort and a top 10 finalist for 2023 in the GrindstoneX programme, in partnership with Naspers Labs.

Services

Corporate Identity:

- Branding & Printing

Websites:

- Premium Website & E-commerce

Corporate Gift

- Customised corporate gifts

PROFILE | NASPERS LABS

Period underwear completely replaces the need to use any other period products, ultimately saving the planet from the burden of millions of single-use products that typically end up in landfills.

At Blushproof, we’re on a mission to change the narrative around menstruation whilst improving lives and reducing waste. Win-win all-round.

Periods

and bladder leaks have been taboo topics in South Africa for years - often not even discussed. It’s time we embrace our natural cycle and empower women with reliable, sustainable products. It’s also time to embrace body positivity.

At Blushproof, our purpose is to empower girls and women, irrespective of their culture or financial standing, to manage menstruation in a comfortable, convenient, sustainable way. Blushproof was founded in 2020 but it took almost a year of researching, learning, sampling, pattern making, prototyping and testing before we were satisfied that we were ready to make our first sale.

Our period underwear is designed and made in South Africa ensuring we have a product that comfortably fits anyone whilst also allowing us to uphold the high standards that our customers have come to know and love. Our high-quality, tech savvy fabrics are moisture-wicking, bacteria-fighting and odourcontrolling, and, of course, leak-preventing!

We’re also passionate about supporting initiatives that reduce period poverty. There are 7 million learners in South Africa between the ages of 13 and 19; 4 million of whom don’t have access to the period products they need every month. Not having the right products on hand means that these teenagers are often forced to miss class, which can affect their chances of finishing school and finding jobs down the line. Through our charity initiative, BlushproofTM donates period packs paid for from the proceeds of our sales. This helps to ensure that tweens and teens in disadvantaged areas are given access to safe and sustainable products that are reliable and long lasting.

About Founder & CEO, Thandi Hartmann

Thandi’s the CEO and Founder of Blushproof. When she started Blushproof she wanted to tackle three things: ensuring the sustainability of a menstrual product, how to help people manage menstruation in a more reliable, comfortable way, and how to help South African students stay in school no matter where they are in their cycle.

After more than 20 years in implementing ERP solutions at large corporations, including companies like Barloworld, Grinaker and Sasol, she decided to take a break to spend time with her young children. Fast forward to 2020, when COVID-19 hit, she came across the amazing idea of period underwear. Buying her first pair, she knew this was something fellow South Africans needed but wouldn’t be affordable at the imported prices. This led to the creation of Blushproof and almost a year spent creating an equal product in terms of quality and functionality but at a far more affordable price.

NASPERS LABS | PROFILE

WISI-Oi stands for Wear It, Sell It, Own It, and is pronounced wee-see-owe-eye. We are a peer-topeer resale marketplace where sellers can sell their new and second-hand clothes and buyers can shop for pre-owned clothes that are in excellent condition.

Who’s it for?

Everyone including independent fashion brands can open an online boutique and start selling their own pre-loved clothes or new/deadstock within minutes.

Our Mission

WISI-Oi aims to reduce the impact of fashion waste by extending the life of a garment and turning your closet into cash.

The Solution

• A seamless platform for reducing fashion waste

• Sellers earn an income

• Easy seller onboarding and safe payment & order deliveries

Extensive Preloved Inventory

Shoppers access their favourite brands at affordable prices & can sell their own clothes

Community Building

Normalising a shared fashion culture and sustainability of fashion by extending the life of a garment.

The Team

• Phumi Körber - Founder

• Campbell Green - Co-Founder & Head of Technology

• Nils Körber - Advisory - Marketplace Advisory

• Marketplaces Executive

Company Details

(+27) (0) 71 555 2563 emailus@wisioi.com www.wisioi.com

Naspers Labs brings together the deep operator and investor knowledge of Naspers and the expertise of trusted and experienced partner organisations to deliver tailored development programmes to graduates wishing to enter the world of work in a digital age. Bridging the gap between training and real economic opportunities. Our entrepreneurship program offers budding youth led micro enterprises with business support needed to become self-sustaining.

Company Details

General enquiries: + 27(0)21 344 1870

Media relations: communications@naspers.com

Investor relations: investorrelations@naspers.com

PROFILE | NASPERS LABS
58 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

ICT SECTOR OVERVIEW MATCHING A SKILL SHORTAGE WITH TRANSFORMATION GOALS

ICT builds local skills for growing demand

The Information, Communication and Technology (ICT) sector is one of the industries facing the most disruption as it adapts to the fourth industrial revolution. With the increased reliance on artificial intelligence and other technologies, this sector is poised to see drastic changes in the next few years as it navigates the demand for new skills among employees.

AN EVOLVING INDUSTRY

There are a number of different definitions as to which sectors fall within ICT. For example, the Independent Communications Authority of South Africa (ICASA) limits its definition to only the telecommunications, postal and broadcasting sub-sectors, while the Media, Information, Communication and Technology (MICT) Seta includes media, information technology, telecommunications and electronics. Statistics SA groups all

communication-related industries with the transport and storage sectors.

Despite this ambiguity, the ICT sector is a key driver of revenue. According to ICASA’s 2022 State of the ICT Sector report, the total sector revenue (telecommunications, broadcasting, and postal services) slightly increased by 0.3% year-on-year to R243.6-billion in 2021. The revenue for the three sectors increased by 4.3% over a seven-year period.

REVENUE GENERATED IN THE ICT SECTOR

Broadcasting services revenue increased by 2.8% to R36-billion in 2021

Postal services revenue increased by 11.1% to R6.6-billion

Telecommunication revenue decreased by 0.5% to R200-billion in 2021

60 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

EMPLOYMENT IN THE ICT SECTOR

According to the MICT Seta the industry is made up of five sectors:

54% of employees work in the information and technology sub-sector

28% working in telecommunications

9% in the electronics sub-sector.

5% work in film and electronic media

EMPLOYMENT IN THE ICT SECTOR

228 990 employees by MICT Seta industries in 2022

43 862 people were employed in telecommunications, broadcasting, and postal services in 2021

For the three sectors, employment decreased by 22.4% in 2021

Over a seven-year period, employment in the three sectors decreased by 4.7%

GENDER EMPOWERMENT IN ICT

51% of those working in the ICT sector are women

maintained a Level 1 B-BBEE status for three consecutive years.

Black top female management increased by 29.7% to 48% in 2021

20% of women in the sector are employed in formal jobs

TRANSFORMATION AMID A SKILL SHORTAGE

The ICT sector is evolving rapidly, and empowerment regulations are not being updated at the same rate, which has led to a mismatch between the ICT sector code’s requirements and the industry’s needs, according to the Sanlam Gauge report.

The sector’s transformation progress does show some positive signs, especially in terms of procurement. The ICT sector is dominated in terms of spend by a small number of large companies. However, many of the larger companies in this sector have made significant strides in transformation – for instance, Vodacom has achieved and

TECHNOLOGICAL DISPLACEMENT’S IMPACT ON GENDER TRANSFORMATION

Studies have found that women are more vulnerable to the threat of technological displacement due to artificial intelligence and automation. Many young, black women comprise the most vulnerable demographic segment of the South African labour force. This is because this demographic is increasingly moving from low-skilled occupations, such as domestic work, to clerical and service-oriented occupations. These fields are highly vulnerable to displacement by machine learning software systems.

Yet the majority of businesses in this sector – more than 95% – are small players who are not required to report their transformation progress, the report found. The ICT sector scored 74.5% of its target for black ownership.

One of the areas in which the sector struggles to achieve transformation is management control. The sector only achieved only 53.9% of its management control target, but progress can be seen in some sub-sectors. In the telecommunications sector, for example, employment of top black management increased by 25.3% year-on-year to 104 in 2021.

In terms of enterprise supplier development, the ICT sector’s score was 61.8%, with 839 companies in the sample. ICT scored 80.5% for skills development, despite facing a significant shortage of talent.

The industry has long struggled with a small local talent pool and a global demand for ICT talent. The sector faces a low number of school leavers who matriculate with sufficiently high mathematics marks to be admitted to tertiary studies in the field of ICT. Initiatives to grow talent are also not producing talent fast enough to meet the needs of the industry.

The 2022 JCSE-IITPSA ICT Skills Survey found that more than half of employers are recruiting overseas –something the report calls a “disturbing trend” in light of South Africa’s high unemployment rate.

ICT | SECTOR OVERVIEW
Sources: Academy of Strategic Management Journal | State of ICT Sector Report March | MICT Seta | JCSE – IITPSA Skills Survey | IT Web | Sanlam Gauge Report
22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 61

NASHUA - SAVING YOU TIME. SAVING YOU MONEY. PUTTING YOU FIRST .

NSolutions partner of choice for businesses and organisations of all sizes throughout southern Africa. Using modern technology, our years of expertise, and a franchise model with an extensive regional footprint, we empower businesses to thrive in a constantly changing world.

Over the years, we have evolved from a leader in office automation into an integrated ICT solutions provider offering voice, energy, connectivity, cloud, currency management and document management solutions, access control, surveillance and more in our portfolio. Serving our clients for 50 years, we have always remained committed to a singular brand promise: Saving You Time. Saving You Money. Putting You First. Nashua is a Reunert company.

1. Nashua was established in 1973 – since then we’ve become a household name and South African brand icon

2. We’re not your typical corporate – we’re about a friendly, positive attitude that welcomes customers to become part of our big, colourful Nashua family

3. Proudly homegrown, we have 42 franchises across southern Africa, with 50 points of presence –we understand the needs of southern African businesses because we are one

4. Our franchises are not branches but small businesses – this adds credibility and trust when working with other small business owners, as we work together for one goal: success!

– from office automation to a leading provider of integrated business solutions that speak to the total workspace

Company Details

Woodmead North Office Park, Maxwell Dr, Woodmead, Johannesburg, 2191 011 232 8000

solutions@nashua.co.za

www.nashua.co.za

Social Media

Nashua

Nashua LTD

@nashualtd

PROFILE | NASHUA
62 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION
www.nashua.co.za

MBULASE GROUP -OFFERING UNIQUE IT ADVISORY SERVICES

Mbulase

Group (Pty) Ltd (“Mbulase”), a Level 1 B-BBEE contributor, was founded in 2013 and is 100% black-owned. It’s an ICT consultancy that specialises in data management services, cloud services, analytics solutions, enterprise architecture and governance, risk & compliance, cyber security, IT-recruitment and software licence management. Mbulase Group employs over 40 staff across South Africa.

With more than 150 years of collective experience, Mbulase has successfully completed numerous technology services contracts, projects and programmes for public sector clients such as the State Information Technology Agency (SOC) Limited, Airports Company of South Africa (SOC) Limited, National Health Laboratories (SOC) Limited and South African Government at national, provincial and local levels and for private sector clients such as Absa Bank Limited, Standard Bank Limited, FirstRand

Mbulase is the sole distributor and consulting partner for the Republic of South Africa and the Southern African Development Community (SADC) region for MEGA International (HOPEX), a global leader in enterprise architecture solutions. MEGA International has been a leader in the Gartner Magic Quadrant for Enterprise Architecture Tools report for the last eleven consecutive years.

WHO WE SERVE

• Commercial Banks

• Tier I, II

• Regional Banks

• Telecommunications

• Networks

• State-Owned Entities (SOEs)

• Government (National, Provincial and Local

Customer Centricity

Our customers’ requirements are our key driver to delivering world class services.

Innovation

We are constantly exploring and reviewing how we approach the markets we serve.

Delivery

Ours is a strong culture of putting solutions to the test and delivering to clients’ expectations with cost, timeline and high quality.

Ethics

We hold in high regard adherence to corporate governance and the rule of law.

OUR SERVICES

We offer a unique consultative IT advisory approach in applications, cloud, and IoT services for the modern data-driven small-

64 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

medium and large-sized businesses delivering enhanced business outcomes. We are dedicated to helping clients achieve their strategic business and transformation objectives, working with strategic partners such as Mega International; VMware; OPSWAT; Immersive Labs, SUSE and other vendors.

• Software defined networking & infrastructure

• Enterprise architecture and governance, risk & compliance

• Core banking capability

• IT resourcing & IT recruitment

• Analytics solutions and capabilities

• Cyber security

COMPANY INFORMATION

Year founded: 2013

Founding members: Palesa Smouse (BCom & MBA) and Nkululeko

Dominique Khumalo (MBA, Barcelona & Exec Program, MIT)

Number of employees: 10

Strategic partnerships: VMware, Mega, Suse, Altron, Dell

Mbulase Group Experience

Some of Mbulase’s recent technology projects experience includes:

MBULASE GROUP | PROFILE
22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 65

PARTHA BASU

Reverside is a global ICT company focusing on Digital Engineering, Integration, Cyber-Security, Cloud and Digital Transformation services with delivery centres in Johannesburg and Cape Town in South Africa, Gurgaon and Kolkata in India. With over 16 years of experience in diverse enterprise scenarios, the company is “equipped with the know-how to solve the complex riddle between the people, process and technology.”

Q: Please give an overview of the history of Reverside?

Reverside was founded by a team of passionate technology professionals who had diverse experience working globally. We quickly became a preferred partner for many enterprises globally because there were not many technology service providers who understood the technology, processes, and cost engineering to fit into the groove of the clients’ requirements.

Q: What services does the company offer?

We offer IT consulting and services with a unique value proposition, focusing on Digital Engineering, Integration, Cyber-Security, Cloud and Digital Transformation.

INTERVIEW WITH

PARTHA BASU , MD OF

REVERSIDE

Q: How do you see your role and responsibilities as MD?

It starts from making sure that the tea/ coffee are served. I ensure that the company meets its required growth, and it is financially stable. I also ensure that the organisation meets all required governance and maintains a good and healthy work culture and environment .

Q: At reverside “you are with good company” – please unpack?

The above phrase has a double meaning: Firstly, for our customers this means that they are in good hands for services we provide. For our employees it means that they are working for a good organisation and secondly, for our customers, partners, and employees, we also indicate that they are with good people “good company” as we maintain a healthy and helpful organisational culture and work ethic.

Q: What courses do you offer at the academy geeks4learning?

We offer niche technical courses that are currently in high demand in the local and global market. The courses are designed to equip the youth of South Africa to easily fit into the market and become employed. We offer multiple courses under four main streams in ICT: software development, software testing, business analysis, systems support and many more customised courses for scarce skills.

Q: Please outline what accreditation the academy provides?

We are an MICT SETA accredited academy, providing NQF level 5 and 6 qualifications. We are accredited with BCS and ISTQB. We have also partnered with the following IT Professional Bodies:

• Microsoft Imagine Academy

• Oracle

• CompTIA

• PearsonVue

Q: What have been some of your major achievements as MD?

The company started with 3 people, and I took it to over 500+ members in 15 years. Developing a well-established financially stable organisation with a good work culture and creating job opportunities.

Q: What is your target market, and why should they do business with you in preference to your competitors?

Large enterprises within the BSFI, telecom, RCG, public sector, healthcare and manufacturing sectors that require Digital Engineering, Integration, Cyber-Security, Cloud and Digital Transformation services.

We have the ability to become a part of a big execution team and manage multi-year initiatives as we have done in the past. With a stress on cost engineering and quality for each solution Reverside builds, the focus has always been on the customer. We always adjust our engagement model as per the customers’ requirements and suitability.

Q: Do you have exciting plans for the future?

We are investing in R&D and training in modern technologies and popular products like AI, robotics, block chain, salesforce and all cloud platforms. We foresee a huge demand in the local market for the above-mentioned technologies.

66 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

REVERSIDE: EQUIPPED TO SOLVE COMPLEX RIDDLES BETWEEN THE PEOPLE, PROCESS AND TECHNOLOGY

Mission:

Solve the lack of global IT skills that businesses need to successfully adapt and grow in a rapidly digitising world and generate youth employment in South Africa.

Vision:

To be the most valued and trusted IT partner for our customers and be the first choice as an employer for all IT career seekers and current Reversidians.

Recent Acquisition

Reverside has acquired 51% of Talos Globalsourcing in India to strengthen the service delivery and also to embark into the international market where in future South African youth can be involved for global service delivery. Currently, Talos Globalsourcing has been renamed as Reverside Global Services.

Selling Proposition:

Our Unique selling proposition is our customised engagement model, cost engineering and technical expertise. Reverside, having experienced many diverse enterprise scenarios since its inception, are equipped with the know-how to solve the complex riddle between the people, process and technology

Innovations:

• Skills Revolution Program

• Geeks4Learning

• Research and Development

Reverside has a big initiative in training unemployed youth and generating employment for the young talents in South Africa.

BEE Achievements:

Reverside is a B-BBEE Level 1 company with a total score of 132.23. (Geeks4Learning goes a step further by assisting other organizations with the Skills Development)

Business & Finance:

Turnover: 250+ million

Financial year-end: 31 March

Subsidiaries: Geeks4Learning, Reverside Consulting and Reverside Global Services

Strategic partnerships:

Reverside works with the World’s Leading Technology and Platform Partners. We value the unique synergy our partners provide. Together, it helps achieve the best value proposition to our customers. It helps us deliver a cost-effective solution which increases productivity and optimises efficiency for our customers.

• AWS

• Oracle

• Forcepoint

• Beyondtrust

• Salesforce

• Dell

• Microsoft

• GlobalSign

• SailPoint

• Maltego

• Alien Vault

• Digital Shadows

• CyberArk

Current customer base: Reverside is trusted by leading brands globally. Reverside’s delivery-oriented approach has ensured that we have become the trusted partner for our Global Customers. Reverside is a customer-centric organisation and continuously aims to improve customer delight. We deliver cost-effective solutions which increase productivity and optimise efficiency for our customers.

To view a list of current major accounts and key clients, go to https://reverside.co/clients/

Company Details

Johannesburg Head Office

Block Tamboti, Hurlingham Office Park, 59 Woodlands Avenue, Hurlingham Ext 5, Sandton, Gauteng, South Africa

Cape Town Office

5th Floor, Boulevard Place, Heron Crescent, Century City, Cape Town, South Africa

India Office

43, Ground Floor, JMD Megapolis, Sector-48, Sohna Road. Gurgaon, Haryana, India

011 998 1960

info@reverside.co.za

reverside.co

Social Media:

@Reverside

Reverside

Reverside1

@reverside_sa

Reverside

REVERSIDE | PROFILE
22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 67

Solutions-driven and constantly working with a strong focus on quality and long-term relationships with is customers and suppliers, Interconnect Systems has grown into one of South Africa’s largest privately owned, black economically empowered network infrastructure providers.

The company prides itself on being a world-class networking infrastructure provider that offers superior services and products to its customers.

CEO, Herman De Vries, shared with Top Empowerment what takes a good company to great heights.

Q: PLEASE GIVE AN OVERVIEW OF THE COMPANY’S HISTORY AND DESCRIBE THE SERVICES OFFERED BY INTERCONNECT SYSTEMS.

Founded in 1986, Interconnect Systems specialises in the supply and installation of structured world-class technological infrastructure solutions.

We are one of South Africa’s largest privately owned, black economically empowered network infrastructure providers, and strive to create an environment that offers

INTERVIEW WITH

HERMAN DE VRIES, CEO

INTERCONNECT SYSTEMS

our customers a well-designed and installed solution as well as a continued long-term business relationship. We consist of 17 branches countrywide with highly trained and experienced team members implementing network infrastructure solutions that improve efficiency and connectivity within businesses irrespective of size or complexity.

We offer solutions for the following:

DATA CENTRES

Cloud computing, virtualisation and mobility have each revolutionised IT and connectivity, creating waves of disruption for data access, security and performance, and driving up data centre costs and risks.

CABLING & CONNECTIVITY

Robust turnkey cabling solutions to help clients reduce disruptions from inefficient, slow network speed by migrating to scalable, flexible cabling solutions that will increase efficiency, and connectivity while reducing costs within your business.

ADVANCED ELECTRICAL SERVICES

With the cost of energy constantly

rising, we can help provide solutions through our vast experience that will save and increase the efficiency of any facility. We also provide alternative energy (especially solar) as well as backup energy solutions.

FACILITIES MONITORING & RESPONSE SOLUTIONS

In today’s environment, building systems that manage energy demand is vital. This is achieved with our solutions that integrate Building Management Systems (BMS) which control and monitor the mechanical components inside a facility, such as ventilation, lighting, security systems and more.

Q: WHAT HAVE BEEN THE MAJOR HIGHLIGHTS FOR YOU AS CEO OF INTERCONNECT SYSTEMS?

The growth and development of our staff from ground level up have been phenomenal. We have given the opportunity to nine individuals of colour to obtain an NQF level 5 qualification in General Business Management. This has bolstered our middle management and senior management ranks in the organisation.

68 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

Q: PLEASE DESCRIBE HOW INTERCONNECT SYSTEMS ENSURE DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION IN THE WORKPLACE.

We are proud to be an organisation that celebrates diversity and to be one that values inclusion. We believe that our strength is found in our diversity. The various ways in which we ensure diversity and inclusion are through our values system, which we refer to as HEART and our talent management strategies. HEART is an acronym for Honesty, Esteem, Accountability, Respect and Teamwork. Our values are the foundation on which we build our organisation. Each of these values touches on inclusivity and the Esteem and Respect value emphasises the celebration of diversity.

We are also fully committed to our EE plan which is supported by our talent management strategies. Our talent management strategies include a leadership development programme, accelerated development programme, coaching and mentorship programme. On our learning and development platform, we also have training modules that speak to diversity management and inclusion.

Q: WHAT ARE SOME OF THE RECENT INNOVATIVE PROJECTS INTERCONNECT SYSTEMS HAS BEEN WORKING ON?

• We designed and built a turnkey Mobile Server Room (MSR) for one of our large corporate mining clients. These units vary in size depending on the client's requirements but are usually 3m x 4m. Dual air conditioning, fire suppression, cabinets, and routing infrastructure are all in place. And as stated can be relocated as the need arises. Built tough for industrial applications.

• We are assisting our corporate clients in the banking sector with fit-for-purpose Inverter Solutions with LithiumIon Batteries to keep their branches active during testing load-shedding outages, some installations include Solar Panels. During these conversions, lighting in the branches is upgraded to LED lighting, much more energy efficient and cost-saving. This is a national roll-out.

• We have been very innovative in the Data Centre Environment, with a Special Cabinet Design for Optimal Airflow and Cooling of various servers,

switches, and storage devices. Our Enterprise DC Rack is one of a kind in the world! ICS has been appointed on 2 large DC Projects as White Space Consultants, part of the Professional Design Team.

Q: WHAT EXCITING PLANS DO YOU HAVE FOR THE COMING YEAR?

In an everchanging economy and South African landscape, we are excited about the opportunities to facilitate the growth of our clients, as well as making an impact to the greater community by being part of the rebuild and improvement of national infrastructure.

INTERCONNECT SYSTEMS | INTERVIEW Company Details 344 Surrey Avenue, Ferndale, Randburg, 2194 011 521 2300 info@interconnect.co.za www.interconnect.co.za Social Media: @Interconnect 22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 69

Company Details

Address:

Block B, Ground Floor

Sweet Thorn On Beyers Office Park

61 Bosbok Road, Randpark Ridge.

Tel: 010 900 4324

Email: info@tendaiict.com

Website: www.tedaiict.com

TENDAI ICT: TURNING ON AFRICA’S TECHNOLOGY

Founded in 2014 by Andrew Maringa, Venture Capitalist, award-winning entrepreneur, amateur golfer, Chairman of MRN Investment Group, Founder & CEO of Andrew Maringa Foundation, Tendai ICT has gained a reputation as a leading provider of technology solutions for companies across South Africa. A business cannot make a stand without a collaborative environment. Tendai ICT is empowered by Afrocentric Group and Black Umbrellas – a partner entity of the President Cyril Ramaphosa Foundation.

Andrew`s specialties are shared value (purpose beyond profits), IoT, blockchain, IoT security, design thinking, robotics, ai, big data, project management, social innovation, creative problem solving, IT management and strategy.

“Black Umbrella’s programme has helped to shape me into a better entrepreneur. It instilled patience and direction to have an understanding that business takes time to grow. You can’t get everything you need in one go; you need to work hard for it,” he says.

After being shortlisted in 2021 for the National Enterprise Development Awards for Excellence categories, Tendai ICT has been chosen as an

overall winner of the Most Resilient Business and the People’s Choice awards. Tendai ICT also came in second for the Most Jobs Created in a Pandemic Award . Tendai ICT has also been awarded an Impumelelo Top Empowered Certified Company for the year 2022.

Andrew shares: “I started running my business on a part-time basis while I was still employed full time, I used to sell hardware and offer IT services to SOHO (Small offices and Home Offices). We did not have any retainer contracts with them, it was only on request when they needed our services. My outcome-creating stance grew when I was bitten by the entrepreneurship bug and decided to resign from my employment and start working on my vision of turning on Africa’s technology and launching Tendai ICT.”

His mission was to take ICT technology to underprivileged people of Africa and create employment.

This was motivated by his previous disadvantaged experience, as he grew up in Limpopo (Giyani and Venda) and was never exposed to technology. The first time Andrew had an encounter with a computer was after his high school in tertiary when he enrolled to study Information

ANDREW MARINGA MANAGING DIRECTOR
NON-EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF POWER MATLA LOGISTICS
NON-EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF WABTEC SOUTH AFRICA
70 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION
“I owe this success to our employees who believe in me, and my wife who continues to play a critical technical role within the company. You don’t exist in isolation. You need to make sure you’re surrounded by people who support your vision,”

Technology. He said he knew nothing about computers but, as he learned more, he fell in love with them. “For as long as I can remember, I have always wanted to start my own business. Although money and success is important, I believe in the purpose of leading enterprises.”

Among the services that Tendai ICT delivers are data communication and networking, IT managed services, fibre optic network solutions, IoT solutions, software and applications development, AI, data centres and facilities integrated ecosystems.

“I owe this success to our employees who believe in me, and my wife who continues to play a critical technical role within the company. You don’t exist in isolation. You need to make sure you’re surrounded by people who support your vision,” says Andrew.

Andrew’s goal for the future is to help solve unemployment in the country. “My biggest goal is to help solve unemployment, not just in South Africa, but globally. I truly believe that entrepreneurship is the solution to many of Africa’s unemployment issues.”

A 100% owned and managed BEE company, Tendai ICT holds the vision of taking ICT to the underprivileged people of Africa.

Andrew has a Diploma in IT, a B.Com Degree in Information and Technology Management and Postgraduate Diploma in Management Practice from Henley Business School where he is currently studying towards a Master of Business Administration Degree (MBA).

“If you are working or you are running a business you have to set aside time and money to invest in your continued formal education and skills acquisition.

“We have just recently launched a Network Management Centre (NMC), Security Operation Centre (SOC) and a 4IR Innovation Centre/HUB and Centre for Innovation, Research & Development with the mission of ensuring that the fourth industrial revolution (4IR) does not just benefit a select few, but all of society. The methodology is a human-centric approach that is agile and based on rapid iteration. Our Industrial IoT and Digital Mining department depends on our Innovation, Research & Development Centre,” he said. Tendai ICT SOC is a centralised facility housing the most qualified and certified cybersecurity analysts and engineers tasked with monitoring, analysing, detecting, and responding to all our clients’ cyber threats and risks. It is responsible for maintaining all our clients enhanced security posture in a constantly changing security environment.

Some cyber incidents overwhelm the ability of organisational security

staff. However this can be resolved by outsourcing services to Tendai ICT which gives all its clients access to the most qualified security professionals. Tendai ICT SOC is capable of dealing with any threat and recommending the best tools and products for preventing breaches.

Tendai ICT Network Operations Centre is a centralised location where our competent and certified staff supervises, monitors, and manages all our clients network. Our network operation personnel ensure that all clients’ networks, databases, devices, external services, and firewalls are up and running 24X7X365. Since networks are expensive to maintain yet necessary for a business to operate, enterprises need to consider a Network Operations Centre.

“I have just recently launched the Andrew Maringa Foundation, a nongovernmental organisationof African origin on the African continent. Our focus area is to provide technology infrastructure, 4IR training and access to connectivity to underprivileged schools. Our commitment is to synergise with underprivileged schools and healthcare facilities to leverage our skill set and the latest technologies to help them build our community and achieve positive results.

“Through MRN Group we have invested in acquiring shares in Wabtec South Africa through the Project Landau B-BBEE deal.”

TENDAI ICT | ADVERTORIAL 22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 71

NovoSense Intelligence is a 100% black owned (49% female + 51% male) and managed technology and innovations company with a clear focus in business software application development spanning all the way from basic stand-alone to integrated solutions. Our application development easily adapts into the Internet of Things (IoT) and Artificial Intelligence (AI). Its founding beliefs are driven by the global fast-paced evolution of Innovation and Technology. Our model is simple, firstly, find out what your customer wants, use your expertise to model a business solution according to the requirements, test the overall solution and test again before deployment.

WHAT WE DO!

Electric Movers

We are in the process of developing low cost movers for local commuting. We strongly believe that this is the answer to our Africa's problems where most people walk long distances to work or to visit relatives...EVERYONE DESERVES

TO BE MOBILE

Internet of Things (IoT)

The partnership we have entered into with ATTACQ is making it easy for us to test our technologies in the retail space. We are confident that the systems we have in place

would work for any type of business that wants to use IoT to enhance their business operations. We use RFID, NFC, wifi, bluetooth beacons and other technologies.

Artificial Intelligence (AI)

We specialise in Cognitive Services and computer vision using the best tools in the market today. There is a lot of data going around in the world today. To make this data useful for your business, it is important that set rules are applied to filter through it to get the meaning. From simple predictive models that tell you if your outlet is not going to meet your targets month-end to more sophisticated models that ensures that you use your fleet in a more productive way, we are your best bet.

Augmented Reality

We design and develop systems that use AR technology to enhance user experience when it comes to in-mall/indoor navigation systems, heritage site information distribution and general brand advertising. We have deployed some of our systems at the Mall of Africa, Midrand.

Virtual Reality

Education is the main beneficiary when it comes to VR. This includes and is not limited to virtual classrooms and laboratories for those schools that do not have physical laboratories for pupils to complete practicals

etc. High-end property sales is also another field we focus on, saving our clients thousands on demo apartments and site travels.

Car-Sharing(GoGo)

Mobility in Africa is a challenge due to financial difficulties experienced by the lower working classes. Minibus taxis come with a lot of safety concerns and comfort issues. More and more people are opting for better, cheaper and convenient means of semiurban and urban transportation. Our solution is both green and custom made for the person on the street who probably will never get to own a vehicle.

Novosense & Bluehopes

Drone Surveillance & Tracking Solution using AI.

Company Details

688 Gallagher Avenue, Gallagher Business Exchange, Halfway House, Midrand

+27 (0) 72 576 2633

info@novosense.africa

www.novosense.africa.com

ADVERTORIAL | NOVOSENSE INTELLIGENCE 72 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

Providing innovative and tailor-made solutions to help clients make informed data-driven decisions

Q: Please describe the services and products offered by Analytics Advertising

Our key services are a combination of Data science, Strategy consulting, Software development and Market research and our products include:

• Jamii Trade Platform – A continental platform created to centralise continental trade and transformation of AfCFTA

• BMS Education – A platform Designed to connect Students , Teachers and Parents to keep track with student work, homework’s, new innovations and student profile in basic learning targeting public schools

• Artise – Actors management platform that allows all actors to get new jobs and castings globally

• Chat2Cars - A Platform designed to be a marketplace for for selling cars, tracking device and communication with car owners via their number plate

Q: Please share the history and background of the company

Analytics Advertising is a Data Technology company and a digital transformation partner for large and emerging enterprises with the aim of providing innovative and tailor-made solutions to help clients make informed data-driven decisions. The business was birthed to solve digital inclusion and digitisation within the 4th Industrial revolution. The heart of the business is mining,

cleaning and analysing data to narrate business performance stories and drive communication direction

The goal is to help digitise and monetise large corporations within Retail, Mining , Manufacturing, Insurance and Banking.

Q: How has your business grown over the last 18 months?

We have been scaling exponentially across the continent and now we exist in 5 countries on the continent outside of South Africa: Botswana, Zimbabwe, Zambia, Rwanda and Kenya

We have also grown outside the continent and have a team in UAE , Estonia and Berlin

We have won 8 awards as a medium enterprise company within the technology space and our CEO became a Top Entrepreneur of the Year 2022 in South Africa and Top Entrepreneur for Brics+ hosted in Russia December 2022

The growth has been clear internally and publicly which opened so many opportunities to work with the largest corporations in the continent

Q: What exciting plans do you have for 2023?

We have now officially Introduced our Parent Company AnalyticsX to the market - 4 different companies will be in operation under AnalyticsX ( SehKohYah, Conte Africa, Analytics Advertising and AX)

We plan to acquire land in the Midrand area that will become a central hub for our companies and emerging entrepreneurs who want to work at a co-working space and connect with other innovators.

We plan to start building AnalyticsX HQ by August 2023.

We are also excited to get AA outside the continent and work with global companies in Europe , UAE and USA.

We have big plans to help innovators through the Mansa Foundation – Our foundation designed to spread knowledge across the continent and help fund innovators.

We are also hosting the CEO Corner Podcast which will help to drive innovation and true knowledge to grow a company.

Q: Do you have an inspirational message for our readers?

You will get challenged as you grow, you get a lot of variables that will come to destroy the growth. Keep the vision and keep walking in the path of greatness.

There are people whose lives and dreams are connected to yours so if you do not work on this, it will sooner or later affect other innovators who would have been able to bring about change.

ANALYTICS
TALIFHANI MAMAFHA, FOUNDER OF INTERVIEW WITH Company Details 44 Richards Dr, Halfway House, Midrand, 1685 South Africa 084 978 3220 mrbanks@anayticsadvert.com www.analyticsadvert.com
ADVERTISING

Aberdare Cables powering communities since 1946

Aberdare Cables is Southern Africa’s largest and leading supplier of intelligent energy interconnection products and services in Africa. Established in 1946, the company offers cable designs, product development, installation support, commissioning and diagnostic testing through their engineering service division. In 2021, Aberdare Cables celebrated its 75th anniversary and since its humble beginnings , the organisation has grown significantly through mergers and acquisitions. In 2016, Aberdare Cables was acquired by Hengtong as a majority shareholder. The Hengtong group operates in 147 countries, with 11 overseas manufacturing bases and owns 7 brands, including Aberdare.

Our Empowerment partner, Golden Consortium Africa (Pty) Ltd, is a 100% women-owned consortium and has a 25.1% shareholding in Aberdare (South African operations). Empowerdex ratings place Aberdare Cables at a Level 1 Broad-based Black Economic Empowerment (BBBEE) company and is 55% black-owned with 30% black-women ownership.

Aberdare Cables has two manufacturing sites based in the Eastern Cape and KwaZulu-Natal. The company’s headquarters are in Meadowdale, Gauteng. The Meadowdale facility serves as a centralised distribution to South Africa to enable reduced lead times.

The company offers cable and cabling solutions to the mining, utility, building, construction, large industry,renewable energy, retail, original-equipment manufacturer, agriculture and transport sectors.

The company has amongst the most highly trained and experienced employees in the industry. As a technology leader, it is driven by cutting-edge Research and Development (R&D), providing worldclass innovative solutions, processes, products and customer service.

The company's 40 000 m² Stanford Road facility in Port Elizabeth was the original Aberdare site and manufactures XLPE medium and high voltage cables, paper insulated lead covered medium voltage

cables, overhead conductors, medium voltage aerial bundled conductor (ABC) and large low voltage PVC mains cables.

The 32 300 m 2 Aberdare

Pietermaritzburg facility manufactures low voltage ABC, Rubber trailing cables and Nitrile welding cables. In addition the PMB facility manufactures low voltage cables compromising wiring cables: Housewire, Surfix, Flat twin and earth cables. The range also includes ArmaDac and AirDac cables as well as the Flamosafe range of PVC and XLPE insulated armoured and unarmoured cables.

The Aberdare Group’s product range and services are wide but specialised. Tried and tested, and carrying the South African Bureau of Standards (SABS) safety and compliance certification marks and complying with International Standards as applicable.

In addition to the organisation's cable portfolio is the long awaited entry of a competitor into the South African high voltage cable market. This strategic

74 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

move in capital investment by the company, enhances its current cable portfolio of low and medium voltage cables, conductors and specialty cables and is ensuring sustainability and an increase in the company’s market presence.

Aberdare has opened the HV cable offering to initially supply the traditionally accepted (CSA) Corrugated Seamless Aluminium Sheathed cable and plans to add alternative designs and improvements to its portfolio. The goal for the HV project is to establish Aberdare Cables as a competent South African high voltage cable manufacturer and solutions provider. To this end, the organisation will manufacture HV

cables and supply HV accessories. The organisation will also commission and maintain HV cables (old and new) and install HV cables and all accessories. In addition, the company will be accepted as a leading expert in HV systems (design of the system, providing add-ons such as DTS, etc.)

As a cable manufacturer for over 76 years, we know that quality and reliability of cable systems and risk mitigation are of primary importance to our customers. For this reason, Aberdare’s plan to enter the HV market was carefully considered, so as to uphold these standards and principals.

At Aberdare, we are people-centric and believe that our people are our greatest

asset. We understand that an engaged workforce delivers on our strategic goals and helps us achieve the impossible. We also understand what motivates our staff and we reciprocate with challenging but rewarding work; a wide range of opportunities for continuous individual learning and growth through robust incentive programmes, including career succession and progression. We know that our duty extends further to the greater population and we take pride in being an active agent of social change and transformation which is evident in our BEE Level 1 rating. Our ongoing socio-economic development initiatives have been commended by the Presidency and we are continuously working hard to make a difference in the communities in which we operate.

ABERDARE CABLES | ADVERTORIAL Company Details 1 Corobrick, Meadowdale, PO Box 1679, Edenvale 011 396 8000 info@aberdare.co.za www.aberdare.co.za Social Media: @aberdare 22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 75

MINING SECTOR OVERVIEW

A GOLDEN OPPORTUNITY TO INCREASE EQUITY Mining sector bolsters job creation

South Africa is home to more than 50 different types of minerals, which are mined through more than 1 700 mining operations. The robust industry is essential for South Africa’s economic performance, contributing close to R220-billion to the GPD in 2021, and job creation, employing more than 480 000 employees.

OVERCOMING NEW CHALLENGES POST-PANDEMIC

South African mining output dropped by as much as 70% at the height of the COVID-19 pandemic, but the industry has been steadily recovering over the last two years.

According to the SA Mine 2022 report by PwC, the industry’s financial performance exceeded expectations

on most fronts: Total revenue for the industry grew by 10% even though production only saw a 5% increase.

As global supply chains attempted to recover from the pandemic, the South African mining industry was offered a growing demand for commodities. This resulted in record prices for platinum group metals, iron ore, and coal. South Africa is home to more than half of the

world’s platinum reserves, which allowed it to capitalise on this demand for platinum group metals.

However, the mining sector still felt the impacts of a sluggish South African economy and disrupted local supply chains that were hampered by the impact of the Russian invasion of Ukraine, COVID-19 lockdowns in China, flooding in KwaZulu-Natal and loadshedding.

76 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

As of November 2022, mining production had decreased by 9% year-on-year, and mining sales had dropped by 15% year-on-year in November 2022, Stats SA reported. However, employment in the sector is increasing. In the last Quarterly Labour Force Survey, employment in the mining and quarrying industry had increased by 1% from the second to the third quarter and saw an almost 4% increase year-on-year.

EMPLOYMENT IN THE

MINING SECTOR

483 000 total employees in September 2022

465 000 total employees in September 2021

EMPLOYMENT GAINS

The mining industry reported a 3.9% year-on-year increase in employment (18 000 employees) in September 2022.

Employment increased by 1% between Q2 and Q3 of 2022 (5 000 employees)

GROSS EARNINGS PAID TO EMPLOYEES

R45.8-billion in September 2022

R 43.5-billion in September 2021

The average monthly earning in the sector was R32 365 in August 2022

MINING EMPLOYMENT BY SECTOR

For every 100 mine workers:

39 are employed in the platinum group metals sector

21 in the coal sector

CREATING EQUAL OPPORTUNITIES

20 in the gold sector

The mining sector has maintained a focus on increasing equity and promoting transformation. According to the Sanlam Gauge report, the sector as a whole achieved a Level 4 B-BBEE recognition. The sector has scored 100% in its targets for black equity ownership and socioeconomic development and boasts almost 85% for enterprise and supplier development. However, there is work that remains to be done in terms of management and control (59%) and skills development (67.5%).

GENDER REPRESENTATION

The number and share of female employees in the mining sector has been growing steadily. It has almost doubled since 2009, when there were 34 433 women employed in the sector. Even at the height of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, the sector hired 957 female employees, raising the total to 62 315. According to the Minerals Council South Africa’s Facts & Figures 2021 report, there were 65 490 posts are filled by women in the mining sector.

The industry has traditionally been male-dominated. Today, around 86% of all jobs are still held by men. The 2018 Mining Charter incldes a target of 10% women representation in top management roles, and while there have been key appointments of women to leadership roles at three JSE-listed mining companies, the advancement of women in the sector will still require considerable work.

Minerals Council president Nolitha Fakude said the Minerals Council and its members have set targets to double the percentage of women in mining by 2025, aiming for 30% to 40% women representation across the industry.

“In the next decade, we are targeting 50% women representation in management. If we, as an industry, intend reaching our targets for women representation in mining, we must act more than we talk, and actively recruit, train and retain women in our businesses, developing clear career paths so that women are fully represented in all layers of our businesses,” said Fakude.

Sources: DMR | Minerals Council | PwC | Stats SA

MINING | SECTOR OVERVIEW
5 in the iron ore sector
FEMALE REPRESENTATION IN THE MINING SECTOR
22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 77
15 across other minerals, lime works and stone quarrying.
Men hold 86% of all jobs
Women hold 14% of all jobs

INTERVIEW WITH

Prince Mashabela, the CEO of Tau Matla, doesn’t think small. When you work in mining, you can’t afford to think small, and you can’t afford to think short-term. Mining also has a direct impact on the communities where the minerals are mined, and it’s no wonder that Prince is able to keep his eye on the bigger picture, while ensuring that the fruits of mining exploration are also used to develop communities.

From strength to strength

Prince has a good story to tell, a story that shows that one can come into the industry and turn a vision into reality. Making it a reality doesn’t come easy but the result is worth the hard work: In December last year, Tau Matla recorded a turnover of R127-million, despite the challenges the mining industry has faced.

“We’re coming to disrupt,” says Prince. “As an entrepreneur, once you know what it’s like to not have any money, to be poor, to not have money in your business, to not have anything to take care of yourself. There’s nothing that can really hurt you. What’s the worst that could ever happen to you? That’s a mindset you need to have.”

78 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

This year Tau Matla is working on a contract for 10 base vessels with a value of over R1-billion. Moving from a small business to one that works across the world is possible, and Prince is proof of this.

“This is working with communities, working with poor people, creating employment. We’re hiring so many people at the moment. You know, it feels great to employ people. We employ people globally at the moment. We’re employing people in South Africa. We employ people in Dubai, and people in Hong Kong, China. That’s extremely great for us, and we’re supplying some of the largest plants in the Middle East, which is quite incredible.”

Going beyond our borders

Prince has spotted a gap in the market: exports. This is why they have trade desks in Hong Kong and Dubai. “We’re investing in our global markets and our global mindset, and that’s what we’re addressing.”

“Sustainability goes in the form of owning assets that can be mineable for the next 30 to 40 to 50 years,” says Prince. He explains that mining is a generational business, one that can be passed on because mining takes place over a long period of time.

“You want to be sustainable by getting export contracts. That’s what makes you sustainable.”

“You’ve got to reach more clients internationally,” he says, highlighting that the focus on the local market can limit growth for smaller players.

“If you had an export contract, the amount of money you were losing in loadshedding on the rand, you would make up in foreign currency.”

Taking others with

“Business is about fighting, about being a lion.”

Tau means ‘lion’ in the Sepedi. Matla means ‘strength’. His two sons are named Tau and Matla, and the name exemplifies his business philosophy. Breaking down barriers and being a disruptor can also mean you’re using that strength and power to empower others.

“We’re working with these communities to uplift them,” explains Prince. “For us, it’s how can we take as many people as we can with us? That’s my focus as CEO.”

Prince wants to ensure that the communities they’re going into get something out of the assets which they live on. Educating them about the value of minerals, how they can be leveraged and used to develop communities, is key to making operations sustainable.

“Our mindset is to educate people on the importance of finding partnerships and working with people that are like-minded, people that want to invest back in communities.”

It’s not enough to make a promise to people that mining will bring development and then not deliver.

“We want our kids growing and understanding what they own,” he says. “Our parents made that mistake because our parents wanted us to survive.”

“We’re not coming into the mining sector just to live and be luxurious.” “What drives us? We’re a group of

guys who have grown - yes, with privilege, you could say. But we didn’t let that deter us. We’re not going to get caught up in the same system. We want to get out of that system.”

TAU MATLA | INTERVIEW

Purpleglaze 3 (Pty) Ltd is a proudly South African company with a national and international footprint. We are a leading dust management and solutions company with a focus on road construction, road maintenance,dust suppression, plant hire, and mining-related services. Purpleglaze 3 is a 100% black-owned enterprise with 20% black woman ownership.The company was registered in 2009 and has grown in stature over the years offering services to numerous mining houses and the public sector.

PURPL3 IT’S NOT PURPLE… IT’S GREEN

DUST CONTROL SOLUTIONS

Purpleglaze 3 delivers a wide range of dust suppression products for permanent and temporary mine haulage roads, public and municipal gravel roads, and tailings facilities. We also design, build and install several innovative misting technologies for plant areas and stockpiling points. We offer a total dust managing solution to our clients, from dust monitoring and reporting to road dust management and services.

Our products are all 100% biodegradable and originate from a process that produces organic materials, therefore it has no negative impact on the environment. Our products are designed, developed, manufactured, supplied, and applied according to controls established by a quality management system that meets the requirements of ISO 9001: 2015, which has been independently certified by DEKRA Certification under certificate number: 91019748.

MINING SOLUTIONS

We offer a wide range of mining products, solutions, and services. We strive to provide the best solution based on customers' requirements within the blasting sector as well as load and haul activities.

PURPL3 CARES Enterprise and Supplier Development

We are currently supporting a large

number of local transport operators through contracts to transport our personnel. We launched a similar initiative with SMME’s which are based in our local communities.

Skills Development

Purpleglaze 3 believes in skills development, especially for the less privileged, financially strained, and disabled individuals, to further their careers. We invested in bursaries for 350 students between 2014 to 2017. We are constantly running numerous learnership programmes to provide youth with the necessary skills to better their future. We currently run 15 active leadership programmes. It is our mission to spend on skills development to uplift our employees.

In 2021 Purpleglaze 3 started participating in the Youth Employment Service (YES) programme. The programme is a joint venture between the private sector and government and signifies huge progress towards assisting South Africa’s youth, and more specifically the youth in our region, to gain work experience through employment placement.

We are absorbing at least 1% per year within the organisation. In 2022, the company started a recurring programme for the youth.

80 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

OTIC PROJECTS - ENGINEERING THE FUTURE

OTIC PROJECTS (PTY) LTD is a 100% Mofokeng woman-owned company, with a keen interest in the provision of specialised products and services to the mining industry. We are 100% rural based, in Chaneng Village, which is a mining community adjacent to RBPLAT, Impala Platinum & GlencoreBoshoek Smelters operations.

We are a level 1 B-BBEE contributor.

The founder, sole shareholder and Managing Director, Ms Prudi Rapoo, is an astute Attorney, with more than 15 years’ legal experience. She's a strategist with an unmatched entrepreneurial spirit and the attitude of an achiever. She got exposed to the mining industry during her employment with the Department of Rural Development & Land Reform, Bakwena Ba Mogopa & Bakgatla Ba Kgafela Traditional Administrations in her capacities as the Head of Land & Legal Services, respectively.

OTIC Projects services

Engineering

• Fabrication, repairs, modification

• and installation of steel structures

• Welding of various material,

• including aluminium, cast iron and steel

• Plant maintenance

Mining

• Mining Constructions

• Standard new installations

• Maintenance & Repairs

• General Inspections and Diagnosis

Refrigeration & Air Conditioning

• Supplies of quality products

• Standard new installations

• Maintenance & Repairs

• General inspections and Diagnosis

Mining Supplies

• Medical equipment

• Electrical components

• Bulk Ore Handling Wear-Parts

• Crusher wear parts

• Mill Liners

• Conveyor belt/Components

OTIC PROJECTS | ADVERTORIAL Company Details P.O Box 74, Chaneng, 0310 082 338 9360 info@oticprojects.com www.oticprojects.com

uncertainty, South Africa’s immense natural resources, coupled with current macro factors, provide ample opportunity for the country to further enhance its position on the global mining stage.

One fundamental aspect hampering this progress is the lack of industry skills – skills that will be required to meet the ongoing technological and leadership demands of a green and digitallydriven economy. Access and supply chain visibility still remain essential when it comes to growing local small, medium and micro enterprises (SMMEs), as do the stipulations of the Mining Charter III and related legislation, which aim to promote job creation and empower the historically disadvantaged. Here’s how we can get it right…

ENGAGEMENT AND HANDS-ON COLLABORATION

When selecting SMMEs to collaborate with, it is critical that mining companies engage with a view to establish whether businesses effectively align with their goals, values and ethics. Further to this, these SMMEs should be viewed as more than just vendors, they are, in fact, partners in success. As part of Ukwazi’s transformation journey, focus has been placed on engaging

with SMME and/or black junior mining companies and participating with them in projects and tenders; enabling them to become established and trusted suppliers to the industry. Ukwazi has, since 2019, established a black women in mining initiative comprising the company’s own black female mining engineers. The objective has been to create a black female mining contractor business, focused on load & haul, rehab and mining for closure.

INCUBATION AND TRAINING

Ukwazi has used various enterprise incubation techniques to allow the SMMEs it has worked with to grow and mature as they navigate going up the value and maturation curves of business evolution. These involve assisting SMMEs with opportunity recognition, conducting technical due diligence and project valuation, and helping these businesses apply for mining equipment and negotiate with original equipment manufacturers (OEMs). It is also critical to guide SMMEs on how to submit tenders, proposals and bids to provide technical and other services to mining companies.

Of course, on-the-ground knowledge sharing and skills transfer are non-negotiables. Doing this in an academic setting also helps lay the foundation for adequately equipping

young, sector professionals of the future. Various members of the Ukwazi team have participated in the Exxaro SMME training course offered by the Gordon Institute of Business Science (GIBS), lecturing SMMEs on mining and contract law.

IMPACT OVER QUANTITY

The reality is, many SMMEs are startups and have little to no mining experience. Despite this, you have to start somewhere. Not all SMMEs can be assisted, but emphasis can be placed on trying to make an impact over a longer period of engagement rather than just focusing on quantity over quality. The ultimate aim of our SMME programme is a transformation dividend – capacitating SMMEs to go up the maturation curve from micro to small, from small to medium and from medium to becoming fully fledged sustainable businesses. n

we do mining

Company Details

Address:

Level 4, 3rd Floor, The Gate Centurion 146 Akkerboom St, Zwartkop, Centurion

Tel: 012 665 2154

Email: info@ukwazi.com

Website: www.ukwazi.com

ADVERTORIAL | UKWAZI 82 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

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84 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

“If you’re not having conversations as a marketer around growing your business, then you shouldn’t have any seat at the table,” says Nedbank’s Group Executive for Marketing and Corporate Affairs, Khensani Nobanda. For a recognisable brand such as Nedbank, creating awareness, and building an emotional connection is not the aim - they’ve got that already. “We actually need our sponsorship properties to drive volume sales.”

When Khensani started at Nedbank, she had to build a case for a digital marketing strategy that involved a bigger budget. She understood that in order to make a compelling case she had to go in having a firm grasp of what digital marketing actually is.

Learning is key to what has made Nedbank’s marketing strategies so effective. Khensani cites the example of the bank’s foray into the metaverse: In order for Nedbank to maximise the opportunity, they need to learn more about it - which involves taking a risk and accepting there

might not be any immediate return on investment. The point is to ‘play’, and the age of digital marketing means that you can gather more data than with traditional marketing.

In the latest Business Unusual Podcast, Khensani is in conversation with Topco Media’s CEO, Ralf Fletcher. Starting with her own fascinating journey, Khensani takes us through the thinking of one of the country’s leading marketing professionals. Ever wondered what the thinking behind what Nedbank sponsors? How can “playing” lead to a return on investment? Why is output more important than input? Khensani and Ralf discuss all this and more.

10 KEY TAKEAWAYS LISTEN OUT FOR IN THIS PODCAST

1. Digital marketing gives you more information on consumer behaviour than traditional marketing ever could

2. “Unless we play in it, we’re never going to learn”

3. Recognisable brands already have the emotional connection - growth is the target

4. Sponsorships can help change perceptions about your brand

5. You need to ask yourself: “What do I want this sponsorship for?”

6. “If you don’t know the brand itself, how are you going to judge creative work?”

7. South African business leaders understand macro issues more than many leaders around the world

8. Hard work means nothing without the output to match

9. The first thing you should look for when hiring is curiosity

10. What you learn in one context can be applied in others

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BEE, JOB CREATION, AND THE PUSH-PULL EFFECT OF PROCUREMENT

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Despite many plans and interventions by government, unemployment continues to rear its ugly head; this is evident by the Quarter 3, of Quarterly Labor Force Survey (QLFS) results of 29 November 2022 citing a 32.9% unemployment rate which is a slight improvement from Q2. The National Development Plan 2030 target is 11 million new jobs by 2030. In real terms employment is increasing at a rate of 31 000 new jobs in the past year, as opposed to the 1.6 million per year needed to meet the NDP targets. This unemployment is not helped by the fact that since 2015, the GDP per capita has been at a negative, according to the macro-economic indicators. This means that the economic growth is slower than population growth.

However, we cannot ignore the fact that the B-BBEE provides a good tool for inclusive economic growth, particularly the Enterprise and Supplier Development element which includes Preferential Procurement, Enterprise Development and Supplier Development.

The Preferential Procurement element makes available, in generic scorecard, a total of 7 points for buying from SMMEs, an additional 11 points for buying from companies who have a minimum of 51% black ownership, 4 points for companies that have at least 30% black women ownership, and an additional 2 points for companies owned by black designated groups i.e., military veterans, women, youth, people with disability and based in underdeveloped areas. When companies spend on goods and services, they receive points based on which company they have selected and the credentials they possess.

Small Medium Micro Enterprises (SMMEs) are seen as the bastion of hope for job creation, however, they bear the brunt of the regulatory framework as they are expected to perform at the same level as large corporations with resources. The burden of compliance, loadshedding, overheads, and other structural factors, continue to result in myriads of statistics in South Africa indicating 70% of small business fail within the first 2 years of operation. It is extremely difficult to see where the 11 million jobs will come from.

According to SEDA SMME Quarterly report 2021 Q3, there are just over 2.4 million SMMEs operating in South Africa of which 68% are in the informal sector. The 2.4 million SMMEs account for just under 10 million of employment and have unfortunately been the highest shedder of jobs, over 300 000, in that period. While we struggle with SMMEs not employing enough, we are also faced with the reality that “South Africa also has a concentration of power sitting in only a few employers (mostly government and large corporates), leading to 56% of jobs coming from only 1 000 employers - and these jobs are growing at a faster rate than what SMMEs are creating,”- Sonqoba Vuma, 2019. At the rate we are going, South Africa will not reach its targeted NDP job creation targets.

Enterprise Development (ED) awards 5 points for supporting 51% or more black-owned SMMEs that you do business with. This support is targeted at a % of Net Profit After Tax (NPAT), and ED is for generic codes, generally set at a target of 1% NPAT to obtain the 5 points. This mean that if the value of support towards ED qualifying SMMEs is equal to 1% NPAT, you will receive 5 points. This form of support or development must lead to sustainability, towards operational and or financial independence. Developing an SMME means that you may procure goods and services from them – and graduating the Enterprise Development beneficiaries into fully fledged suppliers also yields bonus points.

Supplier Development is intended to support the “at least 51% black owned SMMEs” that are your suppliers in order to improve their delivery. This will help with reducing supply risk and ensure quality of supply. Supplier Development has 10 points available for reaching 2% NPAT, in terms of support towards qualifying SMMEs. Both Enterprise Development and Supplier Development also provide a bonus point if jobs were created because of the support provided. So, B-BBEE provides sufficient incentives to score points, while creating an inclusive economy.

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Among many other benefits, B-BBEE through ESD, provides a plethora of opportunities for the small businesses and the economy; these include:

• Driving investment in enterprise and supplier development

• Encouraging SMME funding

• Commercialisation of products

• Providing access to market

• Rewarding job creation

• Providing competitive advantage

• A business case for economic growth

The growth in numbers of SMMEs will result in a commensurate growth in the market as the need for products and services increases. If we want to grow the economy, we need to put more effort in the growth and sustainability of SMMEs.

In the past 12 months, I have worked with 44 SMMEs, analysing their operations, needs and working on interventions for sustainable operational and financial independence. In the process, I noticed 3 out of many areas that required attention if we are to win with employment creation by SMMEs:

• Cash flow challenges

• Navigating red tape

• Austerity vs productive fiscal spending

CASH FLOW

The life blood of a business is the availability of cash to meet its current obligation - the difference between what comes in vs what is spent to deliver goods and services. One of the most difficult challenges that SMMEs face is late payments from clients, both government and private companies, particularly large organisations. SMMEs struggle to obtain cheaper credit and would generally

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sit on accounts receivable of over 120 days from their regular customers who have it as their policy to pay in 60 to 90 days, thereby making an SMME carry their trade credit. Since the SMME does not have money to carry stock or deliver services while waiting for payment, they will resort to trade finance, overdraft or PO financing which comes at a higher cost and eats at their margins. One of the ways to manage this cash flow challenge, would be to legislate payment terms for SMMEs, limiting them to no more than 30 days failing which, a levy must be imposed. This, I believe will go a long way in ensuring the survival and growth of this sector.

RED TAPE, DUE DILIGENCE

A s indicated earlier, red tape or complex regulatory and compliance framework compels compliance from both big business and SMMEs. This means much-needed resources are channeled in this direction. If one thought registering a company was difficult, one must look at obtaining finance to implement a purchase order, or to run a business with orders already in place. The hoops that an SMME must jump through can be daunting and even lead to losing a contract due to the length of time it takes to obtain approval together with the list of documents required. There are many unnecessary rules, procedures and regulations, formal systems and centralised decision making that result in inefficient, and unjustifiable delays, all of which lead to a small business losing opportunities and its ultimate demise.

AUSTERITY VS. PRODUCTIVE FISCAL SPENDING,

In the 2020 budget speech, the Finance Minister referred to a R48-billion saving that would go back to the taxpayers’ pocket in 3 years. Much as this is a welcome budget policy direction and an effort to please businesses, I would imagine that an option of fiscal stimulus, instead of austerity measures, would have been more welcome, particularly given the COVID-19 pressure on economic growth. According to Schröder, E. and Storm, S., the option of multipliers would have yielded better economic results if channeled in a productivist approach; this was based on the deduction that R1-billion extra spending would have generated R1.68-billion extra income with the ability to yield 6 900 jobs. The R48- billion would therefore have resulted in an estimated 330 000 much needed jobs.

Let me conclude by asserting that the revised Procurement Regulations introduced by the Finance Minister, Enoch Godongwana, in November 2022 is a much-needed breather, only if properly implemented to target the said specific goals. These specific goals may among others include targeted spend by government entities towards SMMEs, Black woman-owned businesses, black-owned business and black designated groups so as to achieve inclusive economic growth. These Regulations, I believe can be used to address the unemployment challenges that we face through the targeted spending towards the historically excluded groups, and targeted spending towards SMMEs. I would also include the already proposed policy on early payments of SMMEs to ensure quicker money flows in the economy and increased ability to spend on the delivery of goods and services resulting in a ripple effect.

The reduction of red tape and improving efficiencies in Developmental Funding Institute targeting SMMEs will go a long way in reducing SMME failure rate, especially when companies are already in possession of contracts to deliver and remain in business. Production based, SMME targeted spending, Preferential Procurement, and productive fiscal spending, coupled with effective Enterprise and Supplier Development activities that ensures improved capacity to deliver for SMMEs, will help channel more money towards the creation of much needed jobs in this country.

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“The revised Procurement Regulations introduced by the Finance Minister, Enoch Godongwana, in November 2022 is a much-needed breather, only if properly implemented to target the said specific goals”

TREASURY TABLES NEW RULES

New regulations to give departments more discretion in procurement

Treasury has announced new regulations around procurement, which will come into effect in January. The updated regulations are still focused on Black Economic Empowerment (BEE) criteria in public procurement, Finance Minister Enoch Godongwana has stressed, but they also provide for more department discretion in tendering. The regulations will act as a placeholder until the adoption of new legislation around procurement.

REVIEWING THE REGULATIONS

Minister Godongwana said the new regulations allow government departments and state-owned enterprises to determine their own preferential procurement policies.

The change in regulations came after a Constitutional Court ruling. The ruling looked at changes made in 2017 to the Act, originally passed in 2000. The 2017 overhaul of the regulations saw two key changes. The first stipulated that companies awarded tenders above R30-million were obliged to sub-contract 30% of the contract value to benefit the previously disadvantaged, women, youth and the disabled. Secondly, the changes required state entities to procure from local suppliers, even in the case of imported items or items that could only be sourced from a global supplier.

The litigation centred around the argument that the 2017 preferential procurement regulations were harmful policies resulting in the misallocation of funds away from maximum

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value-for-money for the public. Setting aside the regulations now gives organs of the State constitutional discretion in the procurement process, allowing them to choose value-driven and effective solutions relevant to the communities they serve.

The Constitutional Court ruled in February this year that the 2017 changes were to be set aside, as policy changes cannot be made in ministerial regulations. The Court gave the finance minister until February 2023 to make rectifications, and Treasury has since reinstated the 2000 regulations.

The revision of the regulations mean that government departments and state-owned companies will still be able to operate in a middle ground between the two versions of the legislation. The 80:20 and 90:10 BEE system remains a fixed requirement, but departments will now be able to include preconditions as part of their procurement policy, should they wish, such as the pre-qualification for tenders, 30% sub-contracting to designated groups, and local procurement clauses in the 2017 regulations.

This status quo will remain in place until the Public Procurement Bill is passed in Parliament next year. This Bill is likely to standardise procurement policies across state entities and is expected to be presented by March next year.

“While we are finalising the Public Procurement Bill, which will empower the Minister of Finance to set preferential procurement, the 2022 regulations repeal the 2017 regulations and take effect on 16 January 2023,” says Minister Godongwana.

“In essence, the 2022 regulations are a placeholder while we finalise the Bill.”

FOCUS ON VALUE FOR MONEY

The latest regulations specify that an organ of state must, in the tender documents, stipulate the applicable preference point system as envisaged in the regulations; and the specific goals in the invitation to submit the tender for which points may be awarded.

“It should be noted that these Regulations deal with preferential procurement in terms of the PPPFA. The new 2022 Regulations require organs of state in the development of their procurement policies to also consider specific the programmes stipulated in the Reconstruction and Development Programme as published in Government Gazette No 16085 dated 23 November 1994 and provides for points to be awarded for specific goals,” Treasury says.

“In addition to maximising value-for-money objectives, a further objective is to regulate preferential procurement anew in the draft Public Procurement Bill (among others repealing the PPPFA) and, as announced during the MTBPS, is to be introduced in Parliament by March 2023.”

The regulations, under the Preferential Procurement Policy Framework Act (PPPFA), still favour companies with BEE status. The regulations state that government must award extra points during the scoring of tenders for black-empowered firms. For contracts valued at under R50-million, firms can score up to an extra 20% on the scorecard if they are fully black-owned and empowered. For contracts above R50-million, they can score an additional 10%. This rule has been in place since the Act was promulgated in 2000.

The regulations allow for departments and state-owned companies to add preferential criteria when awarding tenders, so long as these criteria advance the country’s developmental goals, as stated in the Reconstruction and Development Programme (RDP) of 1994. This allows departments and state-owned companies to award points to companies that sub-contract to small and medium-sized enterprises, for example.

“Procurement is a complex and highly contested arena in South Africa. Much of it is steeped in legalese and technical language. It is no accident that the Zondo Commission published a dedicated report on public procurement and made significant findings. The Minister of Finance, as well as the National Treasury and the Government, remain wholly committed to transformation and empowerment as envisioned in the Constitution,” the Treasury says.

Sources: News24 | Sakeliga | Treasury | Engineering News | Biznews

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DUTIES OF A DESIGNATED EMPLOYER

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According to the Employment Equity Act No. 55 of 1998, as Amended (EEA), if an organisation fits the definition of a ‘Designated Employer’, it is obligated to perform the duties outlined in sections 16 through to 26 of the Act. Failure to do this puts a Designated Employer at risk of having a fine imposed according to Schedule 1 of the EEA. Fines can range between R1.5m and 10% of an organisation’s turnover, depending on the type and number of contraventions.

Currently, the EEA defines a Designated Employer as an organisation with 50 or more employees; or a business with less than 50 employees but a turnover that exceeds a specified threshold based on the sector it falls within.

The gazetting of the Draft Amendments to the EEA is imminent. Following this, the only criterium for being a Designated Employer will be 50 or more employees as the turnover thresholds will be removed.

During an inspection, the DoEL will assess whether a Designated Employer complies with the following duties in line with the EEA requirements:

Sections 16, 17 and 18 outline the duty to consult with employees. For this purpose, a Forum must be established with a membership that includes representatives of recognised trade unions and nominated staff representatives from all EE levels. The role of the Forum is to assist in the analysis of a Designated Employer’s current situation (section 19 that follows). It provides a platform for consultation on the Designated Employer’s EE Plan (section 20 that follows), and the EE Report (section 21 that follows).

• During an inspection, a Designated Employer must provide proof of the consultation which must incorporate the nomination process, how members were nominated and the minutes of meetings occurring at least quarterly.

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Section 19 obligates a Designated Employer to:

• Identify any barriers in policies, procedures or practices which may adversely impact Designated Groups, namely African, Coloured and Indian People, as well as women and persons with disabilities, both of which include White People;

• Identify Affirmative Action measures to overcome any barriers identified;

• Ascertain the degree of alignment of its employee profile across each EE level with the most recently published Economically Active Population (EAP) statistics. A Designated Employer must record the results of the analysis on the EEA12 template. (The EEA12 but must be available if requested during an inspection.)

Section 20 stipulates that a Designated Employer must develop an EE Plan to address any barriers and under-representation of specific groups identified during the analysis required in section 19. An EE Plan guides transformation and should follow the format of the EEA13 template as a minimum requirement, as follows:

• The duration of the EE Plan must be between one and five years and include the barrier analysis and Affirmative Action measures. It must indicate the time frames and the positions of the employees responsible for implementing the measures.

• A Designated Employer must set numerical goals and targets to include the aspirational racial, gender and disability profile per EE level for each year and must indicate strategies to achieve these goals and targets.,

• An EE Plan must include the process to monitor achievements against the objectives as outlined in the plan.

• Furthermore, a transparent process is required to resolve disputes arising from the interpretation and implementation of the EE Plan. It must further highlight the senior manager appointed in terms of Section 24 that follows.

As with the EEA12, the EEA13 does not accompany the annual submission to the DoEL, but must be available upon request.

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“A Designated Employer must set numerical goals and targets to include the aspirational racial, gender and disability profile per EE level for each year and must indicate strategies to achieve these goals and targets”

Section 21 requires a Designated Employer to report its EE progress to the DoEL annually. The deadline is 1st October if submitting the report manually; or 15 January the following year for online submissions.

For reporting, a Designated Employer must complete and submit an EEA2 and an EEA4 form. The information necessary is as follows:

• A snapshot of the workforce profile on the last day of the Designated Employer’s chosen EE reporting period, categorised by EE level, race, gender and disability status.

• Workforce movement for the reporting period, including recruitments, promotions and terminations, per EE level, race and gender.

• A breakdown of the Beneficiaries of Skills Development interventions.

• A summary of identified barriers, including an estimate of the dates when Affirmative Action measures are earmarked for implementation. The EE Plan must include the persons responsible for implementing such Affirmative Action measures.

• An Income Differential Statement – EEA4. The aim is to identify unfair discrimination in employment terms and conditions.

Sections 22 through to 26 stipulate that a Designated Employer must:

• Publish a summary of its EE Report – in the EEA10 format – in its Annual Financial Report as section 22 indicates.

• Develop a successive EE Plan before the current plan expires, as per section 23.

• Officially assign and provide a formal mandate to at least one Senior EE Manager overseeing the implementation of the EE Plan as per section 24.

• Inform employees about the provisions in the EEA, as well as the content of the EE Plan and EE Report. Such communication must include any legislative actions against the Designated Employer concerning the provisions of the EEA as per section 25.

• Keep accurate records of all EE related documents and data as per section 26.

There are various fines ranging from R1.5m to R2.7m for different contraventions of the above sections and it is important to note that fines imposed are per contravention.

The following 12 steps guide Designated Employers in remaining compliant.

1. Appoint an EE Manager;

2. Establish an EE Forum;

3. Perform an analysis;

4. Develop an EE Plan;

5. Consult on the EE Plan with the EE Forum;

6. Finalise the EE Plan;

7. Prepare the EE Report;

8. Consult on the EE Report with the Forum;

9. Report the progress in implementing the EE Plan to the DoEL;

10. Publish a summary of the EE Report in the Annual Financial Statements. (This only applies to publicly listed Designated Employers);

11. Communicate Employment Equity-related information to employees throughout the process; and

12. Keep accurate records relating to every aspect of the implementation processes.

Following these steps will provide peace of mind that a DoEL inspection will go smoothly, with limited findings and recommendations; thereby lessening the risk of penalties.

About Frik Boonzaaier

Frik Boonzaaier is a Human Capital Specialist at the BEE Chamber. During his career, he has worked with many national and multinational market leaders. His expertise in the field equips him to chart a course of transformation for organisations by identifying relevant stakeholders whose decisions impact their ability to transform. Frik’s aptitude for formulating sustainable strategies aligns his clients’ KPIs, training and policies with their transformation goals. However, the area of his work that he finds most rewarding is implementation, whereby tracking mechanisms yield tangible results that filter positive change throughout an organisation.

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DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION - MULTINATIONALS IN SA

The long way to economic freedom

While there is there’s still a way to go on the transformation journey for the business sector in South Africa, in the words of former American president Harry S. Truman: “Progress occurs when courageous, skillful leaders seize the opportunity to change things for the better.” There are companies who are making progress in driving transformation in South Africa - and here we look at four multinationals making great strides in transforming the country’s economy.

which include empowerment, entrepreneurial and skills-based projects in the ICT sector in which it operates in. The company states that its ten-year plan aims to address key developmental aspects linked to the National Development Plan and the overall transformation of the economy. The company says: “Samsung’s aim is to build on the landmark multimillionaire Equity Equivalent Investment Programme (EEIP), which is already celebrating over three years of sustained success. Launched in May 2019 in partnership with the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition (DTIC) and sector support from the Department of Communications and Digital Technologies (DCDT), the programme is expected to have a measurable impact on job creation with a projected contribution of over a billion rands to the South African economy at large.”

VODACOM

“We are serious about the transformation agenda and the development of South Africa and we won’t be deterred in our resolve to play an active role in moving South Africa forward by driving meaningful and sustainable transformation programmes to afford historically disadvantaged people the opportunity to participate in the mainstream economy.” So said the Chief Executive Officer of Vodacom South Africa, Shameel Joosub, following Vodacom’s achievement of Level 1 B-BBEE status for the fourth consecutive year in 2022.

SAMSUNG

The incredible strides Samsung has made in supporting economic transformation in South Africa cannot be overstated.

This is reflected not only in the company’s continued investment in the country or its Level 1 B-BBEE status “which is aligned with Samsung’s dedication to remain an active contributor to the future of the South African economy and strong supporter of economic transformation,” but also in initiatives that the company runs throughout South Africa

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Joosub said the achievement demonstrates the organisation’s strong commitment to the transformation agenda and is testament to its commitment towards the transformation of this economy.

“For us at Vodacom, B-BBEE is not something we do to get points. As a company with deep local roots, we fully embrace transformation and its ideals which, among other things, aim to provide women with equal work opportunities so they can contribute meaningfully in the mainstream economy,” he said.

• Ensuring that everyone who directly provides goods and services to the company earns at least a living wage or income, by 2030

• Spending €2-billion annually with suppliers owned and managed by people from under-represented groups, by 2025

• Pioneering new employment models for employees, and equipping 10 million young people with essential skills to prepare them for job opportunities, by 2030

MTN GROUP

The MTN Group is also making steady progress in contributing to the country’s economic growth. This is what the MTN Group saw in May 2022 when, for the first time ever, the group reached a major milestone in their work to create shared value by achieving, for the first time, Level 1 B-BBEE contributor status in South Africa.

UNILEVER

To achieve a fairer and more socially inclusive world, Unilever believes that equality and equity are equally important.

It was in 2020 when Unilever established a Racial Equity Task Force with an aim to advance the representation of people of colour in its four leading markets: Brazil, South Africa, the United Kingdom and the United States. Chief Transformation Officer & Chief People Officer, Nitin Paranjpe, says to be able to reach a place where “workplace opportunities are fair, just and equal, we need to take into account the different needs, cultural barriers and potential discrimination that specific groups may face in our business.”

The company says: “Our global and local HR teams are working together to remove bias from our talent management practices and processes so that, while we develop all our people, we can focus on equitably accelerating the progress of those from under-represented communities.” The company says while they are aware that there’s still a long way to go to be fully inclusive, real progress has been made. The company has made commitments to achieve by 2030 which include:

MTN Group President and CEO, Ralph Mupita, said they were happy with the progress the organisation is making in driving broad-based transformation. “As MTN Group, we see the broad-based transformation and making socio-economic contributions to the markets we operate in as the key to our sustainability and creating shared value,” he said.

Sharing his sentiments, MTN SA CEO Charles Molapisi said, “In an environment of mounting economic challenges, we are pleased to be able to help create meaningful opportunities for South Africans. In 2022 we will work harder to provide a world-class Enterprise and Supplier Development Programme to deliver more sustainable solutions that are aligned to government’s efforts to speed up the inclusion of black-owned business in the mainstream economy [sic].”

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Sources: Samsung | Unilever | MTN Group | Vodacom | Sanlam Gauge Report 2022

INFLUENCE THROUGH INSPIRATION Meet Avril Campher

Avril Campher is the Cummins Southern Africa Transformation Leader responsible for business transformation, strategy and all BEE related activities. Moreover, her role includes developing and implementing the strategies for Employment Equity (EE) and chairing the Employment Equity Forum. In addition she oversees marketing and business continuity planning and supports the corporate responsibility portfolio and any other key projects. Avril has also been with Cummins since 1995 and started her journey as a Personal Assistant and grew from the ground up within the organisation.

YOUR MOTTO IS “INTEGRITY - DO WHAT IS RIGHT, EVEN WHEN NO ONE IS WATCHING,” WHY IS THIS IMPORTANT TO YOU?

For me, this is a moral stance, and it drives my thinking that automatically guides my actions when it comes to my inherent ethos. As a mom to my two sons, this is the basis of my core value in raising them, setting an example for their futures to be men of integrity.

YOUR WORK INCLUDES DEVELOPING AND IMPLEMENTING THE STRATEGY FOR EMPLOYMENT EQUITY (EE) AND CHAIRING THE EE FORUM. PLEASE COULD YOU TOUCH ON THE IMPORTANCE OF THIS?

Employment Equity is at the helm of transformation, addressing the inequalities of the past. As a Code of Good Practice, it is important for Cummins to eliminate unfair discrimination in the workplace and to achieve equitable representation of employees from designated groups by means of affirmative action measures. One of Cummins’ core values ‘Diversity, Equity and Inclusion’

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and through the platform of the EE Forum, we are able to purposefully address barriers and implement transformative measures of correction.

PLEASE SHARE SOME OF YOUR MILESTONES AT CUMMINS SOUTHERN AFRICA?

The act of caring at Cummins has granted me the opportunity to spearhead and incorporate the corporate responsibility programme by setting up Community Involvement Teams across Cummins Africa – this led to serving the communities in which we operate and addressing the educational, environmental and equality of opportunity challenges we face within the continent. I also orchestrated the Technical Education for Communities project at Sedibeng TVET College in Vereeniging through a strong partnership between Cummins and Komatsu, which was endorsed by the former Minister of Education, Ms Naledi Pandor and recognised with global awards from Komatsu and the recent Gold Award as ‘Best Performing TVET College on International Student Placements’.

PLEASE SHARE CUMMINS’ ONGOING TRANSFORMATION JOURNEY IN SOUTHERN AFRICA?

transformation is a constant journey for Cummins South Africa as we strive to create equity across all occupational levels, inclusive of persons with disabilities. We are intentional about bringing positive change to our procurement in ensuring compliance, developing enterprises and making a meaningful difference in the socio-economic space, serving causes that are bigger than you and I.

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE CHALLENGES YOU’VE ENCOUNTERED AS A TRANSFORMATIONAL LEADER AND HOW DID YOU OVERCOME THEM?

One of the challenges encountered is the dilutive and non-compliant supplier base.

The journey that Cummins is on is to bring our suppliers respectfully and dutifully on board on the journey of transformation or to seek procurement from suppliers who are compliant.

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR LEADERSHIP STYLE?

My leadership style focuses on servant-leadership directed at the needs of others, valuing people for who they are, not just for what they give to the organisation allowing them to step into their purpose in serving the greater good for all.

DO YOU HAVE EXCITING PLANS FOR THE COMING YEAR?

My plan for the coming year is to continue the creation of a culture of positive change within the hearts, minds and behaviour of all Cummins employees.

WHAT IS YOUR “WHY?”

My ‘why’ drives my purpose to intentionally influence and encourage people to gracefully and effectively do what is right in transforming self, and to be part of the change that will impact the dynamic of Cummins and our business world.

DO YOU HAVE AN INSPIRATIONAL MESSAGE FOR YOUNG WOMEN OUT THERE?

My message to myself and others is a quote by the late Dr Myles Munroe:

“Leadership is the capacity to influence through inspiration, motivated by passion, generated by vision, produced by a conviction, ignited by purpose.” If we seek to become successful, we must strive to become a person of value. The greatest tragedy in life is not death, but life without a purpose!

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“We are intentional about bringing positive change to our procurement in ensuring compliance, developing enterprises and making a meaningful difference in the socio-economic space”

TRANSPORTING ECONOMIC GAINS Transport sector essential for empowerment

The transport sector is a vital cog in the South African economy. It enables other sectors to grow, such as mining, manufacturing, and agriculture, while creating jobs and revenue. The industry employs more than 415 000 people and boasts one of the highest scores for black-owned enterprises.

ESSENTIAL SUPPORT FOR ECONOMIC ACTIVITY

South Africa’s transport and logistics industry contributes around R270-billion to the country’s GDP. A thriving sector in its own right, the transport industry allows other sectors which drive the economy to flourish – aiding economic growth and recovery. The industry comprises several arms, including rail and road freight, shipping, and air transport.

An effective transport sector allows South Africa to remain competitive in the global market and can accelerate development and access to basic services.

The sector has seen an increase in employment between Q2 and Q3 of 2022, with more than 4 000 additional people employed – a rise of 1%.

EMPLOYMENT IN THE TRANSPORT, STORAGE AND COMMUNICATION SECTOR

415 000 total employees in September 2022

397 000 full-time employees in September 2022

18 000 part-time employees in September 2022

TRANSPORT
OVERVIEW
SECTOR
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GROSS EARNINGS PAID TO EMPLOYEES

R35.4-billion in September 2021

R 36.1-billion in September 2022

32.8-billion was paid in wages in September 2022

R1.2-billion was paid in bonus payments in September 2022

R1.9-billion was paid in overtime in September 2022

AFRICAN CONTINENTAL FREE TRADE AREA A BOOST FOR THE TRANSPORT SECTOR

The World Economic Forum has forecast that the transport sector is likely to see rapid growth under the African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA). The AfCFTA agreement became operational on 1 January 2021.

The World Economic Forum’s AfCFTA forecast report said that the majority of intra-African exports are transported over land.

It also estimated maritime trade would jump from 58 million to 132 million tons by 2030. The report anticipated that AFCFTA would have increased intra-African freight demand by 28% by 2030, necessitating the use of about two million trucks, 100 000 rail wagons, 250 aeroplanes, and more than 100 vessels.

56% of pharmaceutical exports 60% of agro-processing product exports

FREIGHT TRANSPORT IN SOUTH AFRICA

Despite these challenges, the sector remains a Level 4 contributor with 85.5 recognition points. The report found that the sector scores particularly highly in terms of black ownership, at 90.3% of the target, making it the highest of all sectors by some margin. Transport also comfortably exceeded its socio-economic scorecard weighting.

Because the transport sector is driven by procurement, transformation in the industry can significantly impact customers’ B-BBEE performances.

The area in which the industry struggled to reach its targets is management control, which sits at 55.5% of the target. In terms of skills development, transport is the worst-performing sector at 66.4%. It was also the worst performer, with ESD at 58.7%.

A NEW PATH TOWARDS TRANSFORMATION

A new path towards transformation

Transformation in the sector has dealt some blows, with the industry operating on B-BBEE Codes of Good Practice that have not been updated in a decade, according to the Sanlam Gauge 2022 report. It has also lacked guidance from a charter councilwhich is at the core of policing B-BBEE progress – for several years.

Estimates say that less than a tenth of all jobs in the transport sector are held by women. However, various initiatives exist to increase the number of female professionals in the industry, including training programmes. For example, the Commercial Transport Academy (CTA) recently announced an initiative to empower almost a thousand women in the transport sector.

TRANSPORT | SECTOR OVERVIEW
42 860 000 tons were transported by rail freight in 2022 188 446 000 tons were transported by road freight in 2022
Sources:Business Tech | Sanlam Gauge Report | Transport Evolution | DBSA | Engineering News | News24 | Stats SA| World Economic Forum
over land INTRA-AFRICAN EXPORTS TRANSPORT
60% of automotive exports are transported
22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 101

FLEET HORIZON SOLUTIONS WHERE INNOVATION MEETS EFFICIENCY

With Fleet Horizon’s comprehensive fleet management solutions, you can say goodbye to the headache of managing your own fleet. Our experts will take care of everything from routine maintenance to major repairs and replacements, leaving you free to focus on what you do best - running your business.

Our expertise in the industry include our nationwide footprint, commitment to excellence and innovative mindset. This has seen us grow and remain resilient for more than years.

Our solutions include:

• Consulting & Advisory Services

• Fleet management technology systems

• Asset financing solutions,

Operating Rentals, Finance Leases, Full Maintenance Lease)

• Managed Maintenance Solutions (Servicing, Maintenance, Repairs, Tyre Management)

• Fuel management solutions

Here’s what one satisfied customer had to say:

“Since switching to Fleet Horizon’s full maintenance leasing solutions, our fleet has never run better. We’ve saved money on maintenance costs and avoided unexpected repairs, and our vehicles are always running at their best. The flexibility of their leasing terms means we can scale our fleet according to our needs, which has been a huge help in managing our business.”

One of our flagship programmes

The partnership between Fleet Horizon, a JSE listed mining company in the North West and a community based entity demonstrates the power of collaboration. This positive development in the mining sector focuses on commercialising B-BBEE in host mining communities. It amplify the benefits of community-private partnership (CPPs), with the private sector being the technical and financial partners on empowerment initiatives that seek to create sustainable value for all stakeholders in the long term. It further establishes competitive emerging black-owned businesses and empower members of the local community through skills development and job creation.

102 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

”It is my hope that other businesses will follow their lead and embrace similar initiatives, creating a brighter future for communities around the world.”

The challenges we faced as a business due to COVID-19, the war in Ukraine, the tension between US and China which affected our service delivery.

FHS’ survival during the COVID-19 period can be attributed to its ability to adapt to the changing circumstances. The company’s focus on technology and innovation allowed it to respond quickly to its challenges brought about by the pandemic. FHS’ commitment to the safety of employees by providing a safe working environment and proper PPE played critical role in reducing the fatality risk due to Covid.

Like any other company exposed to global risks, FHS had to stay ahead of the challenges posed by the ongoing war in Ukraine which resulted to shortages of key automotive components required for the manufacturing of vehicles. One of the key strategies adopted by FHS is diversifying its vehicle sourcing options. FHS implemented advanced supply chain management systems to monitor and manage the entire supply chain process. This enables real-time monitoring of vehicle and component availability, allowing for quick identification of any issues that may arise in the process.

Furthermore, Fleet Horizon has implemented a rigorous quality control system, by working closely with its suppliers and manufacturers to ensure that all vehicles and components are tested and certified before delivery. At the heart of ouroperations is an ethos of partnership with industry experts.

FHS is an excellent example of how companies can overcome challenges and adapt to changes in the business environment to remain competitive and provide value to their customers.

How FHS contributed to reducing the unemployment rate by employing young graduates and also assisting them to be well equipped/skilled, in line with the 4th industrial change.

FHS has been a significant contributor to the reduction of unemployment in South Africa by providing employment opportunities to young graduates and assisting them in becoming well-trained and skilled individuals not only in the fleet management space. The company has demonstrated its commitment to social responsibility by investing in the development of young graduates and supporting them to become leaders in the market.

With regard to employment,in the past five years, FHS workforce has grown by 40% (including internships and learnership programmes with 100% absorption into the workforce.

The current staff compliment consist of 53% overall female representatives who in turn hold 61% in managerial positions. With the youth holding 31% of the staff compliment.

Fleet Horizon provides training, bursaries and upskilling opportunities for its employees and to the youth of South Africa at large.

“I want to express my gratitude to Fleet Horizon and you in particular for the bursary you gave me last year once more. I am happy to inform you that, as a result of your kindness, I have successfully completed my Hons in Gender Studies. May you treat others as kindly as you have treated me. From the bottom of my heart, I appreciate you. We appreciate Fleet Horizon’s persistent commitment to empowering the disabled community.” - Bursary recipient.

“I’m grateful you trusted me. Really, God sent your business to the world. Although you just walk among us, I am convinced that you are angels.”

- Bursary recipient.

I would like to take this opportunity and thank the Fleet Horizon team for helping me buy this kit. The pictures serves as evidence on how the kit looks like. May God bless you all”. – Bursary recipient

In the past five years FHS has been committed to alleviate distress from communities through CSI projects. With the recent floods around the KwaZulu natal province, FHS managed to provide food parcels andblankets to the affected families. Furthermore, provided sanitary pads, school shoes, books and stationery to disadvantage learners in different provinces.

Energy crisis – our efforts in assisting in efforts to be more efficient through reduced repair turnaround times of their fleet.

Fleet Horizon’s effective management of the maintenance and repairs of municipal fleets and specialised equipment has been instrumental in assisting with the energy crisis in South Africa. Our solutions have resulted in improved reliability, increased uptime, reduced costs, and improved production.

Fleet Horizon CEO, Dick Ngobeni:
FLEET HORIZON SOLUTIONS | ADVERTORIAL 22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 103

Q: You have been CEO for 8 years –what have been some of your most memorable achievements?

As someone who has spent a considerable amount of time in the financial services sector, it may seem unusual to some that I made the move to the fleet management industry. However, for me, the decision was a natural one based on a number of factors.

Firstly, I have always been interested in technology and how it can be used to solve complex problems. The fleet management industry is a perfect example of how technology can be applied to improve the way businesses operate.

Secondly, the fleet management industry is an exciting and growing industry that presents a significant opportunity for innovation and growth. With the rise of telematics and other technologies, there is a lot of potential to deliver value to customers and improve the way they manage their fleets.

Lastly, the fleet management industry is a highly collaborative and customerfocused industry. I enjoy working with customers to understand their unique

FLEET HORIZON SOLUTIONS

challenges and delivering solutions that meet their needs. The fleet management industry allows me to do this on a daily basis.

Overall, what excites me most about this industry is the opportunity to make a real difference in the lives of our customers and communities at large. Our solutions help businesses reduce costs, improve efficiency, and increase safety, which ultimately contributes to their success. Being able to play a part in that success is incredibly rewarding, and it is what keeps me excited and motivated about what I do.

Q: What is on the horizon for Fleet Horizon Solutions in the coming year?

We are always looking ahead to identify opportunities to innovate and improve our solutions. Here are a few things that are on the horizon for us in the coming year:

Continued Investment in Technology

We are committed to investing in the latest technologies and tools to enhance our offerings. We will be investing in advanced analytics and artificial intelligence capabilities to deliver more insightful and accurate data to our customers.

Expansion into New Markets

We plan to expand our operations into new markets, both public and private sector. This will allow us to serve a broader range of customers and offer our solutions to businesses operating in new sectors.

Deeper Integration with Customer System

We plan to deepen the integration of our solutions with our customers' systems to provide a more seamless and efficient experience. This will involve building more robust technologies and connectors to enable our customers to easily access and share data.

Continued Focus on Sustainability

We are committed to helping our customers reduce their environmental impact, and we will continue to focus on sustainability in the coming year. This will include the development of new solutions to help customers reduce fuel consumption and emissions.

Overall, we are excited about the opportunities ahead and look forward to continuing to deliver innovative solutions that help our customers operate their fleets more efficiently and effectively.

DICK NGOBENI , CEO OF DICK 104 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

PROTOURS COACH CHARTER

We are a proudly Level 1 BBBEE contributor, 100% women-owned coach operator – with us you will be “moving in luxury”.

Our story began at the heart of the coronavirus pandemic, in 2020. It was at this precarious moment that the Director, Ntsako Nkuna made the brave decision to create a transport offering that would play a role in reviving the South African economy after the devastating effects of the pandemic.

Tourism is one of the strongholds of the South African economy, and our focus is on providing a world class, innovative and accessible land transportation service for this sector. Our services are not limited to tourism however, as we have built strong relationships with corporate, educational and private clients as well.

Our services are not limited to tourism however, as we have built strong relationships with corporate, educational and private clients as well.

Our team

Our team at Protours Coach Charter boasts a combined 25 years of experience in the transportation

industry. Our versatile and dynamic fleet of coaches and minibuses has been adapted to local conditions in accordance with international standards. We endeavor to make doing business with us efficient and more enjoyable, from making your booking, to disembarking safely at your final destination.

Our vision

Our vision gives us a sense of direction and platform upon which we base all our actions. It captures our aspiration to be the very best at what we do. Our vision and our values guide the choices and decisions our employees make every day.

Our mission

Our mission is to provide a consistent, flexible and world class transportation service to all our clients across various sectors.

Our values

• The safety of our passengers comes first

• We approach our work with integrity

• We value, challenge and reward our people

• We strive to consistently provide our clients with quality services

The fleet

15 Seater Mercedes Benz Sprinter

21 Seater Mercedes Benz Sprinter

7 Seater VW Luxury

39 Seater Hyudai Luxury

32 Seater Yutong Luxury

53 Seater Scania Luxury

57 Seater Scania Luxury

60 Seater Scania Semi Luxury (Without Toilet)

Company Details

Northern depot:1007 Ergon Avenue, Lyttelton,Centurion, South Africa

Southern depot: 31 Moody Avenue, Epping Industria 1, Cape Town, South Africa

012 945 3722

www.protourscoaches.co.za

Gauteng 24 Hour

Ops: 082 652 9105

Cape Town 24 Hour

Ops: 082 445 0071

info.cape@protourscoaches.co.za

012 945 3722

PROTOURS COACH CHARTER | ADVERTORIAL

SUGAN KRISHNA NAIDOO

A leader who leads with humility and empathy, Managing Director of Titan Cargo, Sugan Krishna Naidoo is a silent giant in the world of business.

In a short time span, this business mogul has propelled Titan Cargo into a formidable logistics company; unparalleled in entrepreneurial flair, exponential growth, superior customer service, and a winning culture of “doing Ordinary things in an extraordinary way”.

Often described as a visionary, inspirational and exemplifying a true servant leader, Naidoo has, through Titan Cargo, invested heavily in capex infrastructure, people, innovation and community upliftment to create a

unique logistics value proposition for his clients. Naidoo’s unique logistics value proposition is providing A-food grade warehousing, long-distance, local, and import/export transport, all integrated into seamless customer-tailored “route to market” logistics solutions.

Some of the key achievements and milestones include;

• Growing Titan Cargo from a small company with 5 employees to currently employing in excess of 300 people with a forecasted 100% growth on this number in the next fiscal year based on expansion projects in the pipeline. This incredible achievement is a cornerstone of the economic recovery in South Africa post COVID 19 and few businesses today can attest to this sort of growth in employment numbers;

• Titan Cargo grew its revenue and headline earnings by 700%, 300% and 100% in the past three years, showing resilience in the face of adversity and affirming the market acceptance of its unique service offering and customer experience;

• Titan Cargo warehouse footprint has grown from 1600 sqm in Paarden Eiland, Cape Town just 3 years ago to over 211 000 sqm countrywide with A Grade facilities warehouses in Cape Town, Durban, Johannesburg, and Port Elizabeth.

• Titan Cargo has grown its fleet from five trucks in 2018 to 150 in 2022! We have grown our distribution network nationally with efficiency throughout the length and breadth of South Africa!

• We have embraced digitisation and spared no expense in implementing fully automated warehouse and transport management systems with a state-of-the-art technologyenabled 24 x7 control tower.

Customer communication and effective reporting on cargo flow and virtual warehousing remains our core focus and growth strategy;

• Attracted, negotiated, and signed up long-term business contracts with companies such as Distell, Barloworld, Rhodes Foods Group, DSV/Ford, Freddy Hirsch, Pepsico, Pioneer Foods, Maersk and more.

106 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION
“FOR THIS VISIONARY, PHILANTHROPY COMES FROM DEEP WITHIN HIM AND HE BELIEVES IN SERVING HUMANITY. THIS DRIVES HIM TO PRACTICE BENEVOLENCE AT EVERY OPPORTUNITY.”

For this visionary, philanthropy comes from deep within him and he believes in serving humanity. This drives him to practice benevolence at every opportunity. Thus far, Mr. Naidoo has:

• Established a countrywide strong business reputation for combined integrity, customer service and community upliftment in his business deals.

• Set up a flagship partnership with Gift of the Givers for community and social upliftment. He provides Gift of the Givers with free warehouse space in Cape Town, Port Elizabeth, and Johannesburg, as well as free transport for delivering their essential donor-collected contributions to needy and destitute communities,

• Provided free transport for over 1 million litres of water from Gift of Givers Cape Town donors to KwaZulu-Natal communities after the recent tragic floods in KZN,

• Deep compassion and concern for the everyday struggles of ordinary South Africans and therefore celebrates his birthday every year by not having a birthday party, and instead spending money on providing free food parcels for the poor and destitute in the impoverished townships of Cape Town.

• Mr. Naidoo also understands the historical impasse between communities and their police

services and has therefore formed a partnership with the police to be part of the delivery of free food parcels to the communities they are supposed to protect. This assists in creating trust between communities and their police and enables collaboration among them in fighting crime through a more cohesive social compact.

The team describes him as an ambassador for entrepreneurship, leadership and socio-economic development and exemplifies the aims, objectives, and values of a true business leader.

The team stated: “Mr. Naidoo is an extremely humble and modest person, who never believes he is better than other people. He is never pompous, never seeks media attention, nor does he treat anybody based on their wealth or social standing. He treats everyone with the same reception and evenhandedness.”

TITAN CARGO | ADVERTORIAL Contact Us: 22 Manhattan Street, Boquinar Industrial Area, Airport Industria, Cape Town, 7490 021 110 0494 info@titangrp.co.za titancargo.co.za Social Media: @Titancargo Titancargo
22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 107
“Titan cargo grew its revenue and headline earnings by 700%, 300% and 100% in the past three years.”

Snethemba Phakathi founded KNG Transport and Logistics when she saw the need for a black, female-empowered transport and logistics company that would assist clients in expanding their footprint. As a leading transport and logistics company, the company’s mission is to provide quality customised transport and logistics solutions that not only meet but exceed customer expectations. The MD, Snethemba, shares what it takes to lead a female-empowered transport and logistics company.

Q: Please describe the services offered by KNG transport and logistics..

Our services include local and intercity transport, logistics and warehousing solutions for our clients in the construction, FMCG as well as agricultural industries. We help clients move both normal and abnormal loads. We are a solutions-based company and pride ourselves in offering customised services that suit our clients’ needs. We aim to deliver the most cost-effective solutions at the highest levels of quality.

More recently, we have ventured into building material supply solely focusing within the inland region. Our vision is to operate on a national scale and offer transport, building materials supplies and construction services under the Khula Nathi stable.

Q: What are your flagship projects?

We have partnered with the Housing Development Agency on a sector-wide programme, called the Sector Economic Empowerment and Enterprise Development initiative, spear-headed by the Kholosego Group. The strategic programme focuses on economic empowerment and transformation and aims to create long-term sustainable development of black industrialists to achieve broader economic goals by allowing them to participate in the human settlement supply chain, giving them access to finance,

& LOGISTICS

increased Inclusivity, capacity, capability and credibility. The programme aims to drive business growth for women, youth, military veterans and persons with disabilities and allows black industrialists to develop pathways into sustainable earning opportunities. KNG’s role in the partnership is material management; which includes purchasing andsupplier partnering, demand and lead timemanagement, assistance with materials and inventory control management, storage, transportation and order fulfilment. The programme benefits include delivering goods and services on time, bulk buying of construction materials and elevating local businesses through partnerships.

Q: How do you ensure that diversity and inclusion are built into KNG’s policies?

We firmly support the development of black women by employing top-quality, dedicated, skilled and experienced black women. Believing that a company grows through its employees, KNG Transport and Logistics encourages its employees to undergo professional development related to its line of business.

Q: What excites you about what you do – and what has been your greatest AHA moment as MD of KNG?

The idea of inspiring young, black women to pursue careers within male-dominated industries motivates and drives me to continue breaking down doors and barriers.

My biggest AHA moment has been realising that one needs to be agile and must be able to adapt in order to survive as an entrepreneur. My passion for the road freight industry and working with various parties has opened my eyes to greater opportunities which have allowed KNG to grow. We have

been able to expand by diversifying our service offering to include building material supply.

Q: Do you have a message for our readership?

Diversity, inclusivity and transformation are key drivers to change in South Africa. As the founder and managing director of KNG, I feel a big responsibility to operate in a manner that promotes inclusivity, encourages transformation and creates a space that aims to address and change the socio-economic dynamics in a way that will promote positive change in our society.

There is a need for an aggressive approach, now more than ever, to drive and effect change in our country. We need to rise and create platforms that will equip young South Africans with the necessary skills and knowledge required to kickstart their entrepreneurial journey to alleviate unemployment.

SNETHEMBA PHAKATHI , MD OF INTERVIEW WITH Company Details 223 Sevenoaks Avenue, Chartwell, Fourways, 2025 +27 (0) 66 053 6029 info@khulanathigroup.com www.khulanathigroup.com 108 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION
KNG TRANSPORT

TURNKEY SOLUTIONS

T HE BOILER, STEAM & ENERGY SPECIALIST S
"Deliver steam & energy utilities in a cost effective & sustainable manner"

The untapped potential in manufacturing

MANUFACTURING SECTOR OVERVIEW A MIXED BAG

South Africa has one of the biggest economies on the continent, supported by an established network of infrastructure and ports of entry, employing over a million people in the manufacturing sector. As economist Dr Iran Abedian, of the Pan African Investment and Research Services, highlighted when presenting a report for Proudly SA, there’s still untapped potential.

“Manufacturing in South Africa, given the structure of our economy, has a positive multiplier effect to the tune of 1.3 times because if you inject 10% into manufacturing, the total economy is better off 13%,” said Dr Abedian.

“So for every rand that you inject into manufacturing investment, you’re going to get R1.30 back.”

Dr. Abedian noted that this potential will require the private and public sectors to each play their roles, in

an industry that has become more capital-intensive over the years.This relationship will be a key driver of reindustrialisation. “The success of South Africa’s reindustrialisation rests on an effective partnership framework within which the public sector

110 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

implements a well-coordinated, intergenerational infrastructure provision programme while the private sector in diverse industries focuses on industry-specific dynamics,” said Dr Abedian.

“Sufficient investment in any sector, including manufacturing, is a necessity for sustainable growth and development,” reads the report. “Gross fixed capital formation has shown to be an important driver of economic growth in South Africa.”

The report touches on the need for the manufacturing sector to adapt to the limitations created by the urgent need to address climate change and rising energy costs. “The growing concerns for environmental sustainability, the rising consumer awareness about the significance of reducing the carbon footprint for all goods and services, and the escalation in the cost of energy in all its forms are but a few examples of the constraints within which global manufacturing needs to redefine its operations.”

2022 IN REVIEW

In December 2022, production in the sector decreased by 4.7%, compared to December 2021. The biggest decline was seen in petroleum, chemical products, rubber and plastic products at 12%. This was followed by basic iron, steel and non-ferrous metal products, metal products and machinery with a 7% decline for December 2022.

The total volume of manufacturing production dipped by 0.3% compared to 2021. Petroleum, chemical products, rubber and plastic products dropped 2.5% for the year, with wood and wood products, publishing and printing down by 2.8%.

There was good news on the seasonally adjusted manufacturing production front, for the last three months, a trend which will hopefully pick up. Electrical machinery was the biggest winner, increasing 6.2% from the previous quarter. Textiles, clothing, leather and footwear also increased from the previous quarter, albeit by only half a percent.

Seasonally adjusted sales went up by 1.1% in December, compared to the

previous month. Motor vehicles, parts and accessories and other transport equipment rose 8.2% from the previous quarter.

Following three consecutive months of decline, the July 2022 year-on-year production volume increased by 4%.

In terms of production, the bestperforming sub-sector was motor vehicles, parts and accessories and other transport equipment, which increased 11.8% in July, 20.1% in August, 40.9% in September, 22.5% in October, 11.5% in November and 12.9% in December.

This was followed by radio, television and communication apparatus and professional equipment: 18.8% increase in July, 20.4% in August, 15.1% in September, 3% in October, 8.2% in November and 20.8% year-on-year in December.

CHANGE IN SALES YEAR-ON-YEAR

• 24.1% in July

• 17% in August

• 18.2% in September

• 15.5% in October

• 11.4% in November

• 8.1% in December

MOTOR VEHICLES, PARTS AND ACCESSORIES AND OTHER TRANSPORT EQUIPMENT SALES YEAR-ON-YEAR

• 63.5% in July

• 56.3% in August

• 79.4% in September

• 53.8% in October

• 48.3% in November

• 48.7% in December

MANUFACTURING | SECTOR OVERVIEW
Sources: Stats SA | Engineering News | Proudly SA
22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 111

fluidity

Leon Fourie, the Managing Director of AxFlow AQS Liquid Transfer, is at the helm of a company which is a leading source of pumps, complete handling expertise The company - which was acquired by the AxFlow Group - services the mining, industrial and water utilities sectors.

Here Leon details the services offered by AxFlow AQS Liquid Transfer, the company’s empowerment policies and his insight on the perceptions of future consumers.

Q. DESCRIBE YOUR ROLE AND RESPONSIBILITIES AT AXFLOW AQS LIQUID TRANSFER.

My primary role is holding the rudder whilst keeping an eye on the path in front of the bow and towards the horizon. Secondary to that is keeping an eye on starboard, bow and stern for the ship that is AxFlow AQS Liquid Transfer. The AxFlow Group is directly represented in 31 countries worldwide and forms part of Axel Johnson International based in Sweden.

I am responsible for coordinating and integrating the management textbook stuff that sustains continued business operations. More importantly, to drive the process of ensuring that the effort put in and results which come out stay aligned with our goals for the short, medium and long term.

I facilitate and enable many processes supporting strategic thinking and drive engagement with the team for continuous improvement. I aspire to ensure that we achieve daily, monthly and annual results in line with our future thinking.

Q. WHAT SERVICES DOES THE COMPANY OFFER?

In brief, we offer solutions to either supply, control, transfer, circulate or remove any and all types of liquid, in either clean or contaminated form.

112 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

Our field of expertise has expanded over the past two decades to include mining applications, chemical transfer, manufacturing industries, agriculture, pressure boosting, slurry pumping and sewage solutions. The expansion is driven by the diversity of technology that often needs to find its way into complex solutions. Energy efficiency has become the key driver to the exacting standards of system control that we subscribe to.

PUMPING

Q. WHAT EMPOWERMENT POLICIES DOES THE COMPANY HAVE IN PLACE?

As a company we are gung-ho to live by the five pillars of the B-BBEE Act and to ensure that it permeates through all facets of our operations.

» It starts with our investment in the youth of South Africa, where we do skills development for previously disadvantaged individuals on a year-to-year basis and by utilising accredited educational institutions.

» We are involved in social development at the grassroots level with charities that are located in the immediate regions of our eight branch offices. On a wider front, we are involved and contribute directly to three national charities

» Enterprise development is probably where results are most tangible and we are proud to establish at least two new companies every year. The process involves conceptualisation, staffing, equipment procurement, provision of office/workshop space,

intensive training in all business facets, ensuring fully functional and independent businesses

» Supplier development of the maturing enterprise businesses are supported by dedicated staff from AxFlow AQS Liquid Transfer to ensure ongoing sustainability

» We are a value-added supplier and take pride in verifying our local suppliers’ B-BBEE status. We support businesses that are like-minded and maintain high levels of adherence to B-BBEE compliance. We share knowledge of these processes within our supply chain and aspire to build trust, whilst adding stability without compromising on performance

» AxFlow AQS Liquid Transfer is proud to be in partnership with our people in the form of an employee trust which has full ownership of 26.1% of our shares debt-free. We actively involve our employee trustees in the day-to-day running and activities of our business and have Director’s level representation from the workers’ trust

» We do a lot of external training, but we spend as much time and effort on internal training. Continued improvement remains the chief driver of our mission to send beneficiaries of our workers’ trust on theoretical and practical courses to improv our human capital. We encourage our employees to obtain qualifications that will benefit them personally, but also increase efficiency in our business

» One of our enterprise development businesses prepares lunch for all employees and at all of our offices. The meal is free to staff and we all eat together. This creates a family feeling and an opportunity for informal communication and sharing of ideas

Q. HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR LEADERSHIP STYLE?

Consistent and adaptable. I guess that it’s a blend of characteristics that are most accurately associated with the authoritative, democratic and coaching styles. The same tool cannot be used for different fixes. Sometimes one needs to be a little autocratic and other times affiliative. A shifting spanner only gets you so far.

Q. HAVE YOU HAD AN AHA MOMENT IN YOUR CAREER? PLEASE TELL US ABOUT IT. The moment I realised that the consumer of the future’s perception of brand and loyalty towards brand can be successfully challenged by offering an alternative product/service with inherently improved value characteristics.

Q. WHAT HAVE BEEN YOUR MAJOR MILESTONES SINCE JOINING AQS LIQUID TRANSFER?

There have been a few, but AQS Liquid Transfer being acquired by AxFlow Group and me experiencing the dynamism of the Group is front of mind.

Also, how we pulled together as a unit and managed to not only survive, but grow during the COVID pandemic. n

CONTACT:

Head Office

Email: aqsmontana@aqslt.co.za

Phone: (012) 548 7204

Address: 375 Calliandra St, Montana Park, X91, Pretoria, 0180

IN
TERMS, EFFICIENT, LOW MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGIES ARE WHERE AXFLOW AQS LIQUID TRANSFER IS AT.
AQS LIQUID TRANSFER | INTERVIEW 22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 113

AFRICA’S LEADING ENVIRONMENTALLY RESPONSIBLE CHARCOAL PRODUCER

Toronto Group (TG) is part of a diversified group under the umbrella of Excellento Group Holdings, a wholly owned South African Group, covering manufacturing, oil and gas, property development and agriculture.

MULUNGO

“In recent times there has been a spike in demand in the charcoal market, as a result of the war in Ukraine, which was one of the major producers of charcoal in Europe. This spike in demand creates opportunities in the international market.

TG’s manufacturing activities are focused on charcoal, with activated carbon as a secondary product. The charcoal produced is categorised into three grades: metallurgical 80%, restaurant 10% and BBQ 10%. TG recently added a Nasdaq-listed company to its client base, to supply them with metallurgical grade charcoal on a long-term basis.

CULTURE & VALUES

At Toronto Group we strive to:

• Achieve a shared sense of purpose and belonging

• Work with integrity and ethics in all our dealings

• Develop a culture of innovation and creativity

• Be caring of the environment and people

• Inculcate sustainable and environmentally sound practices both within the company and our surrounding communities

Company Details

Address: 12 Edison Way, Century Gate, Century City, Cape Town, South Africa

Tel: 021 525 1536

Email: phillip@torontogroup.biz

Website: www.torontogroup.biz

TG uses alien invasive species as feedstock. These are sourced by clearing riparian zones, which allows natural indigenous species to return and enhances water flows in catchment areas. TG uses South African developed and produced carbonisation technology and local labour. TG alone will create in excess of 100 direct jobs in its production facility.

The charcoal manufactured is of export quality and 20% of the produced charcoal will be exported to Europe, whilst 80% will be for our largest client, a global company that will be utilising the charcoal for their SA operations.

PARTNERSHIPS

Toronto Group has established a research collaboration with Stellenbosch University on the valourisation of cleared biomass from invasive alien plants (IAPs). The optimisation of methods both for the conversion of IAPs into so-called biochar, as well as its application as soil enhancer in vegetable gardens, is undertaken using facilities available at the university. Various potential biochar products from IAPs are thereby characterised to determine whether they comply with international standards, and to demonstrate potential beneficial effects on smallscale vegetable gardens. The overall

PHILLIP
EXECUTIVE & STRATEGIC DIRECTION OF TORONTO GROUP
114 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

economic and environmental viability of the proposed method of IAPs valorisation is also investigated, with consideration of biochar as a method of carbon sequestration. The research work is executed in the departments of Process Engineering (Prof Johann Görgens) and Soil Science (Dr Ailsa Hardie-Pieters). The project hopes to demonstrate the application of IAPs as biochar in a manner that supports food production and nutrition.

CHALLENGES

Like many other businesses affected by COVID-19 and the restrictions, TG experienced significant delays in setting up its production facilities. These delays were a consequence of the COVID pandemic and the related supply chain impacts. Factory build is back-on-track and the plant will go live in December 2022.

OPPORTUNITIES

In recent times there has been a spike in demand in the charcoal market, as a result of the war in Ukraine, which was one of the major producers of charcoal in Europe. This spike in demand creates opportunities in the international market.

In recent times there has been a spike in demand in the charcoal market, as a result of the war in Ukraine, which

MISSION STATEMENT

To achieve its vision, the Toronto Group seeks to:

• Use all resources in a sustainable and environmentally responsible manner

• Consistently produce charcoal of high quality

• Be focused on reliability of supply

• Be innovative in finding solutions to challenges

• Empower and develop individuals and enterprises by providing an enabling environment

• Foster a collaborative and transformative approach in its engagements and partnerships

• Comply with all legislative and regulatory requirements

was one of the major producers of charcoal in Europe. This spike in demand creates opportunities in the international market.

Knowledge in the diverse uses of charcoal and related carbon products is growing. Examples of these are the use of charcoal fines (biochar) as a soil remediation agent e.g. for rehabilitation of land following mining. In SA, this eco-friendly product is not yet being used but should be encouraged, to return former mine lands to agricultural production, and contribute to the Just Transition.

and bio-stimulant, improving soil carbon content and water retention, while reducing use of chemical fertilisers. Other opportunities in the charcoal/carbon sector are the use of activated carbon in water treatment facilities (activated carbon is currently imported), and in livestock farming for improvement of digestion, prevention of toxicity etc.

GREEN ECONOMY

The pursuit of green economy principles seeks to reduce environmental risks and ecological scarcities and aims for sustainable development without degrading the environment.

Toronto Group is ensuring that we present no risks to the environment, while at the same time providing solutions to some of the country’s water scarcity and energy challenges.

At Toronto we ensure that we supply our markets with the best quality products from traceable and trusted sources, thereby enabling clean and responsible forest management and promotion of the green economy.

In August 2021, Toronto Group launched a first-of-a-kind charcoal manufacturing plant, set to produce 10 000 tons per year of export-grade charcoal from biomass of invasive alien vegetation. The facility, on its own, created about 150 direct and 75 indirect job opportunities through the value chain. n

Biochar can be used in the wider agricultural context as a soil enhancer

TORONTO GROUP | ADVERTORIAL
22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 115

BUILDING A HEALTHY SOUTH AFRICA Administering transformation in healthcare

South Africa has a dynamic healthcare sector, made up of both public and private enterprises. It is one of the sectors in which the government invests significantly, both in terms of providing public services and in creating infrastructure. The total healthcare market is projected to reach a value of $47-billion by 2027.

SHARING PROFITS BETWEEN PUBLIC AND PRIVATE

There are over 400 public hospitals and more than 3 800 public clinics in South Africa, and there is one doctor for every 60 people. In the 2019/2020 year, provincial government expenditure was R628.8-billion, of which 33% (R206.6-billion) was allocated to healthcare.

Hospital services accounted for the biggest tranche of provincial healthcare spending. The nine provincial administrations spent R125.6-billion on hospital services in 2019/20, accounting for 61% of total healthcare expenditure. There are close to 500 hospitals in South Africa that are privatelyowned. These private hospitals play a significant role in the sector. They contribute more than

R55.5-billion (1.3%) to the national GDP and generate around 220 000 jobs.

While the private healthcare sector accounts for almost half of South Africa’s total healthcare expenditure, only 16.4% of the population is covered by private medical insurance. The vast majority of South African citizens rely on the public health sector.

HEALTHCARE
OVERVIEW
SECTOR
116 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

THE IMPACT OF PRIVATE HOSPITAL GROUPS

Private hospital groups yield in excess of R23-billion in labour income

For every R100 of private hospital services delivered by private hospital groups, South Africa’s GDP grew by R123

Private hospital groups’ activities generated government tax revenue of R16.4-billion throughout the economy

For every person directly employed by private hospital groups, almost five additional jobs are supported

EMPLOYMENT IN THE COMMUNITY, SOCIAL AND PERSONAL SERVICES INDUSTRY

2 827 000 total employees in September 2022

2 341 000 full-time employees in September 2022

486 000 part-time employees in September 2022

GROSS EARNINGS PAID TO EMPLOYEES IN THE COMMUNITY, SOCIAL AND PERSONAL SERVICES INDUSTRY

R 264 795 000 in September 2022

THE IMPACT OF NATIONAL HEALTH INSURANCE ON BEE

South Africa is working towards the implementation of National Health Insurance (NHI), which could help improve B-BBEE levels at hospitals, clinics and other healthcare providers. Where B-BBEE procurement and ratings may not necessarily have been a priority for businesses serving the public, it has become essential to gain government contracts. With the implementation of the NHI, the government will become the main client of healthcare service providers, and they will therefore need to comply with the government’s equity requirements.

To comply, healthcare providers will need to ensure they meet specific and verified ownership, management, and spending requirements, and this will require more companies to ensure they have a BEE strategy in place.

Ownership, in particular, will need to transform to ensure more companies are BEE compliant, and this will open up more shares for purchase by black individuals or blackowned companies.

BALANCING GENDER INEQUALITY

The healthcare sector’s employment ratios boast more equity than many other sectors. While not quite aligned with South Africa’s demographics, estimates say more than 50% of posts in the healthcare sector are held by black South Africans, with 27% held by white, 15% by coloured, and 8% by Indian or Asian individuals.

The sector employs a significant amount of women – some estimates place the figure as high as 80% - but there are still some areas in which gender inequalities persist.

According to research by Oxfam, women make up more than 90% of South Africa’s nurses. Of these, more than 80% are black women. Nurses account for more than three-quarters of the healthcare system.

Yet they face a significant wage gap. It will take the average nurse more than 60 years to earn the annual salary of a chief executive officer of one of the private hospital groups in South Africa.

Nurses are up against entrenched patriarchy and racism, Oxfam found, with their roles seen as a culturally feminine sector. Viewed as labourers, nurses are often viewed as a cost to be reduced, the report added.

R 270 449 000 in September 2021

It will also ensure that more procurement is sourced from black-, women-, and youth-owned enterprises.

Sources: Government Information and Communication Systems | All Africa | Hospital Association of South Africa | Switzerland Global Enterprise | Stats SA

HEALTHCARE | SECTOR OVERVIEW
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Menzi Sandile Khumalo possesses the relevant qualifications and management experience to have founded Msanda Labs as he has a BTech in Biomedical Technology from the University of Johannesburg. He independently worked the night shift for Lancet Labs between 2009 and 2011, before he managed clinical pathology labs for two years in Toga Labs under Ndlovu Care Group ( Limpopo).

As the Founder and Managing Director of Msanda Labs his vision is to expand into rural towns where the opportunity for quality healthcare access is a challenge when needed.

Q: Please provide an overview of your professional background.

I led Toga Labs for IPM (International Partnership of Microbicides Research) and worked for National Health Lab Services (NHLS) at Bertha Gxowa Hospital (formerly known as Germiston Hospital) in full Clinical Pathology Labs for a year and three months. I then moved to Lancet for two years as a Senior Medical Technologist (Life Flora Hospital and Sandton Medi Clinic Night Shift), and also worked as a Senior Medical

ADDRESSING INEQUALITY HEALTHCARE ACCESS IN RURAL AREAS

Technologist at Ampath Labs Olivedale. I’m currently operating my lab at Lister Medical Centre in Johannesburg Central.

Q: What led you to start Msanda Labs?

The aim is to provide healthcare services to assist in rapid diagnosis, resulting in better service. The idea of Msanda Labs services is based on the need for fast and reliable pathology results for doctors, especially in rural areas. The plan is to have the Msanda Labs with Chemistry, Haematology, Immunology, Virology, and basic microbiology test in all medical centres in rural areas and allow rural communities to participate in clinical trials.

Q: What services does Msanda Labs provide, and in which provinces are you based?

We offer all tests under Molecular (biology), Haematology, Microbiology, Immunology (chemistry), and Cytology which we are currently outsourcing. We are currently in Johannesburg central and surrounding areas and COVID-19 Testing at Lebombo Border Post in the Mpumalanga province.

Q: You are able to offer professional services at competitive rates. How do you achieve this?

Yes, we are affordable in our prices for the same specimen test. We are 30% to 40% less than pathologists in terms

of medical aid rates. We are also more affordable for cash patients because we tailor-make our prices based on the client's preference for tests.

Q: Providing services to rural areas is a key component of the National Development Plan, Vision 2030. Please unpack how Msanda Labs accomplishes this.

Msanda Labs' idea is to have a franchise model for Clin Paths where we set up the medical for the technologist that want to work in rural areas. Techs will

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MENZI SANDILE KHUMALO

be owning 50% of their rural lab while operating under Msanda Labs.

Q: What have been your major milestones?

Being able to pay cash for all the laboratory machines and employing more than 60 people to operate at Lebombo border Gate (National Key Point) in SA/Mozambique Border as a private/public sector partnership.

Q: How have you managed to turn challenges into opportunities?

• Instrument Leasing – I bought them.

• COVID-19 lockdown threatened us to close – I worked for Gift of Givers partner lab to stay a loat.

• Hiring a taxi for employees –Bought our transport.

• Unable to infiltrate markets –Outsource marketing services to Firejuice

MSANDA LABS | INTERVIEW 22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 119

Q: What is your “why”? What excites you about what you do?

Saving lives by helping doctors prescribe correctly because of my diagnosis and hearing testimonies of lives saved because of correct diagnoses offered to doctors by my laboratory.

Q: In your opinion, what should be done to encourage greater service provision in rural areas?

Professionalise services and outsource to the private sector where possible.

Q: How do you measure excellence?

• Returning clients

• Patient/Client review and testimonials

• LinkedIn follower growth – people believe in what we do, and they relate to our content

Q: What exciting plans do you have for the future?

We are working on a new product that will be a subscription model for blood tests for lower-middle-class income earners.

Q: Do you have a message for our readership?

Q: How did COVID-19 impact your business model?

The COVID-19 pandemic brought business to our doors as we started offering Covid tests and also purchasing the PCR machine for patients to get their test results in three hours. Because of the pandemic, we were also able to hire 60 people to operate at the Lebombo border gate, testing people going in and out of the country for COVID-19.

Look after your health because your health is your wealth. Know yourself by subscribing to Msanda Labs with a minimum of R 250 per month over 36 months and taking blood tests every six months based on clinical information. This will help you deal with congenital disorders and start lifestyle changes as soon as possible. Your health is your responsibility, avoid dealing with your health when you are sick but start screening or check-ups now.

Company Details

Physical address: Floor 12 Room 1202, Lister Medical Centre, 195 Rahima Moosa St, Johannesburg, 2001

Menzi Khumalo, Founder and Managing Director of Msanda Labs: 012 023 2461 Marketing consultant, Mo Lebelo: moshoeu@firejuice.co.za

In-house marketing co-ordinator, Philisiwe Mhlongo: philisiwem@msandalabs.com

Web: www.msandalabs.co.za

Social Media: msandalabs msandalabs

INTERVIEW | MSANDA LABS
120 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

SUPPORTING DOCTORS TO SERVE THEIR PATIENTS

Msanda Labs was started with the aim to support rural doctors to serve their patients better. A medical diagnostic laboratory, Msanda labs offers a full range of laboratory services to help diagnose and monitor their patients’ health.

From collecting blood samples to partnering with clinical trial companies for patient care, we play a vital role in healthcare delivery and improving disease detection methods.

We offer one of the most comprehensive laboratory services

available to enhance the patient experience. The aim is to provide healthcare services to assist in rapid diagnosis, resulting and better service. The idea of Msanda Labs services is based on the need for fast and reliable pathology results for doctors. The plan is to have the Msanda Labs with Chemistry, Hematology, Immunology, Virology, and basic microbiology test in all medical centres. Over the last two years, directors have seen the need to empower young minds by awarding them the opportunity to make a difference through skills

development and applying strategies that our competitors have omitted to take advantage of.

Reasons you should choose

Msanda Labs:

• Semi-automated Lab

Our pioneering laboratory is furnished with the latest infrastructure and instrumentation from reputable diagnostic companies to produce flawless results.

• Qualified Lab Technologists

Our self-motivated and

MSANDA LABS | ADVERTORIAL 22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 121

• dedicated team of health practitioners play a significant role in our success and growth and has provided us with an opportunity to deliver outstanding services.

• Trusted by 50 plus doctors with their patients’ Lives Our dedication and passion for rendering extraordinary services to our patients and exceptional relationship with the Doctors have made us gain the trust of thousands of patients.

• SANAS Accreditation (pending) We render quality and highstandard services to our customers to ensure supremacy at every stage.

The services we provide:

• Molecular biology: Molecular PCR COVID-19 testing facilities at our head office ensure safe and efficient testing. You get your results in three hours.

• Hematology: This department focuses on complete blood counts to diagnose and monitor any blood disease. White blood cells respond to infections (e.g., bacteria, viruses, parasites, and other foreign substances) and the screening of clotting disorders (platelets). Instruments with the latest technology assist in FBC analysis to diagnose Anemia, Leukemia, and Coagulation diseases.

• Microbiology: Testing is done on specimens like stools, urine, sputum, pus, and CSF. In addition, MC&S (Microscopy, Culture,

and Sensitivity) analyses are performed, assisting in identifying, growing, and checking the resistance and sensitivity of the bacteria, respectively.

• Immunology – Chemistry: This department mainly focuses on blood analysis using body fluids such as serum, plasma, and urine. The latest technology in our instruments assists in the study of tests such as Cardiac, Therapeutic Drugs, Lipid, CMP, Drugs Of Abuse, Specific Proteins, General Chemistries, Cancer, Hepatitis, Fertility, Inflammatory Disorders, Retroviruses, Metabolic, Renal, Thyroid, and Transplant Profiles.

• Cytology (Outsourced): This referral test is performed by cervical screening to detect the threat of cancerous cells in the endocervical cells of the female reproductive system. Microscopy identification of abnormal cells is used. Other abnormalities and infections of the endocervix and endometrium are also detected.

If you are a medical doctor collecting +/-10 blood test samples a day, need same-day results to make crucial medical decisions, and want to serve your patients better, then contact Msanda Labs to discuss the possibility of setting up an Onsite laboratory solution for your medical centres.

MSANDA LABS | ADVERTORIAL
122 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

MEDILAC GROUP -PROVIDING CLEANING, HYGIENE AND CLEANING SERVICES ACROSS THE COUNTRY

Additionally, they provide diagnostic and patient monitoring equipment, hospital linen, clothing, and home care. Their mobility and frail care equipment includes wheelchairs, walkers, and pressure-relieving mattresses. Medilac procures surgical and pharmaceutical products in bulk to secure competitive prices for hospitals and clinics. The company also provides services to retail pharmacies, doctor’s offices, and clinics, offering medical waste bins, infusion stands, diagnostic sets, and emergency equipment.

for other South African companies in of our chosen operating areas.

With this as our main focus, we aim to develop and grow the medical services and cleaning services industries into ones that always put their clients, big and small, at the forefront of their intervention thinking and priority lists. To provide effective, reliable and valuable medical training and cleaning services, as well as residential and commercial cleaning services.

Accreditations & Membership Certificates:

• B-BBEE Level 1 Contributor

Medilac Group is a leading provider of commercial and healthcare cleaning services, medical equipment, and consumables in South Africa. The company prioritises customer satisfaction by ensuring excellent service delivery and post-project follow-ups.

Our commercial cleaning services, which are available day or night, specialise in retail, industrial, and food hygiene cleaning. Our hygiene services offer restroom management solutions for commercial and residential settings. Medilac specialised cleaning solutions in the healthcare sector cover hospitals, clinics, and medical practices.

We also provide pest control management services that are environmentally friendly and superior in quality.

Medilac is a national distributor and wholesaler of medical equipment and supplies, offering significant savings by bringing products directly from manufacturers. Their medical furniture products are suited to meet all needs, including hospital beds, examination couches, and trolleys.

Medilac’s extensive range of services and products make them a unique and reliable choice in the industry.

The company is owned by previously disadvantaged black professionals who want to meet the growing demand for residential and commercial cleaning services while helping South Africa face the larger socio-economic challenges of our country that they understand, personally.

Medilac Group has over 11 years of experience within the cleaning industry and is known countrywide for providing our clients with tailor-made cleaning solutions at cost-effective rates for all organisations, big and small.

We have the vision to provide trustworthy, high quality and cost-effective services that will exceed our customers’ expectations every time they utilise one of our services. As a South African firm, we intend to be a significant contributor towards the social development and economic well-being of our country and society as a whole. It is our mission to be the contractor of choice for all of our clients, supply chain members and employees, and to be an industry leader

• National Contract Cleaners Association (NCCA)

• BEECA Cleaning Association (BCA)

• South African Pest Control Association (SAPCA)

• Waste Disposal Certificates

• South African Health Products Regulatory Authority (SAHPRA)

• South African Landscapers Institute (SALI)

• South African Facilities Management Association

• ISO 9001, ISO 45001 and ISO 13485 certified

MEDILAC GROUP | ADVERTORIAL
Company Details 24 Kempton Road, Kempton Park +27 (0)11 568 7970/ +27 (0) 86 547 3342 info@medilac.co.za www.medilac.co.za

Born and bred in Pretoria, Jonathan Blackburn is a serial entrepreneur managing various companies. He has a passion for effectively managing a drug diagnostics business using his past experience. He is an activist for Change in South Africa, helping drug addicts find a path to recovery.

Q: Please describe the services provided by iMED.

The iMed Group are specialist in the provision of medical point-of-care devices and laboratory services. iMed Distributors focuses on the logistics behind the medical point-ofcare devices to remotely test for pregnancy, infectious diseases, drugs, and COVID-19.

We provide services in; Forensics toxicology and DNA testing, Diseases and pregnancy, Cannabinoid testing, and Manufacturing of medical diagnostic products

Q: As the first privately owned toxicology lab, what trends have you seen in this field?

As an emerging nation, South Africans in general do not live or work in a controlled environment. This has led to the cultivation of a population that suffers from drug addiction. The trends are similar across all provinces. Our lab has established that Codeine and methamphetamine are abused in

i MED

all communities in South Africa. These substances are less expensive because they are manufactured locally and can be obtained easily.

Q: iMed is South Africa’s “premium supplier of diagnostic drug test kits”. Please unpack this.

iMED Distributors pioneered the first “South African” drug test. We pride ourselves on our flagship 8-panel drug test cassette that can be used at home or at the workplace. The test includes unique compounds and exotic drugs commonly used in South Africa like Nyoype, Wonga, Tik, and Khat. All our testing devices used in the laboratory are ISO, CE and FDA510K approved.

Q: How did COVID-19 impact your business?

Because iMed already had an existing forensic toxicology laboratory prior to COVID-19, we started construction on a COVID-19 testing laboratory immediately to assist with the pandemic. The laboratory supported the early detection of and research into COVID and its variants. iMED still has two COVID-19 laboratories in Gauteng and the Western Cape.

Q: As MD of iMED, please describe your role and responsibilities?

To continuously improve iMed’s customer

service experience. To ensure that the personnel are safe, secure and content with their workload and work environment. To drive transformation across the business. To research and implement systems that support health innovation. To have fun and make sure everyone else is too.

Q: Congratulations on being a Level 1 BEE organisation. How do you ensure diversity and inclusion are maintained in the company?

iMED understands that it has a duty; not only to its customers; but also to its community. We are dedicated to the development of health science and laboratory services. Part of iMed’s employment policy is the development of the very best scientists from previously disadvantaged communities in South Africa so that they can serve South Africa and its people in the struggle against drugs and infectious diseases.

Q: How would you describe your leadership style?

I am always optimistic about the future of the business and the future of the country. I am flexible when it comes to adopting new policies and growing aspects of the business. I am future-orientated, looking for new and innovative ways to improve the service suite of the business. I am practical when it comes to considering new ideas from

JONATHAN BLACKBURN , MD OF 124 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

personnel. I’m adventurous and happy to swim in unchartered waters.

Q: What have been some of your major challenges as MD of iMed and how did you overcome them?

There was no way to foresee how to deal with a health crisis like COVID-19. iMed was in unknown territory accompanied by unknown risks. Because iMed established the country’s first privately owned and ISO 17025-certified forensic toxicology laboratory, we were already well-versed in the unknown. We quickly mobilised the iMed Laboratory team and established a COVID-19 testing laboratory to start testing citizens as rapidly as possible. We worked together to overcome COVID-19.

Q: What is your “why”? What excites you about what you do?

I am motivated by the belief that life should be experienced to the fullest, by everyone in every community. I am excited about the ways in which medical science and medical research can improve the quality of life of everyone. It brings me such joy to be a part of that movement.

Q: How have the advancements in technology impacted iMed and how do you see AI being part of your business strategy?

The iMed Group ensures that the latest technology is deployed within the business. We make use of facial recognition technology to ensure the highest security is maintained in the laboratory. We also make use of laboratory information management systems to ensure that data security is maintained. Automated electronic systems are deployed to control the environmental conditions in the laboratory but currently, no AI strategy has been adopted in the business.

Q: Does iMED subscribe to the green economy? Please describe how.

Not at the moment, however, some of our product range does include plastic, from 2023 iMED will reuse – sterilise and repurpose all our plastics

Q: What would you say is the best decision you have ever made?

Joining a 12 step recovery program (NA) and turned my life around. The movement was still in its emerging stages in South Africa back then and I was only the fourth person in Pretoria to join the fellowship. NA provided the community and the acceptance I needed

to recover. I believed so strongly in the program that I became an NA leader instrumental in expanding the program across South Africa.

Q: Do you have exciting plans for the coming year?

iMed Laboratories is currently researching how to analyse the information provided in DNA testing to recommend the most suitable cannabinoids to best address a diagnosed health problem. It also recently started testing cannabis samples for all major cannabinoids to ensure that the dosages contained in products are regulated according to legislative requirements.

iMed Pharmaceuticals started manufacturing and distributing cannabinoid-related medical products. The products are aimed at relieving the symptoms of fibromyalgia and other forms of chronic pain, epilepsy, and spasticity. The range also includes products that reduce feelings of nausea and address certain skin irritations.

Please share an inspiring message with our readership.

Trust God, clean house, and help others.

i MED | INTERVIEW
Company Details R21 Corporate Park, 69 Sovereign Drive, Irene, Pretoria 0157 0860 017 474 info@imeddistributors.co.za www.imeddistributers.co.za Social Media: @iMED Distributors
22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 125
“ I am motivated by the belief that life should be experienced to the fullest”

EDUCATION SECTOR OVERVIEW

TRANSFORMING JOB OPPORTUNITIES VIA DIGITAL LEARNING

In South Africa, education has long been recognised as a way of promoting equality of opportunities in society, more generally. The Post-School Education and Training (PSET) system, as envisaged in the White Paper for PSET, is expected to be equitable, accessible, and affordable to all sections of the population. South Africa also has binding international obligations in the field of human rights which promote equality and prohibit unfair discrimination. Among these obligations are the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 4 which calls for inclusive and quality equitable education for all, and Goal 5 which aims to achieve gender equality and empowerment of all women and girls - Statista

THE NUMBERS

South Africa currently has more than 25 000 schools, 23 000 of which are public schools that make provisions for more than 12 million learners. These estimates indicate that, on average, there is one school for every 500 learners.

25 000 + Schools

23 000 Public schools

12 Million + Learners

500 Learners per school

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DIGITAL LEARNING TOOLS

Current technological trends emerging for improved quality of education include:

• The Democratisation of Education

• Virtual Classrooms

• Nano learning methods

• Multi-factor authentication and verification processes for online education platforms

• Browser tracking solutions to ensure the integrity of online assessments

Minister of Higher Education and Technology, Hon. Blade Nzimande said that the pandemic showed the education sector the importance of supporting augmented and remote learning. Not only did this allow basic and higher education to continue during various levels of lockdown regulations, but it has also seen the sector move towards embracing the fourth industrial revolution (4IR).

“At the core of it all – we need education – education and training that keeps pace with the 4IR,” –Minister Nzimande.

Future jobs youths will take up include data analysts and scientists, AI and machine learning specialists, big

data specialists, new technology specialists, and software and applications developers and analysts.

“However, alongside robotics specialists and engineers you will find jobs like people and culture specialists, client information and customer service workers, and client information and customer service workers.”

“We have to fill the whole spectrum of the job market – we are not going to replace people with machines, we are going to make people better workers using innovative technologies,” – Hon. Nzimande

Digital skills are driving competitiveness in today’s economy - Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) Colleges are ideally placed to impart these skills with their focus on preparing students to become functional workers.

Imparting these digital skills is already underway in many TVET colleges. Recently, the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) and industrial manufacturing company Siemens South Africa entered into a partnership to empower the country’s students with digital skills, working through TVET colleges. This will equip

students with critical technical and digital skills, making them more employable, with a focus on data science and advanced IT skills in artificial intelligence and machine learning.

Another similar partnership - between Microsoft, the Public Service Sector Education and Training Authority (PSETA), and Afrika Tikkun Services - promises to provide online opportunities for 20 000 young people under the Microsoft Global Skills Initiative.

The initiative has helped over 30 million people in 249 countries and territories, and nearly 300 000 in South Africa, to gain access to digital skills. The programme aims to build digital skills capabilities in South Africa and to improve the employability of the country’s youth in the Information and Communications Technology (ICT) industry.

According to a critical skills survey, conducted by Xpatweb, the most in-demand, ‘scarce’ skills in the country that must factor into the curriculums of our institutions, are:

• Health Professions

• Accounting

• Science Professionals

• Related Clinical Sciences

• Senior Financial Executives

• C-Suite Executives

• Artisans

• Media and Marketing Specialists

• Foreign language speakers

• ICT

• Engineers

EDUCATION | SECTOR OVERVIEW
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GUGU MKHIZE CEO OF INSETA

No stranger to the SETA environment, and the public sector in general, Gugu Mkhize has been leading the INSETA team since she was appointed as the CEO in 2020. The seasoned business leader, with expertise amassed through working in various fields, shares what it takes to lead a team to greater heights.

MEET
22 ST EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 129

Q: Please describe the role of INSETA and the services the Authority provides.

INSETA is part of 21 Sector Education and Training Authorities and develops and implements the best skills and educational solutions for the insurance, and related sector, and its employees. Our primary purpose is to grow the pool and quality of critical and scarce skills within the insurance sector. These skills enhance the sector while supporting the transformation of the country.

Q: You were appointed as CEO in December 2020. What have been some of your most memorable milestones over the last 2 years?

As a newly appointed CEO coming from the outside, the focus was on visionary and strategic decision-making, whilst guiding a new team. I took three to six months to meet with as many of my staff as I could and I asked a lot of questions and listened. Your team and your employees will tell you a lot if you ask the right questions. I truly listened to what they had to say, and was receptive to the feedback.

Your employees are one of the organisation’s biggest assets, and their performance has a major impact on productivity. However, simply managing skilled employees is not enough, as they can greatly impact the organisation’s overall performance if they do not believe in your vision.

The journey was not easy but they stayed the course and we saw the results when the SETA recorded an improvement of 14% in performance, with an overall SETA performance of 86%.

With student financial debt at all-time high, innovative and bold solutions were required to help both the students and our sector. The Insurance Sector Student Fund – which was a brainchild of mine, sought to address the growing demand for financial support in education which we know far exceeded the supply and continued to hinder skills development in all industries. The ISSF addresses this by providing funding for youth, workers, and businesses.

The fund caters for programmes that were previously excluded but that support the value chain across the sector and at different National Qualifications Framework levels. Since its launch in December 2020, it caters for all South African academically qualifying youth, the missing middle and non-missing middle, of all races – both new and continuing students who are financially hamstrung. It will also support students across TVET colleges, universities, universities of technology, private and international institutions and other certified entities.

Q: How did the pandemic impact INSETA and the insurance industry as a whole?

The 4-month payment holiday for companies did hugely impact the SETA in terms of levy income however we are slowly coming out of this and our levy income has improved due to the resilience and agility of the sector.

Q: What have been some of your greatest hurdles?

I have learnt that agility, security, and stakeholder engagement are more important for insurance companies in a fast-changing industry and world. Cyber risk or cyber security is the top challenge that we could face over the next two to three years. This is a serious challenge for an industry that deals with so much sensitive information: not just financial but also personal, property and health records can often be intermingled in an insurer’s data logs. Securing this vital information will only grow in importance.

Q: In your opinion what characteristics are required for visionary leadership in “the new normal”?

There is always a way forward. Great leaders rise to the occasion and find a way to survive crises and thrive. Great leaders leverage traditional leadership competencies while refocusing on behaviours that provide a sustainable competitive advantage in the new normal. Leaders need to ensure that employees have an opportunity to discuss the ‘new normal’ and the changes needed to thrive.

These discussions are underway across many organisations and are instrumental in the change process. A systematic Organisation Change Workshop can be a key component and accelerate the process of change, getting people on the same page and working together to achieve a common vision. An Organisation Change Workshop can be an excellent initial step, bringing leaders together to structure a systematic path to change and we have seen the benefits and increase in productivity and performance by implementing these Organisational Change workshops.

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Q: Have you noticed interesting trends and/ or changes in the insurance sector recently?

The past few years have seen the emergence of core technology trends that are affecting nearly every industry. A multitude of technological advancements and shifts are reshaping products and services, especially the future of connectivity and applied AI in many markets. Insurers have begun using telematics to evolve the core auto product. The wider adoption of IoT could usher in a similar reshaping of products in life, health, property, and commercial lines. Increasing the frequency and specificity of data being shared through IoT devices helps customers provide a more accurate view of their needs and insurers better understand risk, both at the time of purchase and on an ongoing basis.

The increased prevalence of 5G allows this data to be shared at lower latencies and helps insurers provide real-time services to clients.

While many insurance companies are experimenting with AI, few have truly scaled their capabilities across the enterprise. As AI becomes more prevalent and algorithm creation becomes commoditised, these companies will be able to more fundamentally reengineer core processes to be more predictive in nature. AI will disrupt distribution, underwriting, claims, and service as core processes become AI-enabled, creating a “human in the loop” model that increases productivity and allows for higherquality touchpoints with customers.

Q: How do you ensure diversity and inclusion are built into the foundation of INSETA?

An inclusive workplace starts at the top and echoes throughout your company. As a leader, you are responsible for fostering a company culture that is accepting and inclusive of all employees. Educate your

team on what is acceptable and inclusive behaviour and have strict policies in place for compliance with your diversity and inclusion initiatives. Creating a workplace where every employee feels safe and accepted is essential for a successful business.

As a leader in the education and training arena, what is it that you find inspiring about working in the public sector?

To help increase the quality of life for our people. To improve the independence of the vulnerable. To empower small businesses. To improve productivity, to prepare our next generation for the future of work. Where there’s less of a focus on ‘skill sets’, and more of a focus of how each person can bring their unique selves and their own strengths to the workplace. This creates a very rich culture, which puts people before CVs and helps them to feel valued, appreciated, included, and celebrated.

My encounters with public service have seen me benefit from some really inspiring leaders. Leaders who are about ‘We, Together, and Us’ and not ‘I, Me and My’. These are individuals whom we follow not because of their deemed authority over us, but because of their vision and purpose, putting people first – giving us responsibility and making us feel valued, necessary, and appreciated. And, despite the huge mandate they are expected to deliver, they do not seem too busy to give their time and energy to those under their care.

Q: Do you have any exciting plans for 2023?

The 2023 planning season is underway, and CEOs are facing a lot of unknowns—inflation, recession, as well as the disturbing electricity crisis—but one thing is certain: Efficiency and agility will be the constant no matter what scenario plays out.

In 2021, our sector boasted 3 603 active employers, 31.1% in life insurance, 30.6% in non-life insurance and the balance in risk management and auxiliary activities.

Just over 75% of employers who submitted workplace skills plans in the last round of submissions were small enterprises with fewer than 50 employees. From the skills plans, employment is estimated at just over 130 000.

Thus, we must tailor programmes for a broad range of stakeholders. These programmes must be designed against the backdrop of the six change drivers we have identified, namely climate change, COVID-19 and other pandemics, digital transformation, the economy, the regulatory environment and remote working. Transformation, job creation in the context of the 34.5% unemployment rate andaccess to financial services for those currently excluded remains a critical priority.

Q: Do you have a message for our readers?

Live to empower, influence and inspire in everything that you do.

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INSETA -EMPOWERED TO INFLUENCE AND INSPIRE

TheInsurance Sector and Education Authority (INSETA) is one of 21 SETAs. INSETA’s primary purpose is to grow the pool and quality of critical and scarce skills within the insurance sector. These skills enhance the sector while supporting the transformation of the country.

We have centred our strategies and goals to implement the mandates of the National Skills Development Plan 2030 (NSDP), the Skills Development Act (SDA), the Skills Development Levies Act (SDLA), the PFMA, the INSETA constitution, the Department of Higher Education (DHET) and other legislation that relates to the governance of Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs).

Over the years, our relevance has relied on our ability to adapt to the needs of an everchanging and highly regulated sector. Our medium-term performance will require even faster-paced action and readjustment of skills interventions to address external priorities and attend to internal fundamentals, including:

• Innovation (and research)

• The impact of the fourth industrial revolution

• Sector transformation

• Sustained support of small and medium enterprises

• Quality assurance

• Monitoring and evaluation

Our work

INSETA provides learnerships, internships, bursaries, and skills programmes to a diverse range of employers within the rapidly growing and evolving sector it represents. The sector employs over 100 000 individuals, to whom INSETA provides the opportunity to improve their education and skills, thus INSETA

develops and implements the best skills and educational solutions for the insurance sector and its employees.

Insurance Sector Student Fund (ISSF)

The ISSF - which was launched on 14 December 2021 by the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation, Dr Blade Nzimande, and INSETA - continues to grow in leaps and bounds. The growing demand for financial support in education far exceeds supply and continues to hinder skills development in all industries. The ISSF addresses this by providing funding for youth, workers and businesses. The fund caters for programmes that were previously excluded but that support the value chain across the sector and at different National Qualifications Framework levels.

It caters for all South African academically qualifying youth, the missing middle and non-missing middle, of all races – both new and continuing students who are financially hamstrung. It also supports students across TVET colleges, universities, universities of technology, private and international institutions and other certified entities. Our goals are to encourage a growing number of employers in our sector to participate in the co-funding concept and to attain maximum impact for beneficiaries, which will boost employability and entrepreneurship prospects and, ultimately, bring positive change to many.

Developing our leaders

INSETA annually invests in the development of executive leadership and middle management competencies through partnerships with universities that have toprated programmes in South Africa.

This strengthens the sector’s ability to respond to transformational targets in the Financial Sector Charter. Middle management interventions were run in 2021/22 with the University of Cape Town Graduate School of Business, with 45 candidates in Western Cape and KwaZulu-Natal, and Henley Business School, with 25 candidates in Gauteng.

Plans for the year

Our focus will be:

• Exploring the digital delivery of learning

• Improving service standards to our stakeholders

• Investing in transformative programmes

• Addressing the placement of youth in employment

Company Details

Physical Address: 18 Fricker Road, Illovo Boulevard, Johannesburg, 2196

Postal Address: 18 Fricker Road, Illovo Boulevard, Johannesburg, 2196 011 381 8900

info@inseta.org.za

inseta.org.za

Social Media: INSETA insurance-seta

Inseta

INSETA | ADVERTORIAL 132 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

eSTUDY was founded by the father and son duo of Gerhard Visser Snr. and Gerhard Visser Jnr in the middle of the past decade. Their goal was to shift perspective on learning methodologies away from the traditional way of learning. They drive learning culture through teams of experts, innovative thinking and keeping the value of their businesses they work with in mind. Here Gerhard Visser Jnr. takes us through how working with eSTUDY can help businesses unlock their value.

PLEASE DESCRIBE THE SERVICES THAT ESTUDY OFFERS.

Over the years, our products and services have changed at a rapid pace. Today, we offer products and services directly related to Learning and Development (L&D) as a whole and globally. We consult our clients on learning and development, B-BBEE and Talent Management Frameworks.

The pandemic changed our landscape rapidly. Fortunately, being an agile company, we could adapt our already technologically advanced solutions to meet the demand. Our core services include L&D Consulting, Integrated B-BBEE Solutions, Learning Technology and a vast library of accredited courses.

HOW DO YOU ASSIST BUSINESSES IN MAXIMISING THEIR BENEFITS?

Coming from the hospitality industry, I emphasise delivering exceptional

customer service beyond our client’s expectations. We believe that if we focus on the customer’s business objectives and use our internal expertise, we can deliver tremendous value for our clients. If our services cannot pay for themselves, we have failed. That is how we maximise the benefit for our clients. That is how we empower enterprises. That is how you economically transform South Africa.

WHAT HAVE BEEN SOME OF ESTUDY’S MAJOR MILESTONES?

We always have been (and will continue to be) disruptors. We have received awards such as Innovative Partner and Best Plug and Play solution from CrossKnowledge. Both these awards secured the trust of CrossKnowledge to gain exclusive distribution rights of the CrossKnowledge suite in the SADC region. We quickly jumped onto this opportunity and now serve customers in the SADC member countries.

PLEASE UNPACK ESTUDY’S COMPLIANCE CONTENT AND ACCREDITED CONTENT LIBRARY.

Through numerous partnerships with subject matter experts, we can service our customers with perfectly curated compliance training that does not make you fall asleep. We specialise in compliance training for the Finance & Insurance sector, but quickly realised we have to cater to all companies’ general

compliance needs. Our accredited content library has over 400 courses, empowering our clients to meet their business requirements. The courses range from 2-hour online self-paced learning to 12-month qualifications, internships and learnerships.

DO YOU HAVE EXCITING PLANS FOR THE COMING YEAR?

Absolutely! We plan to expand our library by another 200 courses, ensuring it is a seamless experience for our clients. The launch of our locally developed eSDF platform is on the horizon, which will help our clients automate their regulatory reports such as Workplace Skills Plans, Annual Training Reports and B-BBEE Skills Development Reports. All indications are there that we will soon expand our team by 50% with a core focus on Learning Consultants. n

Company Details

Address: 62 Hesketh Drive, Moreleta Park, Pretoria, South Africa

Tel: 012 997 0037

Email: trainme@estudysa.co.za

Website: www.estudysa.co.za

INTERVIEW WITH
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TRANSACTIONAL VS. TRANSFORMATIONAL B-BBEE

What’s the difference between transactional and transformational B-BBEE?

134 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

I have had what I believe is the privilege of working in the B-BBEE space for 12 years. My unique experience in this space stems from working within the B-BBEE verification industry whereby I would engage with organisations and facilitate the B-BBEE verification process. Learnings within the B-BBEE verification industry were an eye-opener for me. I have dealt with many organisations that support transformation and then there are those that see this process as a compliance exercise. I later moved on to the B-BBEE Policy Unit at the Department of Trade Industry and Competition (DTIC) whereby I started to understand what the government is trying to achieve for our country – inclusivity by allowing black people to participate in the mainstream economy. I moved onto the South African National Accreditation System (SANAS) as the Accreditation Manager for B-BBEE in which I had many fruitful engagements with B-BBEE rating agencies.

In the past year and a half, I have fulfilled a support role at the BEE Chamber as the Member Support Executive. Hence, I have had a bird’s eye view of how organisations approach B-BBEE since the implementation of the Codes of Good Practice (Codes). Over the years, I have seen many organisations moving from the transactional approach to the transformational one in implementing their B-BBEE strategy. However, more attention still needs to be paid to moving more organisations to embark on the transformational approach when developing or evaluating their B-BBEE strategy.

In my experience working in the B-BBEE arena, I have witnessed various B-BBEE approaches undertaken by organisations. Some are impressive – entirely transformational. Others are short-sighted – a mix of transformational and transactional – and of course, there are the ones that simply boggle the mind – totally transactional - as they do not benefit the organisation

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or black people. A good indication of whether an organisation will implement a B-BBEE strategy that is transformational or transactional is its initial approach to developing a B-BBEE strategy. My birds-eye view of the initial process, more often than not, provides two scenarios:

1. “Let’s get this done quickly; where do we find the points and people to make this happen”; and

2. “If we’re gonna do this, let’s do it sustainably, so we yield a long-term return on our investment”.

The initial scenario indicates whether an organisation is going to throw money at their

TRANSFORMATIONAL APPROACH

Applying a transformational approach to B-BBEE initiatives means an organisation’s focus is on changing its internal DNA. Consideration should be on what a transformed organisational DNA will mean for the business and the economy at large.

Based on the desired outcome, an organisation must evaluate the scorecard they are measured on then decide what initiatives will support the end goal. Using the B-BBEE scorecard as a benchmark of transformation, as opposed to the end goal itself – the points on a B-BBEE scorecard will organically lead to a transformational approach.

TRANSACTIONAL APPROACH

Four questions to consider when developing or evaluating a B-BBEE strategy that will yield long-term results:

1. What sustainable internal changes must take place to realise the points offered on the B-BBEE scorecard?

2. How will this impact business over five years?

3. How can we use the indicators in the B-BBEE scorecard to optimise performance and productivity?

4. Is the B-BBEE strategy robust enough to be sustainable in the long term?

B-BBEE strategy and create an illusion of transformation or if they are going to meaningfully contribute to a transforming South Africa. Although these approaches are at separate ends of the scale, they do have one common denominator: each organisation believes their approach makes good business sense. However, each scenario establishes whether they are gearing towards a transformational or transactional approach.

The idiom ‘penny-wise, pound-foolish’ pops to mind when comparing a transformational and transactional approach to B-BBEE.

5. Applying a transactional approach means an organisation focuses on the points they can earn, not considering what the impact it will have on its internal DNA.

More often than not, an ill-considered transactional approach is at arms-length. The focus is on circumvention, a minimal investment in people and quick-fix solutions. Thus, it creates an illusion of transformation with no long-term benefit.

Organisations applying this approach generally return to the B-BBEE drawing board annually to rehash another transactional approach with no tangible return on their investment.

Four questions to consider when developing or rehashing a B-BBEE strategy that yields quick fix results:

1. How much money do we have to spend to get the points?

2. What are the cheapest points available on the B-BBEE scorecard we are measured on?

3. How do we claim the points using as few resources as possible?

4. Can we recoup the money we spend?

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The above got me thinking. Suppose there was no B-BBEE framework in place. Would organisations consider who owns a business before procuring from them? Would they have processes in place to ensure fair representation of employees in their workforce? Would they invest in skills development and training? Would their preferred suppliers be representative of our national demographics? Would they develop small black-owned businesses? Would they participate in income-generating activities to develop black beneficiaries? Perhaps they would, marginally, but not to the extent necessary to include more black people in the economy and balance out the deficit of wealth facing our country. B-BBEE legislation may not be the perfect solution. Still, it is the chosen policy to transform the country.

Granted, B-BBEE has garnered reputational damage over the years as tenderpreneurs, profit-driven joint venture agreements, and questionable ownership schemes drive the transactional approach to B-BBEE. Unfortunately, they have outshone the meaningful and sustainable impact it has had on organisations and black people alike. However, regardless of which approach organisations take, one must remember that B-BBEE legislation guides organisations. Still, people of all races and genders either embrace it or circumvent it.

It is essential to accept that B-BBEE is an economic policy that aims to invite more people into the economy. By design, it creates a synergy between all South Africans as it is an unworkable policy without the buy-in of white-owned businesses or the participation of black people. South Africa’s B-BBEE legislation globally is unique. However, we have to remember that the foundation for B-BBEE began when the Native Land Act of 1913 was promulgated.

Earlier this year, I was part of a discussion whereby a white-owned family business did not want to change their ownership structure as they wished the business to be passed down in the family. The answer is simple, as B-BBEE compliance is not a legal requirement, they should not go the route of B-BBEE. However, if choosing to implement B-BBEE, it must be done within the legal parameters and spirit of the Codes. Such an

organisation would have to measure the pros and cons of not transforming. However, such an organisation must bear in mind that if they choose not to have a B-BBEE certificate and its clients have chosen the transformation route; there may well be a challenge to gain and retain business. It is essential to further understand how the white-owned family business was established during the Apartheid era.

Over my years of experience within the B-BBEE industry, there has also been a negative message associated with B-BBEE. A comment around B-BBEE that I have heard many times is: “A black-owned entity has won a tender, this must have not been correct, and corruption has taken place.” What many do not understand is that corruption has no colour – people act or engage in corrupt activities. Therefore, associating this concept of corruption with B-BBEE is nonsensical and is not needed for our country.

From my bird’s eye view, like it or not, a B-BBEE certificate is key to conducting business in South Africa. If an organisation chooses the B-BBEE route, do it in its intended spirit. Over the years, I have seen more organisations choose the penny-wise, pound-foolish approach to B-BBEE that commands financial output, little resources and instant gratification that benefits nobody. Remember, the bigger picture, sustainable B-BBEE, invites more people into the economy, allowing government coffers to invest in the national infrastructure to benefit all.

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B-BBEE BUDGET

High-impact ways to spend your leftover B-BBEE budget

138 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

As a company, we are very fortunate to be able to work on several high social-impact initiatives in the fields of youth entrepreneurship and youth employability and this gives us a unique perspective around ways that organisations can deploy their B-BBEE budgets for maximum impact.

Below we have outlined some ideas around projects we are working on to highlight that you can think innovatively about how you deploy your spend.

IT’S NOT JUST B-BBEE

One of the big shifts we are seeing in the markets –particularly with multinationals – is that it is no longer just about “B-BBEE”. Organisations are now having to comply with a number of Environmental, Social and Governance models as well as the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

This is an important development as the conversations are shifting from South Africa specific to aligning with global goals and reporting.

MICRO-FRANCHISE MODELS ROCK!

One of the pain points around many of the Enterprise Development initiatives out there is a question about sustainability. Funding a small business sounds good in principle but if that business is not sustainable, it often feels like a case of throwing good money after bad.

SMEs in South Africa have very high failure rates and the goal is to de-risk the projects to the best of your ability. Enter the micro-franchise model.

Franchising has long been one of the most successful forms of entrepreneurship in the country as owners are given an established formula and they are able to scale them while playing off an existing skills base and marketing collateral.

Some examples of the micro-franchising opportunities that we are involved in include mini sanitary pad manufacturing factories, computer training centres, beauty spas and accounting businesses.

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PROVIDE OFF-TAKE AGREEMENTS

Access to markets remains one of the single greatest challenges that SMEs face and many businesses are reluctant to use suppliers who don’t have a track record.

Without being able to test their systems, develop cashflow inside of the business and grow their internal skills base they are unable to provide any evidence of success to future clients.

When the issue of “off-take” agreements is raised with many larger businesses, the first response is: “We don’t have a need for the services so we can’t see how to involve them in our supply chain”

It is all about thinking laterally.

For example, we have a beautiful model that we currently work with involving sanitary pad manufacturing

micro-franchises which are women-owned and managed. Businesses commit to off-take agreements for ESD / SED purposes and then donate the manufactured pads to charities or schools of their choice.

The micro-franchises enjoy full order books, and the corporate is ticking multiple elements in terms of their scorecard and social recognition.

TACKLE SOCIAL MOBILITY

Due to historical spatial planning issues, a major challenge that South Africa faces is the lack of social mobility: People don’t work where they live.

This in turn means that your staff are spending much of their salaries on transport costs, just to get to and from work.

What we really want to be doing is creating jobs where people live.

140 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

We do quite a lot of work with the Youth Employment Service (YES) who have rolled out “hub” models in communities such as Saldanha Bay and Alexandra and these provide local jobs for the surrounding communities. These include catering, manufacturing and technology-related options and provide funders with the opportunity to secure both SED and tax donation (Section 18A) recognition as part of their strategy.

RE-THINK SUPPLIERS FOR TACTICAL AND STRATEGIC BENEFITS

Supplier Development remains one of the single biggest challenges that many organisations in the country face and we find that many focus on a “bottom-up” approach trying to build black-owned suppliers rather than a “top-down” approach. Instead of focusing on entry level suppliers, you can use your leftover B-BBEE spend tactically. A good example of this is one of our partners is a black-women-owned consulting business assisting industrial and manufacturing businesses apply for grants and incentives out of the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition (DTIC) – an Enterprise or Supplier Development contribution here was able to give one of our clients access to insights around the DTIC incentives landscape which they could use to inform strategic decisions taken by the Exco.

OUTRAGEOUS SKILLS

We get it – Skills Development in South Africa has many detractors.

Every year billions of rands of Skills Development funding is pumped into the economy and it feels like there is no tangible change in the level of economic activity and we continue to bemoan the fact that we are not building the skills of the future.

Without economic growth and an opportunity to gain practical work experience and work hardening, these youth are trapped in a cycle of bouncing from one learnership to the next in the hope that they will be absorbed.

The nature of many of these programmes is that they are looking to push as many people through a simple cookie-cutter recipe to tick their skills spend each year. But

what about if you were doing something outrageous like training drone pilots, 3D printing specialists or developing data science skills?

We are working on a programme this year to train 65 young drone pilots – 60% of whom are likely to be women. Initiatives like this have very high absorption rates across multiple industries including mining, security, logistics and agriculture.

ACCOUNTING IS THE LANGUAGE OF BUSINESS

One of the programmes we are seeing a lot of success with now is our “Adopt-An-SME” which sees a corporation effectively funding accounting and back-office support for small businesses.

Accounting itself doesn’t sound particularly sexy at a first glance but a vast number of SMEs fail to sort out their compliance issues which then impacts their ability to get things like a tax clearance certificate. By sorting out their compliance issues, they can get onto vendor lists, qualify for other grants and incentives and be able to apply for finance.

Help your ESD beneficiaries speak the “language of business” and the world opens up for them!

The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result.

As a country we need to re-imagine the South African economy and find unique and novel ways to grow our skills and SME base and hopefully the above gives you some exciting ideas to re-imagine your B-BBEE spend.

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“Access to markets remains one of the single greatest challenges that SMEs face and many businesses are reluctant to use suppliers who don’t have a track record”

TRANSFORMING TECH

Transforming the tech sector with B-BBEE

The Youth Employment Service (YES) B-BBEE incentive out of the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition (DTIC) is arguably one of the best in recent years and the tech sector is benefiting on multiple levels.

As highlighted by both the Sanlam Gauge 2022 report and the “National Status and Trends on B-BBEE Transformation Report” from the B-BBEE Commission, the ICT sector has been

struggling, particularly on the ownership and Enterprise and Supplier Development (ESD) elements. The YES B-BBEE incentive has been a game-changer in the last two years with many technology businesses who struggle to meet ownership criteria, able to move up to two full levels on their scorecard through the creation of youth jobs.

While much of the focus for YES is around the job creation element, we would argue – based on our experiencethat YES is playing a critical role in capacitating grassroots technology skills that will have a transformative impact in the coming years.

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Take for instance a youth named Lonwabo who was part of a YES cohort based in the Eastern Cape and had been deployed to support basic computer literacy initiatives in schools. During his 12-month work experience, Lonwabo was able to receive in training a variety of tools including the Microsoft Power Apps suite of products. In his spare time, Lonwabo has been building an app to help municipalities in the Eastern Cape digitise their records and we are now working with him to access grant funding for grassroots innovation.

Seen in isolation, Lonwabo is a good story.

When one considers that he was part of a cohort of over 800 youth and more than 100 of this cohort were subsequently taken into a project in the banking sector, you can start to see how skills transfer and capacitation begins to have a massive multiplier effect.

There are many examples that we can draw on. Another project that we recently reported on, saw 29 young women on a YES funded program supporting digital labs doing early childhood literacy and numeracy. In just 6 months this intervention alone reached 14 000 young children across Gauteng and the Western Cape and we expect to see these benefits in education standards in the years to come.

As a business, we have worked on a variety of high-social impact initiatives from sanitary pad manufacturing, software technicians, call-centre support and solar but at the core of each of these projects is a focus on enhancing digital literacy for all youth participating in the programmes.

Through its “Implementation Partner” model, YES itself has also developed some powerful partnerships with the likes of RLabs which is an award-winning, globally recognised player in the technology space as well as the Cape Innovation and Technology Initiative (CapaCITI).

These are not just youth being kept busy for 12-months as part of a B-BBEE initiative but rather an opportunity to access partnerships and placement opportunities which are developing in capacity in everything from accounting packages through to SalesForce and AirBNB sector-specific projects.

YES is also reporting growing success through its drone pilot training initiatives of youth based at its hubs in Alexandra and Vredenburg in Saldanha. Exposure to programmes like this shift the psyche of youth who are waking up every morning in these communities facing unemployment rates of between 40% and 60% and many job seekers have simply given up looking for work. Suddenly the opportunity to become a drone pilot or an app developer can become a reality.

There is no question that B-BBEE is a contentious topic and participants in the ICT sector have very real challenges in terms of how they integrate it into their operations, particularly as they face pressure from the likes of the financial services and mining sectors who push for higher scorecard ratings.

B-BBEE remains a key part of any access to market strategy for technology businesses and getting it right doesn’t have to be difficult if companies in the sector start leveraging the opportunities available. Opportunities that create value on multiple levels for the sector and promote scarce and critical skills.

We believe that the YES incentive out of the DTIC is not only playing a key role in job creation but it is also rapidly developing technology skills at a grassroots level that will benefit the South African economy for years to come. So YES! B-BBEE is a tech game changer.

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“B-BBEE remains a key part of any access to market strategy for technology businesses and getting it right doesn’t have to be difficult ”

DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION are good for business

When hiring new employees, one of the first things you’ll want to determine is whether they are a good fit for your organisation’s culture. You may have heard it said that people don’t leave jobs, but rather leave their managers. But there’s another factor that can make or break employee retention: diversity and inclusion. According to research by McKinsey & Company, “the key drivers of diversity and inclusion include personal values and experience; skills training; career development opportunities; organisational diversity strategies; and management commitment.”

“DIVERSITY IS A CRITICAL COMPONENT OF A COMPANY’S ABILITY TO INNOVATE AND RESPOND TO THE NEEDS OF ITS EMPLOYEES AND CUSTOMERS”

Diversity is a critical component of a company’s ability to innovate and respond to the needs of its employees and customers. Diversity provides new insights into problems, challenges, and opportunities through different perspectives that come from varied life experiences. When everyone feels part of the team, not just a checkbox on an HR form, innovation can flourish.

“INCLUSIVITY ENSURES EVERYONE FEELS PART OF THE TEAM, NOT JUST A CHECKBOX”

Diversity and inclusion aren’t just about hiring a diverse workforce; they’re about ensuring that everyone feels like they belong, as well. This includes making sure all employees feel comfortable sharing their authentic selves at work. The best way to achieve this is by creating an inclusive culture that makes everyone feel welcome, valued, and respected regardless of their differences.

“95 PERCENT OF DIVERSITY, EQUITY, AND INCLUSION LEADERS SAID THAT DIVERSITY IN THE WORKPLACE MAKES THEM MORE COMPETITIVE”

Diversity and inclusion are key to success. Diversity helps you attract and retain talent, improve the bottom line, and create a competitive advantage that will help you attract customers and investors.

• 70 percent said it helps them recruit top talent;

• 5 percent said it improves employee satisfaction levels;

• 63 percent said it drives innovation;

• 61 percent said it enhances employee engagement;

• 57 percent said it increases revenue.

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JOB APPLICANTS CAN FIND OUT IF YOUR COMPANY HAS BEEN RECOGNISED FOR ITS DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION EFFORTS ON WEBSITES LIKE THE GLAAD WORKPLACE EQUALITY INDEX

The GLAAD workplace equality index is a nongovernmental organisation that monitors media for fair and accurate representation of LGBTQ people. GLAAD also publishes an annual workplace equality index where companies are ranked based on their policies and practices related to sexual orientation and gender identity.

If you’re considering applying for a job at a company that might be less than accepting of diversity, you can use this list as one way to gauge whether or not it’s something you’d like to work for.

DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION ARE INCREASINGLY IMPORTANT TO CONSUMER VOTERS, GIVING YOU ADVANTAGES OVER COMPETITORS WHO LAG BEHIND

As consumers, we are increasingly making our purchasing decisions based on the values of the brands we buy from. Our votes with our dollars are directly reflecting the importance of diversity and inclusion in the workplace.

Gap is an excellent example of a company that has come under fire for not having diverse models in its ads. This can be seen as an opportunity for them to use these criticisms as a learning experience, and become more inclusive going forward.

In contrast, Walmart has been celebrated for being one of the largest companies in America to feature Muslim women who wear hijabs in its “I Am” campaign—a move that was criticised by some but praised by many others who saw it as progress toward greater diversity within their workforce (and beyond).

support diversity through their hiring practices and public statements are more likely to purchase their products.

In addition to attracting new consumers, diversity helps companies attract and retain talent: diverse teams are more innovative, make better decisions, and solve problems more effectively than homogeneous groups do.

“EMPLOYERS CAN LOSE AS MANY AS 50 PERCENT OF THEIR KEY EMPLOYEES IN TIMES OF INTENSE CORPORATE CRISES OR SCANDALS THAT INVOLVE ISSUES SUCH AS GENDER OR RACIAL BIAS”

Diversity and inclusion are essential elements of business success in the 21st century. Employers can lose as many as 50 percent of their key employees in times of intense corporate crises or scandals that involve issues such as gender or racial bias.

Companies have a responsibility to promote diversity and inclusion because it’s the right thing to do, but they also need to be mindful of the important link between diversity and profitability—a company’s ability to attract and retain top talent.

In fact, businesses with more diverse workforces are 24 percent more likely than those that are not diverse to experience sales growth at least twice the national average over five years, according to McKinsey & Company research.

DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION ARE KEY TO BUSINESS SUCCESS AND GROWTH

Diversity and inclusion are more than just buzzwords; they’re essential to a business’ success. Diversity is critical to innovation and responsiveness, while inclusivity ensures everyone feels part of the team, not just a checkbox.

Diversity isn’t just a moral imperative; it’s also good for business. Consumers who know companies actively

It’s important for companies to understand their workforce demographics in order to identify areas where they can improve, then implement policies that ensure those improvements remain sustainable over time.

SOCIAL | DIVERSITY & INCLUSION | EDITORIAL
“CONSUMERS WHO KNOW COMPANIES ACTIVELY SUPPORT DIVERSITY THROUGH THEIR HIRING PRACTICES AND PUBLIC STATEMENTS ARE MORE LIKELY TO PURCHASE THEIR PRODUCTS”
22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 145

DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION How to move from diversity to inclusion

While we have made some slow progress towards ‘diversity’—which is mandated through black economic empowerment codes and employment equity laws—most businesses still have some work to do on the ‘inclusion’ side. Let’s take a closer look at what these terms mean before diving into some ways of improving inclusion.

According to Gallup, diversity is “the full spectrum of human differences.” These may include age, gender, disability, race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, educational background, marital status, sexual orientation and even cognitive styles. Inclusion “can be assessed as the extent to

which employees are valued, respected, accepted and encouraged to fully participate in the organisation,” says Gallup.

As these definitions show, an organisation can be diverse without being inclusive. We can, for example, promote a woman to a position on the executive committee or board to show diversity. But if she isn’t included—if her opinions aren’t sought or respected—her ability to help bring about organisational change will be limited.

To change this picture, we need to start looking beyond black economic empowerment and employment equity scorecards, towards how we actively develop cultures of inclusion. Here are seven tips for building a more inclusive business:

146 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

EXAMINE YOUR OWN UNCONSCIOUS BIAS

All of us form stereotypes about different groups of people in society through what we learn from peers, our education, family and other social institutions over our lifetimes. These stereotypes shape our attitudes and behaviours towards others, yet most of us aren’t even aware of their existence.

Our unconscious bias may lead us to unwittingly discriminate against others in small and big ways based on factors such as age, disability, race, gender, sexual orientation, economic class and other personal characteristics. Before we can become truly diverse and inclusive, leaders must examine and confront their own internal biases. This helps us to behave in ways that are fairer and more rational.

BE CURIOUS

Business leaders that want to create an equitable and inclusive workplace should be ready to immerse themselves in diverse environments. They should be actively curious about the different lived experiences of people from different groups. This engenders respect, understanding and acceptance of different worldviews in the workplace.

SET MEASURABLE GOALS FOR DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION

Diversity and inclusion should be about more than tick-box compliance with employment equity and broad-based black economic empowerment metrics – it should be about creating a workplace where everyone feels included and respected. To achieve this goal, leaders need to set business objectives and create systematic ways to measure the business’s progress. Monitoring innovation within the business can help us to understand whether employees feel included as well as whether there is diversity of thought.

BE A CHAMPION AND MENTOR

Diversity and inclusion shouldn’t be left up to the human resources department or transformation committee – it should be led by champions within the top leadership team. When business leaders sponsor and mentor people from wide-ranging backgrounds, they are setting examples for inclusion. We should also insist on hearing diverse voices in the business. Many people from marginalised or formerly excluded groups may fear speaking out, especially if they are a minority in the business.

CELEBRATE DIVERSITY

Diversity and inclusion doesn’t mean becoming blind to differences in thinking, outlook, gender, race, age or sexual orientation. It means creating an environment where people can celebrate who they are. Each person should feel as though the perspectives and insights they bring to the table are valued and respected – it is in this diversity that our businesses can become stronger and more innovative.

DON’T SHY AWAY FROM DIFFICULT CONVERSATIONS

To create a diverse and inclusive workplace, we need to create spaces where people can engage in difficult conversations. While it is tempting to avoid the elephants in the room, having the courage to speak openly can diffuse many tensions in the workplace. Transparency can help us to resolve conflicts in a more constructive way and to foster mutual understanding and respect.

FOCUS ON PSYCHOLOGICAL SAFETY

The term ‘psychological safety’, coined by Amy Edmondson of Harvard, refers to “a shared belief held by members of a team that the team is safe for interpersonal risk taking”. In such a workplace, each person feels they can bring their full self to work and share their opinions, thoughts and ideas without fear of being ignored, shut down or punished for mistakes. Steps towards creating psychological safety including normalising vulnerability and demonstrating care for each team member as a person, not just a worker or colleague.

DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION—LEVERS FOR BETTER BUSINESS PERFORMANCE

Diversity and inclusion are moral and legal imperatives in South Africa, given our country’s history of systemised exclusion. But there is also a great deal of research which shows genuinely diverse and inclusive businesses financially outperform their less diverse peers. Diversity and inclusion should thus also be a strategic imperative for businesses with ambitions to grow and thrive.

DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION | EDITORIAL
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GOVERNMENT EMPOWERMENT INITIATIVES Transforming the Economy

The public sector has always recognised the importance it plays in economic empowerment, using its funds, networks and infrastructure to further transform the economy. through various initiatives it has sought to decrease unemployment and assist black-owned SMMEs in finding a footing in the mainstream economy. Here we look at four government initiatives which are giving a helping hand to black-owned businesses and the unemployed.

NATIONAL EMPOWERMENT FUND

In order to increase black economic participation, The National Empowerment Fund (NEF) was created through the National Empowerment Fund Act. Its work involves “promoting and facilitating black economic participation by providing financial and non-financial

support to black-owned and managed business [sic],” and is governed by the Public Finance Management Act.

The NEF takes three approaches. The first involves asset management, as the “custodian of certain equity allocations in State-Allocated Investments (SAIs)”. The second is fund management for start-ups, expansion efforts and equity transformation. The third approach involves a strategic project fund, providing entrepreneurs with the opportunity to enter into sectors at an early stage, which has seen the NEF break good ground in venture capital finance.

Besides assisting black people, communities and businesses to adhere to every part of the Codes of Good Practice, they also “focus on preferential procurement, broadening the reach of black equity ownership,

148 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

transformation in management and staff and preventing the dilution of black shareholding”.

BLACK BUSINESS SUPPLIER DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME

The Black Business Supplier Development Programme (BBSDP) offers a cost-sharing grant which supports black-owned businesses in becoming competitive and ensuring that they’re sustainable. The maximum grant is R1-million, R800 000 of which is for “tools, machinery and equipment” and R200 000 for business development and training.

It aims to speed up the integration of SMMEs, which show good promise, into the mainstream economy. Their second aim is to grow black-owned businesses by strengthening the ties between SMMEs and the private and public sectors. The BBSDP supports the work already being done in preferential procurement. The last objective is to support the grant recipients in ensuring they have the capacity to meet the requirements of the opportunities available with larger businesses and the public sector.

BLACK INDUSTRIALISTS SCHEME

Much like the NEF and BBSDP, the Black Industrialists Scheme aims to increase the involvement of blackowned businesses in the economy. The scheme, which was started in 2016, is guided by the Industrial Policy Action Plan, and is separated into three pillars: funding, markets and non-financial support.

“The intended beneficiaries are entities that want to expand their current operations or start-up a new operation and become self-sufficient within 10 years of participation in the programme.”

The scheme offers funds for between 30 - 50% of a project, with a limit of R50-million, and provided a co-founder is available to match the funding. The funds cover capital investments, feasibility studies, post-investment support and business development support.

GROEN SEBENZA

In 2013 the South African National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI) embarked on a major skills development and job creation pilot programme - Groen Sebenza - a Jobs Fund Partnership Project funded by the National Treasury.

“Groen Sebenza is aimed at developing priority skills in the biodiversity sector to create sustainable job opportunities for unemployed graduates and non-graduates (school leavers with a matric certificate) for two and a half years.

“Groen (in Afrikaans meaning green) Sebenza (meaning work in isiZulu) brings young South Africans from previously disadvantaged backgrounds together with experienced biodiversity professionals to learn, grow and eventually gain the competence and confidence to embark on rewarding and meaningful biodiversity careers.

“The programme partnered with 43 host institutions across the country from all tiers of government, NGOs and the private sector and has equipped the participating young people, called Pioneers, with various life and generic skills training e.g. computer literacy, workplace communication, career guidance, leadership and project management skills” - SANBI

In 2022 the Groen Sebenza Phase II Programme was funded to the value of R300-million for the next three years, aiming to recruit 1 050 unemployed graduates (from Diploma to PhD level) and place them nationally in different organisations (government and non-governmental) where they will be trained and mentored in the management of environment/biodiversity.

GOVERNMENT EMPOWERMENT INITIATIVES | EDITORIAL
NEF | SA Gov
DTIC
SANBI
Sources:
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22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 149
“ The public sector has always recognised the importance it plays in economic empowerment, using its funds, networks and infrastructure to further transform the economy ”

BUILDING THE FUTURE Construction industry poised to transform through infrastructure development

The construction sector has been earmarked to play a vital role in aiding recovery after the pandemic. Not only does it employ more than half a million people and generate an income above R400-billion, but it also holds the key to improving the country’s infrastructure.

GROWTH AND RECOVERY

Like most others in South Africa, the construction industry has been working towards recovery after the COVID -19 restrictions and economic fallout. The industry is expected to continue to grow by

around 3% each year between 2023 and 2025.

There is hope that its growth will be added by plans to significantly invest in public infrastructure, which the government has

announced will be implemented over the medium term. These projects will aid in economic growth and job creation for the construction sector and benefit other sectors such as manufacturing, agriculture and transport.

CONSTRUCTION
SECTOR OVERVIEW
150 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

The construction sector recorded one of the highest increases in employment between Q2 and Q3 of 2022, at around 11%.

EMPLOYMENT IN THE CONSTRUCTION SECTOR

530 000 total employees in September 2022

459 000 full-time employees in September 2022

71 000 part-time employees in September 2022

GROSS EARNINGS PAID TO EMPLOYEES

R32.4-billion in September 2021

R30.6-billion in September 2022

INVESTING IN PUBLIC INFRASTRUCTURE

The National Infrastructure Plan 2050 sets out a long-term programme to build and improve South Africa’s infrastructure. This consists of extensive investments in public sector infrastructure. This spend was estimated at around R791 billion in 2021 and has since grown to R812.5 billion, according to the 2022 medium-term expenditure framework.

INFRASTRUCTURE SPENDING WILL FOCUS ON:

Public housing

Expanding powergeneration capacity

Upgrading and expanding the transport network

Improve sanitation and water services

The code aims to make every company responsible for creating a pool of skilled people by investing in sustainable training. It also seeks to fast-track the development and registration of black professionals to make them eligible for management positions. This has seen the number of black professionals in junior and middle management almost triple in the last decade, said the Construction Sector Charter Council’s Gregory Mofokeng.

Health services

Education

PUBLIC SECTOR SPENDING ON INFRASTRUCTURE OVER THE NEXT THREE YEARS

State-owned companies: R251.7-billion

Provincial governments: R185.5-billion

Municipalities: R194.4-billion

BUILDING A TRANSFORMED SECTOR

The construction sector was one of the first to develop sector-specific codes. The code applies to any business that derives more than half its income from construction-related activities. The code speaks to the challenges of the sector and makes it possible to definitively track transformation in the industry.

Sources: EWN | CIDB | Research and Markets | Stats SA | The Africa CEO Forum | treasury

According to the Sanlam Gauge 2022 Report, the construction sector achieves a level 3 contribution rating. Construction achieved 72.6% of the target for skills development, 61% for ESD and 22.5% for socio-economic development. This achievement is in part due to a robust Construction Sector Charter, which prioritises training spending, even for 100% black-owned companies.

It is one of the better performing sectors in terms of ownership, scoring 18.5 out of a possible 27 points, achieving 69% of the target. Management control and women empowerment remain areas that require work. The sector has achieved 67% of its management control target.

Female ownership of 51% and above amounted to around 27% of all construction contractors in the second quarter of 2021, added Bongani Dladla, CEO of the Construction Industry Development Board. Estimates are that around 11% of all industry professionals are women.

However, one of the biggest constraints to transformation in the construction sector is a slowdown in government procurement. This slowdown, along with ineffiencet government process, threatens empowered companies by resulting in project delays or cancellations.

CONSTRUCTION | SECTOR OVERVIEW
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METHANO GROUP INTERVIEW WITH CEO, SEREME JOEL MAPHAKA

Q: Please describe the products and services provided by Methano Group.

We offer services such as developing infrastructure solutions in underground deeping projects for all mining commodities i.e. pre-feasibility to feasibility studies that are made possible by our capable team comprising of engineers (mining, mechanical, civil, electrical, process and industrial), geologists, ventilation specialists, planners, and financial modellers. Our resources have capability of delivering a complete EPCM solution from concepts, feasibility, project financial evaluation, project management and project closure.

Q: What does it mean to be an EPCM partner?

Our approach is more client-centric in our engagement and how we deliver our solution, and in this approach, we see ourselves as EPCM partners to our stakeholders, ranging from our employees, the communities we operate in, investors, and our clients. We listen to our clients and adopt integrative collaboration when developing customised solutions to their problems.

Q: In your opinion, what sets Methano Group apart from the competition?

Our differentiator is the core value diversity that we put at the centre of

our strategy, through recruiting the multi-cultural South African professionals both old and young coming from all boundaries of South Africa, this approach makes us embrace the challenges and benefits of operating as a multicultural organisation in the African market. The engineering solutions we offer to our clients are also backed by the digital transformation (through the use of technology) that we embed in our business processes when developing solutions. We enjoy the benefit of skills transfer from the diverse in-house professionals that take place between the experienced multidiscipline engineering professionals and young professionals. At Methano Group we combine our unique strengths as individuals to make diversity come alive.

Q: The organisation was established in 2014 – what changes have you seen taking place in the sector and in your company over the last 9 years?

The evolution in the industry includes the changes such working remotely and being able to collaborate and deliver projects without regular contact sessions with the project stakeholders. The other reality in mining sector is that the PGM mines are getting deeper and deeper there is going to be a huge demand of solutions for keeping the deeper mining working areas cooler, and most of the proven ways of keeping the deeper mines cooler is through implementing

SEREME JOEL MAPHAKA CEO OF METHANO GROUP
152 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

fridge plant to send the ice down the mine shaft. This is an excellent opportunity for the South African mining engineers to prove their worth, since the world is very interconnected, we need innovative solutions to remain competitive in the global market.

The changes in the organisational levels, we have seen a lot of very talented young graduates in our graduate recruitment programme. This is a positive sign that our universities are really doing well in preparing them for the working place environment. I believe this is also good for South Africa to have such talented young graduates ready for the workplace market.

Q: Please share some of your flagship projects.

We did a pre-feasibility study for a PGM client, for two shafts as a ramp for 200KT and 100 KT projects - the business case project cost was R2-billion. We’ve done mining and engineering project management for reviving a mothballed shaft into full-production for a PGM client in the North West.

We designed a public road in the Limpopo province region and also designed a water management system for both surface and underground in a mining complex for a PGM client in the same province.

We’ve also done modernisation of the mining conveyor guarding for an iron ore client in the Northern Cape, using the Wire Mesh (which is a patented product). Another flagship project is an EPCM of a diamond mine dust plant for a client in the Northern Cape.

How do you ensure diversity and inclusion are embedded in the policies and practices of the company?

Firstly, our recruitment policy accommodates employment of any South Afircan citizen irrespective of their background and culture. We believe South Africa has a rich diversity and if it's embraced, it can be a catalyst to South African and continental economic growth.

METHANO GROUP | INTERVIEW
22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 153
(LEFT TO RIGHT) ANDRE LEVENDAL, BOARD CHAIRPERSON; EDDIE HOLDEN-SMITH, OPERATIONS EXECUTIVE; SEREME JOEL MAPHAKA, CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

We have seen innovative solutions developed by our multicultural team when addressing our clients’ pains in the form of sustainable, technically sound and economical solutions. As a business we saw our revenue growing, new sustainable jobs created, and at the same time we also created partnerships in the communities we operate.

In order to map out the vision we have for the business, we’ve developed a 5-year strategy and invested a great deal of resouces in our employees. We strive to get the message to all to become Methano Group brand ambassadors. To achieve this effectively, we undertook intervention

required to address the integration between Methano Group’s strategy (the compelling vision of its future), its aspirational culture, and leadership development. This would be done through building and aligning the Methano Group team and creating a visual map to articulate our strategy. We believe that this approach will allow operational employees to interpret the strategy in their own language and their perspective.

Q: What is the Sandcone model and how do you apply it in the Group?

We adopted the Sandcone Model to measure the sustainability of our

competitive advantage. Sandcone is a principle used in our business process, both internally and externally when delivering our project value chain. At Methano Group we use the Sandcone model to prioritise actions and initiatives for a sustainable advantage.

Q: How important are partnerships in your business model?

We value strategic partnerships at Methano Group, since we believe they essentially drive shared value. With partnerships we are able to deliver competitive solutions that are feasible from the manufacturing perspective and economy markets. Our clients, the communities where we deliver projects, the government and our investor are valuable partners, and they are all valued equally in our business model.

Q: Do you think the requirements of leadership have changed over the last decade-and- a-half? How would you describe your leadership style – and has it changed over the years?

Yes, there have certainly been a lot of changes and today leaders need to deal with issues. Big data and cloud computing innovation has influenced how leaders are expected to remain

154 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

ahead of the curve. Internally, most businesses need to drive digital transformation and data computing and data analytics call for a high level of transparency. As a result, today leaders have very less opportunity to hold back information that is out of the radar. Today leaders are expected to be well informed on both internal and external affairs issues to remain competitive with the dynamic business environment.

I am an advocate of authentic leadership. I believe people's life experiences are rich enough to be relied upon for valuable input in any team. I like to understand where people are from and what their past experience has been, which helps me understand them better and I can easily know where one strength lies for an organisation to be dependent on its strength when we’re faced with a challenge as a team.

Q: What have been the greatest challenges Methano Group has faced, and how did you overcome them?

We had to make a choice whether we wanted to become a leading EPCM in the African market or not and how we overcame that challenge was by accepting that putting diversity as our

number one value is the only way to deliver the vision. And we have really seen the result with the exponential growth rate in revenue that Methano Group has achieved in the last three financial years.

Q: As CEO, what do you see as your key responsibilities?

I am confronted with the responsibility to get our team aligned with our strategy of becoming the leading EPCM entity in the African market, through keeping them informed of the brand in the market, co-ordinating the implementation of the board resolution both internally and externally, last but not least making sure that we deliver our goal that we have set to all our

stakeholders (communities, employees, government, clients and our valuable investors).

Q: What do you enjoy about what you do? What gets you up in the morning –and does anything keep you awake at night?

I am humbled when I see Methano Group creating sustainable employment opportunities for South Africans, especially from the communities that we operate from. One of my drivers is to keep going to see South Africans with their rich diversity working together to grow the economy of South Africa. I believe we can, especially if we can embrace the value that lies in our diversity.

22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 155

Q: Do you have exciting plans for 2023?

In 2023 we will be setting up an office in Zambia, and our next project is to do environmental scanning in both Botswana and DRC. We believe we have what it takes to contribute to the new projects that will be targeting critical metals such copper, manganese, cobalt, lithium, etc. Finally, we will continue strengthening our relationships in the communities where we operate.

Q: Would you like to share a message with our readership?

We need to remain optimistic about South Africa, since we are blessed with diversity. We just need to embrace the best of the diversity we have to offer for our country to achieve its goals, such as curbing unemployment, economic growth and providing the basics to all South Africans.

Contact Us:

Pretoria (Headquarters)

+27 (12)12 443 6454

210 Amarand Avenue, Pegasus Building 1, Menlyn Maine, Pretoria 0181, South Africa

info@methanogroup.com

Cape Town

+27 (21) 403 6425

Spaces, Dock Road Junction, Cnr Dock and Stanley Road Waterfront, Cape Town 8001, South Africa

info@methanogroup.com

www.methanogroup.com

Methano Group (Pty)

Methano Group

METHANO GROUP | INTERVIEW
156 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

Afrigen Biologics and Vaccines is a Cape Town based biotechnology company strategically directed, supported and capitalised by Avacare Healthcare Group and the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) of South Africa.

Founded in 2014 by Infectious Diseases Research Institute (IDRI) and Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) in Seattle, Afrigen drives a business strategy focussing on product development, bulk adjuvant manufacturing, and supply and distribution of key biologicals to address unmet healthcare needs.

Through international partnerships and local capacity building, Afrigen has established the first ever adjuvant production and formulation technology centre on the African continent. This centre, in partnership with IDRI, a world leader in adjuvant development, focuses on next generation vaccine adjuvants, which are not only geared at preventing disease, but have therapeutic value. These adjuvants confer added potency and durability to vaccines.

In 2020 Agrifen was awarded the “mNRA Technology Transfer” title by World Health Organization (WHO) in partnership with Medicines Patent Pool (MPP) for the low and middle income countries.

The company is dedicated to the local development and production of adjuvants for human and animal vaccines, as well as biologicals critical for Africa’s healthcare challenges.

We are affiliated with Universities in South Africa. With these affiliation, we are able to extend our reach and allow our scientists to engage within the community. Several of our senior scientists, including Renate Lamprecht, Gerhardt Boukes and Caryn Fenner have appointments at the University of Cape Town, Nelson Mandela University and Northwest University respectively.

Our International Collaborators include:

• Infectious Diseases Research Institute, USA

• Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Obafemi Awolowo University, Nigeria

• International Livestock Research Institute, ILRI, Kenya

• Institute for Protein Design, University of Washington, USA

• Institute of Infection and Global Health, University of Liverpool, UK

Through these international partnerships and local capacity building, we have established the first ever adjuvant production and formulation technology centre on the African continent. This centre, in partnership with IDRI, focuses on next generation vaccine adjuvants, which are not only geared at preventing disease, but have therapeutic value. These adjuvants confer added potency and durability to vaccines.

In terms of Veterinary Health, we have partnered with Afrivet to develop vaccines against some of Africa’s most serious livestock diseases. We are also working with other collaborators on a range of projects that aim to improve either existing or newly developed

veterinary vaccines in multiple hosts, including sheep, cattle, chicken and horses. We are working on vaccines against viral, bacterial and parasitic infections.

Researchers have, for decades, used adjuvants as a component of vaccine formulations as it is safe to use and it has improved the overall potency of vaccines. Furthermore, adjuvants have also shown that they have a “dosesparing” effect – meaning that less antigens can be used in formulations that contain adjuvants for the same level of protection. This has major significance for disease outbreaks, where vaccine stocks may diminish due to the large number of people being infected. Adjuvants have also broadened the coverage of strain-specific vaccines which may result in protection against new emerging strains.

With the help of adjuvant technologies, not only is the immune response increased, but the costs of vaccines are lowered due to lower dose requirements, which is essential for the developing world.

+27 21 207 0101

information@afrigen.co.za www.afrigen.co.za

AFRIGEN BIOLOGICS AND VACCINES | ADVERTORIAL
Company Details
5 Kestrel Park, Longclaw Drive, Montague Gardens, Cape Town, 7441

INTERVIEW WITH RICTS

LEADERS IN ALTERNATIVE BUILDING SOLUTIONS

Q: PLEASE DESCRIBE YOUR ROLE AND RESPONSIBILITIES AS EXECUTIVE - SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT.

As an Executive, my role is to come alongside the Directors and Shareholders in leading the organisation and its employees, to implement and enforce the business` needs, values, virtues, code of conduct and all its Policies and Procedures. Furthermore, I am responsible to ensure Continuity, Liquidity, Profitability and the Effective running of the day to day activities within the organisation.

As a HOD in Supply Chain Management, I am responsible for the following departments: Procurement, Stores and Manufacturing. As a Department leader, I have to ensure my team remains motivated, inspired and constantly working on improving themselves and the business. On a daily basis, I enforce our value system to minimise the need to use HR processes to exercise discipline. I scrutinise and influence monthly reports, summarising them into executive reports to provide feedback to our Directors and Shareholders as and when required.

Q: HOW DO YOU ENSURE RICTS’ SUPPLY CHAIN IS BEE COMPLIANT?

RICTS have adopted a culture of utilising mostly BEE compliant suppliers as we believe in the system and want to maintain our Level 1 rating. As a part of our supplier vetting checklist, we check BEE levels, validity as well as their scorecards.

Q: HOW DID COVID IMPACT YOUR BUSINESS MODEL?

Covid has impacted our business model in many ways. The most prominent one would be the drastic increases in the price of raw material across the board. It started with the Steel and PVC industry, but quickly spread among most of our other buyins including timber. This is directly affected by global market

conditions. Unfortunately, most clients did not comprehend the magnitude of these affects and it was not easy increasing the prices of our products. These were unprecedented times and one would hope that clients would come on board. At the same time inflation and the cost of living were increasing, so really we were and still are caught up in this conundrum of imbalances with income and expenses.

Q: RICTS’ VIRTUES ARE “HUMBLE, HUNGRY AND SMART”PLEASE DISCUSS.

In 2021, The Management and Exec team of RICTS came together to discuss our business model and specifically speaking into the culture side of the business. We then came across a book by Patrick Lencioni, “The Ideal Team Player” where he speaks about having these virtues to create a Winning Team. So, in essence, our goal is to employ people who are Humble, Hungry and Smart while at the same time influencing our current employees to adapt these virtues as well. This is to reach our end goal of becoming The Ideal Team.

Q: DO YOU HAVE A MESSAGE OF INSPIRATION FOR OUR READERSHIP?

As a person of Faith, I can say with conviction that the Lord is always on time! Patience is a virtue and what is meant for YOU, will reach you! Work Hard, Remain focused, Trust the Process and always Give your Best!

"In essence, our goal is to employ people who are Humble, Hungry and Smart while at the same time influencing our current employees to adapt these virtues as well. This is to reach our end goal of becoming The Ideal Team."
LIZELLE ABRAHAMS, EXECUTIVE – SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT 158 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

Q: PLEASE DESCRIBE THE SERVICES OFFERED BY RICTS. RICTS Holdings (Pty) Ltd, offers its clients a complete Turnkey Solution which covers an all inclusive support on design, manufacturing, civil works, construction, electrical and mechanical services.

Construction services and certification include:

• Civil Construction and Engineering

• Electrical and Structural Engineering

• Plumbing and Architecture

Our 100 000m2 in-house manufacturing capacity includes:

• 97% control of the manufacturing value chain

• SANS 10400 compliance

• Thermal dynamics (R-Value) manufactured to client specifications

• Product offering comes with a 30-120+minute fire rating

• Robust internal Quality Management System

• Fully guaranteed workmanship

Q: WHICH SECTORS DO YOU OPERATE IN – AND WHICH ARE SHOWING THE MOST GROWTH?

RICTS complies with the Agreement, NHBRC, MBA and Green Building Council Standards. We thrive on excellence across all spheres and guarantee our service offering.

We are currently operating in the following Sector/ Markets:

1. Public Sector (Education and Health). We design and manufacture, classrooms, ECD units, ablution facilities, feeding kitchens, ablution facilities and Administration blocks, yet not limited to staff accommodation and student accommodation.

2. Human Settlements, Housing

3. Agriculture, cold rooms, pack houses and chicken broilers

MONIQUE CARTER, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

INTERVIEW WITH RICTS

4. Private Sector; Divisional walls, facades, offices, IT Roomsand Commercial facilities

Q: CONGRATULATIONS ON BEING A LEVEL1 BBBEE COMPANY. WHAT EMPOWERMENT POLICIES DO YOU HAVE IN PLACE IN RICTS TO ENSURE DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION?

Our Human Capital Division was designed to deal with the empowering of our internal staff through continuous development. We have also started an Academy working hand in hand with the TVET colleges to develop our community and our Youth. We have a motto that says “ In the community for the community” Knowledge is Power!!

At RICTS we live by our values and virtues. We are accountable to each other and our clients. The culture we strive to create at RICTS allows our staff to be vulnerable in order to voice their concerns with Humility. We will remain Hungry as we strive for Excellence and our actions will remain Smart.

Company Details

1 Saxenburg Lane, Blackheath, Cape Town 021 905 0259

info@ricts.co.za

www.ricts.co.za

Social Media: @Interconnect

RICTS | INTERVIEW
22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 159

LEADERS IN ALTERNATIVE BUILDING SOLUTIONS

At RICTS Holdings, we are all about possibilities in modular infrastructure solutions

www.ricts.co.za

Our full turnkey solution includes research, design, in-house manufacturing, and construction managed by professional staff with a collective experience of over 200 years.

As an accredited and certified company, we subscribe to the highest degree of quality and compliance to ensure you have the right foundation to meet industry requirements.

021 905 0259 info@ricts.co.za sales@ricts.co.za

Construction services and certifications include:

• Civil Construction and Engineering

• Electrical and Structural Engineering

• Plumbing and Architecture

Our 100 000m2 in-house manufacturing capacity includes:

• 97% control of the manufacturing value chain

• SANS 10400 compliance

• Thermal Dynamics (R-Value) manufactured to client specifications

• Robust internal Quality Management System

• Fully guaranteed workmanship

We change communities by empowering SMMEs and entrepreneurs through our in-house skills development training academy to enter the modular space market through mentorship and certification.

160 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 ST EDITION
GBCSA, NHBRC & Agrément
• B-BBEE Level 1 • CIDB 8GB 7CE • Member of MBA • Top Empowerment Company
Certified
SPECIALISED INDUSTRIES EDUCATION HEALTH AGRICULTURE HOUSING MINING COMMERCIAL INDUSTRIAL
SCAN TO VIEW PREVIOUS PROJECTS

MOVIDNA SERVICES - SAVING YOU TIME, MONEY AND HEADACHES

What product do you make, or what service do you offer?

• Shafts (Normal or Hardened)

• Turning

• Milling

• Machining

• Industrial Mechanics

• Breakdown

• Refurbishment

• Projects

• Plant Maintenance

Approximate market share: 55%

Subsidiaries: Movidna Services and Movidna Rollers

Holding company: Movidna Group Bank: First National Bank

Accountants: Cronje & Cronje

Current customer base: Local

Major accounts / key clients: Arcelormittal, Sasol, Ceramic Industries and Tshipi entle Mine

CONTRACTS & AWARDS

Movidna Services is very actively involved in the market with full systems in place and monitored for performance. We have now ventured into training with Sasol and are to be accredited by TLV Japan in June 2023. With this opportunity, we can specialise in Steam Trap Monitoring systems and commence business in South Africa’s Petrochem sector.

Not only has the company transformed but it also contributes to Skills Development through apprenticeship programmes with MERSETA.

We promise to review your current problem and determine how it can be solved. Our services will help save you time, money and headaches. We are confident we can come up with a plan that will save you money and meet deadlines within a scheduled timeframe.

Target market

• We offer quick turnaround times and can guarantee our quality

• We are committed to offering customer satisfaction and will assist wherever possible

• We are a BEE-associated company

• We are a specialised technical team

• We do most of our job on-site putting you back on schedule

• We provide a 24/7 emergency response onsite service

• Fabrications

• Stairways and Platforms

• Plant Erections

• Structural

• Piping

Do you have a Unique Selling Proposition?

Yes, we engage with clients from project planning and execution work breakdown structure and provide constant communication and updates.

What innovations have you been responsible for?

Redesigning the module concept and engineering approvals for modifications

Report on recent corporate events –mergers and acquisitions

New installation of Bins and De-tar full refurbishment projects

BEE achievements: Level 1 ownership.

COMPANY INFORMATION

STATISTICS/ DEMOGRAPHICS/ HISTORY

Year founded: 2014

Founding members:1

Number of employees: 15

Number and location of branches:2

Trade affiliations: None

Memberships: SEIFSA

Strategic partnerships: N/A

BEE partner: None

BUSINESS & FINANCE

Turnover: R 11 113 895.99

Operating profit: R 489 967.57

Net profit: R 125 063.16

Financial year-end: February

Industrial standards and awards achieved Recent major contracts: ETP 3 Mechanical and Structural Fabrication

MOVIDNA SERVICES | PROFILE

NTGR ENGINEERING PROJECTS

at NTGR Engineering Projects.

As a Director, my duties include selecting Senior Management, determining the company’s strategic direction and growth trajectory, making sure the company responds to market demands, keeping track of progress in achieving goals and policies, and reporting on the company’s operations to relevant parties. My greatest job as the Director of a company with a growth strategy is to inspire, motivate and drive our teams. At times, I have to roll up my sleeves to do just that.

Q: What services does the company provide?

We are an award-winning multidisciplinary South African-owned engineering company. Our core engineering services provide complete engineering designs and support services in Civil, Mechanical, Electrical and Structural engineering, implementing innovative solutions to add real value using state-of-the-art design technics coupled with our advanced use of BIM platforms. We offer quality infrastructure design, roadconstruction, rehabilitation, upgrades and construction solutions from the planning, approval, pre-construction planning and commissioning phases. We have in-house multidisciplinary engineering teams that provide comprehensive EPC services for clients across diverse industries, delivering capital efficiency and project certainty. We are experienced in the EPCM/Turnkey project contract suites such as FIDIC, NEC4, etc.

Q: How do you ensure that transformation is part of the organisational culture?

Not only is gender equality a fundamental human right, but it also forms the basis for sustainability. At NTGR Engineering,

our top priority is women empowerment. We want to actively participate in the development of our economy as well as change the areas of our economy that are predominately male. As a result, we have taken significant steps to ensure that women make up at least 60% of our management ranks, and as part of our conscious efforts to support our nation’s socio-economic goals, we prioritise skills development and make efforts to procure services from female-led organisations.

Q: What are the company’s flagship projects?

We are particularly proud of our road rehabilitation projects as a business. Rehabilitation activities for concrete, asphalt pavement and drainage structures are included in the scope of work for the implementation of these projects. The SDGs’ Goal 9 focuses on creating a resilient infrastructure to support inclusive, sustainable industrialisation and encourage innovation. We are delighted to be able to make a positive contribution through our flagship projects, as adequate infrastructure, particularly road infrastructure is needed to ensure economic growth. Our prominent projects currently are the Rustenburg base metal refinery internal road network rehabilitation with Anglo American, and with the Rustenburg Local Municipality, where we are building and maintaining roads.

Q: Do you have exciting plans for 2023? We aim to improve our operations and align them with recognised international standards to ensure efficiency and accountability across the board, while

responding to the needs of our local markets. As a result, we have developed a Group Level Strategic Growth Plan as well as a strategy implementation exercise that will be initiated with the sole purpose of training all Business Unit Managers to align with operational changes. The aim of this exercise is to create a business with measurable growth and operations to ensure continuity. Environmental, social and governance (ESG) issues are of increasing concern to the investor community. As a business we have invested our resources and capacity in establishing a new business unit that is aimed at managing ESG risks and opportunities for our clients. “Organisations with operations in Africa must engage meaningfully with ESG to build robust sustainability strategies that meet stakeholder expectations and enable compliance with global and domestic mandatory and voluntary ESG standards and codes”.

MEET ABEDNICO MKHARI, DIRECTOR OF
162 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

BVI-LEADING THE ENGINEERING SPACE FOR 5 DECADES AND COUNTING

However, being interested in engineering, and becoming an engineer don’t necessarily follow a logical sequence. When I matriculated with exemption from Carlton-Van Heerden Secondary School in Progress Township back in 1992, I had the opportunity, but not the means. My widowed mother could not afford to send me to study further.

As fate would have it, though, I was fortunate to receive a bursary from BVi at the end of 1992. Without it, there’s a strong chance I wouldn’t be on my chosen path today. But thanks to BVi’s progressive thinking, I am. It’s for this reason that I’m so committed to youth empowerment and transformation.

At BVi, I was exposed to various projects as a Design Technologist and was responsible for managing them. Concurrently, I served as the Upington Branch Chairperson of SAICE from 2004 to 2011 and was also a member of the SAICE National Council. I am currently a member of the BVi Operational Committee and serve on the BVi Board of Directors in the capacity of Managing Director. In 2018, I became a Board Member at Consulting Engineers South Africa (CESA) and was elected on 24 November 2021 as the incoming Deputy President for 2022 and 2023.

BVi – Leading in Transformation

A success story of David Leukes –BVi’s Managing Director

In the engineering environment, we are well-equipped as industry professionals to identify challenges, simulate various possible solutions, and optimise to create economically sustainable infrastructure. It’s second nature, and we do this to improve the lives within our communities, driven at times by our own childhood experiences.

My passion for engineering began from an early age – a fascination with the infrastructure environment surrounding me in my hometown of Upington, Northern Cape. I wanted to know more and to understand how roads are built, where electricity comes from, and how water can flow from a tap on demand.

In 1993, I started my studies at the then Cape Technikon (now Cape Peninsula University of Technology). With BVi’s study assistance, I completed my National Diploma in Civil Engineering. During this time, I also completed my in-service training with BVi.

Subsequently, I was awarded a study bursary by BVi to complete my BTech degree on a part-time basis in Bloemfontein at the then Free State Technikon (now Central University of Technology). Further down the track, a BVi bursary also assisted me to complete an MBA degree at the University of Stellenbosch Business School (Bellville Campus). A highlight of my career was when I registered as a Professional Technologist through the BVi Mentorship Programme in 2002.

These career milestones have shaped my vision for an inclusive and vibrant construction sector in all its facets, building on the solid foundation BVi has established since 1967 – 55 years of engineering excellence.

BVi prides itself on providing professional services in identifying and implementing engineering projects for medium to large corporations, in South Africa and internationally. We are also extremely proud to have achieved a 58% majority black-owned shareholding and the status of a Level 1 B-BBEE contributor. This makes BVi one of the largest black-owned consulting engineering firms in South Africa.

Big Enough to Make A Difference, Small Enough To Care

Achieving a Level 1 BBBEE scorecard is not an isolated event, but the result of all the programmes undertaken by BVi. In addition to ownership, these include:

164 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

Employment Equity: BVi’s workforce is more than 50% black, and we’re close to reaching our target of 50% black degreed employees

Skills Development: BVi is running an extensive mentorship/learnership programme to fast-track career paths for youth. In addition, BVi has numerous bursaries and study assistance agreements, which contribute to young employees gaining knowledge

BVi BEE Employee Trust: There are currently nine individuals on the BVi BEE Trust receiving additional support in terms of their career development. Over the last five years, 10 Trust beneficiaries were offered Director or Associate positions in BVi, which says everything about the programme’s success

Supplier Development: BVi runs various supplier development programmes that assist small black companies to become sustainable

Social Responsibility: BVi supports its local community organisations. We find that a structured approach to corporate social responsibility can add more value than ad-hoc donations

BVi Visionaries: To celebrate our 50th anniversary in 2017, we launched the BVi Visionaries project. There were seven BVi Visionaries winners nationally – each of them qualifying for a bursary and educational support for the duration of their studies.

The BVi Academy and Internship Programme: BVi Consulting Engineers has identified the lack of suitable employment opportunities for graduates as a major risk to the

future of engineering. To address this, the organization launched the BVi Academy to provide opportunities to recent graduates as part of the BVi Graduate Engineer Programme, through our multi-disciplinary firm.

Strategic Transformation

With the appointment of Alfredo Malgas as the Transformation Manager and Board Member of the BVi Group, the Group’s transformation efforts are now better planned and coordinated between the different subsidiaries. Furthermore, our BVi National Employment Equity Committee has been mandated to ensure a planned and equitable appointment process for all incoming applicants.

The most important success factor, however, is the full support and buy-in of the top management structures in the Group, as well as employees at every level within the organisation. We’re all proud to be making a difference as we build our business and contribute to a better South Africa.

Company Details

BVI | ADVERTORIAL
Menlyn Corporate Park, Garsfontein Road (M30), Menlyn, Pretoria, 0181 +27 12 940 1111 pta@bvi.co.za www.bvi.co.za

NGHILAZI ENGINEERS

FIND A BETTER WAY INNOVATE FOR THE FUTURE ENJOY THE EXPERIENCE

Nghilazi Engineers was founded by Julius Baloyi in the year 2018 as a 100% black owned and managed firm with diversified interests - which include the provision of General Building Works, Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Civil Engineering and Commercial Cleaning Services. Our services are focused on operational delivery, which is supported by the commitment of staff thereby resulting in a self-monitoring operation.

Julius Baloyi has many years of work experience for major companies like Group 5. He holds a B Tech in Power Engineering and Project Management. He also holds a Wireman’s License which means he can COC his own projects. Nghilazi Engineers houses talent with qualifications and experience for the services they offer. This enables them to tackle projects from inception until completion, through the desired time frame, costs, quality and scope.

environment based on the technology we are using. We challenge our thinking in pursuit of new solutions. We take calculated risks, we innovate, we experiment and simplify.

We are registered with the Construction Industry Development Board (CIDB), the National Home Builders Registration Council (NHBRC) and the Electricial Conformance Board of SA (ECB).

Our Services

Mechanical & Civil Engineering Heating, air conditioning and ventilation systems are all key areas to consider as well as water cooling/ heating, humidity control or air filtration. Our systems are designed to provide superior comfort and air quality along with sensible controls. We continue to identify the latest trends and new technologies while ensuring a design that is practical, easy to maintain, and flexible.

Services offered

• Engineering Consulting

• Water and wastewater plants and pipelines

• Test Systems; climatic, vibration, force, torque and shock testing.

• Inspection systems; testing and control.

We have proficiency in all areas of telecoms, power transmission and distribution, building, and mechanical and electrical projects from LV to 500kV systems to telecommunication systems.

We have the volume to deliver services through all stages of project from planning, development, design and project delivery.

We also have the proficiency to encompass our services to integrate with the client’s project management and design team.

Throughout our years of trading, we have achieved continuous longterm growth and sustainability in our business by providing our customers with the ultimate sales experience, high-quality products and legendary after-sales support. We aim to create value through leadership in every market in which we operate.

We aim to streamline processes and simplify what has been overcomplicated for too long. We strive to make an impact on people, buildings, and the

• Commercial and residential buildings

• Land development

• Infrastructure for sustainable energy projects

We offer a full variety of multidisciplinary expertise across the various project stages comprising of planning, permitting, designing and professional services during the construction of mechanical, civil

WE ARE RESULTS-FOCUSED RESPONSIVE, DYNAMIC, CHARISMATIC, FUN AND DIVERSE.
166 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

and electricity transmission networks from low and medium voltage distribution networks and high voltage network interconnection from power generation sites, mining and thermal facilities. Our clients include utility companies, mining companies, the SA Government, private-sector energy developers and contractors.

Electrical Engineering

Our expertise includes a full range of electrical services, from power quality and high-voltage networks to switchboards and uninterrupted power supplies. Our engineer’s design systems that will meet the code as well as the power, lighting, and control needs of your structure without over-engineering.

Meeting all demands and ensuring your building is as efficient and cost-effective as possible.

Services offered

• Engineering Consulting

• Generator installation andmaintenance

• Instrumentation

• Electrical and building maintenance.

• Power management.

• Services; COCs, power sizing, replacement parts

• Fire detection installations

• Inverters, battery chargers, UPSs.

Work with a solution focused reliable team who never stop until the job is well done.

WE’RE NOT AFRAID OF PUSHING BOUNDARIES TO SERVE OUR CLIENTS BETTER

info@nghilaziengineers.co.za

www.nghilaziengineers.co.za

MASSLIFT AFRICA | INTERVIEW
Contact Us: Manhattan Office Park, 16 Pieter St, Highveld 012 004 2169
22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 167

AUTOMOTIVE SECTOR OVERVIEW

THE ENGINE OF ECONOMIC GROWTH Powering job creation in the automotive industry

The automotive industry is currently a significant contributor to the South African economy and has long been used as a measure of the country’s economic performance. Not only does it support 110 000 jobs across various manufacturers, but it indirectly supports 1.5 million people through its wide network of suppliers.

KEEPING THE ECONOMY ON COURSE

The South African automotive industry is one of South Africa’s largest economic sectors by revenue, contributing 4.3% to the country’s GDP. The industry accounts for more than 17% of the country’s manufacturing output.

The automotive sector is a key gauge of economic performance, and a close correlation exists between domestic new vehicle sales and the economy’s overall performance. This was evident in the new vehicle market’s robust recovery after the pandemic when it showed growth of 22.2% to 464 493 units.

The sector relies on a network of thousands of companies that supply supplying parts, components, and materials, as well as a retail and vehicle maintenance network of dealers. According to The Automotive Business Council (Naamsa), “no other industry in South Africa has such an expansive

168 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

reach across the country, delivering economic benefits and creating jobs in so many different sectors”.

AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY EXPORTS

The 5th largest exporting sector

The sector accounts for 18% of South Africa’s total exports

The automotive industry exports to 152 countries

298 020 vehicles were exported in 2021

Automotive component exports were valued at R69-billion in 2021

DRIVING TRANSFORMATION THROUGH LOCALISATION

Localisation – increasing the number of components assembled and manufactured in South Africa – could offer a significant opportunity to facilitate transformation in the automotive sector and facilitate the entry of BEE participants to its supply chain.

To meet the objectives set out in the South African Automotive Masterplan 2021 - 2035, the South African automotive industry must create 485 new businesses in Tier 2 automotive products. Of those, 50% need to be locally-owned and black-owned.

South Africa contributes 0.7% of the global automotive manufacturing industry value.

SOUTH AFRICAN AUTOMOTIVE MASTERPLAN IN A NUTSHELL:

Double automotive employment in the supply chain

Grow the automotive industry from 600 000 to 1.4-million vehicles a year in production

Increase local content in South African assembled vehicles from around 37% to 60% by 2035.

South African vehicle production to 1% of global production by 2035

THE FUTURE OF THE AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY

The auto industry is undergoing rapid technological changes, with automation increasing and the manufacturing side of the industry moving towards producing components for electric vehicles. The industry is made up of seven main companies that make up the automotive assembly sector in South Africa. There are more than 400 other companies that manufacture automotive components.

The automotive manufacturing sector has significantly increased capital expenditure over the last 15 years, spending more than R9-billion in

2020. Most of this spending was put towards automation, production machinery and plant equipment. This was accompanied by widespread workplace restructuring.

The auto industry faces challenges in terms of black ownership, with all seven of South Africa’s major motor manufacturers being foreign-owned.

This has required the industry to rely heavily on the Equity Equivalent Investment programme, which allows foreign companies to generate points in lieu of a direct sale of equity. This programme has seen the creation of the R6-billion Industry Transformation Fund, which establishes local component suppliers in the motor manufacturing supply chain. This fund has led to increased local production, black ownership and job creation.

Transformation in management control is also improving in the industry, with around 11% of the sector having black CEOs.

The sector still finds it challenging to implement gender equity, but there has been an increase in women taking up roles shopfloor rather than in clerical positions.

AUTOMOTIVE | SECTOR OVERVIEW
Sources: Business Tech Engineering News Naamsa Salam Gauge Report The Conversation 22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 169

MASSLIFT AFRICA

SOLE DISTRIBUTOR OF MITSUBISHI FORKLIFTS IN SOUTHERN AFRICA

Interview with Masslift Africa, the sole distributor of Mitsubishi forklifts in southern Africa, discussing their recent recognition for service excellence, the products and services they offer, their company culture, diversity and inclusion policies, memorable achievements, and their CSI initiatives.

Q: Congratulations on receiving the Top Empowerment Award for Customer Focus. What does winning this award mean to Masslift?

We are extremely proud to be recognised for the one thing that our team has in common: Service Excellence. Winning the award was a great achievement as we are smaller compared to the others. We were recognised for being customercentric, and that is a pat on the back for us as we strive to offer the best service in the business. For an external party to recognise that, we were delighted. It was all based on how we measure our customer interactions, and they felt that we had a comprehensive approach, focusing on the customer's voice compared to others in the running.

Q: Can you tell us about the products and services that Masslift offers both locally and on the continent?

We offer a wide range of products, including internal combustion forklifts, counterbalance electric forklifts, and warehousing equipment, which includes power pallet trucks, stackers, high-level order pickers, and VNA (Very Narrow Aisle) equipment. Our forklift range includes the Mitsubishi Ninja (2 - 3 ton range), the Mitsubishi Grendia, the Mitsubishi counterbalance range (FBCB range and FBTCB 3-wheel range) and the Carer big electric forklift range for niche markets.

Q: What is the Masslift Ninja Culture? At Masslift Africa, we believe that an organisation with a strong and positive culture creates trusting relationships with stakeholders. The Masslift Ninja is our culture spokesperson. As a collective, we refer to ourselves as Ninjas because this concept embodies our cultural pillars, our values, and the way we need to think and act in order to achieve our goals. Traditionally the Ninja has worked alone. At Masslift, we bring together individuals who come from diverse backgrounds, all equipped with unique skills and, when combined, we create a synergised highperforming group environment. We are a unique collective of Ninjas, we are fun and playful towards one another but calm, mindful, focused, and productive in our individual roles.

Q: How does Masslift ensure that diversity and inclusion are embedded in the company's culture and policies? Masslift's policies are aligned with all relevant legislation to ensure diversity and equality. One of Masslift's values also speaks towards diversity and inclusion. We are proud to be a 71% black-owned business, and this reaffirms our drive towards economic transformation and the desire to help lift our country to new heights. Our transformation agenda has ensured that our leadership and the middle managers are representative of the demographics of the country, which has been an incremental improvement over a number of years.

Q: What have been some of your most memorable achievements? Some of our most memorable achievements include celebrating 30 years in the industry, upgrading our staff count by 25% in the past 18 months, receiving awards from our principal, Mitsubishi Forklifts, for improving market

share in internal combustion, electric and warehouse trucks as well as Top Market share for the 2020/21 period for electric and warehouse trucks and obtaining MerSETA accreditation.

Q: Can you describe your CSI initiatives? Masslift Africa is committed to giving back to the community. One of our initiatives includes working closely with the Mahon Foundation which aims to empower the next generation of South Africans through scholarships, bursaries, and career furthering programmes. In saying this, we have donated over R250 000 to the foundation since 2018 and believe in investing in the youth and empowering them through educational programmes and training. We have recently made a joint donation with our stakeholders to the Nelson Mandela Children's Hospital at our golf day and gala dinner event, commemorating our success in memory of Madiba as we all celebrate Nelson Mandela Day. The contributions made by Masslift Africa and its stakeholders will make a significant difference in changing the lives of the most vulnerable people in our society by providing muchneeded Healthcare.

Q: How important is ESG to Masslift? Being a responsible world and corporate citizen is a very important part of Masslift's DNA and we are constantly exploring ways to play a positive role in the Environmental, Social and Governance departments. Our commitment to ESG principles is demonstrated through our sustainability practices, which are integral to our business operations.

Q: Can you please unpack some of your sustainability practices? We have implemented a number of initiatives to reduce our carbon footprint and conserve natural resources.

170 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

For instance, we have switched from using bottled water to water coolers in our offices to reduce plastic in the environment, installed energy-efficient bulbs throughout our branches, and implemented e-invoicing and e-statements as well as double-sided printing to reduce paper usage in the business. We have also implemented a waste management programme to reduce our waste production and recycle materials wherever possible.

In terms of social responsibility, in addition to our CSI initiatives focused on education and healthcare, the upskilling and development of communities within which industries operate is critical to ensuring economic growth and a prosperous future for the country. Masslift Africa is having a positive impact on alleviating unemployment by providing employment opportunities for those communities within which the company operates through our accredited apprenticeship programme. Once employed, the company also aids in their skills development by constantly providing mentorship and training for them to stay up to date with the industry. Finally, we uphold the highest standards of governance by adhering to all relevant regulations and ethical principles. We believe in transparency and accountability

in all our business dealings, and we strive to maintain the trust of our stakeholders by upholding the highest standards of integrity and professionalism.

Q: What exciting plans do you have for 2023?

From a product perspective, we don't have any major plans to expand as we are busy consolidating our existing products and services. Our focus for 2023 is on further developing our internal capabilities and people development. We have recently been accredited by MerSETA – the Manufacturing, Engineering and Related Services Sector Education and Training Authority - to run a learnership scheme. This scheme will enable us to upskill our existing employees and attract new talent to the company. Right now, it's all hands on deck to ensure we offer the service that we promised to our customers when we do deals with them. It's infrastructure and footprint building, making sure we upskill and train our staff, upgrading our accounting system and updating our entire performance management programme.

In conclusion, at Masslift, we are committed to creating a sustainable and responsible business that benefits all our stakeholders. Our focus on ESG

principles, as well as our commitment to people development, will enable us to achieve our long-term goals while creating value for our customers, employees, shareholders, and the broader community. Commitment to people development will enable us to achieve our long-term goals while creating value for our customers, employees, shareholders, and the broader community.

MASSLIFT AFRICA | INTERVIEW Contact Us: 34 5th Street, Wynberg, Sandton Park: GPS ADDRESS - 766 5th Street, Wynberg, Sandton 011 786 8524 sales@mlift.co.za www.mitsubishiforklifts.co.za 22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 171

Leading automobile manufacturer, Beijing Automotive Industry Corp. (BAIC), one of the largest automobile manufacturers in China continues to invest in South Africa through a joint venture with the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) that led to the formation of BAIC South Africa. Today, this single, largest investment in the country’s 40 years of investments, boasts a local manufacturing and assembly plant in Gqeberha and a network of over 23 dealerships nationwide.

BAIC Group, with its significant influence and economic strength in the global automobile industry, ranked 162 on Fortune 500 list with a business revenue of 481.76 billion RMB. This global brand has been listed in the Fortune 500 for ten consecutive years, fully highlighting its strength in highquality development.

For more than 65 years with headquarters in Beijing, BAIC has now developed into a large state-owned automobile enterprise group covering the R&D and manufacturing of complete vehicles and parts and

components, auto services and trade, integrated mobility services, finance and investment and general aviation. Since 1958 when Beijing Automotive Works produced the Jinggangshan sedan, the first model developed on its own, BAIC has developed and manufactured China’s firstgeneration light off-road vehicle, and the first-generation light truck. The company also established Beijing Jeep Corporation, China’s first joint venture specialising in vehicle manufacturing, Beijing Hyundai Auto Co., Ltd and Beijing Benz Automotive Co., Ltd., the model of strengthening strategic joint venture and cooperation.

BAIC owns a number of well-known subsidiaries and R&D facilities, including Beijing Motor, BAIC BJEV, BAIC ORV, Beiqi Changhe, Beiqi Foton, Beijing Hyundai Motor, Beijing Benz Automotive, Beijing General Aviation and Beijing Automotive Technology Center. With Beijing as the centre, BAIC has established production facilities of passenger vehicles and commercial vehicles of its own brands, new energy vehicle production facilities, joint venture

passenger vehicle production facilities and general aviation production facilities in more than ten provinces and municipalities in China. Its R&D system is seen in seven regions of five countries across the world. BAIC vehicle factories and KD factories have been built in over 30 countries and regions, whose products are sold to over 80 countries and regions worldwide. In recent years, upholding the philosophy of innovation-driven development characterised by electrification, intelligence, connectivity and sharing, BAIC has vigorously advanced the integration of resources and restructuring of core competence, planned for presence in the new energy vehicle industry in advance, conducted research on and explored the industrialization of forward-looking technologies like intelligent connectivity and big data, focused on the core competence of its own brands, worked intensively on the after-market and accelerated the pace of going global, so as to push forward its strategic transition from a traditional manufacturer to service and innovationoriented manufacturer.

172 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

“Your Wish, Our Way” philosophy

BAIC Group will remain committed to the philosophy of “Your Wish, Our Way”, and take the path to sustainability featuring large-scale, high-end, service-based, international and low-carbon development, in a bid to build itself into a service and innovation-oriented manufacturer, provide the public with high-tech, quality, safe and eco-friendly travelling solutions, and become an internationally competitive automaker and service provider and a leader in quality and pleasant travelling.

A truly global brand

BAIC has developed 30 sales channels and 171 sales outlets and established 41 aftersales channels and 196 service outlets in 30 countries across the world, with more than 100,000 sets sold overseas on a cumulative basis and covering Asia, Africa, America and some other destinations of the automobiles exported from China.

In terms of the construction of bases, on July 24, 2018, witnessed by the heads of State of China and South Africa, the general welding workshop of BAIC’s South African project was inaugurated, and the first X25 vehicle successfully rolled off the production line. At the ceremony marking the event, Chinese President Xi Jinping highly praised and affirmed the project, which has a planned output of 40,000-50,000 sets each year.

The BAIC SA plant is not just the biggest auto manufacturing facility in scale invested by a Chinese enterprise in South Africa and in the entire African continent, it is also a typical example of the successful combination of the need for industrial development and investment in South Africa and the manufacturing capacity and internationalisation from China. It will also remarkably enhance the upgrading of industrialisation in South Africa. The BAIC Group will devote its resources in capital, technology and management to promoting machinery manufacturing capability in

South Africa. The BAIC SA plant will upgrade the field of manufacturing technology, from the traditional manufacturing techniques by increasing automatic technique rate and quality and decreasing waste zgas emissions.

One of BAIC’s flagship SUVs, the BEIJING X55 was selected as the 2023 South African Car of the Year finalist, a significant accolade given that BEIJING X55 was only launched in November 2022. This compact SUV with avant-garde styling, excellent power, advanced technology and the latest generation of the BAIC Group’s BMFA (Beijing modular functional architecture) platform chassis platform, underpins future traditional fuel vehicle models and plug-in hybrid vehicle models.

The company also boasts other futuristic vehicles in the offroad market, most notably the B40 Plus and B80, which are both inspired by BAIC’s ties to both Jeep and Mercedes-Benz, with the former stretching back to the 90s and the latter having been established in 2005. Offered in China since 2016, the B80, like the model positioned below it, the B40 PLUS 8AT, available in 2 litre Petrol Turbo or 2.0 Diesel Turbo, is the result of a joint venture between BAIC and in this case, Mercedes-Benz. The B80, which is currently used by the Chinese military, measures 4 765 mm in overall length, with its wheelbase stretching 2 800 mm and width 1 890 mm.

The BAIC Group continues to transfer its experience in terms of skills, technology and management to South Africa via their experienced managers in BAIC SA, to help cultivate and develop local management and personnel, ultimately contributing to job creation, training and management skills improvement. BAIC SA believes all these factors will dramatically enhance the industrial modernisation process in South Africa and bring more competitive and relevant products to the local consumer.

BAIC IN SOUTH AFRICA | ADVERTORIAL 22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 173

INCREASING JOBS THROUGH REAL ESTATE Tackling transformation challenges

The property market contributes R5.8-trillion to South Africa’s GDP, according to the Property Sector Charter Council. But despite its economic importance, it is highly susceptible to economic shifts such as changes in the repro rate, employment levels and minimum wages. All of these affect who can afford to purchase property, and in turn, affect the sector’s performance.

A BUOYANT MARKET CREATING JOBS

The South African housing market is highly reliant on the financial services sector’s appetite for lending. This remained high during 2022, with mortgages as a percentage of the

purchase price rising as high as 93%.

This saw the number of properties sold during the first half of 2022 staying above pre-pandemic levels.

This strong performance saw an increase in employment, with Stats SA recording a 0.3% increase in

employees (6 000 people) in the financial intermediation, insurance, real estate and business services industry – into which the property sector falls – year-on-year. Gross earnings by employees also rose yearon-year by almost 4% (R7.9-billion).

PROPERTY SECTOR OVERVIEW 174 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

The financial, real estate and business service sector accounted for 22% of the country’s real value added.

EMPLOYMENT IN THE FINANCIAL INTERMEDIATION, INSURANCE, REAL ESTATE

2

PROCUREMENT IN THE PROPERTY SECTOR

12% of procurement is spent with majority black-owned (51%+) companies

5% of procurement is spent with black, women-owned companies

CHALLENGES IN MEETING TRANSFORMATION TARGETS

Gender equality remains a particularly challenging area for the sector.

A report by the Women’s Property Network estimated that on average for the past nine years, male executive directors have held 85% of posts, with women in only 15% of the roles.

2

238 000 part-time employees in June 2022

TRANSFORMATION THROUGH PROCUREMENT

According to the Property Sector Charter Council, more of the industry should be encouraged to procure from black- and women-owned businesses. It also has lobbied for the government, with sizeable property holdings, to procure at least 60% of all property services and professionals from majority black-owned companies, suppliers and service providers.

The Council has also advocated for increased transparency in procurement, including public advertising, and the development of B-BBEE procurement policies to ensure companies spend a minimum of 50% of all procurement of property and professional services with black-, women- and youth-owned companies.

While the industry plays a key role in the economy, the property sector has struggled to reach its transformation targets.

The Sanlam Gauge Report found that the sector had low management control figures and high financial barriers to entry, saying it had “a long way to go in terms of meeting B-BBEE targets”.

While all the sectors reported on struggled with management transformation, the property sector ranked lowest, achieving only 35.5% of its target.

The sector faces unique challenges in that it is a highly specialised industry, and professionals can take years to gain the skills and experience required to successfully control and manage a property company. In addition, many companies require access to capital – a significant barrier to entry - while facing generally long-term returns.

These challenges have contributed to low ownership scores in the sector. The property industry achieved 67% of its ownership target.

In terms of ESD, the sector scored 62% of its target and it scored 66.6% in skills development.

In 2021, six out of 24 real estate investment trusts listed on the JSE had 100% white, male executive directors.

TRANSFORMATION IN REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT TRUSTS EXECUTIVES

In 2021, 81% of executive directors were male and only 19% of positions were held by women

In 2021, 76% of executive directors were white and only 24% were people of colour.

Between 2013 and 2021, an average of 78% of executive directors were white, with people of colour representing 22% at the executive level.

However, most companies met their targets in terms of women and people of colour holding positions in the nonexecutive workforce

TRANSFORMATION IN REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT TRUSTS NON-EXECUTIVE WORKFORCE

12% of procurement is spent with majority black-owned (51%+) companies

5% of procurement is spent with black, women-owned companies

351 000 employees in September 2022 AND BUSINESS SERVICES INDUSTRY 113 000 full-time employees in June 2022
PROPERTY | SECTOR OVERVIEW 22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 175
Sources: Salam Gauge Report | State Of Gender Diversity In The Listed Real Estate Sector 2022 | Daily Maverick | Property Charter Sector Council Business Tech | SAIBPP

at what you do when people can associate you with what you do,” says Yusuf Essa, who’s affectionately known as “Choppee” by friends and the business community. It’s that nickname that inspired the name of his international award-winning real estate business, Choprop SA, which he started with his late wife, Shazia.

Yusuf and Shazia ran various businesses before getting into property, which has seen the business grow and along the way it has made a tangible impact by not just being a profitable business, but also a difference in the lives of people who themselves have been able to get into the industry. Here he tells us about the origins of Choprop, what’s given them a competitive advantage and how transformation has been woven into the fabric of the business

Born for business

Yusuf’s influence in his entrepreneurial career began a century ago when his grandfather emigrated from India to “settle down and look for greener pastures in South Africa”.

“They came onto the ship with a couple of rupees in their pockets and they came

to look for a job,” he says, speaking of the numerous Indian immigrants, many of whom worked in the sugar cane fields. But his grandfather became an entrepreneur and it’s this influence that has shaped Yusuf into who he is today.

He highlights how his story is not different from many of the descendants of Indian immigrants who arrived in South Africa in the late 1800s and early 1900s and eventually went into the retail sector, with many businesses concentrated around transport hubs, which presented great opportunities for entrepreneurs.

“Back in the day, the easiest thing to do when you wanted to leave school was to say ‘Dad, I want to leave school,’ they’d say ‘okay, I’ll open up a shop for you,’ or ‘go open up a shop.’”

Having lost his father at an early age, the experience of seeing the struggles his mother went through with his four siblings inspired him to focus on making a success of his life, which he has certainly done. Yusuf dropped out of high school and worked various jobs but found that there were few employers who were willing to “empower anybody besides themselves”.

He began selling hot dogs and after a year, he started his first business - a café. He went on to being a sales rep at a biscuit factory

for one of the largest producers at the time, eventually becoming a manager. This was followed by another entrepreneurial venture, which saw him supplying FMCG products to various retailers until 2007.

“I also had a few Vodashops over the years that I invested in,” says Yusuf. “I used to have cellphone stores in areas like Mabopane, Mamelodi, Soshanguve, Tembisa and KwaMashu.”

This was in addition to the four large cash ‘n carry businesses and supermarkets. In 2007, Yusuf and Shazia decided to sell their business and try something different. It was then that they began a small real estate agency in their garage at home. It was then that Choprop SA was born.

Choprop as a vehicle for change

Before they went into real estate, Yusuf and Shazia would occasionally buy property which they would rent out to tenants and built up a portfolio, which made the shift into the industry a natural one.

“When we started off Choprop, 16 years ago, we decided that we, firstly, manage our own portfolio and we’d go and do the same sort of management for people out there that needed their properties managed,” says Yusuf. Secondly, they decided they would

176 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

also get into sales as real estate agents. Offering a wide range of services, and having multiple income streams is one of the things that has given Choprop SA a competitive advantage, and helped it achieve so much success. They describe it as a “supermarket of real estate services,” apt considering Yusuf’s background in retail.

While Yusuf’s sales skills shone through, falling sick and seeing how reliant the business was on his charisma and ability to close a deal led him to form the Academy of Learning, where he could teach others the skills that he had used to such good effect. He began visiting various nearby townships to share his knowledge. Through the Thola Umsebenzi project, he was able to go on roadshows and introduce unemployed people with manual labour backgrounds to real estate as a career.

Using funds from the sale of his cash ‘n carry in Mabopane, he went about marketing and building up training capacity for the project. Of the thousands of people he’s trained, less than a hundred have made it, due to the difficulties the industry presents. Yusuf is proud that those who have succeeded have significantly improved their lives.

After sharing his idea for an empowerment project with the Minister of Housing at the time, Yusuf was instrumental in the ‘One Learner, One Agency’ programme. This desire to help is what inspired his signature programme, ‘Become a Property Guru’, which allows aspiring agents the opportunity to learn and become Choprop SA’s trade partners, providing these trade partners with the benefit of knowledge and branding, without having to pay the costs of franchising.

It’s these aspiring property gurus who Yusuf is looking to connect with, along with anyone who’s looking to buy property or invest in the journey Choprop SA has been on. He considers himself a nurturer, and nurturing relationships is at the heart of his business.

“Our clients are not clients, they’re family.”

CHOPROP SA | INTERVIEW
Details
House-146 Willem
Company
Choprop
Botha, Centurion, South Africa
www.choprop.com
012 653 4444 reception@choprop.co.za

THE AGRICULTURAL SECTOR CONTINUES TO DRIVE ECONOMIC GROWTH IN SA

Crucial to fostering economic growth, alleviating poverty and improving food security in South Africa, the agriculture sector is one of the biggest contributors to the country’s GDP growth and has been one of the strongest performers in South Africa in recent years, according to the Bureau for Food and Agricultural Policy (BFAP).

OVERCOMING NEW CHALLENGES POST-PANDEMIC

According to Stats SA, the production from the agriculture sector increased by 19.2% in the third quarter of 2022, contributing 0.5 of a percentage point to GDP growth. This, they said, was mainly associated with a rise in the production of field crops and horticulture products.

“After contracting by 0.7% in the second quarter of 2022, the economy rallied in the third quarter, expanding

by 1.6%. The agriculture, finance, transport and manufacturing industries were the main drivers of growth on the supply side of the economy. The demand side of the economy was lifted by a rise in exports and government consumption.” - Stats SA.

Stats SA said eight of the ten industries recorded an increase in economic output in the third quarter of 2022 and agriculture, forestry and fishing was the largest positive contributor.

President Ramaphosa commended the growth. He said that given the condition of the country’s economy, there was no room to be complacent, but there was one to acknowledge that the economic recovery is in progress and that the Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan, conceived amid the COVID-19 pandemic, was bearing fruit.

“We owe the progress we are making to the high-level partnerships between government and all sectors of our economy, as well as to the hard work of

AGRICULTURE
SECTOR OVERVIEW
178 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

millions of South Africans who report for duty or open their businesses daily to add value to our economy and bring services and products to the nation.

“Through increased economic activity, we will see more and more South Africans in employment and sharing in the prosperity of the nation.”

Chief Economist of the Agricultural Business Chamber of South Africa (Agbiz), Wandile Sihlobo shared that while the sector boosted GDP in the third quarter of 2022, it still faced hurdles:

“The better yields of some field crops (mainly summer grains and oilseeds) and horticulture, combined with relatively higher prices, specifically grains and oilseeds, underpin this improvement. Also worth noting is that the summer grains harvest, typically in the year’s second quarter, was delayed by roughly a month and fell into the third quarter this year. In a slightly more technical sense, the weak growth in the last quarter also created a lower base, setting the ground for a recovery in the third quarter,” he said.

The International Trade Administration (ITA) states that South Africa has by far the most modern, productive, and diverse agricultural economy compared to the rest of the African continent.

“South Africa has a well-developed agricultural sector, which will stand the country in good stead in the face of continuing uncertainty both economically and in terms of the weather. There are many factors impacting on the industry – including credit ratings downgrade, land reform concerns, volatile exchange rate, ongoing weather concerns and the latest COVID-19 pandemic.”

CROPS

According to Statista, in 2021/2022, the production of maize was approximately 15.3 million metric tons. “This represents a drop of around 10 percent from previous years. In 2015/2016, South Africa experienced a decline reaching about 8.2 million metric tons. A fundamental reason for this was the severe drought that occurred between 2015 and 2017. However, from 2000 to 2022, an increase of roughly 96.3 percent can be recognised,” they said.

When it comes to sugar cane, the country saw a production of around 18 million metric tons of sugar cane in 2021/2022. “The preliminary volume dropped in comparison to the preceding year. Over the last two decades, the quantity of sugar cane produced in South Africa followed a declining tendency, with several fluctuations. The trend is related to farmers substituting their production of

sugar cane for other more profitable and less capital-intensive crops. Increases in sugar taxes, decreasing prices, and lower import prices are the main reasons for the substitution.”- Statista.

Sihlobo said the country’s quarterly agricultural gross value-added figures tend to be quite volatile and they still expected a mild contraction in the gross value of the sector in 2022.

“This is mainly because of a decline in some field crop harvests, such as maize, which is down 6% y/y, estimated at 15.4 million tonnes, possible poor performance in sugar cane, and challenges in the livestock industry which struggles with biosecurity weaknesses. Moreover, the base effects after two years of solid growth, where the sector expanded by 14.9% y/y in 2020 and 8.8% y/y in 2021, will also be an additional factor to the potential annual contraction,” he said.

AGRICULTURE | SECTOR OVERVIEW
Sources: BFAP | Trading Economics | Stats SA | Statista SA | Agricultural Economic Today
22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 179

ST TSHABALALA AGRI CONSULTING PTY LTD

OFFERING PROFESSIONAL SERVICES TO FARMERS, COMPANIES & MUNICIPALITIES

We are an agricultural management consulting company with the aim to assist and develop farms in and around South Africa. The company is 100% black-owned and was formally established in 2020. We are driven by a well-versed individual with 19 years of expertise in the agricultural space.

At STT Consulting, we provide service and solutions to small-scale farmers with long-term sustainability and functionality to our farmers and

clients at large. The company has developed professional integration with our companies to complement its vision. Such a relationship serves as a basis for ST Tshabalala Agri Consulting Pty Ltd progress thus far. ST Tshabalala Agri Consulting Pty Ltd has 3 years of formal consulting, and 16 years of doing informal consulting services. The company has developed professional integration with other companies to complement its vision. Such relationships serve

as the basis for ST Tshabalala Agri Consulting Pty Ltd progress thus far.

Our Services

Environmental assessments

We evaluate the property’s potential for the presence of environmental attributes, considering everything from endangered species to existing hazardous waste.

Agricultural consulting

We do hands-on experience providing remote or on-site

180 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

specialised troubleshooting and technical agricultural consulting services in livestock production, crop production, agricultural economics and agricultural engineering.

Quality management

We ensure quality produce from healthy crops and animals using management practices that are sustainable from animal welfare, social, economic and environmental perspectives.

Training and conferences

We develop skill-based training modules with the aid of Skills for all essential Agricultural sectors, which can be beneficial to workers, smallholder farmers and management training courses.

Project management

We manage and control the entire design, engineering, procurement and construction process of agricultural projects and provide clients with flexibility and security for managing change during the project lifecycle.

Research and surveys

We offer consulting and training services to public institutions and private companies in some of the provinces of South Africa

Management team

Sbusiso Tshabalala - Director, Agribusiness Specialist and Head of Farmer Support

PhD Candidate (UFS)

Qualifications: MSA Sustainable Agriculture (UFS)

Advance Project Management (Wits)

Professional memberships

South African Society for Agricultural Extension (SASAE)

African Farmers' Association of South Africa: (AFASA)

Nthatisi Tshabalala - Head of Farmer Support and Risk Analyst

Qualifications: B Soc Science (UKZN)

Senior Technical Team and Advisory/Consultants

Senior Technical team

Mrs. M Chamane - BSC Honours in Accounting (UFS) - Registered CA

Ms. Nomagugu Khathi - National Diploma in Food Technology (DUT)

Mr. N Gumede - Btech in Food Technology (DUT)

Ms. Phindile Ngubane - Researcher (PhD Candidate: Business Management, (UKZN).

Advisory Consultants

Mr. H Van Zyl - Structural Engineer (Namibia)

Mrs. N Tshabalala - B.Soc Science: UKZN Forensic Associate/ Administration.

Mr. M. Mdakane - BA of Arts Graphic Design - Pearson Institute of Higher Education

Mr M Sabelo - Refrigeration and Cold Rooms Specialist (Panelling)

Contact Us:

828 Simunye Street Katlehong Gardens Katlehong 1434

060 918 5231

sbusiso@sttconsulting.co.za

info@sttconsulting.co.za

www.sttconsulting.co.za

sttshabalala

@ /sttconsultingpty

@ /sttconsult

ST TSHABALALA AGRI CONSULTING PTY LTD | ADVERTORIAL
22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 181

RETAIL SECTOR OVERVIEW SHOPPING FOR ECONOMIC GROWTH Retail sector continues to lead employment

The retail sector in South Africa is the second-largest employer after the government and the third-largest sector of the South African economy. It is estimated that the sector employs more than 20% of the South African workforce.

A KEY REVENUE GENERATOR

The largest retailer in the country boasts a market capitalisation of R130-billion, more than its next two competitors combined. The landscape is dominated by several high-profile organisations that reported a 3.1%

increase in revenue in 2021, according to Labour Research Service’s Retail Sector Report 2022.

However, retail is still not performing at the levels it was before the COVID-19 pandemic. This was especially clear

during 2021, the first 11 months of the year saw the total retail trade sales 4.7% lower than during the corresponding period in 2019. The sector has more recently been hampered by power cuts, inflation, high-interest rates, and the conflict in

182 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

Ukraine’s impact on supply chains. Financial pressures faced by most South African households mean that consumers are now spending less on alcohol, clothing, eating at restaurants, furniture, appliances and hotels. The pandemic also led to changes in the way households shop, with more moving towards online shopping than visiting retail spaces.

Although the sector is a key employer, there remains a significant wage gap between the highest and lowest-paid workers. To address this, some retailers have established a minimum wage of more than 8% above the national average.

EARNINGS IN THE RETAIL SECTOR

In 2022, on average general assistants and trolley collectors earned around R4 500 per month

Cashiers earned slightly higher at around R5 000 a month

Managers earned around R9 000 per month

REMUMERATION INCREASES

On average, from 2020 to 2021, average total executive remuneration went up over 100%

From 2020 to 2021, the average non-executive remuneration went down by 1.8%.

A MOVE TOWARDS ONLINE RETAIL

The pandemic caused retailers to increase their online capabilities and resulted in most major retailers releasing same-day delivery services and Rapid Grocery Delivery apps.

In the last two years, South Africa’s online retail has more than doubled. At the end of 2021, online retail was estimated at 4% of all retail in South Africa, with some retailers recording online sales ranging from only 2% to 5% of total sales.

UPTAKE OF ONLINE RETAIL SHOPPING

In 2022, 28% of connected South Africans reported using a Rapid Grocery Delivery (RGD) app in the last month.

49% of respondents said they used an (RGD) app at least weekly

62% of respondents said they intend to use an (RGD) app more often.

UNTAPPED POTENTIAL

The retail sector is one of those affected by the Employment Equity Amendment Bill of 2020, which was signed into law last year and is set to

come into effect on 1 September 2023. The Bill introduces various amendments to the affirmative action provisions of the Employment Equity Act of 1998. These new provisions aim to achieve more rapid transformation in the workplaces of designated employers.

The amendments will empower the Minister of Employment and Labour to set sector-specific employment equity targets. These sectoral targets may differentiate between occupational levels, sub-sectors, regions, or any other relevant factor.

Among the sectors that this will apply to are wholesale and retail, education, accommodation and food services, and financial and insurance activities. Consultation with these sectors has already been completed.

To incentivise employers to meet targets, the amendment states that certificates will be issued if the employer has complied with any applicable sectoral targets or has raised a reasonable ground for non-compliance; has submitted its most recent employment equity report; and has, within the previous year, has not been found to have breached the prohibition on unfair discrimination, or paid wages below the level of the minimum wage. These certificates will be important in securing state contracts, and noncompliant companies could face fines of between R1.5-million and R2.7-million.

A new online assessment system will be created to monitor the implementation of sector targets. The first year in which the sectorspecific targets will apply is 2024.

RETAIL | SECTOR OVERVIEW
KPMG | StatsSA Business
|
Retail
22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 183
Sources:
Tech
Fortress Real Estate Investments
Sector Report 2022 | BizCommunity

9 tips from Takealot’s CEO:

HOW TO BREAK INTO RETAIL WITH E-COMMERCE

Did you know e-commerce makes up 4% of the retail sector in South Africa? Did you know Takealot has over 7 700 SMMEs on their platform? Meet Takealot Group CEO, Mamongae Mahlare, who succeeded Founder and Chairperson, Kim Reid, in 2021.

The needs and demands of consumers have shifted and Mamongae is tasked with leading an organisation that is paving the way for the future of retail. In the latest Business Unusual Podcast, Ralf Fletcher, CEO of Topco Media is in conversation with Mamongae about the transformative impact of e-commerce, what it takes to solve complex problems and what we need to consider as e-commerce continues its growth.

10 KEY TAKEAWAYS TO LISTEN OUT FOR IN THIS PODCAST:

1. For e-commerce to reach its potential, the regulatory framework needs to allow for innovation

2. The evolution of e-commerce in South Africa in the coming years will be different to the trajectory of the industry in developed economies

3. Competition is good. Amazon expanding into South Africa is an opportunity to transform the economy

4. E-commerce platforms open up access to markets

5. A business model like that of Takealot has the knock-on effect of helping other businesses grow

6. When venturing into a market its important to understand the context and the culture of the region

7. You cannot be the stumbling block to the growth of your organisation

8. Coming up with a solution to start with understanding what the problem is that needs to be solved

9. Take each possible solution and ask “‘what would need to be true for that to be the answer?”

10. We need to be intentional about creating opportunities for women

> CLICKHER E TOACCESS TH E UNUSSENISUB TSACOPLAUS S . PODCAST | MAMONGAE MAHLARE 184 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

She’s hacking companies to help them

MEET MICROSOFT’S JOYLYNN KIRUI

Microsoft Senior Cloud Security Advocate Joylynn Kirui is what is known as a ‘white hat’ - an ethical hacker. Her job is to do everything a hacker would do to compromise a system and she’s always had consistent success doing so. The Africa Tech Week speaker has hacked into everything. It’s no wonder she was named Hacker of the Year in 2020 and recognised as a finalist in the Top 50 Women in Cybersecurity in the same year.

In this Business Unusual Podcast, Koketso Mamabolo engages in conversation with Joylynn about why businesses hire hackers and how the African continent is faring on the cybersecurity front. She shares with us the importance of developers, businesses and consumers being aware of security threats and protecting personal data.

10 KEY TAKEAWAYS LISTEN OUT FOR IN THIS PODCAST

• “A hacker has to be lucky only once”

• We don’t care enough about cybersecurity

• It’s important for business to anonymise their customer’s data

• Customers need to protect themselves too

• Developers are the first-line of defence

• “If you don’t have security incorporated into your system it’s like you build a very beautiful house and you leave it without doors and you leave it without windows”

• In cybersecurity, the more things change the more they stay the same

• Black Hats compromise a system for their own benefit; White Hats are given permission to compromise a system

Joylynn Kirui is a Microsoft Senior Cloud Security Advocate based in Kenya. A computer science graduate of the United States International University-Africa, she was previously an assurance officer at Safaricom, after having held positions as a SOC analyst and information systems auditor. Joylynn’s work involves empowering developers and businesses to make their systems more secure in what she calls “developer relations’’. Drawn to cybersecurity after being hacked in university, she now shares her knowledge through training and mentorship.

JOYLYNN KIRUI | PODCAST
> CLICKHER E TOACCESS TH E UNUSSENISUB TSACOPLAUS S .
22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 185

MODERN CENTRIC

SPECIALISING IN TRANSFORMATIVE AND LONG-TERM HUMAN CAPITAL

The workplace is constantly changing, and the need for a more diverse and inclusive workforce has never been greater. The pool of available talent in South Africa is vast and diverse, but many organisations struggle to access and retain this talent. This is where Modern Centric enters the picture.

Modern Centric is a human capital partner founded in 2013 with the mission of connecting forward-thinking organisations with top talent that better represents South Africa's diverse workforce. Our distinct approach to human capital management has made us an enabler for both the private and public sectors, providing longterm solutions that add value to the organisations of all of our clients.

Modern Centric specialises in transformative and long-term human capital management. Through strategic transformation and expert advice on human capital management, we believe in driving innovation and sustainability and assisting organisations in making a positive impact on society and the environment. Skills and Training Advisory, Recruitment Consulting, Youth Development, Persons with dis-Abilities Recruitment, Management, and B-BBEE Advisory are among our core business offerings.

We believe that a more diverse and inclusive workforce is critical for organisational success, and we are committed to assisting our clients on this journey. Organisations can unlock the potential of a broader range of talent and create a brighter future for all by embracing diversity and inclusivity.

Finally, Modern Centric is committed to transforming the workforce and

MANAGEMENT

fostering a more sustainable, diverse, and inclusive workplace. If you're ready to take your company to the next level, contact us for a free consultation.

SED activity

• Food Security

• Modern Urban Farming Solutions

• Agripreneur Development

• Mental Health & Wellness

• Zakhele Re-Usable Sanitary Towel

Exciting highlights for the year

Modern Centric is a human capital partner that is dedicated to transforming the workforce and creating a more inclusive world of work. Our innovative approach and commitment to sustainability have earned us recognition both locally and internationally.

186 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

In our efforts to empower youth, we have successfully placed over 100 individuals into employment opportunities. This is a testament to our commitment to bridging the gap between talent and opportunity. Furthermore, through our Agri-Preneureship programs, we have built partnerships with various entrepreneurs and impacted the lives of over 20 youth with dis-Abilities. Our focus on empowering individuals with diverse abilities is a cornerstone of our mission to create a more inclusive workforce.

At Modern Centric, we are dedicated to making a positive impact on society and the environment through human capital management. Join us in our mission to create a brighter future for all.

The impact of technology on the recruitment sector

The integration of technology in recruitment processes has greatly expanded the reach of hiring managers, granting them access to job candidates from all corners of the world. This not only increases the appeal of international recruitment, but also enables companies to outsource work based on the skill sets of the most qualified candidates.

Key trends in recruitment technology

1. Persuasive Candidate Experience: Technology has revolutionised the way in which job candidates interact with potential employers, creating a more persuasive and engaging experience.

2. Remote Workforce: The COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated the shift to remote work, and this trend is expected to continue well into the future.

3. Booming Social Media Recruiting: The widespread use of social media platforms has created numerous opportunities for companies to connect with potential candidates and promote open positions.

4. Advances in Recruitment AI: Artificial intelligence has become increasingly prevalent in recruitment processes, helping companies to sort through resumes and select the most qualified candidates.

5. Emphasis on Soft Skills: A study by LinkedIn revealed that 89% of poor hires often lack key soft skills such as collaboration, teamwork, creativity, adaptability, persuasion, and time management. As a result, companies are placing more emphasis on these skills in their hiring processes.

6. Project-Based Hiring: Companies are moving away from traditional permanent employment models and instead opting for project-based hiring, which allows them to bring in specific talent for specific projects and adapt to changes in their workforce needs.

MODERN CENTRIC | ADVERTORIAL 22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 187

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188 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 ST EDITION primediaoutdoor Prime_Outdoor primediaoutdoor
commitment to the following:
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following:

BBBEE Ownership

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GOLD CIRCLE

MAKING A POSITIVE CONTRIBUTION TO THE UPLIFTMENT OF DISADVANTAGED COMMUNITIES

Created by the amalgamation of three of South Africa’s top Racing Clubs in 1996, namely; the Durban Turf Club, Clairwood Turf Club and Pietermaritzburg Turf Club, Gold Circle is today part of a multi-faceted and integrated industry, organising thoroughbred horseracing events in KwaZulu-Natal. Gold Circle is non-proprietary, as it does not distribute profits to shareholders. All profits go back into the industry of which it is the custodian in KZN.

With racecourses at Hollywoodbets Greyville in Durban and at Hollywoodbets Scottsville in Pietermaritzburg, two thoroughbred training centres at Summerveld and Ashburton and a network of eight company-owned and 98 privately-owned tote betting outlets, Gold Circle is leading the way when it comes to horseracing in South Africa.

Gold Circle directly employs 877 people permanently, and another 500 people on a seasonal and temporary basis. The indirect employment attributable to Gold Circle’s operations is 940 people.

Exciting highlights of the year's racing

The lifting of COVID-19 restrictions a week before Africa’s greatest horse racing event, “The Hollywoodbets Durban July 2022” was most welcome considering that the event was staged behind closed doors in the prior two years.

The course was a buzz of excitement, fashion, entertainment and horse racing, attracting approximately 35000 people. Two-time South African Champion Jockey, S’Manga Khumalo, steered the only filly in the race, Sparkling Water, to an impressive 3-length victory for Mary Slack’s first win in the race. This was S’Manga’s second win in this prestigious event, the first being in 2013 when he became the first black jockey to do so.

Post-event media reports confirmed this year’s Hollywoodbets Durban July to be one of the most successful horse racing events ever staged. Ethekwini Municipality commissioned BDO Advisory Services to conduct an Economic Impact Assessment Report which calculated the event’s economic contribution to the Municipality’s GDP to be R431 million.

“Thanks must go to our new title sponsor, Hollywoodbets, the other race day sponsors, associate event sponsors and media partners who continue to ensure that the Hollywoodbets Durban

July remains a pinnacle event, not only on the racing calendar but on the South African social calendar as well,” says Michel Nairac, Gold Circle’s CEO.

Skills development

Gold Circle is actively involved in providing training opportunities to previously disadvantaged individuals to reduce inequality and promote participation in the economy. During the 2022 financial year, Gold Circle expended an amount of R8.3m towards training and skills development. A total of 601 individuals participated in 1115 upskilling initiatives of which 98% were black people and 63% black women.

“This year saw the launch of our Bursary Fund programme, which is aimed at providing assistance to disadvantaged youth from low-income households who are wanting to further their tertiary education,” says Veronica Jack, Gold Circle’s Corporate Services Executive. “This inaugural initiative attracted hundreds of applications, with bursaries ultimately awarded to 100% black people, of which 57% were black females.”

In May 2022, Gold Circle held its first Learning & Development Awards in partnership with the Culture, Arts, Tourism and Hospitality Seta (CATHSETA), People Solutions and Tourism World, where they awarded National Certificates in Professional Cookery and Certificates in Generic Management to employees who had successfully completed their respective learnerships.

CSI initiatives

Gold Circle is committed to making a positive contribution to the upliftment of disadvantaged communities. The company continuously seeks opportunities to uplift the lives of the vulnerable, including the elderly, children, people with disabilities and those living in poverty, through its Corporate Social Initiatives. As part of a broader social and welfare initiative, Gold Circle provides its administrative infrastructure, buildings and racing events to non-profit organisations and other entities to raise funds for charities and other worthy causes.

Socio-economic development

Gold Circle seeks to empower various industry stakeholders through partnership, engagement and financial support. These stakeholders include, amongst others, the Coastal Horse Care Unit, Traditional Horse Racing, and the Grooms Association.

Gold Circle was the main sponsor of the Umtelebhelo Heritage Cup, a traditional horse racing event that was staged at

190 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

Hollywoodbets Scottsville Racecourse on 17 September 2022 attracting approximately 5000 people from rural communities. Gold Circle recognises that grooms are a particularly vulnerable sector of the industry and has, through the KZN Owners and Trainers Association, initiated, facilitated and funded the creation of a consolidated retirement savings scheme for grooms amounting to R4,5m. This is the first initiative of its kind for the horse racing industry in South Africa which will ensure that grooms will henceforth be able to finish their careers with the comfort of a retirement benefit scheme.

Gold Circle has, in collaboration with a medical practitioner, established a fully-fledged Healthcare Clinic at the Summerveld Training Centre to provide medical care to approximately 800 grooms. The company is also working closely with the Department of Health to expand these medical services to the local community resident in the surrounding areas.

The Company has also embarked on a project to expose low income households and people from rural areas to the sport of horseracing. The Department of Communications and Digital Technologies’ vision is to see all South Africans digitally empowered to create and participate in tech-enabled opportunities that drive inclusiveness, employment and economic transformation across our cities, towns and provinces. Gold Circle has partnered with Hollywoodbets to ensure that in the Sentech bouquet of channels, there will be at least one channel on the decoder dedicated to horseracing. This initiative will take the sport of horseracing to the homes of people, predominantly black, who have not previously been exposed

to horse racing due to broadcasts only being aired on pay-to-view channels in the past.

Challenges in the gambling sector

The KZN Legislature is at present completing its consultative process to introduce the KZN Gaming and Betting Tax Amendment Bill. The Amendment Bill proposes that 3% of the contribution from betting tax that is paid to racecourse operators is abolished, and replaced with a system in terms of which Gold Circle must apply every year for a discretionary contribution of up to 1.6%. Should this Bill be passed, it will have a detrimental impact on Gold Circle and hence a significant socio-economic impact within KZN, and in relation to economic activities in other provinces.

GOLD CIRCLE | ADVERTORIAL Contact Us: 150 Avondale Road, Greyville, Durban, 4001 0313141500 headoffice@goldcircle.co.za www.goldcircle.co.za 22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 191

Diversifi is a social impact advisory business that moves organisations beyond compliance, focusing on transformation and inclusion.

Diversifi’s core focus areas include:

Diversity Equity and Inclusion

The business case for diverse organisations being more competitive in a complex society has been made. In South Africa, given our history, this is also a social and moral imperative. Recurring and persistent racial, age and gender tensions in South African organisations and society show that the integration of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DE&I) is something that organisations still struggle with. Part of the challenge is that embedding DE&I requires deep work with internal and external stakeholders. It requires a change of hearts and minds. Our DE&I engagement programme is made up of distinct phases or steps to ensure a structured and outcomes-driven process. It is underpinned by a Monitoring and Evaluation framework as well as a strong support base to catch and manage any fallout from the process. We make use of a team of specialists in the fields of mediation, counselling and psychological safety. We also work with the organisation’s occupational wellness team if preferred.

Experiential and Thought Leadership Workshops

An opportunity to standstill in order to move forward. Diversifi “OPEN” Thought Leadership and Experiential Workshops is a multi-stakeholder forum for unpacking complex issues and new opportu-

nities. We bring together leaders and change agents to work collectively and in innovative ways. The contributors, participants, location and arrangement of the day(s) are selected with care to encourage optimal connection to authenticity in an inspiring, honest and collaborative space. We chose the term “OPEN” as it represents potential and inclusiveness. It is however also a term that refers to an attitude. An attitude that values diversity, different points of view and multiple levels of intelligence. All of which are required to deal with complexity. In our process, we however aim to be pragmatic, doing-focused and not to over-complicate unnecessarily. Diversifi OPEN is about creating and facilitating dedicated time for organisations, teams or individuals to explore and express what it means to be fully human. We help to remind and reconnect with purpose as individuals, teams, and organisations and ultimately as a system.

BEE Status support

Diversifi has developed a programme that supports organisations’ B-BBEE contribution level. The programme is designed to support the organisation throughout the annual B-BBEE cycle, ranging from planning, monitoring, and interim scorecard assessment to verification support. The programme

does not replace the Verification Agency or Transformation Manager but supports both to ensure that the annual B-BBEE certificate does not bring any surprises.

B-BBEE Scorecard Plan

Diversifi assists organisations to achieve their desired B-BBEE status level by developing a tailored B-BBEE Scorecard Plan.

Using the organisation’s current B-BBEE scorecard as a base, Diversifi, together with the organisation, develop a B-BBEE scorecard plan that is designed to achieve and maintain their desired B-BBEE status level over a period of time. Suitable scorecard element initiatives are identified and required contribution values are calculated. Although the focus is on scorecard achievement, factors such as return on scorecard investment and transformation impact are considered.

Diversifi provides technical advice and opinions on complex B-BBEE issues. Diversifi can assist your organisation with specific B-BBEE issues and can provide clarity on the implementation and interpretation of the Code and appropriate solutions. Based on policy involvement and many years of studying and applying the B-BBEE legislation, Diversifi has in-depth knowledge and experience in the interpretation and application of B-BBEE rules and regulations. Therefore, Diversifi is well-equipped to provide quality technical B-BBEE advice and opinions. This includes Independent Competent Persons Reports (ICPRs) for Ownership, Enterprise Development, Consumer Education, Access to Financial Services, etc.

B-BBEE Ownership

192 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

Computation

Diversifi assists organisations with the computation of their B-BBEE ownership scorecards, both for the annual verification and for transaction evaluation and scenario planning. Diversifi has experts in B-BBEE ownership legislation and B-BBEE ownership scorecard computations. We are competent and experienced in all aspects of B-BBEE ownership, including complex sale of asset transactions, continued recognition, options and hybrid debt/equity instruments. Due to the complex nature of the B-BBEE ownership legislation, the inherent risk of misstatement and the non-core business nature of the computations, we assist many clients with their annual B-BBEE ownership computation and verification.

Structuring & Implementation

Diversifi assists companies with the structuring and implementation of B-BBEE ownership transactions. Our approach is to first identify our clients’ B-BBEE ownership requirements, scorecard and transformation objectives. We design several transaction options and work with our clients to identify and select the most suitable transaction structure. Our process furthermore identifies the funding requirements and evaluates the B-BBEE scorecard implications. Once the transaction design and structure have been finalised we work with our in-house corporate finance team, Valeo Capital, to implement the transaction.

Transaction Evaluation

Diversifi evaluates B-BBEE transactions pre- and post-implementation to ensure that the desired scorecard objectives are achieved and to prevent any fronting risk. Diversifi adds value during

the transaction design and structuring process by reviewing the transaction design and structure and translating it into a B-BBEE ownership scorecard. As part of our evaluation, we seek to eliminate any fronting risk.

Transformation Strategy Development

Diversifi considers transformation in its broader context. Several drivers are at play; social, economic, technological, legal and political amongst others. Risk management and interconnected complexity are forcing organisations to re-think and re-imagine the possibilities associated with Transformation. Transformation is most sustainable if it creates shared value. We provide comprehensive transformation strategy services that include a baseline, competitor analysis, strategic options and scenarios. This is supported by implementation and change management services to result in authentic transformation aligned with business strategy

Contact Us:

Cape Town

+27 (0) 21 851 0091

Unit 12, Paardevlei Specialist Medical Centre Paardevlei

Somerset West, 7130

Johannesburg

+27 (0) 10 880 3933

Office G04

Ground Floor, Acacia House, Stonemill Office Park, 300 Acacia Road, Darrenwood Randburg, 2195

www.diversifi.co.za

DIVERSIFI | ADVERTORIAL
22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 193

M PARENT V I S I O N, S Y N E R G Y, L E G A C Y

Our vision is to build sustainable business through disruptive solutions in the sectors we operate in.

Our businesses employ over a hundred people and partner with various SMME’s in our quest to build lasting business legacies.

Our corporate social responsibility initiatives, under the M Family Foundation, are the conscience that reminds us where we come from. To this end, we sponsor initiatives in rural areas which has culminated in the M Tournament (to be held this year) – reviving an annual tournament

that has been held in Bizana for years. Through our resources we aim to make it a stage for dreams and progress, for young talent, while also encouraging good habits in our youth.

Our business approach ensures that we provide value to our customers' businesses by bringing positive structural change to the markets and sectors in which we work.

We have developed strategic excellence in the following areas during the last few years:

M Parent is a South African, 100% black-owned holding company with its skin in Property, ICT, Private Security, Freight and Logistics and Office Automation. The M Parent umbrella consolidates the vision and work of the Founding Director and CEO, Lundi Mgwili.
194 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

Financial prudence and innovation

To create value and disrupt markets, we use innovation. Our business approach relies on our ability to combine and balance innovation with financial prudence and a focus on meeting our clients' needs.

Integration

We may leverage the integration concept to produce efficiency and long-term value with our stellar goods and services.

M TECHNOLOGIES

M Technologies is a digital transformation enabling organisation that provides solutions and services to empower its clients in their digital transformation journey. A proud Level 1 B-BBEE contributor, with accreditations from majority of the major ICT Original Equipment Manufacturers. We aspire to be the digitalisation partner of choice to our clients. Our highly certified resources form the core of our business.

With years of experience in the industry we have managed to help organisations be more efficient, effective, productive, cut costs, save, be more profitable and differentiate themselves from others through our cutting edge solutions.

M GUARD

M Guard is a 100% Level 1 B-BBEE Security Company that boasts extensive knowledge and in-depth experience in the Security and Information and Communication Technology industries. We have committed to providing the utmost peace of mind to our clients on and offsite. With the goal of being 21st century industry leaders, M Guard focuses on continuously improving our operational structure, the knowledge of our employees and the process around service delivery.

M OFFICE

M Office is an Office Automation organisation that provides holistic solutions for your copy, print, scan, automation and workflows requirements. Our aim is to bridge the gap between home and office automation, and provide the best document processing and management solutions to our clients, both private and public sector.

M FUELS

M Fuels is a Level 1 B-BBEE contributor and independent distributor in development with a specialisation in trading petroleum products. Throughout each interaction, we strive to offer our clients outstanding service.

In order to address customer issues like a running out of fuel or tankers getting stuck, we have the capacity to quickly resolve logistical problems by providing quick fuel management solutions to our clients. No matter what their particular needs are, our motivated team provides our customers with that personal touch.

M PARENT | ADVERTORIAL Contact Us: 30 Brookend close Office park Sunningdale (unite 3) 031 023 0431 info@mparent.co.za www.mparent.co.za 22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 195

Musetsho Law Inc is a unique and modern-day professional law firm created by Lufuno Musetsho, offering personalised services to its wide range of clients. Musetsho Law prides itself on its high levels of service excellence and its unyielding drive to deliver only the best quality of service. CEO, Lufuno Musetsho, shares what it takes to run a successful modern-day professional law firm in South Africa.

Q: Please provide a brief background of Musetsho Law - how long has the company been operating and what services do you offer?

Musetsho Law Incorporated Attorneys was formed in 2016 by Lufuno Musetsho. The firm is a unique and modern-day corporation that offers magnificent personalised legal services to a wide range of clientele. The firm sets the standards in the legal fraternity in various areas of law such as; Commercial Litigation and drafting contracts, Local Government Law, Procurement Law, Mining and Environmental Law, Forensic and general investigation, Protection

of Intellectual Property, Registration of Companies and Trusts, Road Accident Fund (RAF) claims, Labour and Employment Law, Civil Litigation, Family Law, Evictions, Conveyancing and Notarial Practice.

Q: What sets the company apart from the competition?

Musetsho Law differs from other law firms in that, the corporation personalised legal services, which means that it strives to first its clientele, prioritises the needs of the clientele, and offers well-researched and modern-day legal solutions. The firm consists of legal practitioners different backgrounds who offer expert services in each area of law they practice. Further, the firm itself only to South African jurisprudence, but it also focuses on offering services to an international clientele and this exposes legal practitioners to foreign jurisprudence.

Our firm not only serve clients who can afford our services, but we also offer probono services to students in various

from poor communities.

Q: What have been the company’s greatest challenges and achievements?

The firm prides itself on experience in both national and foreign jurisprudence. This has been the greatest achievement for us in that we are afforded opportunities to offer innovative legal services to

196 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

a diverse clientele and gain more insight into different areas of law.

The firm has also attracted clientele stemming from individuals, government, organisations and corporate. However, the greatest challenge the firm faces is to fully penetrate the international market, as some multinational corporations are still reluctant to instruct South African law firms in their legal matters.

Q: What excites you about what you do?

The various legal services that we offer to our clients excite me on the basis that they create opportunities for me to interact with people from different socio-economic backgrounds, enhance my legal knowledge, offer a challenge

for me to grow as a legal practitioner and contribute towards resolving legal matters that our clients face. At Musetsho Law we shape and develop South African jurisprudence.

Q: Do you have exciting plans for 2023?

Our plan for 2023, is to attract more knowledgeable, skilled, and talented legal practitioners to broaden the services we offer to our clientele. We also intend to penetrate the international market and attract more clientele in that space and to dominate the legal fraternity in our country by getting more clients and building offices in different provinces in order for many people to gain access to our offices. We will also continue to offer probono services to dignify those that are destitute and require our legal services.

MUSETSHO LAW INC | INTERVIEW Company Details Office 201, Dumbarton house, No 1 Church St, Cape Town City Centre, Cape Town, 8001 021 426 9401/ 061 012 4802 reception@musetsholaw.co.za www.musetsholaw.co.za

CSVR

MODELLING A MULTIDISCIPLINARY APPROACH TO EMPOWERING SOCIETIES, COMMUNITIES AND VICTIMS AFFECTED BY VIOLENCE

The African continent has experienced high levels of violence and brutalisation and needs empowerment. Empowerment means different things to different people and at the Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation (CSVR), we understand this well. Our work embeds empowerment both as an approach and as an outcome of our activities and interventions. Since its establishment in 1989, the CSVR has upscaled empowerment efforts, inculcating them in all that we do across the various components of our work. We adopt a multi-disciplinary approach through our three programmes: Research, Mental Health and Psychosocial Support Services (MHPSS) and Advocacy.

Empowerment through research: Studying violence to inform evidence-based interventions

We study violence, to understand what causes it, what drives it, and it is this understanding that in turn informs our contextually-relevant interventions and recommendations to leaders, community members and policy-makers.

“It is widely believed that knowledge is power, but as the Centre, we further believe that understanding, particularly of violence, is empowerment as it galvanises targeted and informed action”.

Our research continues to inform actions of various stakeholders. For example, our 2011 research report, The Smoke that Calls, highlighted the root causes and key drivers of violent protests and collective violence in South African communities and is rich in recommendations to leaders, at multiple levels, on what needs to be done. The key drivers of violence found in the 8 communities interviewed and the recommendations made in that report still ring true to the multi-faceted violence we experience today.

Our 2017 research, Violence against Women in South Africa: A Country in Crisis, set off a chain of events that saw women march to the Union Buildings to hand over a petition to the President regarding the high levels of GBV and femicide in 2018. The high-profile study influenced public discourse and sparked the political

recognition of violence against women as a nationwide crisis and the development of the National Strategic Plan on GBV and Femicide (NSP-GBVF).

Our 2022 research report, Lived Realities and Responses to SGBV , conducted in 8 communities experiencing high levels of GBV highlights the lived realities of community members and their experiences of GBV, the root causes and key drivers of violence in these communities and it also outlines multistakeholder recommendations.

Empowerment through MHPSS services: Healing societies and communities one leader, victim and family at a time

Our mental health and psychosocial support work seeks to empower communities, groups, families and individuals to not only heal from the consequences of trauma in the now but also from generational trauma. We believe that the inner healing work from past and present trauma that our clients

198 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

go through, is not only for themselves but also benefits future generations. Our approach to victim support and their healing emphasises an empathic, person-centred assistance through which victims are supported and empowered, and where they are restored to a state as close as possible to the state they were in before the violation and the victimisation took place, and ideally to a state where they are able to learn and grow.

We provide a holistic and integrated approach to healing and empowerment. CSVR also provides psychosocial wellness interventions for organisations aimed at building organisational internal capacities to facilitate the development of a resilient and sustainable social justice sector. We recognise that individuals in institutions and in the workplace are not immune to the violence and trauma around them, in fact some may be victims of trauma, both present and historical. In order for organisations and institutions to deliver high quality services and interventions, a trauma-informed approach to organisational wellness, that acknowledges the impact of working with trauma and violence on individual and organisational wellbeing, is an important one. This approach addresses team dynamics, individual healing and organisational understanding of its people to promote wellbeing and resilience in the social justice sector. We have provided this support and empowerment through our Psychological Wellness Programme to community-based and civil society organisations in South Africa, The Gambia, South Sudan, Sudan, Eswatini, Zimbabwe and Guinea, amongst others.

Our work with leaders focuses on their mental wellbeing, incorporating aspects of trauma healing, deepening resilience practices, becoming effective and people-centred leaders and improving how one interacts with the work they do and the organisation which they lead. Our approach to wellness for leaders incorporates aspects of performance anxiety and self-worth as well as techniques for emotional regulation, exploring meaningful coping strategies with both personal and work-related matters.

There has been a focus on key issues that are often difficult to confront including difficulties with understanding one’s own personality in relation to other colleagues, issues of identity, power dynamics and racism. Our work is rooted on the premise that a healthy leader is a conduit of wellbeing for their colleagues and is able to guide the organisational culture towards wellness.

Empowerment through Advocacy interventions:

Building local and continent-wide

capacities to respond to violence and conflicts

Our advocacy work is anchored on building local capacity in each country to respond to the consequences of violence, conflicts and gross human rights violations. We provide capacity building and technical support to policy-makers and political actors, where we share policy recommendations informed by the lived realities of those most affected by violence and conflicts. We believe that policies, human rights instruments and laws passed at all levels should address, and aspire to provide solutions to the lived realities, experiences and challenges faced by those most affected including victims in all their diversity.

Capacity building and empowerment for peer civil society and community-based organisations entails trainings on various themes of our work including human rights, transitional justice, and between collective violence and SGBV, sharing our own learnings from diverse contexts and work undertaken over the past 34 years, skills transference on advocacy and research as well as content support for campaigns and policy-making processes at localised and national levels.

Our advocacy work also establishes networks and maintains these, to amplify voices on advocating for change at various levels, and to continuously shape public discourse and improve practice through debates, reflections and sharing of best practices. We believe in partnering for greater impact and empowerment.

Our advocacy work also empowers victim groups through facilitating their access to human rights mechanisms for redress and justice.

To date, CSVR has provided technical support to the African Union to develop the African Union Transitional Justice Policy which was adopted by Heads of State and Government on 11 February 2019, after almost 10 years of developing this widely-consultative continental policy. Through the Pan African Reparations Initiative (PARI), a network coordinated by CSVR, of about 48 civil society organisations providing both legal and psychosocial support services to victims of torture in Africa, we worked with partners to support the Committee for the Prevention of Torture in Africa to develop the African Commission on Human and People’s Rights’ General Comment No. 4 on the Right to Redress for Victims of Torture in Africa (adopted in February 2017 by the African Commission).

Contact Us:

Johannesburg Office: 33 Hoofd Street, Braampark Forum 5, 3rd Floor, Johannesburg, 2001, South Africa

Cape Town Office: 1 Bridgeway Rd, Bridgeways Precinct, Century City, Cape Town, 7925, South Africa

+27 (11) 403-5650

info@csvr.org.za

www.csvr.org.za

CSVR | ADVERTORIAL
22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 199

Nkome Attorneys is a wholly black owned Law firm. We strive to provide well researched, effective and professional legal services in the shortest turn-around times to both our corporate and individual clients

We are situated in the Pretoria city-centre and are in close proximity to the North Gauteng Division of the High Court: Pretoria; The Magistrates Court; The Deeds Registries Offices; The Receiver of Revenue; The Master of the High Courts Offices; The Companies and Intellectual Property Registration Offices (CIPRO) and a number of other important government departments. We are thus strategically located to efficiently render prompt legal services to both our clients and correspondent work for other firms of attorneys.

WE MAINTAIN

A weekly review policy to assess and ensure that we maintain a consistent service and identify problems earlier and attend to resolving them without compromising our clients.

WE TAKE

Our time to understand our clients’ situation so as to resolve problems easily.

WE MAINTAIN

Strong ties amongst ourselves so that we all strive to attain the same goal, to satisfy our clients.

NKOME INCORPORATED

WE RESEARCH

Our advice to ensure that our clients are supported by the most recent legal developments.

SPECIALISATIONS

CORPORATE & COMMERCIAL LAW EMPLOYMENT LAW LITIGATION ADMINISTRATION OF ESTATES

MEET OUR LAW TEAM ANDRIES NKOME Director

Andries has vast experience in commercial law having provided advisory services in competition law, prospecting and mining, company law and contract management. He has also played a pivotal role in training other judicial officers.

He received his Mining Law Certificate from Wits University allowing vast understanding about law, also acquiring his Programme in Competition Law Certificate from Pretoria University.

Andries holds a BProc degree from UNISA and is currently completing his Masters in Business Leadership through the School for Business Leadership at UNISA. He was appointed as Commissioner for Small Claims Court by the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development.

BONGA DLULISA Associates

Bonga is an admitted attorney with appearance in both the High Court and Magistrate’s Court. Bonga specialises in Commercial and Criminal Litigation, Administrative Law, Corporate, Commercial Law and Family Law.

MS

PHINAH MODIBA

H.O.D.

Ms Phinah Modiba obtained a certificate in Public Resource Management at Tshwane University of Technology and a Certificate in

Legal Secretary and Business English through Leads Short Courses. She has worked in a variety of law firms as a receptionist, general administrator and legal secretary. She is a seasoned legal secretary with years of experience. She provides invaluable support to various legal departments.

RIRHANDZU HONWANA

Candidate Attorney

Rirhandzu has interest in criminal law, constitutional law and human rights law. She wishes to turn these interests into useful skills that will allow her to assist clients. Since the beginning of her Candidacy she has been exposed to different aspects of the legal field which include Administration of Estates, Civil law, Labour law and Criminal law.

YOLOKAZI MBUTSI

Candidate Attorney

In 2020 Yolokazi completed her practical legal training with the University of Pretoria School for Legal Practice. She has since learnt new skills and applied her knowledge and skills in different areas of law, including Labour law, Civil law, Criminal law, Family law and Administration of Estates. Her path has exposed her to tasks such as drafting legal documents, legal administration, Litigation and tendering legal support.

Company Details

Office 204, Hatfield Forum East 1077, Arcadia Street, Pretoria 0028

(012) 342 6009 078 440 6669 071 513 7884

reception@nkomeinc.co.za

www.nkomeinc.co.za

ADVERTORIAL | NKOME INCORPORATED
200 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

Qunu Staffing is an end-to-end human capital solutions company – working with you to build the expert team of talent your business deserves.

Founded in 2016, the company is equipped with the finest expertise to best fuel any company across South Africa with its ultimate staffing team. The CEO, Melusi Emmanuel Zulu, shares what it takes to lead this company.

Q: What makes Qunu Staffing different from any other staffing business?

Qunu’ s primary focus is its people and holds them at its centre, we pride ourselves in empowering and developing our people to deliver at their best. Our approach is encapsulated in our “profit through purpose” slogan, believing that people are the key drivers of innovative and thriving organisations. Furthermore, we uphold the notion that if our people are well taken care of, they can in turn deliver value to our clients and an exceptional experience to our assignees, creating an environment where everyone wins. We take the approach that both our assignees and clients form an integral part of our business because neither can exist without the other. The two may have different needs but we bring them together for a mutually beneficial relationship

Q: How does Qunu embrace diversity?

Diversity is one of our values as a business. We recognise, respect

AND CHANGING LIVES FOR THE BETTER

MEET MELUSI EMMANUEL ZULU, CEO OF

QUNU STAFFING

and value differences based on ethnicity, gender, age, race, religion, disability and sexual orientation. It is a combination of our differences that shape our view of the world, our perspective and our approach. Our workforce consists of diverse staff which enables us to learn more about each other’s differences - which develops a better culture in the workplace. It creates an environment for innovation where ideas can be openly shared.

Q: What industry trends have you noticed over the years?

There has been an increase in the utilisation of temporary employment services. Industries (i.e. Construction) that have fluctuating staffing requirements, rely mostly on the temporary employment sector to assist with on-demand labour requirements. In the past few years, we have seen an increase in the unemployment rate in South Africa. Not only that but we also had to live through a pandemic which contributed to a further loss of employment. Post-pandemic, we’ve seen an increase in the utilisation of TES in Industries that have not utilised such services before.

Q: What is your inspirational message for our readers?

“Every adversity carries with it the seed of an equal or greater benefit.” -Napoleon Hill.

It is common for humans to complain when faced with challenges, forgetting that therein lies their greatest strength and opportunities. Challenges have a way of revealing the hidden abilities

within you that would have otherwise remained dormant. Just as you find out what’s inside a tube of toothpaste only when it is squeezed, adversity reveals what you’re made of. Wise people have always understood the connection between suffering and growth. Meng Tzu, the Chinese sage, said, ‘When heaven is about to confer a great responsibility on any man, it will place obstacles in the path of his deeds so as to stimulate his mind, harden his nature, and improve wherever he is incompetent.”

Company Details

Physical: 102 Witch-Hazel Avenue, Highveld Techno Park, Centurion

Postal Address: 102 Witch-Hazel Avenue, Highveld Techno Park, Centurion 010 745 2287

Social Media qunu-workforce Qunu Staffing FOCUSED ON PEOPLE,
info@qunustaffing.com www.qunustaffing.com
BUSINESS,

GRIPP is a focused governance, risk, and internal control (GRC) advisory and business solutions organisation. We provide a holistic, end-to-end GRC suite of services to our clients. These services are core to what we do, and our focus is without distraction of other peripheral advisory and audit services.

We do what we stand for

GRIPP’s service offering is embedded in its name: governance, risk management, internal audit, investigations, and information and technology audit, and policies and procedures mapping and design.

Our Mission and Purpose is clear - to improve the governance, risk, and internal control (GRC) environment for our clients. We see this as partnering in a complementary manner, with likeminded individuals and organisations across the public and private sectors of the geographies within which we operate, to provide reasonable assurance and an outcomes-based solution to our clients, and by extension, their stakeholders, including shareholders, the board, board committees such as the social and ethics, and audit and risk,

GRIPP ADVISORY CATALYSTS FOR CONTINUAL CHANGE

remuneration, management, regulators, alliance partners, society, and other third-parties.

Our clients benefit from partnering with a purpose-driven organisation like ours through individualised solutions that are practical to their specific needs and chosen outcomes and receiving services from an organisation that specifically focuses on their unique GRC improvement journey.

We seek to work as a strategic partner to either uplift, upskill, or capacitate inhouse assurance functions or to provide full outsourced solutions to clients to ensure their assurance strategies and objectives are achieved with the aim of our aligned vision.

An aligned vision between us and our clients benefit stakeholders through ensuring that our objectives are the same as that of the in-house assurance function, management, and the board, thereby eliminating other business objectives that would impede the effectiveness of the engagement outcomes for our clients.

As catalysts for continual change and improvement, we work with our clients to deliver quality solutions, with suitably skilled professionals, to ensure limited time wastage and inefficiencies on our part, to achieve our client’s objectives. By focusing on outcomes and planning our efforts with that in mind, we ensure that we achieve the objectives to be met. We find when clients focus on time spend only, then the outcomes and objectives are compromised. Our clients benefit from this strategy through innovative

and cost-effective pricing models tailored to our clients' specific needs and use of more senior professionals and experienced skill sets to drive output and quality work product.

Organisational presence and reach

GRIPP maintains three locations in South Africa from where clients are serviced globally; these are located in Johannesburg, Cape Town and Durban (virtual). Whilst our systems and processes allow for remote working and encourages a reduction in carbon footprint, we have found that a hybrid way of working whereby our professionals can spend some time physically at a client provides for a more engaging and fruitful outcome.

GRIPP currently, and in the past, has serviced clients in various countries and across all nine provinces of South Africa.

B-BBEE, employment equity and transformation

GRIPP prides itself on being a valuable contributor to the society within which it operates. As such, we take to heart the challenges of historical discrimination and seek to contribute to the social uplifting of those previously disadvantaged.

Since the commencement of its business, GRIPP’s philosophy has been to:

• Partner with the HCI Foundation to mentor graduate students across South Africa

• Provide pro-bono services with the HCI Foundation towards causes

202 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION
GRIPP CEO RITESH NARSAI

• of national interest, such as the Covid-19 Food Relief Campaign

• Employ graduate students through a learnership programme with the IIA SA and FASSET to promote the profession to the youth and kick-start youth employment in the professional services sector, predominantly aimed at uplifting previously disadvantaged individuals because of race or gender, whilst reflecting the demographics of South Africa

GRIPP has an interest in investing in its employees to further their qualifications and career ambition through investment in learning and development opportunities and the promotion of individuals within the GRIPP competency and career path.

Key outcomes

> 50% female employees

> 75% black employees

> 8 completed learnerships to 2020

= 8 current learnerships 2021 intake

= 3 new learnerships 2022 intake

Our recent achievement of AAA+ LEVEL 1 B-BBEE rating bears testimony to our commitment towards transformation goals and objectives and the effort and energy put in to make this happen as a small to medium sized organisation.

Creating value for the society we operate in

For our clients

We Do…

• Deliver high-skilled and professional services nurturing strong business relationships

• Focus on outcomes and efficient solutions driven by value adding engagements

• Provide a competitive investment case with high return on our client’s stakeholder and shareholder value

and Achieved...

• Delivered more than 250 engagement projects across our client base annually

• Partnered with and served at least 18 JSE-listed organisations across industry sectors

• Created a presence in strategic locations to serve our clients better

• Reduced cost of assurance and consulting to our clients through innovative and tailored pricing models

For our valued employees

• Employ enthused professionals with a view for career growth and pathing in governance, risk, and internal control advisory and consulting

• Create employment opportunities for the youth with a view to diversify their professional skills or become deep skilled specialists in the professional services sector

• Protect employment during Covid-19 with a view to keep our professionals and support staff motivated and energised

• Provide fair and responsible remuneration with a view to improve performance incentives and bridge the remuneration gaps

For our communities

We Do…

• Provide pro-bono services to relief campaigns during Covid-19 lockdown

• Employ youth on our learnership programme with a view to increase certified young professionals entering the formal workplace

• Mentor and facilitate bursary students through the HCI Foundation with a view to create accessibility for students to become employable

• Donate and sponsor initiatives to promote the objectives of the professional bodies we ascribe to

and Achieved…

• Generated at least 8 successfully completed IAT learnership candidates

• Promoted at least another 8 IAT learnership candidates due for completion in 2021/22

• Promoted additional intake for the IAT learnership programme annually

• Facilitated and mentor HCI bursary candidates with a view to improve their employment opportunities across industry sectors

• Provided pro-bono professional advisory services to the HCI Foundation-eMedia Covid-19 relief campaign

• Sponsored several initiatives, thought leadership pieces, presentations, talks, panel discussions at conferences for professional and industry bodies like ISACA, IRMSA, and IIA SA, Gaming Magazine Africa

Company Details

Cape Town: Unit AO77, 3rd Floor West Wing, The Palms Décor and Lifestyle Centre, 145 Sir Lowry Rd, Woodstock, 7925

Johannesburg: The Pivot, 2nd Floor, Block E, 1 Montecasino Blvd, Cnr William Nicol Drive &, Witkoppen Rd, Fourways, 2055

+27 (0) 87 551 1702

info@grippadvisory.co.za

www.grippadvisory.co.za

GRIPP ADVISORY | ADVERTORIAL
gripp advisory

INTERVIEW WITH

“KMAKH Consultancy came about as a result of circumstances rather than an intentional pursuit of dreams,” says CEO and Founder, Grace Makhurupetsi. “The journey was more about revealing to me who I really am, how resilient I really am and how much I was willing to fight for my dream to come true. It was through the challenges and the joys of being in business that I discovered myself.” Here Grace takes us through KMAKH’s services, how transformation is embedded in the consultancy firm’s DNA and more.

Q: What do the letters KMAKH stand for and what is the company’s background?

KMAKH stands for Kgaugelo Makhurupetsi. It has always been my dream to own a consultancy firm at some point in my life, although I didn’t imagine it to be this way. KMAKH Consultancy came about as a result of circumstances rather than an intentional pursuit of dreams.

The company was incorporated after I completed my BCom degree at Wits University and I could not get a job, it was frustrations that led to the existence of the company. The company has grown since then.

Q: Please unpack the services offered by KMAKH?

The company is made up of a team of accountants, our service offering can be categorised as below. The objective of the company is to provide simplified and tailor-made solutions to our clients.

• Financial Reporting

• Tax consultancy

• Finance and management consultancy

• Compliance

• Business literacy coaching

• Marketing and branding

KMAKH Consultancy aims to provide services that enable our clients to focus on the operations of the business while we take care of the financial administration part of their entities. The wide range of services we offer enables us to be seen as a one-stop business

consultancy destination and, over the years of our operation, we have built good relationships with our clients.

Q: As the majority shareholder and CEO of the company, how do you ensure transformation is embedded in the DNA of KMAKH?

KMAKH Consultancy has been structured as a foundation for selfdevelopment for our employees. The company has invested in self-mastery activities, workshops and mentorship programmes. This enables the company to operate at a desired level of efficiency.

Part of our aims as a female-owned company is to make leadership opportunities and roles available to females in the finance, reporting and tax space. In our small ways, we strive to bring exposure to females in the field.

We have made it a priority to communicate the vision, values and objectives of the company to each and every one of our stakeholders - this clears up how they fit into the bigger picture and enables them to play their part with diligence.

KMAKH GRACE MAKHURUPETSI, CEO OF 204 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

For both our clients and employees, our approach to transformation is achieved through working together as a unit, reaching common ground first, then working together towards that which is agreed on.

As a female working a primarily maledominated platform, I intend to make information available to those who aspire to take on the challenge and step up to the ‘not-so-comfortable’ platform of business. This has been achieved through the startup business support programme we launched late 2022, this allowed aspiring entrepreneurs access to a business consultant and business literacy coaching where necessary.

Q: What have been some of your ‘AHA!’ moments as CEO?

For me as a CEO of the company, almost everything was a point-ofdiscovery, although I had worked in a number of companies before venturing into business, the experiences I have had running the company were totally different.

The journey was more about revealing to me who I really am, how resilient I really am and how much I was willing to fight for my dream to come true. It was through the challenges and the joys of being in business that I discovered myself.

There is an element of volatility in business, decisions that make sense now, may not really make much sense in the near future, this is when you need to go back to the drawing board and I have seen myself make so many mistakes that did not really look like mistakes at first and still would not look like mistakes if all else remains equal, but I have discovered and learnt that it is all part of the game.

Q: How would you describe your leadership style?

I like to imagine myself as a transformational leader more than anything. I believe in effective communication of the bigger picture, the vision and the objectives of the company to allow and encourage effective participation from the team in question.

I constantly review my leadership approach to determine if it is working towards the desired goal, if not, then what needs to be adjusted. This is so that every member of our team is able to give maximum participation and input in the project they are working on.

I believe in thoroughly communicated expectations and leading by example in ensuring that company objectives are met and the employer/employee expectations are met.

and challenges the mind, although this comes with some level of pressure, we believe that as a company we have put in place ways and measures to control this for mental wellness purposes.

Q: What is your “why”?

Running a consultancy company has always been my childhood dream, so much that I still cannot believe it is here. For a girl who grew up in the rural areas of Limpopo, this was too wild a dream and it led to me being identified as “the girl with reckless ambition”.

KMAKH Consultancy was founded with a vision to make available services that our target market would require in order to sustain their businesses.

For startup companies, the inherent challenge is keeping the administration and finance legs of the business functional and up-to-date as the operations are being undertaken.

I am passionate about the wellbeing of businesses, hence KMAKH Consultancy focuses more on building sustainable business models, clear corporate vision and comprehensible brand images for our clients.

I believe in creating a work environment that incubates growth

Part of our vision is to foster legacy companies, which will not only contribute positively to the livelihood of the economy of our country but will also play a role in addressing some of the socio-economic issues within the country.

KMAKH | INTERVIEW 22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 205

Q: What have been some of the most exciting projects the company has embarked on?

Due to the nature of the industry we operate in, “exciting” is almost always accompanied by “challenging”.

Most of the biggest projects we have worked on entailed: business planning, sourcing finance, project analysis, feasibility, and profitability studies. These had longer turnaround times and the interactions between the team and the clients were always thought provoking and challenging.

It is in these types of projects where I believe the real growth is, as different industries are introduced to us, new challenges are exposed.

Q: Have you faced particular challenges in certain sectors as a women-led company?

As a female-led company in a maledominated space, we have had to deal with credibility issues. It took a bit of time to secure a home in the business consultancy space and to eventually gain trust from our clients.

The stereotypes around gender and competency are not a thing of the past. I do wish for a planet where it is normal for a woman to venture into any type of business without being sidelined because of her gender.

Q: What role has technology and the 4IR played in your business model?

4IR has improved the quality of our work as accountants, the sophisticated accounting software and packages available to perform various reporting tasks are both efficient and effective.

This allows us to invest more time in other areas of commerce rather than historical figures and forecasting, hence the wide range of services we are able to offer.

Q: Please tell us about the CSI initiatives that KMAKH invests in?

In the 2022/2023 financial year, KMAKH Consultancy initiated the “Upcoming entrepreneurs support programme”. The purpose of the programme was to stretch out a helping hand to the upcoming entrepreneurs that may have the passion for business but may not have the necessary financial know-how for the sustainability of their businesses. The programme was directed mainly to businesses operating in the rural areas and townships.

Making these resources available to South Africans that are willing to get into business, is a small way of intervening in the socio-economic crisis the country is facing.

Do you have exciting plans for 2023? Please share them with us.

The 2023/24 financial year is packed with endless possibilities for the company. We are looking forward to expanding our team as the business growth requires a bigger team, this is coupled with increasing our footprint in South Africa, then the continent.

We are excited about our monthly newsletter which we will launch in March, where we will be sharing insight on matters around business, governance, tax amongst other things. We are also aiming to partner with more organisations and agencies in support of the upcoming entrepreneurs in the rural and township areas of the country.

Company Details NO 11 pieter street Time square office park Techno park, Centurion 0167 +27 76 783 1990 info@kmakhconsultancy.co.za www.kmakhconsultancy.co.za INTERVIEW | KMAKH 206 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

Southern Africa’s largest food, safety, environmental and veterinary laboratory group is Safety SA’s food safety division, Assurecloud. Safety SA is a marketleading provider of Testing, Inspection, Certification (TIC) and training solutions to Africa and the Middle East, focused on food safety and workplace safety. Their goal is to prevent illness and injury caused by food safety issues through identifying and monitoring risks.

ethics and professional conduct that deals with an employee’s responsibility in the workplace, respect and nondiscrimination and anti-harassment - this is applicable to all employees irrespective of race and gender. This policy supports our aim to correct the demographic imbalance that exists in the nation’s workforce by removing barriers and to promote the advancement of all South Africans.

around us, which is why we have volunteered our support and resources to help disadvantaged communities.

Assurecloud has the expertise, tools, and accreditation to enhance food safety at every point of the value chain, from the manufacturing of animal feed, to agricultural best practices, transport and storage. They track how food is handled and stored at the manufacturer and retailer, how it has prepared in a hospitality or catering environment, and provide testing services for allergens, bacteria, and quality compliance. Here Chief Information Officer briefly takes us through their approach to empowerment and sustainability.

Q: What are your organisation’s gender equality and BEE ratings and policies?

Our policy on employment equity goes hand-in-hand with our code of

Assurecloud is a proud Level 1 B-BBEE company that cares about supporting our country. Our black ownership is currently 26% and women ownership is 10.20%. By doing business with us, clients have the advantage of tapping into our wide variety of services and expertise which will benefit their overall needs and requirements.

Q: How are you integrating the drive for sustainability into your organisation?

Driving a sustainable business is all about leaving a positive impact. We are fighting to reduce inequalities and ensure that we maintain a workforce that promotes gender equality and helps those in need. We have seen that there is a need in the communities

It is also clear that the food industry is seeing a growing push towards sustainability. This is because consumers want to know if food ingredients are local, organic, etc. as they become more conscious of the meals they consume. At Assurecloud, we follow a “farm to fork'' service proposition that ensures that we have expertise, tools, and accreditation to enhance food safety. Our testing capabilities contribute towards the goals of safety, good health and well-being.

ASSURECLOUD
GAASENWE, CIO OF INTERVIEW WITH Company Details Portion 5 (Building) Gazelle Close, Corporate Park South Midrand Gauteng 1683 South Africa +27 10 142 1830 enquiries@assurecloud.co.za assurecloud.co.za
PALESA

Mariva was the name given to our late brother T.H. Ntamane by his friends and members of the community whilst growing up in Ezakheni, Ladysmith in the early 90s.

He was a profound source of wisdom, knowledge, hope, resilience, and a sound voice of reason for many across all walks of life. Staying true to his values of respect, integrity, dedication, discipline, and hard work, he would grow to be well entrenched in the lives of every single person with whom he engaged.

It is on the foundation of these principles that our business is built.

After 17 years of financial services industry and corporate advisory experience, we believed it was the right time to establish and introduce Mariva Advisory to the world.

Management consulting and advisory are peripheral business solutions that allow greater shareholder value creation. This has been traditionally the case for large and publicly-listed corporations which operate in more than one country with a higher degree of complexity to their operations. Smaller firms have not had these services and have missed out on achieving growth and sustainability.

We have seen through various legislation, both foreign and domestic, the carving out of more risk tolerant finance houses filling the gap which previously was occupied by large banks. Banks have been compelled to operate with lower risk as one bank failure can cause a devastating ripple effect. Consultants have been thus re-routed to operate more as inhouse counsel rather than outsourced functions for an organisation. This trend has led to an increase in consulting services and scope to achieve a more enterprise-wide solution. Technology both internally (efficiency) and externally (customer interaction) has influenced the way in which consulting looks at problem solving.

The global pandemic, though very rare in its occurrence over time, has prompted organisations of all sizes to look at adopting a hybrid model which is not beneficial for customers but also for its workforce. A work-life balance, though it may vary across industries, is core to a well-functioning business model. This is where consulting has achieved a good intent of playing the long game as opposed to billable hours on project by project basis.

New, smaller, and growing firms have realised the necessity of consulting along with various stakeholders in financial services. The private equity industry contracts firms like Mariva to best understand the business model and company culture to best estimate the probability of success. We have seen how their analysis has increasingly become more quantitative and thus the relevance of technology facilitating data processing for critical insights to a business’ operations.

Open consulting has also emerged as a viable component of rendering services to clients in that skill sets can be derived from other organisations and industry partners to great effect.

Conferences allow for such relationships to be formed to have a global impact and ultimately an increased quality product for the client. Although we do understand the need to embrace technology, we are aware of the challenges that the previously disadvantaged companies will need to navigate. Mariva is well placed to unearth the potential by being patient enough to expose clients to what the future looks like when they implement the change.

Physical address : Suite 407, 4th Floor Strauss Daly Place,14 Richefond Circle, Umhlanga Ridge, Durban 4139

Postal address: 63 Seapark, 47 Gillespie Street, Durban 4001

031 572 5723 or 071 826 7491

info@marivaadvisory.com

Sandile@marivaadvisory.com

Company Details
Mariva Advisory
ADVERTORIAL | MARIVA ADVISORY 208 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION
www.Marivaadvisory.com Mariva Advisory
@marivaadvisory

Vogue Exchange is a 100% black woman-owned company and a member of Proudly South African, Cape Chamber of Commerce & Industry, Small Business Institute, National Contract Cleaners Association and the Professional Bodyfor Environmental Hygiene.

We have specialised in the provision of sustainable corporate cleaning and environmental hygiene services since 2015. Our expertise includes:

• Corporate cleaning

• General waste management

• Medical/Hazardous waste management

• Washroom hygiene, equipment and consumables

• Industrial, domestic and commercial cleaning and hygiene

Vogue Hygiene is a division of Vogue Exchange and is an environmentally friendly cleaning, sanitation and hygiene services for Western Cape and Gauteng.

ABOUT VOGUE HYGIENE

Your first choice for environmentally friendly hygiene services in Cape Town, Western Cape and Gauteng.

We render a wide range of economical, sustainable cleaning and sanitation

solutions for clients in the corporate, commercial, and industrial sectors. Our commitment to customer satisfaction means that we consistently strive to exceed industry standards while maintaining a high level of quality management.

We have an extensive record of contracts within Western Cape and Gauteng and a history of satisfied clients who have made use of our bespoke services.Our diverse hygiene and cleaning services include everything from events, factory, and corporate cleaning to bathroom sanitary solutions and waste management.

WHY VOGUE HYGIENE

Our dedication to customer satisfaction means that we consistently strive to exceed industry standards while maintaining a high level of quality management. With our expertise backed by years of experience, we guarantee an efficient service every time.

This is shown through the steady relationships we have built with clients, suppliers, and staff over our years as a cleaning and hygiene services provider.

Health and safety are our utmost priorities. We deploy well-trained, knowledgeable employees with years of industry experience kitted in complete personal protective gear. In addition, we equip them with industrygrade equipment and machinery.

Only SABS-approved sanitation and cleaning products are used in our services. We promise not only customer-centric cleaning and hygiene services, but a healthy, safe environment for your organisation. To ensure continuous service

availability, we employ permanent auxiliary staff who serve as relief in the case of absenteeism, sickness or leave.. A supervisor is assigned to each project to ensure compliance and top customer service.

In aligning with the legislation of both health and environmental affairs sectors in South Africa, Vogue Hygiene adheres to the following:

• Ensuring all Vogue Hygiene™ personnel are highly trained

• Providing all Vogue Hygiene™ employees with appropriate safety and protective equipment

• Complying with applicable environmental legislation and regulations

• Utilising pollution-preventative techniques in our cleaning processes

• Constantly striving to minimise waste generation within all channels

• Conserving all applicable resources to optimise their usage, through gentle and efficient methods

• Taking measures to correct and eliminate hazards or conditions that endanger employees’ health and safety

• Allowing only fully trained personnel to utilise and operate equipment

• Using industry-approved equipment and materials.

HYGIENE | ADVERTORIAL 22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 209

PAUSE, REGROUP AND NOURISH YOURSELF

Ntsiki BiyelaSouth Africa’s iconic winemaker

210 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

“Accept what life offers you and try to drink from every cup. All wines should be tasted; some should only be sipped, but with others, drink the whole bottle.” -

Aslina Wines has a product that cannot be sipped just once, and the producer and the brains behind this brand is Ntsiki Biyela, a black woman who is paving a way for many young people, eliminating barriers while making a mark in the South African wine industry which is still transforming.

Ntsiki is the first black woman winemaker in South Africa. Born and bred in KwaZulu-Natal, she shares that the opportunity came when she received a scholarship from South African Airways to study winemaking. “It wasn’t something I planned to do. It was just a study opportunity for me that came in and I grabbed it with both hands and then I joined and studied at the University of Stellenbosch,” she says.

She says the tricky part was that Stellenbosch University was an Afrikaans-medium institution and, coming from Kwa-Zulu Natal, she did not understand the language and was worried about the language barrier being a stumbling block but she used that as a stepping stone because there was just nothing else she could do. “I asked myself that if I don’t take this opportunity, what else am I going to do? So it was a matter of saying let me fight here and build, even though I didn’t understand, I told myself I’d learn and understand,” she says.

She shares that initially, she wanted to do chemical engineering and changed to civil engineering but winemaking came her way and she decided to go with it.

Just after graduating, she got a job as a junior winemaker where she was involved in the vineyards. The work involved planning when the harvest should be done, organising with farmers to bring the crops in, looking over the process of winemaking, crushing the cliffs, adding sulphur and monitoring the fermentation process until it finishes. It was in 2016 when she established Aslina Wines.

NTSIKI BIYELA | EDITORIAL
22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 211

It was in 2016 when she established Aslina Wines. She says she’s always known that, at some point, she’d start her own company.

“I had been to the States in 2015, having been invited to an African women apprenticeship programme where I met women from all over the continent, and some of those women had successful businesses. But the rules of the country of their origin stated that as a woman, they could not own bank accounts and couldn’t own their businesses, so they had to have these things registered either with their sons or their husbands and they did it at those risks.

“My question was, what is holding me back? I came back and then, in November, I resigned. I had already started making wine on the side and had spoken to my boss, he knew that I had a side hustle that I did and he was okay with that. That trip accelerated me to jump ship and say, now is the time.”

Touching on the name of her company, she said she’d always known that she wanted to name it after one of her grandmother’s three names.

“It happened when I was in California doing a collaboration with an American winemaker. We were busy blending and then we decided to prep and make dinner. And I was telling her that I’m going to start my own brand and then she asked ‘what will be its name,’ and I told her it will be named after my grandmother.

“She asked me to tell her about my grandmother, which I did, and then at the end she asked about the name again and I told her it’s Aslina and we literally said ‘cheers’ [and] toasted to Aslina Wines”.

212 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION
“There’s a difference between saying the industry is open for people to come in, and actually making people comfortable and feel welcomed”

On the challenges she’s encountered as a woman, she looks back to her university days.

“It started when I was studying at the university, because of the language barrier, I had people asking me what was I doing in an Afrikaans university when I didn’t understand the language. For me, It wasn’t what they were asking but it was what they meant behind the question.

“And also starting in the industry, it wasn’t just the people I worked with in the industry but the people who are coming to the tasting room seeing that I’m a winemaker, they’d get shocked and I kept getting questions like “how do you know all this information?”

She said when she’d tell them and share information they would change the way they looked at her.

“When you tell a person, they realise and they start treating you differently because you’re a winemaker and this is me thinking like we’re all people, you know, we’re all human. I was in front of you at the tasting room and gave you information and I don’t think it should be different because now I’m a winemaker, but treat me differently because I’m a human. People tend to treat the position better than the human,” says Ntsiki.

She adds that sometimes people would come to sell grapes and look for a winemaker and they’d overlook her and she would gladly send them to the office. “I wasn’t getting offended. And, again, I’m grateful for the way I was looking at things because if I was, I could have found myself blocked or disheartened to do what I wanted to do. Because I was going to get tangled up in all the things that are happening and they’d affect me emotionally but I was strong and would literally point them to the office and then they’d come back with my boss and apologise.”

Touching on race and the gender gap in the wine industry, Ntsiki says there’s a difference between saying the industry is open for people to come in, and actually making people comfortable and feel welcomed.

“You can open the door, but if you make sure that your aircon inside is blasted so that a person with sinuses doesn’t stay, then that’s not welcoming. If you make sure that your chairs have thorns on so nobody can sit, then that’s not welcoming. There are people who came into the industry and left because the industry was not welcoming.”

She adds that she’s now involved with the Pinotage Youth Development Academy (PYDA), which trains young people through the value chain of the wine industry, and then helps with job placement.

“The young people are between 18 and 25 and they’re from the surrounding areas. They see the industry, they see the space, but they don’t feel they belong. So when they get the training at the academy, the focus really is more on personal development and then the technicalities of the industry. So they learn the technicalities, but we emphasise their personal development because I think as a person, if you’ve dealt with most of the issues within yourself, then you can be able to stand up and walk,” she says.

NTSIKI BIYELA | EDITORIAL
“When they get the training at the academy, the focus really is more on personal development and then the technicalities of the industry ”
22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 213

THE BLACK CELLAR CLUB Maturing into diversity

Zimbabwean-born sommelier Tinashe Nyamudoka summed up the position many black sommeliers found themselves in when they began their journey: “I had never drank wine. There was no wine tradition in my house growing up,” said Nyamudoka, speaking to Seven Fifty Daily. The Black Cellar Club (BLACC) leverages its network to share knowledge and resources for those already in the industry and those trying to break through.

Founded in 2016, the club wants to create more black sommeliers and introduce wine to a wider audience. “At the heart of BLACC is a commitment to benefit and advance wine loving, wine curious and everyone in between, with knowledge through social activities and raising awareness. BLACC aims to make the enjoyment and journey of wine appreciation accessible to all,” says their website.

Sommeliers, like Pearl Oliver-Mbumbawho now works as a general manager of food and beverage outlets - find joy in seeing the happiness of guests who have the perfect wine to pair with their meal, and are pushing to see more young people getting involved. “The idea is to have young Africans come on board and find a place [where] they feel comfortable,” said Oliver-Mbumba in Wine Enthusiast Magazine.

“There is a huge emerging black middle class in South Africa and Africa for whom affordability is not an issue. We know this to be the case with this market segment as we have seen it in their spending power when it comes to buying high end imported products such as Champagne and Cognac,” said Pearl, the former chairperson of the BLACC board, speaking to Travel Noire.

214 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

“I believe this to be an enormous untapped market and one whose buy-in can only benefit the whole of the South African wine industry. When there is a better and more locally-focused wine culture amongst Black Africans, there will be a higher demand for locally produced wines.“

Considering that there are more than 90 000 hectares of vines under cultivation, with over 200 000 people employed by the wine industry, and a R55-billion contribution to GDP in recent years, increasing at 10% per annum, further growth would not only be an incredible achievement, but also a welcomed boost to the South African economy.

BLACC has two levels of leadership, the first is the Executive, who are elected by members of the organisation, who total almost 3 000. The Executive then invites members to the Guardian group, who support BLACC’s initiatives. The guardians implement programmes and seek out opportunities for the members. The majority of BLACC members are based in Cape Town and Gauteng.

BLACC Mondays is one of the approaches BLACC took. The objective being to provide support to sommeliers and stewards in forging links with winemakers and owners. Ten to fifteen members are taken on trips to visit wine estates, where they see the vineyards, network and taste wines.

As part of their drive to educate aspiring sommeliers, BLACC formed a partnership with the Asia Pacific Wine and Spirit Institution (APWASI) to create a scholarship programme for online wine education. Applicants need to explain how they plan to play a role in promoting diversity in the wine industry. “This fully funded scholarship program awarded by APWASI is intended to reinforce, widen and build sustainable diversity for future generations within the South African wine and spirits industry. APWASI’s commitment in supporting the “BLACC’’ community within the wine and spirit industry is a historic and significant step in this long, but purposeful journey,” said Dr. Clinton Lee, Executive Director of APWASI, at the launch of the programme in May of 2021.

“We believe that through the engaging support that APWASI delivers, we can make that vital difference to help the next generation achieve their successes.”

With a rapidly growing membership, and ambitions based on a genuine vision for a more diverse and inclusive future,

BLACC’s initiatives and the people behind them are sure to give us more Pearl Oliver-Mbumbas. She personifies the excellence possible, having served as an executive board member for the South African Sommeliers Association and judge of many competitions and lists. Diners around the country, and the world, can make their reservations here confident they will have a delightful wine to compliment their dishes.

Pearl Oliver-Mbumba

• Former outlet manager at Vista Bar and Ochre Restaurant, One & Only Cape Town

• Executive board member of South African Sommeliers Association

• Former national chair of Black Cellar Club (BLACC)

• Former BLACC ambassador

• Wine Judge for Wineland magazine

• National Wine List judge 2018

• Chairperson of Wellsfaber Best Value Sommelier wine panel 2015 - 2016

• Shiraz wine judge 2014 - 2017

• Ultra Value Wine Challenge judge 2014 - 2016

• Garagiste wine judge 2016

Sources: Black Cellar Club | Michael Oliver | LinkedIn |

Seven Fifty Daily | The Wine Mag | Wines of South Africa | Travel Noire

THE BLACK CELLAR CLUB | LIFESTYLE
22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 215
HLOBA.CO.ZA
216 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION
2023 NOMINEE
linkedin.com/company/hloba-clothing/ instagram.com/hlobaclothing/ 1E Westgate Industrial Park, Stockville Road, Marianhill, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa WWW.HLOBA.CO.ZA +27 31 700 5550 INFO@HLOBA.CO.ZA A MEMBER OF THE 22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 217

Q: PLEASE SHARE THE BACKSTORY OF YOUR COMPANY – AND ITS NAME.

Why the name Atlantic Apara O Tlale (AAOT)? I am very spiritual person, and you will not believe when I say I actually dreamt of the name Atlantic. At the time when I was still trying to figure out the name of the brand, and on one random day I had a very interesting dream - I was having a conversation with my late father, Tlou Matlwa-Seleka and the name came up. I ran with it. APARA O TLALE is just one of those kasi quotes to express the vibe of the brand by saying “Dress up and look nice”.

I saw a loop hole and came to a realisation that there are a number of local clothing companies/brands that produce the quality of clothing that does not appeal to me. I took that as an opportunity to start my own proudly South African black-owned clothing brand.

It all started with the research of different fabrics and qualities because essentially, I wanted the best quality products. I had to contact different mass production companies to help create samples to the standard of quality I required; I even went to the extent of getting samples from international companies. I wanted the items

DRESSING UP AND LOOKING NICE

to be the best quality of clothing to ever be produced locally. I managed to choose five companies out of nine to help me with my brand, three are proudly South African and the others are international.

My team and I came up with different designs of clothing, then did the whole process of customised products sampling until I was happy to proceed with bulk production.

The journey was not easy finding the right mass production companies, being rejected by some, getting the quality and designs right, personally funding the entire vision, enduring the negative comments from people, and most importantly encouraging my team to fully understand the vision we had/have.

Q: WHAT VISION DID YOU HAVE FOR ATLANTIC APARA O TLALE?

My vision as the founder of the brand is to see AAOT 5yrs+:

• Have at least 20 stores nationwide

• Recognised brand across SA Borders

• Brand identity still in tact

• Acquire a bigger warehouse

• Create more employment opportunities

Q: WHAT PRODUCTS AND SERVICES DOES THE COMPANY OFFER?

Atlantic “Apara O Tlale” (AAOT) currently offers a range of items for men and women. Our items are produced from different fabrics of the highest quality and our customers are more than happy with the quality of our items.

Our main product line includes:

• Denims jeans

• Golf shirts

• Golf dresses

• Crew-neck T-shirts

• V-neck T-shirts

• Long sleeves T-shirts

• Baseball caps

• Sweater tops/sweaters dresses

• Hoodie tops / hoodie dresses

• Accessories

THE COMPANY OPENED ITS DOORS IN THE SAME YEAR AS THE PANDEMIC HIT THE GLOBE. HOW DID THIS IMPACT YOUR BUSINESS MODEL?

Well, we had to postpone the launch of the brand until such a time when things were a bit settled. It was really disappointing especially when you have employees and the business isn’t making any money.

218 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

Q: PLEASE SHARE THE IMPORTANCE OF KASI BRANDS FOR BOOSTING THE LOCAL ECONOMY.

I am happy that I am part of the people who are creating employment opportunities in our country through my brand. The unemployment rate is very high especially in the township communities. The brand is not just about me; people must and will benefit from ATLANTIC APARA O TLALE (AAOT). The aim is to add a value to our local economy and create employment.

Q: WHAT HAVE BEEN SOME OF YOUR AHA MOMENTS AS CEO?

• Realising the gap in the market for quality and stylish clothing items

• Trying out international manufacturers

I pursuit to achieve my vision

• You don’t have to please everyone, not everyone is your target market

Q: WHAT EXCITES YOU ABOUT WHAT YOU DO?

I am an Electrical Engineer by profession, with no experience or education in fashion. This has been nothing short of an exciting journey, coupled with passion - which is one great force that unleashes the creativity from within and the willingness to take the risk. Ke nyaka batho ba tlale gore it’s possible that black businesses can provide high quality clothing to the world”

Q: HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR LEADERSHIP STYLE?

Q: WHAT IS YOUR TAKE ON SMALL BUSINESSES BEING THE BACKBONE OF THE SOUTH AFRICAN ECONOMY?

Small businesses are often ignored but in actual fact create more job opportunities, offer career opportunities and put money back into their local communities through pay-cheques and taxes. All this helps to reduce the huge unemployment rate especially in our township communities.

• Coach

• Visionary

• Democratic

Q: WHAT EXCITING PLANS DO YOU HAVE FOR 2023?

We are currently busy with a new clothing line that will be released very soon. We are expanding to include jackets, bucket hats, shirts, chinos, sweatpants etc. some of which are currently in production. We will be adding accessories to our range of items – such as AAOT cologne, belts and watches. We are also planning to continue opening more stores in South Africa to create employment opportunities, have billboards and enhance our marketing strategy.

Company Details

Physical address: Unit 02, Old Mint Park, Louwlardia, Centurion, 0157

Postal address: P.O Box 911-3460, Rosslyn, Pretoria, 0200

Tel: 012 023 2461

Fax: 086 560 5488

WhatsApp: 083 503 8669

info@shopatlantic.co.za

Web: www.shopatlantic.co.za

E-commerce facilities: www.shopatlantic.co.za

ATLANTIC APARA O TLALE | INTERVIEW

ATLANTIC APARA O TLALE ATLANTIC APARA O TLALE

A proudly South African premium Kasi brand, founded in 2019 by Hardley Matlwa-Seleka, the vision behind Atlantic Apara O Tlale was to explore the best quality clothing which would ultimately spark innovation and creativity with a local feel.

With a valuable touch of local flair, the brand offers premium styling, as well as quality and value to consumers nationwide, with a breadth of items including, men’s and women’s golfers, crew-necks, sweaters, sweater dresses, hoodies and hoodie dresses.

Atlantic “Apara O Tlale” is a 100% black-owned brand and a start-up retail establishment that proudly sells fashionable clothing for men and women between the ages of 18 and 50 years.

As we get older, our fashion needs and style evolve and change. But that doesn’t mean that getting up and getting dressed needs to become a mundane task. Fashion should be

an expression of your personality, an outburst of your mood, an example of your artistic expressions.

Age certainly shouldn't be a factor in how you dress, but there is a difference between what you gravitated toward in your 20s versus in your 50s.

If you're looking for some fresh outfit inspiration now that you've hit the big 50, we've got you covered as well. From polished, work-ready looks to wear-anywhere outfits that are undeniably polished, consider the question of what to wear in this next chapter officially solved.

SCORECARD

Black Empowerment level – shareholding (%):

>50.1% black shareholding

Black Empowerment Level - executive directors/senior management (%):

>50.1% black executive directors

Gender empowerment level – executive

directors/senior management (%):

25.1-50% female executive directors

Black Empowerment - total staff (%): >50.1 % black staff

Company Details

Physical address: Unit 02, Old Mint Park, Louwlardia, Centurion, 0157

Postal address: P.O Box 911-3460, Rosslyn, Pretoria, 0200

Tel: 012 023 2461

Fax: 086 560 5488

WhatsApp: 083 503 8669

info@shopatlantic.co.za

Web: www.shopatlantic.co.za

E-commerce facilities: www.shopatlantic.co.za

PROFILE | ATLANTIC APARA O TLALE
220 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

Angel investor Lelemba Phiri explains how profit and impact can go together

Having scaled Zoona across the African continent, Lelemba Phiri now manages a R100-million gender-lens investing fund. She’s found the special balance many entrepreneurs and investors are looking for: generating profit while still creating an impact. It was at Zoona that she realised she can make an impact elsewhere and as such Lelemba has dedicated her work to empowering women entrepreneurs.

In this Business Unusual Podcast, Koketso Mamabolo engages in conversation with Lelemba Phiri about how to attract investors, why she left a successful venture and how it’s possible to make an impact while making a profit. Lelemba shares her journey and explains why gender-lens investing is important.

KEY TAKEAWAYS FROM THIS PODCAST:

• Sub-Saharan Africa has more women getting into entrepreneurship than men

• Investing with your own money only can only go so far

• Investors don’t want complicated language. Be clear, concise and specific when pitching to them

• Your fund needs to have enough to able to survive

• “Entrepreneurship can be very lonely”

• You need to identify “needle-movers”

• Pitching isn’t reserved for investors only, you also want to be able to attract strategic partners

• If your pitch is interesting enough, they will ask for more details

• More profitable business can create more impact

• “Look for the visionary that’s in the space of what you are passionate about”

• We need spaces where academics and businesses can work together

Lelemba Phiri is the Principal of the Africa Trust Group and Fund Manager for Engyma Ventures. She is a Director at Zoona and Startup Circles and is currently completing a PhD in gender-lens investing at GIBS. Lelemba has almost two decades of experience working with both the public and private sectors across sub-Saharan Africa. The award-winning angel investor is a certified chartered accountant in the UK and has appeared in various publications, including the Oprah magazine, and was a SABC 3 presenter on “The Power Within”, where she was the financial expert.

LELEMBA PHIRI | PODCAST
> CLICKHER E TOACCESS TH E UNUSSENISUB TSACOPLAUS S .
22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 221

LEADING THE WAY A snapshot of three Top Empowerment Award winners

Following the 2022 Top Empowerment Awards, a young CEO posted a video on LinkedIn showing him in a jubilant mood, surrounded by the people he’s built a rising business with. There are smiles and champagne - this is a celebration. The CEO of Analytics Advertising, Talifhani Banks, is taking a moment to celebrate his achievement, which was being named the Top Empowered Entrepreneur of the Year.

That video is a look into what recognition means to many. It means sharing your story with others, and sharing the opportunities you’ve created in driving transformation. Along with Talifhani, here we’re going to take a look at two other CEOs who were recognised at the 2022 awards: Tshegetsang Sebeela, the CEO of TEG, and Dr Felleng Yende, the CEO of FP&M SETA.

TALIFHANI BANKS

Top Empowered Entrepreneur of the Year

Innovation, finding new paths and exploring the world of data science is what Talifhani is all about. Hailing from Louis Trichardt, he excelled in mathematics and went on to study at the University of Pretoria, where he completed a Bcom Statistics, majoring in Econometrics. He worked for businesses such as Massmart, Pick ‘n Pay and Autozone before he founded Analytics Advertising, a rapidly growing data technology SMME.

“Although I dreamt and visualised this as a goal, and pursued it with confidence, I could still not believe when it happened,” said Talifhani, about his Top Empowerment award. “I was ecstatic and thankful.”

Some of the clients his company has worked with include PPC Africa, Saint Gobain Africa, Transunion Africa, Adapt IT Africa, Yonder, BCX, VW and the Development Bank of Southern Africa.

222 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

TSHEGETSANG

SEBEELA

Top Empowered Business Leader

Tshegetsang has been an entrepreneur for many years, since she was very young, in fact.

Her earliest entrepreneurial venture involved indulging people’s love for sugary treats with ice-cream and sweets which she sold in her neighbourhood. It’s no wonder she went on to study Business Management, after which she began a career as a business consultant.

That changed in 2010 when the firm she was working for closed its doors. Tshegetsang had two options, one which could have given her more certainty, and another which involved taking a risk that could lead to almost anything. Either go into the public sector or tap into that entrepreneurial spirit. She chose the route she seems to have been destined for.

Her career in management consulting was not over, though, as that was exactly what her business, TEG, did. It focuses on corporate and social responsibility, specifically enterprise supplier development solutions. She has also ventured into mining and drilling solutions.

DR FELLENG YENDE Top Empowerment Public Sector Leader

Before being appointed the CEO of FP&M SETA, Dr Felleng Yende held various senior positions at industry-leading companies. She was the Group Transformation Manager at PwC, before holding the same position at Lafarge South Africa. Dr Yende was then tasked with driving BHP Billiton’s corporate investment strategy as the Head of Transformation - Group Functions.

Dr Yende serves on the boards of the Vaal University of Technology, People Opposing Women Abuse (POWA) and the South African Furniture Initiative (SAFI). She is the former Executive Director of BHP Billiton Holdings SA and Trustee of the BHP Billiton SA Development Trust.

Under her leadership, FP&M SETA has seen phenomenal growth and unqualified audits and clean administration. She’s led the drive to work with countries across the continent and has been recognised with multiple awards. A true example of a public sector leader.

TOP EMPOWERMENT AWARD WINNERS | EDITORIAL
HENRY SE B AT A Partner BT S AVO & B T S Grou p S I YA N DA KUNEN E D irector | Kun e ne Ma k opo Ri s k Solution s U Z AIR ESSA C K Forb e s 30 under 30 M D | Riy p ALLA N V A N DE R MEULE N C E O | ZIt o LANGA M AD O NK O Co-Founder and Principal | Summit Afric a KH O L O S A N ON KE N G E A ss istant D irector | Departmen t of B asic E ducatio n GE R ALD MWA N DIA M BI R A CE O | SA Saving s In s titut e HENRY SE B AT A Partner BT S AVO & B T S Grou p S I YA N DA KUNEN E D irector | Kun e ne Ma k opo Ri s k Solution s U Z AIR ESSA C K Forb e s 30 under 30 M D | Riy p ALLA N V A N DE R MEULE N C E O | ZIt o LANGA M AD O NK O Co-Founder and Principal | Summit Afric a KH O L O S A N ON KE N G E A ss istant D irector | Departmen t of B asic E ducatio n GE R ALD MWA N DIA M BI R A CE O | SA Saving s In s titut e HENRY SE B AT A Partner BT S AVO & B T S Grou p S I YA N DA KUNEN E D irector | Kun e ne Ma k opo Ri s k Solution s U Z AIR ESSA C K Forb e s 30 under 30 M D | Riy p ALLA N V A N DE R MEULE N C E O | ZIt o LANGA M AD O NK O Co-Founder and Principal | Summit Afric a KH O L O S A N ON KE N G E A ss istant D irector | Departmen t of B asic E ducatio n GE R ALD MWA N DIA M BI R A CE O | SA Saving s In s titut e
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IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT RESEARCH CRITERIA

SOUTH AFRICA’S

TOP EMPOWERED COMPANIES

At a time when South Africa is grappling with the implementations of rapid economic transformation, hats off to the top empowered companies in the country.

Companies are assessed on the seven pillars of empowerment as set out by the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition::

• Ownership

• Management Control

• Employment Equity

• Skills Development

• Preferential Procurement

• Enterprise Development

• Socio-Economic Development

Further, eligibility is determined by compliance with the following requirements. These criteria are:

• Black ownership as a share of total ownership

• Black executive directors as a share of all executive directors

• Black senior managers as a share of total senior management

• Black employees as a share of total employment

• Corporate social investment spend (in both absolute and relative terms)

• Expenditure on skills development focused on empowering historically disadvantaged individuals

• Procurement practices

Companies complying with the ownership and directorship requirements and exceeding the minimum turnover requirements are evaluated according to these criteria and points are allocated relative to their performance.

Impumelelo Top Empowerment does not, however, rank companies on the basis of the points scored, preferring rather to highlight all companies that perform above a certain level.

Key objectives of revised codes:

• Drive growth of SMME black-owned enterprises

• Encourage job creation

• Drive local manufacture and processing

• Accelerate representation of black women, rural and the youth in economic activities

• Eradicate fronting

Revised B-BBEE categories:

• Ownership

• Management Control

• Skills Development

• Enterprise & Supplier Development

• Socio-Economic Development The full A-Z listing of South Africa’s Top Empowered Companies can be viewed at topempowerment.co.za

240 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

PRIMARY SEGMENT LISTING RESOURCES MINING COAL

MC Mining Limited

Makoya Supply Chain Holdings (Pty) Ltd

Salungano Group

GOLD MINING

Gold Fields Limited

Harmony Gold Mining Company Limited

DIAMOND

De Beers Consolidated Mines

Petra Diamonds Southern Africa

GENERAL MINING

African Mineral Standards (AMIS)

Exxaro Resources Limited

Otic Projects (Pty) Ltd

South32 SA Holdings (Pty) Ltd

Tau Matla

Ukwazi Mining Studies (Pty) Ltd

OIL & GAS

OIL & GAS - EXPLORATION & PRODUCTION

BP Southern Africa (Pty) Ltd

Easigas (Pty) Ltd

Engen Petroleum Limited

Shell Downstream South Africa (Pty) Ltd

OIL & GAS - INTEGRATED

Afric Oil (Pty) Ltd

Central Energy Fund (SOC) Limited

Econ Oil & Energy (Pty) Ltd

Engen Petroleum Limited

KZN Oils (Pty) Ltd

Sasol Gas (Pty) Ltd

Sasol Limited

Shell Downstream South Africa (Pty) Ltd

SLG (Pty)Ltd

Total South Africa (Pty) Ltd

SECONDARY SEGMENT LISTING

BASIC INDUSTRIES

CHEMICALS

CHEMICALS - COMMODITIES

AECI Limited

Air Products South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Chemical Initiatives (Pty) Ltd

Elemental Analytics (Pty) Ltd

FFS Refiners (Pty) Ltd

Omnia Holdings Limited

CHEMICALS - SPECIALITY

CHEMICALS

AECI Limited

African Oxygen Limited

Buckman Laboratories (Pty) Ltd

FFS Refiners (Pty) Ltd

Hosaf (Pty) Ltd (name changed to SAFRIPOL)

Laser Chemicals (Pty) Ltd

NCP Chlorchem (Pty) Ltd

Sasol Limited

CONSTRUCTION & BUILDING MATERIALS

CONSTRUCTION & BUILDING MATERIALS

Adriya Sports And Fencing cc

Afrisam (South Africa) (Pty) Ltd

Amabamba Fencing (Pty) Ltd

Enza Construction (Pty) Ltd

Group Five Limited

Isizwe Glass & Aluminium cc

Malaka Supplies cc

Massbuild (Pty) Ltd

HEAVY CONSTRUCTION

Adenco Construction (Pty) Ltd

AEL Mining Services (Pty) Ltd

Aveng Grinaker-LTA

B & W Instrumentation and Electrical Limited

Baseline Civil Contractors (Pty) Ltd

Edwin Construction (Pty) Ltd

ELB Group Limited

G4 Civils (Pty) Ltd

Group Five Limited

Hillary Construction (Pty) Ltd

Imbani Projects (Pty) Ltd

Motheo Construction Group (Pty) Ltd

NMC (Pty) Ltd

Power Group (Pty) Ltd

Raubex Group Limited

SOUTH AFRICA’S TOP EMPOWERED COMPANIES
22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 241

Rumdel Construction (Pty) Ltd

Ruwacon (Pty) Ltd

SMEC South Africa (Pty) Ltd

TTR Building Construction

Umso Construction (Pty) Ltd

Waco Africa (Pty) Ltd

WBHO Construction (Pty) Ltd

OTHER CONSTRUCTION

Baseline Civil Contractors (Pty) Ltd

Enza Construction (Pty) Ltd

Eris Property Group (Pty) Ltd

M3 Construction Projects (Pty) Ltd

Methano Group

MRW Projects cc

Murray & Dickson Construction (Pty) Ltd

RICTS Holdings

Turner & Townsend

Winvest Africa Group

OTHER MANUFACTURING

OTHER MANUFACTURING

Acoustex (Pty) Ltd

Artistic Wood Carvers And Turners (Pty) Ltd

C.V Projects SA

CZ Electronics Manufacturing (Pty) Ltd

Dosco Precision Hydraulics

Elegant Plastics Displays cc

ERB Technologies (Pty) Ltd

First National Battery

Flag Craft International (Pty) Ltd

GB Bearings (Pty) Ltd

Green Office (Pty) Ltd

Hloba Clothing (Pty) Ltd

Jendamark Automation (Pty) Ltd

Masslift Africa (Pty) Ltd

Regma South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Steam Generation Africa

The Lion Match Company (Pty) Ltd

FORESTRY & PAPER FORESTRY

Komatiland Forests (Pty) Ltd

Timrite (Pty) Ltd

PAPER

Mondi Limited

Sappi Southern Africa Limited

STEEL & OTHER METALS

NON-FERROUS METALS

B & E International (Pty) Ltd

Debar Ceramics

Hulamin Operations (Pty) Ltd

IRON & STEEL

Aveng Manufacturing

Decoma Services cc

Khombanani Steel (Pty) Ltd

Metal Plus South Africa

GENERAL INDUSTRIES

DIVERSIFIED INDUSTRIALS

Southey Holdings (Pty) Ltd

The Bidvest Group Limited

Clyde Bergemann Africa (Pty) Ltd

Firefly Investments 42 cc

Hitech-Gregfor (Pty) Ltd

Imperial Holdings Limited

Kap Industrial Holdings Limited

ELECTRONIC & ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT

ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT

Aberdare Cables (Pty) Ltd

ACTOM (Pty) Ltd

ARB Holdings Limited

Black Lite Energy (Pty) Ltd

CBI Electric: Aberdare ATC Telecom Cables (Pty) Ltd

CBI-Electric: low voltage

Colcab (Pty) Ltd

Edison Power Electrical (Pty) Ltd

Enzani Technologies (Pty) Ltd

Idube Electrical (Pty) Ltd

Malesela Taihan Electric Cable (Pty) Ltd

Mandlakazi Electrical Technologies (Pty) Ltd

Voltex (Pty) Ltd

ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT

ABB South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Aberdare Cables (Pty) Ltd

Ansys Limited

Bytes Document Solutions (Pty) Ltd

Conlog (Pty) Ltd

DIVERSIFIED INDUSTRIALS

Argent Industrial Limited

Barloworld Limited

Beier Envirotec (Pty) Ltd

Imperial Holdings Limited

Dartcom (Pty) Ltd

Delba Electrical Company 1980 (Pty) Ltd

Electronic Touch Systems (Pty) Ltd

Enzani Technologies (Pty) Ltd

Instrument Transformer Technologies (Pty) Ltd

SOUTH AFRICA’S TOP EMPOWERED COMPANIES
242 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

IST (Integrators of Systems Technology)

Jasco Trading (Pty) Ltd

Kolok (A Division of Bidvest Paper Plus)

KPG Media Technologies

Kyocera Document Solutions South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Minolco (Pty) Ltd

Nashua (Pty) Ltd

Reunert Limited

Ricoh South Africa (Pty) Ltd

SGT Solutions

Siemens SA (Pty) Ltd

ENGINEERING & MACHINERY

COMMERCIAL VEHICLES & TRUCKS

Babcock Plant Services (Pty) Ltd

Centurion Truck and Bus (Pty) Ltd

CTS Trailers (Pty) Ltd

ENGINEERING CONTRACTORS

Aveng Rail Division of Aveng Africa (Pty) Ltd

Barloworld Equipment

Haw & Inglis (Pty) Ltd

Mitsubishi Hitachi Power Systems Africa (Pty) Ltd

ENGINEERING - GENERAL

Bearing Man Group (Pty) Ltd

APE Pumps (Pty) Ltd

Aveng Water (Pty) Ltd

Battery Electric (Pty) Ltd

Dibama Supplies cc

Dupleix Liquid Meters

enX Group Limited

Howden Africa Holdings Limited

Hudaco Trading (Pty) Ltd

Lengwati Electrical

Liquid Automation Systems (Pty) Ltd

Max Scott Engineering Sales cc

Reutech Solutions

Valve Specialists cc

CONSULTING ENGINEERS

Arup (Pty) Ltd

Aurecon South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Bigen Africa Services (Pty) Ltd

BVI Consulting Engineers (Pty) Ltd

Exigo Sustanability (Pty) Ltd

Geosure (Pty) Ltd

Gibb (Pty) Ltd

Glad Africa Holdings (Pty) Ltd

Ingérop South Africa (Pty) Ltd

JG Afrika (Pty) Ltd

Kantey & Templer (Pty) Ltd

Lesedi Nuclear Services (Pty) Ltd

Malani Padayachee and Associates (Pty) Ltd

Movidna Services

SRK Consulting (South Africa) (Pty) Ltd

CYCLICAL CONSUMER GOODS

AUTOMOTIVE & PARTS

AUTOMOBILES

Barloworld Motor Retail South Africa

Nissan South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Motus Holdings Limited

VolkswagenSA

BAIC South Africa

AUTO PARTS

Abes Technoseal

Alfred Teves Brake Systems (Pty) Ltd

Ashrafs Windscreens cc

Auto Industrial Group (Pty) Ltd

Deutz Dieselpower

GB Bearings (Pty) Ltd

Lumotech (Pty) Ltd

Metair Investments Limited

TFM Industries (Pty) Ltd

TYRES & RUBBER

Bridgestone SA (Pty) Ltd

Michelin Tyre Company SA (Pty) Ltd

VEHICLE DISTRIBUTION

AAD Truck And Bus (Pty) Ltd

Bidvest McCarthy

Freeway Toyota

HOUSEHOLD GOODS & TEXTILES

CLOTHING & FOOTWARE

Atlantic Apara O Tlale

Deneb Investments Corporation Limited

Sweet-Orr & Lybro (Pty) Ltd

FURNISHINGS & FLOOR COVERINGS

CV Projects

BidOffice (Pty) Ltd

Cecil Nurse a Division of Bidvest Office (Pty) Ltd

Dynamic Flooring cc

APPLIANCES & CONSUMER ELECTRONICS

Beka Manufacturing SA (Pty) Ltd

Ellies Holdings Limited

Home of Living Brands (Pty) Ltd

SOUTH AFRICA’S TOP EMPOWERED COMPANIES
22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 243

NON-CYCLICAL COMSUMER GOODS

AGRICULTURE

Omnia Holdings Limited

Senwes Limited

Kaap Agri Bedryf Limited

Jansen Farming Agriculture

ST Tshabalala Agri Consulting

BEVERAGES - DISTILLERS & VINTNERS

Distell Limited

Nederburg Wines (Pty) Ltd

FOOD PRODUCERS & PROCESSORS

FARMING

Crookes Brothers Limited

RCL Foods Limited

Tswellapele Plants t/a Plantwise

FISHING

Amawandle Hake (Pty) Ltd

Blue Continent Products (Pty) Ltd

Oceana Group Limited

Premier Fishing SA (Pty) Ltd

Sea Harvest Group Limited

FOOD PROCESSORS

Compass Group Southern Africa (Pty) Ltd

Excellent Meat Corporation (Pty) Ltd

Illovo Sugar (Pty) Ltd

Rhodes Food Group (Pty) Ltd

Tiger Brands Limited

HEALTH

HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANISATIONS

Batsomi Lifeworks (Pty) Ltd

Discovery Health (Pty) Ltd

Discovery Holdings Limited

Kaelo Consulting (Pty) Ltd

Medscheme Holdings (Pty) Ltd

Metropolitan Health (Pty) Ltd

Sechaba Medical Solutions

Workforce Healthcare (Pty) Ltd

Life Healthcare Group Holdings

HOSPITAL MANAGEMENT & LONG-TERM CARE

Life Healthcare Group Holdings Limited

Melomed Hospital Holdings Limited

Netcare Limited

BIOTECHNOLOGY RESEARCH

Afrigen Biologics (Pty) Ltd

OTHER HEALTHCARE

Be Safe Paramedical cc

Msanda Laboratories

PACKAGING

PACKAGING

APL Cartons (Pty) Ltd

Astrapak Limited

Consol Glass (Pty) Ltd

Future Packaging & Machinery (Pty) Ltd

Lufil Packaging (Pty) Ltd

Mpact Limited

Pride-Pak Packaging (Pty) Ltd

Transpaco Limited

PERSONAL CARE & HOUSELHOLD PRODUCTS

PERSONAL PRODUCTS

Amka Products (Pty) Ltd

HPCB (a division of Tiger Brands Ltd)

PHARMACEUTICALS & BIOTECHNOLOGY

PHARMACEUTICALS

Adcock Ingram Limited

Ascendis Health Limited

Aspen Pharmacare Holdings Limited

TERTIARY SEGMENT LISTING

CYCLICAL SERVICES

INDUSTRIAL GOODS

PLANTS & EQUIPMENT RENTAL

Jabula Plant Hire (Pty) Ltd

Turner Morris Manufacturing (Pty) Ltd

ELECTRONICS EQUIPMENT

RENTAL

CCTV Security Surveillance Gauteng (Pty) Ltd

Gearhouse South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Media Film Service (Pty) Ltd

GENERAL RETAILERS

RETAILERS - HARDLINES

AJM Sales & Services cc

Combined Motor Holdings Limited

Fig Technology (Pty) Ltd

Forms Media Independent Africa (Pty) Ltd

Introstat (Pty) Ltd

Ithuba Valves & Industrial Supplies cc

SOUTH AFRICA’S TOP EMPOWERED COMPANIES
244 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

Leitam Business solutions

Neo Technologies (Pty) Ltd

TRADE

WHOLESALE

Aberdare Cables

AQS Liquid Transfer

ARB Electrical Wholesalers (Pty) Ltd

Bathu Shoes (Pty) Ltd

Discount Electrical Wholesale cc

EP Electrical Distributors (Pty) Ltd

Invincible Valves (Pty) Ltd

Kele Engineering and Construction

Lalita Investments (Pty) Ltd

Malls Tiles (Pty) Ltd

DISTRIBUTORS

Bearings International

BEP Bestobell (Pty) Ltd

D & J Stationers Cc

Drager South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Elephant Lifting Equipment (a division of Torres Holdings (Pty) Ltd

iMed Distributors

Imperial Fast & Fresh (Pty) Ltd

Invincible Valves (Pty) Ltd

Natal Coastal Communications

LEISURE, ENTERTAINMENT & HOTELS

GAMING

Afrisun Gauteng (Pty) Ltd

Afrisun Gauteng t/a Carnival City

Emnotweni Casino

Emperors Palace

Gold Circle (Pty) Ltd

Ithuba Holdings (Pty) Ltd

Peermont Global (Pty) Ltd

Tsogo Sun Holdings Limited

HOTELS

Emperors Palace

Peermont Hotels & Resorts

Sandton Sun Hotels (Pty) Ltd

Southern Sun Hotels (Pty) Ltd

Sun International Limited

Tsogo Sun Hotels

TRAVEL & RELATED SERVICES

Astra Travel (Pty) Ltd

City of Choice Travel & Tours (Pty) Ltd

Club Travel SA (Pty) Ltd

Flight Centre SA (Pty) Ltd

Flywell Travel Agencies Cape (Pty) Ltd

MSC Cruises

Thompsons Travel

Tourvest Travel Services

Travel Wth Flair (Pty) Ltd

LEISURE FACILITIES

Aquila Projects (Pty) Ltd

SPORTS BODIES

Athletics South Africa

Cricket South Africa

MEDIA & PHOTOGRAPHY

BROADCASTING CONTRACTORS

Multichoice South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Primedia Broadcasting (Pty) Ltd

Sentech (SOC) Limited

Tswelopele Productions (Pty) Ltd

Urban Brew Studios

CABLE & SATELLITE

Multichoice South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Supersport International (Pty) Ltd

MEDIA AGENCIES

360 Degrees Production House (Pty) Ltd

Joe Public (Pty) Ltd

Media24 Limited

Meropa Communications (Pty) Ltd

Ogilvy South Africa

Omnicom Media Group (Pty) Ltd)

Primedia Outdoor

Sail Rights Commercialisation (Pty) Ltd

South African Broadcasting Corporation Limited (SABC)

Synergy Creative

The MediaShop (Pty) Ltd

SUPPORT SERVICES

CATERING SERVICES

Bidfood (Pty) Ltd

Sodexo Southern Africa (Pty) Ltd

Vulcan Catering Equipment (Pty) Ltd

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT

Bidvest Facilities Management (Pty) Ltd

Peermont Global (Pty) Ltd

LEGAL SERVICES

Adams & Adams Attorneys

Bowmans

Cheadle Thompson & Haysom Inc.

Cliffe Dekker Hofmeyr Inc

DMO Attorneys

SOUTH AFRICA’S TOP EMPOWERED COMPANIES
22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 245

Garlicke & Bousefield Inc

Musetsho Law

Nkome Incorporated

Spoor & Fisher

Strauss Daly Incorporated

Webber Wentzel

Werksmans Attorneys

EXHIBITION & CONFERENCE FACILITIES & FACILITATORS

Atterbell Investments (Pty) Ltd

ICC Durban (Pty) Ltd

Johannesburg Expo Centre (JEC)

FLEET MANAGEMENT & VEHICLE TRACKING

Fleet Africa (Pty) Ltd

Fleet Horizon Solutions (Pty) Ltd

MiX Telematics Limited

Netstar (Pty) Ltd

MANAGEMENT CONSULTING

Enviroserv (Pty) Ltd

Manto Management (Pty) Ltd

Nikha Technology Group

Palmer Development Group (Pty) Ltd

PRP Solutions (Pty) Ltd

Saya-Setona (Pty) Ltd

Sepfluor Limited

Siyakha Consulting (Pty) Ltd

Work Dynamics (Pty) Ltd

Zevoli Consulting (Pty) Ltd

BUSINESS PROCESS OUTSOURCING

CallForce Direct (Pty) Ltd

Merchants SA (pty) ltd

Sigma Connected South Africa (Pty) Ltd

VERIFICATION AGENCIES

AQRate (Pty) Ltd

Ardent Business Partners (Pty) Ltd

Honeycomb BEE Ratings

Empowerdex (Pty) Ltd

Noble B-BBEE Advisory

BUSINESS SUPPORT SERVICES

A-Z Vending Solutions (Pty) Ltd

Achievement Awards Group (Pty) Ltd

ADvTECH limited

Analytics Advertising (Pty) Ltd

Aspirata Auditing, Testing & Certification

CSG Holdings Limited

Curo Fund Services (Pty) Ltd

D & J Stationers cc

Diversifi

Durban Chamber Of Commerce And Industry

Ekurhuleni Artisans and Skills Training

ELB Group Limited

ENRA Technologies CC

eStudy

Exponant (Pty) Ltd

Frontline Safety, Health & Environmental Consultants

Fumani Holding (Pty) Ltd

Global poise (pty) Ltd

Goldberg, de Villiers & Myburgh (Pty) Ltd

Greymatter & Finch (Pty) Ltd

Gripp Advisory (Pty) Ltd

In The Vault 33 cc

Indgro Holdings (Pty) Ltd

Institute of Directors South Africa

Interconnect Systems (Pty) Ltd

Ipsos (Pty) Ltd

Itec South Africa (Pty) ltd

Itec Tiyende

Izithelo Strategic Partners (Pty) Ltd

Kantar South Africa (Pty) Ltd

KMAKH Consultancy (Pty) Ltd

LRMG

Marthinusen and Coutts Cleveland a division of ACTOM (Pty) Ltd

Mindcor (Pty) Ltd

Modern Centric Holdings (Pty) Ltd

Movida Services (Pty) Ltd

Muma Property Developers

Nghilazi Engineers (Pty) Ltd

NPI Governance Consulting

NTGR Engineering Projects

Omni HR Consulting

OS Holdings (Pty) Ltd

Plus 94 Research (Pty) Ltd

PM Skillshouse L&D (Pty) Ltd

Primeserv Group Limited

Purchasing Consortium Southern Africa

Purpleglaze 3 (Pty) Ltd

Qunu Staffing (Pty) Ltd

Reverside (Pty) ltd

SA Commercial

Sakha-Isitjhaba

Skills Hub

SkX Protiviti

Teba (Pty) Ltd

Tendai ICT (Pty) Ltd

The Actuate Group (Pty) Ltd

The Graduate Institute of Financial Sciences

TKD Holdings (Pty) Ltd

TMMBS Conglomerate (Pty) Ltd

TMS Group Industrial Services

Toronto Group

SOUTH AFRICA’S TOP EMPOWERED COMPANIES
246 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

TSATSILE CONSULTING (Pty) Ltd

Tshimologo Executive Group cc

Turner & Townsend (Pty) Ltd

Uwin Iwin Incentives (Pty) Ltd

Wilec

Zizi Institute (Pty) Ltd

EMPLOYMENT AGENCIES

Adcorp Holdings Limited

Asie Personnel cc

Callforce Direct (Pty) Ltd

DAV Professional Placement Group

E-Merge IT Recruitment cc

Express Employment Professionals (Pty) Ltd

Isilumko Staffing (Pty) Ltd

Kgabolize Recruitment Consultancy

Manpower SA (Pty) Ltd

Mindcor (Pty) Ltd

Mindworx Consulting (Pty) Ltd

Primeserv Group Limited

Professional Career Services (Pty) Ltd

Quest Staffing Solutions (Pty) Ltd

Teba Limited

ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL

Interwaste Holdings Limited

Pikitup Johannesburg (Pty) Ltd

CONTRACT CLEANERS & HYGIENE SERVICES

Bidvest Services (Pty) Ltd

Bidvest Steiner (Pty) Ltd

Masana Hygiene Services cc

Medilac Group (Pty) Ltd

Neledzi Services (Pty) Ltd

Ntswaki Sehunelo Holdings

Rentokil Initial (Pty) Ltd

Sanitech

Servest Hygiene (Pty) Ltd

Vogue Hygiene Services

SECURITY & ALARM SERVICES

Afri Guard (Pty) Ltd

Bidvest Protea Coin (Pty) Ltd

Elvey Security Technologies Inc.

Fidelity ADT Security Group (Pty) Ltd

G4S Secure Solutions SA (Pty) Ltd

iMvula Quality Protection

John Elliott Security cc

Omega Risk Solutions (Pty) Ltd

Securitas SA (Pty) Ltd

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

Bham Tayob Khan Matunda Quantity Surveyors

Empowerdex (Pty) Ltd

Productivity SA

SearchSpecifics (Pty) Ltd

Turner & Townsend (Pty) Ltd

POST, PARCEL & COURIER

DHL International (Pty) Ltd

FedEx Express South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Ram Transport South Africa (Pty) Ltd

TRANSPORT

AIRLINES, AIRPORTS & AIR CHARTER

Air Traffic and Navigation Services Company Limited

Airports Company South Africa (SOC) Limited

CAR HIRE

Avis Fleet Services

Bidvest Car Rental (Pty) Ltd

CMH Car Hire (Pty) Ltd

Europcar Southern Africa

Tempest Car Hire (Pty) Ltd

RAIL, ROAD & FREIGHT

Bigfoot Express Freight (Pty) Ltd

C. Steinweg Logistics (Pty) Ltd

Cargo Carriers Limited

Crossroads Distribution (Pty) Ltd

DHL International (Pty) Ltd

Dynamic Express Services cc

Golden Arrow Bus Services (Pty) Ltd

Kintetsu World Express South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Megafreight Services (Pty) Ltd

OneLogix Group Limited

Protours Coaches (Pty) Ltd

Super Group Holding (Pty) Ltd

Transnet SOC Limited

Value Group Limited

World Net Logistics (Pty) Ltd

Xeon Holdings (Pty) Ltd

SHIPPING & PORTS

AMSOL - African Marine Solutions

Toll Global Forwarding (SA) (Pty) Ltd

Transnet National Ports (Pty) Ltd

LOGISTICS SERVICE

KNG Transport & Logistics

Sashal Enterprises t/a Titan Cargo

NON-CYCLICAL SERVICES

FOOD & DRUG RETAILERS

Clicks Group

SOUTH AFRICA’S TOP EMPOWERED COMPANIES
22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 247

TELECOMMUNICATION SERVICES

TELECOMMUNICATIONS PROVIDERS

Blue Label Telecoms Limited

M Telecoms Africa (Pty) ltd

Evercomm (Pty) Ltd

FIXED-LINE TELECOM SERVICES

Telkom SA SOC Limited

WIRELESS TELECOM SERVICES

Cell C (Pty) Ltd

MTN Group Limited

Vodacom Group Limited

UTILITIES

POWER & WATER

ELECTRICITY SUPPLY & DISTRIBUTION

ACTOM (Pty) Ltd

City Power Johannesburg (Pty) Ltd

Eskom Holdings Limited

M-tech Industrial

WATER SUPPLY & DISTRIBUTION

Amatola Water

Bloem Water

GCS Water And Environment (Pty) Ltd

Johannesburg Water (Pty) Ltd

Mhlathuze Water

Rand Water

Sedibeng Water

Umgeni Water

FINANCIAL BANKS BANKS

ABSA Bank Limited

African Bank Investments Limited

Capitec Bank Limited

FirstRand Limited

Grindrod Bank Limited

Mercantile Bank Holdings Limited

Nedbank Group Limited

Standard Bank Group Limited

INSURANCE

INSURANCE BROKERS

Indwe Risk Services (Pty) Ltd

Lion of Africa Insurance Company Limited

INSURANCE NON-LIFE

AON South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Hollard Life Assurance Company Limited

MotoVantage (Pty) Ltd

Old Mutual Insure Limited

OUTsurance Insurance Company Limited

Santam Limited

OTHER INSURANCE

Kunene Makopo Risk Solutions (Pty) Ltd

Icebolethu Group (Pty) Ltd

MMI Holdings Limited

Yard Insurance (Pty) Ltd

LIFE ASSURANCE

LIFE ASSURANCE

AVBOB - Mutal Assurance Society

Discovery Life Limited

Liberty Holdings Limited

Old Mutual Life Assurance Company

South Africa Limited

Sanlam Limited

INVESTMENT COMPANIES

African Equity Empowerment

Investments Limited

Allan Gray (Pty) Ltd

Balondolozi Investment Services

Cognition Holdings Limited

Coronation Fund Managers Limited

Grand Parade Investments Limited

Growthpoint Properties Limited

Hosken Consolidated Investments Limited

Hudaco Trading (Pty) Ltd

Investec Limited

ISA Holdings Limited

JSE Limited

Motseng Investment Holdings (Pty) Ltd

Pareto Limited

Prescient Limited

Rand Merchant Insurance Holdings Limited

Thebe Investment Corporation (Pty) Ltd

Vuwa Investments

HOLDING COMPANIES

Aveng Africa Limited

Enviroserv Holdings Limited

EOH Holdings Limited

Excellerate Real Estate (Pty) Ltd

Inmins Trading (Pty) Ltd

MMI Holdings Limited

Quyn Group of Companies

SSG Holdings (Pty) Ltd

REAL ESTATE

REAL ESTATE HOLDINGS & DEVELOPMENT

Choprop (Pty) Ltd

Growthpoint Properties Limited

Investec Property Fund

SOUTH AFRICA’S TOP EMPOWERED COMPANIES
248 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

Redefine Properties Limited

SA Corporate Real Estate Fund

Vukile Property Fund Limited

SPECIALITY & OTHER FINANCE

INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT

27Four Investment Managers (Pty) Ltd

Argon Asset Management (Pty) Ltd

Delta Property Fund Limited

Ethos Private Equity (Pty) Ltd

Futuregrowth Asset Management (Pty) Ltd

Lithemba Investments (Pty) Ltd

Nedbank Private Wealth (Pty) Ltd

Oasis Group Holdings (Pty) Ltd

Peff Holdings

Pragma Africa (Pty) Ltd

PwC Combined Systems (Pty) ltd

Rentworks Africa (Pty) Ltd

Rex Trueform Group Limited

Selective Empowerment Investments 1 Limited

STANLIB Wealth Management Limited

Sygnia Limited

CONSUMER FINANCE

Compuscan (Pty) Ltd

Diners Club (SA) (Pty) Ltd

Experian South Africa (Pty) Ltd

TransUnion Credit Bureau (Pty) Ltd

INVESTMENT BANKS

AloeCap (Pty) Ltd

Novare Holdings (Pty) Ltd

MORTGAGE FINANCE

Finbond Mutual Bank (Pty) Ltd

SA Home Loans

OTHER FINANCIAL

Sasfin Holdings (Pty) Ltd

ACCOUNTING & CONSULTING

Auditor-General South Africa

BDO South Africa

Brimstone Investment Corporation Limited

Grant Thornton South Africa

Hosken Consolidated Investments Limited

Hospitality Property Fund Limited

Mariva Advisory

Nexia SAB&T (Pty) td

Novare Actuaries (Pty) Ltd

PKF (PE) Inc

Royal Bafokeng Holdings (Pty) Ltd

SekelaXabiso (Pty) Ltd

Tinyeleti Consulting (Pty) Ltd

INVESTMENT ENTITIES

INVESTMENT ENTITIES

Business Partners Limited

Emira Property Fund

Industrial Development Corporation of South Africa Limited (IDC)

Noah Capital Market (Pty) Ltd

Vunani Property Fund

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY HARDWARE

COMPUTER HARDWARE

Dell Computers (Pty) Ltd

Mustek Limited

NEO Technologies (Pty) Ltd

Rectron (Pty) Ltd

SSA (Pty) Ltd

Tarsus Technologies (Pty) Ltd

TELECOMMS EQUIPMENT

Siemens South Africa (Pty) Ltd

SOFTWARE & COMPUTER SERVICES

COMPUTER SERVICES

A Solutions t/a Advocate Solutions (Pty) Ltd

Adapt IT Holdings Limited

Altron TMT SA Group (Pty) Ltd

Alviva Holdings Limited

Aptronics (Pty) Ltd

ASEDA (Pty) Ltd

Atio Corporation (Pty) Ltd

Axiz (Pty) Ltd

AYO Technology Solutions Limited

Business Systems Group (Africa) (Pty) Ltd

CA Southern Africa (Pty) Ltd

CHM Vuwani Computer Solutions (Pty) Ltd

Colour Laser Copier Sales (Pty) Ltd

Concilium Technologies (Pty) Ltd

Cornastone Technology Holdings (Pty) Ltd

Datacentrix Holdings Limited

Dimension Data (Pty) Ltd

DVT (Pty) Ltd

eNetworks cc

EOH Consulting (Pty) Ltd

EOH IBM Services

EOH Microsoft Services (Pty) Ltd

Esquire System Technology (Pty) Ltd

First Technology KZN (Pty) Ltd

Ikando cc

Innovations Group (Pty) Ltd

SOUTH AFRICA’S TOP EMPOWERED COMPANIES
22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 249

Jumpco (Pty) Ltd

Khusela Solutions (Pty) Ltd

Lesedi Corporate Technology (Pty) Ltd

Mustek Limited

Nambiti Technologies (Pty) Ltd

PBT Group (Pty) Ltd

Pink Elephant (Pty) Ltd

Pinnacle Micro (Pty) Ltd

Praxis Computing (Pty) Ltd

Rocketseed South Africa

Sintrex Integration Services (Pty) Ltd

Sizwe Africa It Group (Pty) Ltd

Tarsus Technologies (Pty) Ltd

T-Systems SA (Pty) Ltd (TSSA)

Vukani Technologies (Pty) Ltd

INTERNET

Datatec Limited

Internet Solutions

MTN Business Solutions (Pty) Ltd

SOFTWARE

Accsys (Pty) Ltd

Accutrak (Pty) Ltd

Blue Turtle Technologies (Pty) Ltd

Chillisoft Solutions Services (Pty) Ltd

Elvey Security Technologies (a division of Hudaco Trading (Pty) Ltd

Konica Minolta South Africa

Lan Solutions (Gauteng) (Pty) Ltd

M-Technologies (Pty) Ltd

Mbulase Group (Pty) Ltd

NovoSense Intelligence (PTY) Ltd

React 24

SAS Institute (Pty) Ltd

Symplexity (Pty) Ltd

Technology Corporate Management (Pty) Ltd

Troye (Interactive Solutions) (Pty) Ltd

TELECOMS SOLUTIONS

Altron TMT SA Group (Pty) Ltd

Boniswa Corporate Solutions (Pty) Ltd

Broadband Infraco (Pty) Ltd

Celcom Group (Pty) Ltd

Drive Control Corporation (Pty) Ltd

In2IT technologies (Pty) Ltd

Jurumani Solutions (Pty) Ltd

Telemaster Holdings Limited

Vox Telecommunications (Pty) Ltd

LOGISTIC SOLUTIONS

Access World (Durban) (Pty) Ltd

Bakers SA Limited

Imperial Logistics

JVC Freight Carriers (Pty) Ltd

PUBLIC SEGMENT LISTING

GOVERNMENT ORGANISATIONS

LOCAL GOVERNMENT

UNICITIES/METRO MUNICIPALITIES

Buffalo City

City of Cape Town Municipality

City of Johannesburg Metropolitan Municipality

City of Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality

Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality

Ethekwini Metropolitan Municipality

Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan Municipality

LOCAL COUNCILS/ MUNICIPALITIES

Abaqulusi Local Municipality

Aganang Local Municipality

Amahlathi Local Municipality

Ba-Phalaborwa Local Municipality

Beaufort West Local Municipality

Bela-Bela Local Municipality

Benoni City Council

Bergrivier Local Municipality

Bitou Local Municipality

Blouberg Local Municipality

Blue Crane Route Local Municipality

Breede Valley Local Municipality

Bushbuckridge Local Municipality

Camdeboo Local Municipality

Cape Agulhas Local Municipality

Cederberg Local Municipality

Chief Albert Luthuli Local Municipality

City of Matlosana Local Municipality

City of Tshwane Metropolitan Council

Dawid Kruiper Local Municipality

Dihlabeng Local Municipality

Dr Nkosazana Dlamini Zuma Local Municipality

Edumbe Local Municipality

Elias Motsoaledi Local Municipality

Elundini Local Municipality

Emakhanzeni Local Municipality

Gamagara Local Municipality

George Local Municipality

Govan Mbeki Local Municipality

Greater Giyani Local Municipality

SOUTH AFRICA’S TOP EMPOWERED COMPANIES
250 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

Greater Kei Local Municipality

Greater Kokstad Local Municipality

Greater Letaba Local Municipality

Greater Taung Local Municipality

Greater Tzaneen Local Municipality

Hessequa Local Municipality

Ingquza Hill Local Municipality

Joe Morolong Local Municipality

Kamiesberg Local Municipality

King Sabata Dalindyebo Local Municipality

Knysna Local Municipality

Kou-Kamma Local Municipality

KwaDukuza Local Municipality

Laingsburg Local Municipality

Matatiele Local Municipality

Mnquma Local Municipality

Molemole Local Municipality

Mbombela Local Municipalities

Ntabankulu Local Municipality

Overstrand Local Municipality

Polokwane Local Municipality

Port St Johns Local Municipality

Prince Albert Local Municipality

Ramotshere Moiloa Local Municipality

Raymond Mhlaba Local Municipality

Richtersveld Local Municipality

Rustenburg Local Municipality

Saldanha Bay Local Municipality

Sol Plaatjie Local Municipality

Stellenbosch Local Municipality

Thabo Mofutsanyane District Local Municipality

Tswelopele Local Municipality

Umuziwabantu Local Municipality

DISTRICT MUNICIPALITIES

A2Z Chemical and Industrial Supplies cc

Alfred Nzo District Municipality

Amajuba District Municipality

Amathole District Municipality

Bojanala Platinum District Municipality

Cape Wineland District Municipality

Capricorn District Municipality

Central Karoo District Municipality

Chris Hani District Municipality

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati District Municipality

Eden District Municipality

Ehlanzeni District Municipality

Fezile Dabi District Municipality

Gert Sibande District Municipality

Greater Sekhukhune District Municipality

Harry Gwala District Municilpaty

Ilembe District Municipality

Joe Gqabi District Municipality

John Taolo Gaetsewe District Municipality

Kaunda District Municipality Formerly known as Southern District Municipality

Kenneth Kaunda (Dr) District Municipality

Kgalagadi District Municipality

King Cetshwayo District Municipality

Knnechkaunda District Municipality

Lejweleputswa District Municipality

Metsweding District Municipality

Mopani District Municipality

Motheo District Municipality

Namakwa District Municipality

Ngaka Modiri Molema District Municipality

Overberg District Municipality

Overstrand Local Municipality

Richtersveld Local Municipality

Sedibeng District Municipality

Ugu District Municipality

Umgungundlovu District Municipality

Vhembe District Municipality

Waterberg District Municipality

West Coast District Municipality

West Rand District Municipality

Xhariep District Municipality

Zululand District Municipality

LOCAL GOVERNMENT AGENCIES & BODIES

City of Johannesburg Property Company SOC (Limited)

Chartered Institute of Procurement and Supply (Africa) (CIPS)

City of Joburg Property Company (Pty) Ltd

Coega Development Corporation (Pty) Ltd

Durban Investment Promotion Agency (DIPA)

East London Industrial Development Zone SOC Limited

Eastern Cape Gambling & Betting Board

Inkomati-Usuthu Catchment Management Agency

Johannesburg Development Agency (Pty) Ltd

Johannesburg Housing Company NPS

Johannesburg Roads Agency (Pty) Ltd

Mandela Bay Development Agency

PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT

PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENTS

Department of Agriculture - Western Cape

Department of Agriculture & Rural Development - Eastern Cape

Department of Agriculture & Rural Development - Free State

Department of Agriculture & Rural Development - Gauteng

SOUTH AFRICA’S TOP EMPOWERED COMPANIES
22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 251

Department of Agriculture & Rural Development - KwaZulu Natal

Department of Agriculture & Rural Development - Limpopo

Department of Agriculture, Conservation, Environment and Rural Development - North West

Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development - Northern Cape

Department of Agriculture, Rural Development and Land AdministrationMpumalanga

Department of Community SafetyGauteng

Department of Community SafetyWestern Cape

Department of Community Safety And Liaison - KwaZulu-Natal

Department of Community Safety and Transport - North West

Departmentof Community Safety, Security And Liaison - Mpumalanga

Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional AffairsEastern Cape

Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional AffairsFree State

Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional AffairsGauteng

Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional AffairsNorthern Cape

Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional AffairsKwazulu-Natal

Department of Coooperative Governance, Human Settlement and Traditional Affairs - Limpopo

Department of Cultural Affairs and Sport - Western Cape

Department of Culture, Arts and Traditional Affairs - North West

Department of Culture, Sport and Recreation - Mpumalanga

Department of Economic Development - Gauteng

Department of Economic Development and Enviromental Affairs - Eastern Cape

Department of Economic Development and Tourism - Mpumalanga

Department of Economic Development and Tourism - Western Cape

Department of Economic Development and Tourism- Northern Cape

Department of Economic Development, Environment and Tourism - Limpopo

Department of Economic Development, Environment and Tourism - Mpumalanga

Department of Economic Development, Tourism and Environmental AffairsKwaZulu-Natal

Department of Economic, Small Business Development, Tourism and Environmental Affairs - Free State

Department of Education - Eastern Cape

Department of Education - Free State

Department of Education - Gauteng

Department of EducationKwaZulu-Natal

Department of Education - Limpopo

Department of EducationMpumalanga

Department of Education - North West

Department of Education - Northern Cape

Department of Education - Northern Cape

Department of Education - Western Cape

Department of Education and Sport Development - North West

Department of e-GovernmentGauteng

Department of Environment and Nature Conservation - Northern Cape

Department of Environmental Affairs and Development PlanningWestern Cape

Department of Environmental Affairs and Nature Conservation - Northern Cape

Department of Finance - Eastern Cape

Department of Finance - KwaZulu-Natal

Department of Finance - Mpumalanga

Department of Finance - North West

Department of Finance - Northern Cape

Department of Finance - Western Cape

Department of Finance, Economic Development & Environmental AffairsEastern Cape

Department of Health - Eastern Cape

Department of Health - Free State

Department of Health - Gauteng

Department of Health - KwaZulu-Natal

Department of Health - Limpopo

Department of Health - Mpumalanga

Department of Health - North West

Department of Health - Northern Cape

Department of Health - Western Cape

Department of Housing - Eastern Cape

Department of Housing - Gauteng

Department of Human SettlementsGauteng

Department of Human SettlementsKwaZulu Natal

Department of Human SettlementsMpumalanga

Department of Human SettlementsNorth West

Department of Human SettlementsWestern Cape

Department of Human SettlementsFree State

Department of Infrastructure Development - Gauteng

Department of Local GovernmentWestern Cape

Department of Local Government & Housing - Gauteng

Department of Local Government & Human Settlements - North West

Department of Local Government & Traditional Affairs - KwaZulu-Natal

Department of Local Government & Traditional Affairs - Northern West

Department of Local Government and Housing - Limpopo

Department of Local Government and Traditional Affairs - Eastern Cape

Department of Police, Roads and Transport - Free State

Department of Provincial LegislatureFree State

Department of Provincial LegislatureLimpopo

Department of Provincial LegislatureMpumalanga

Department of Provincial LegislatureNorthern Cape

Department of Provincial Planning and Treasury - Estern Cape

Department of Provincial Treasury - Free State

Department of Provincial TreasuryLimpopo

Department of Public Safety - North West

Department of Public Safety, Security and Liaison - Limpopo

Department of Public Works - Eastern Cape

SOUTH AFRICA’S TOP EMPOWERED COMPANIES
252 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

Department of Public Works - KwaZuluNatal

Department of Public Works & RoadsLimpopo

Department of Public Works & RoadsNorth West

Department of Public Works and Infrastructure - Free State

Department of Public Works, Roads & Transport - North West

Department of Public Works, Roads and Transport - Mpumalanga

Department of Roads & Public Transport - Gauteng

Department of Roads & Public Transport - Limpopo

Department of Roads & Public WorksEastern Cape

Department of Roads and Public Works

- Northern Cape

Department of Roads and Transport -

Gauteng

Department of Rural Development and Agrarian Reform - Eastern Cape

Department of Rural, Environment & Agricultural Development - North West

Department of Safety and LiaisonEastern Cape

Department of Safety and LiaisonLimpopo

Department of Social Development -

Eastern Cape

Department of Social DevelopmentFree State

Department of Social Development -

Gauteng

Department of Social DevelopmentLimpopo

Department of Social DevelopmentMpumalanga

Department of Social Development -

North West

Department of Social Development -

Northern Cape

Department of Social Development -

Western Cape

Department of Sport and RecreationKwaZulu-Natal

Department of Sport, Arts and Culture -

Limpopo

Department of Sport, Arts and Culture -

North West

Department of Sport, Arts and Culture -

Northern Cape

Department of Sport, Arts, Culture and Recreation - Free State

Department of Sports, Arts, Culture & Recreation - Eastern Cape

Department of Sports, Arts, Culture & Recreation - Gauteng

Department of Tourism - Northern Cape

Department of Transport - Eastern Cape

Department of TransportKwaZulu-Natal

Department of Transport - Limpopo

Department of Transport & SafetyEastern Cape

Department of Transport and Public Works - Western Cape

Department of Transport, Safety and Liason - Northern Cape

Department of Treasury - Eastern Cape

Department of Treasury - Gauteng

Department of Treasury - KwaZulu-Natal

Department of Treasury - Mpumalanga

Department of Treasury - Western Cape

Department: Police, Roads and Transport

Departmentof Arts and CultureKwaZulu-Natal

Eastern Cape Department of Human Settlements

Eastern Cape Provincial Legislature

Education - Western Cape

Gauteng Provincial Legislature

Limpopo Economic Development, Environment and Tourism

Local Government and Traditional Affairs - North West

MEC for Arts, Culture, Sport and Recreation in KwaZulu-Natal

Office of the Premier - Eastern Cape

Office of the Premier - Free State

Office of the Premier - Gauteng

Office of the Premier - Kwa-Zulu Natal

Office of the Premier - Limpopo

Office of The Premier - Mpumalanga

Office of the Premier - North West

Office of the Premier - Northern Cape

Office of the Premier - Western Cape

Provincial Treasury - Western Cape

Provincial Treasury - Free State

The Department of Agriculture & Rural Development - KwaZulu-Natal

PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT AGENCIES

Agribusiness Development AgencyKwaZulu Natal

AsgiSA Eastern Cape (Pty) Ltd

Blue IQ Investment Holdings (Pty) Ltd

CapeNature

Casidra (SOC) Limited

Eastern Cape Development Corporation

Eastern Cape Gambling & Betting Board

Free State Development Corporation

Free State Gambling and Racing Board

Free State Provincial Treasury

Gauteng Economic Development Agency (GEDA)

Gauteng Enterprise Propellar (GEP)

Gauteng Gambling Board

Gauteng Growth and Development Agency.

Housing Development Agency

Ithala Development Finance Corporation Limited

Johannesburg City Parks & Zoo

Kwa-Zulu Natal Gambling and Betting Board

Limpopo Economic Development Agency (LEDA)

Limpopo Economic Development Enterprise

Mandela Bay Development Agency

Mpumalanga Economic Growth Agency (MEGA)

Mpumalanga Economic Regulator (MER)

North West Development Corporation

North West Gambling Board

North West Provincial Legislature

Roads Agency Limpopo (Pty) Ltd

St Joseph's Care and Support Trust

Trade & Investment KwaZulu-Natal

Trade & Investment Limpopo

Trans-Caledon Tunnel Authority (TCTA)

SOUTH AFRICA’S TOP EMPOWERED COMPANIES
22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 253

Western Cape Gambling & Racing Board

Western Cape Investment and Trade Promotion Agency (WESGRO)

NATIONAL GOVERNMENT

NATIONAL GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENTS

Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Civilian Secretariat For Police

Department of Communications

Department of Arts And Culture

Department of Basic Education

Department of Communications and Digital Technologies

Department of Community SafetyWestern Cape

Department of Cooperative Governance & Traditional Affairs

Department of Correctional Services

Department of Defence and Military Veterans

Department of Economic Development

Department of Energy

Department of Environment Forestry and Fisheries

Department of Finance, Economy and Enterprise Development

Department of Health

Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET)

Department of Home Affairs

Department of Human Settlements

Department of International Relations and Cooperation (DIRCO)

Department of Justice and Constitutional Development

Department of Labour

Department of Mineral Resources

Department of Performance and Evaluation

Department of Planning, Monitoring & Evaluation

Department of Public Enterprises

Department of Public Service and Administration

Department of Public Works and Infrastructure

Department of Science and Innovation

Department of Small Business Development

Department of Social Development

Department of Sport Arts and Culture

Department of State Security

Department of Tourism

Department of Trade,Industry and Competition

Department of Transport

Department of Water and Sanitation

Department of Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

National Treasury

Presidency Ministry for National Planning Commission

Presidency Ministry for Performance Monitoring and Evaluation

NATIONAL GOVERNMENT AGENCIES

Academy of Science South Africa

Accounting Standards Board

Agricultural Research Council (ARC)

Botswana Communications Regulatory Authority

Brand South Africa

Central Energy Fund (SOC) Ltd

Centre for Public Service Innovation (CPSI)

Citizen Entrepreneurial Development Agency

Competition Tribunal

Construction Industry Development Board

Council For Geoscience

Council For Medical Schemes

Council for Scientific & Industrial Research - CSIR

Cross Border Road Transport Agency (C-BRTA)

Export Credit Insurance Corporation Of South Africa SOC Limited

Financial and Fiscal Commission

Financial Services Board (FSB)

Gauteng Partnership Fund

Government Communication and Information System (GCIS)

Government Employees Medical Scheme

Government Employees Pension Fund (GEPF)

Government Pension Administration Agency

Health Professions Council Of South Africa

Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC)

Independent Communications Authority Of South Africa

Independent Complaints Directorate (ICD)

Independent Development Trust Independent Electoral Commission (IEC)

Independent Police Investigative Directorate (IPID)

Independent Regulatory Board for Auditors (IRBA)

Industrial Development Corporation Of South Africa Limited

International Trade Administration Commission of South Africa - ITAC

Ithemba Labs

Ingonyama Trust Board

Land Claims Court (LCC)

Media Development And Diversity Agency

Mintek

National Agricultural Marketing Council National Arts Council of South Africa (NACSA)

National Consumer Commission

National Development Agency

National Economic Development and Labour Council (NEDLAC)

National Electronic Media Institute of South Africa (NEMISA)

National Empowerment Fund

National Energy Regulator of South Africa (NERSA)

National Film & Video Foundation

National Health Laboratory Services (NHLS)

SOUTH AFRICA’S TOP EMPOWERED COMPANIES
254 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION

National Heritage Council of South Africa

National Home Builders Registration Council (NHBRC)

National Housing Finance Corporation SOC Ltd

National Library of South Africa

National Lotteries Commission

National Office of Public Service Commission

National Research Foundation

National School Of Government

National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS)

National Youth Development Agency (NYDA)

Ntinga O.R. Tambo Development Agency

NTP Radioisotopes SOC Ltd

Office Of The Chief Justice

Pan South African Language Board (PANSALB)

Petroleum Agency SA (Pty) Ltd

Private Security Industry Regulatory Authority

Productivity SA

Public Investment Corporation (PIC)

Public Service Commission

Quality Council for Trades & Occupations

Railway Safety Regulator

Sasria SOC Ltd

Small Enterprise Development Agency (SEDA)

Small Enterprise Finance Agency (SOC) Ltd

South African Astronomical Observatory (Pty) Ltd

South African Bureau Of Standards (SABS)

South African Cities Network

South African Council for Educators (SACE)

South African Forestry Company Ltd (Safcol)

South African Library for the Blind

South African Local Government Association (SALGA)

South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

South African Medical Research Council

South African National Biodiversity Institute

South African National Energy Development Institute (SANEDI)

South African Nuclear Energy Corporation (NECSA)

South African Special Risk Insurance Association (SASRIA)

South African Weather Service (SAWS)

Sport and Recreation South Africa (SRSA)

State Information Technology Agency (SOC) Ltd (SITA)

Statistics South Africa (Stats SA)

Technology & Human Resources for Industry Programmes (THRIP)

The Companies Tribunal

The Competition Commission

The Estate Agency Affairs Board

The Freedom Park

The New Partnership for Africa's Development (NEPAD)

The Presidency

The Road Traffic Managment Corporation

The South African National Roads Agency (SANRAL)

The South African Nuclear Energy Corporation SOC Limited (NECSA)

The Southern African Association of Energy Effeciency

Town Development Building & Construction Agency

Transnet National Ports Authority of SA

SETAS

Agricultural Sector Education Training Authority (SETA)

Banking Sector Education And Training Authority (BANKSETA)

Chemical Industries Education & Training Authorities (CHIETA)

Construction Education and Training Authority (CETA)

Culture, Art, Tourism, Hospitality and Sport Education and Training Authority - CATHSSETA

Education, Training and Development Practices SETA (ETDP-SETA)

Energy and Water Sector Education and Training Authority (EWSETA)

Fibre Processing & Manufacturing

Sector Education and Training Authority (FPMSETA)

Financial and Accounting Services

Sector Education and Training Authority (FASSET)

Food and Beverage Manufacturing

Industry Sector Education and Training Authority (FOODBEV)

Forest Industries Education and Training Authority (FIETA)

Health And Welfare Sector Education and Training Authority (HWSETA)

Insurance Sector Education & Training Authority (INSETA)

Manufacturing, Engineering and Related Services Sector Education and Training Authority (MERSETA)

Media, Advertising, Information & Communication Technology

Mining Qualification Authority

Safety & Security Sector Education & Training Authority (SASSETA)

Services Sector Education Training Authority (SERVICES SETA)

South African Qualifications Authority (SAQA)

The Wholesale and Retail Sector Education and Training Authority

Tourism Hospitality and Sport Education and Training Authority (THETA)

Transport Education Training Authority (TETA)

CHAPTER 9 INSTITUTIONS

Auditor-General South Africa

Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA)

Commission For Gender Equality

Commission on Restitution of Land Rights

Independent Electoral Commission

Public Protector South Africa

South African Human Rights Commission (SAHRC)

Commission on Restitution of Land Rights

SOUTH AFRICA’S TOP EMPOWERED COMPANIES
22 nd EDITION IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 255

NON-GOVERNMENET ORGANISATIONS

SECTION 21

SECTION 21 - FOUNDATIONS

Adopt-A-School Foundation

Dell Development Fund

Engineering Council of South Africa (ECSA)

Ikamva Youth SA

Palabora Foundation

Rainbow and Smiles Foundation

Rose Foundation

Sasol Siyakha Trust

Smalll Enterprise Foundation (SEF)

South African Property Owners Association (SAPOA)

Telkom Foundation

The Nepad Business Foundation

Vodacom Foundation

SECTION 21 - COMPANIES & ORGANISATIONS

Africa Bio

Black Management Forum Investment Company Limited

Board of Healthcare Funders of Southern Africa (BHF)

Business Against Crime South Africa

Business Process Enabling South Africa

Business Unity South Africa (BUSA)

Cape Chamber of Commerce & Industry

Catholic Welfare & Development

Centre For Early Childhood Development NPC

Centre for the Study of Violence & Reconciliation (CSVR)

Concrete Institute

Cotlands

Film and Publication Board (FPB)

Independent Examination Board

Inkululeko Yesizwe Association

Inqaba Yokulinda Cisco Networking Academy

International Sporting, Event & Enterrtainment Association

KwaZulu-Natal Convention Bureau

Mhani Gingi Social Entrepreneurial Trust

Mimi Women

Naspers Labs

National Arts Council of South Africa

National Business Initiative for Growth Development

National Home Builders Registration Council

New Lovelife Trust (Pty) Ltd

Proudly South African

Public Servants Association of South Africa

Read Educational Trust

SA International Maritime Institute (SAIMI)

Seda Ethekwini

Siyabonga Africa

Siyafunda CTC

Siyakha Development Trust

Sonke Gender Justice Network

South African Institute of Black Property Practitioners - SAIBPP

South African Institute of Race Relations

South African Property Owners Association

the Institute of Bankers In South Africa

World Wildlife Fund South Africa

EDUCATION

TERTIARY INSTITUTIONS

North West University

Tshwane University Of Technology (TUT)

University of Cape Town (UCT)

University of Free State

University of Johannesburg

University of KwaZulu-Natal

University of Limpopo

University of South Africa (UNISA)

University of Stellenbosch

University of Witwatersrand

GRADUATE SHOOLS

Graduate School of Business - University of Cape Town (GSB)

Milpark Business School (Pty) Ltd

Regent Business School

UNISA Graduate School of Business Leadership (SBL)

University of South Africa Graduate School of Business Leadership (UNISA SBL)

University of Stellenbosch Business School (USB)

Wits Business School

COLLEGES

COLLEGES

Africa Skills Training College

Boland Tvet College

College of Cape Town

International Colleges Group (Pty) Ltd (ICG)

Management College of Southern Africa (MANCOSA)

UNIVERSITIES

Monash South Africa Limited

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

SOUTH AFRICA’S TOP EMPOWERED COMPANIES
256 IMPUMELELO TOP EMPOWERMENT 22 nd EDITION
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Articles inside

Multinationals - Are They Leading The Way To Economic Freedom?

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Three Leaders In Black Business

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Meet The Good Hacker: Microsoft's Joylynn Kirui

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Tips From Takealot's Group CEO: How To Break Into Retail With E-Commerce

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Investing in Tech: How to Get 177% in ROI

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Interview With Tau Matla CEO, Prince Mashabela

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Interview with Tau Matla CEO, Prince Mashabela

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Top Empowerment 22nd Edition

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Top Empowerment 22nd Edition

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Top Empowerment 22nd Edition

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9 tips from Takealot’s CEO:

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Diversity and Inclusion are good for business

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IT MUST LOOK DIFFERENT TO BREAK THE CYCLE!

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LOCALISATION: THE PERFECT INGREDIENT FOR ECONOMIC GROWTH

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DRIVING BUSINESS SUCCESS THROUGH DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION

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EMPOWERMENT AND THE MEDIA IN SOUTH AFRICA AND THE REST OF THE AFRICAN CONTINENT

6min
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