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www.top500.co.za

www.top500.co.za

Top500 provides business leaders, government officials, and top executives with a unique opportunity to join South Africa’s corporate circle of excellence by identifying and profiling South Africa’s leading organisations. Top500 is an indispensable tool for doing business with the best companies in South Africa.

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2014 5 November 2014 • Emperors Palace The Oscars of South African Business

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PARTNERS:


INSIDE TOP 500 Upfront

Contributors

4

Featured clients

4

Editor’s letter

5

Foreword: Lesedi Nuclear Services

7

News

8

Famous business quotes

14

Tips for doing business in Africa

15

Business trends: Communal work spaces

18

Top 500 research criteria

22

The Top 500 companies in South Africa

23

Features

South Africa’s top entrepreneurs

40

South African tertiary truimphs

48

Millennials in the workplace

64

Social media lessons for big business

78

The emerging contribution of internal coaching

90

Social selling: The automotive industry online The common pitfalls of restructuring

100

124

48

South African Tertiary truimphs

132

NBA recap

2

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CONTENTS

FOREMATTER

Credits TOPCO MEDIA CEO Ralf Fletcher

40

National Sales Manager Judy Twaambo-Chileshe

SA's Top Entrepreneurs

Key Account Managers Stephen Bennet

Editorial

Calculated risks contribute to entrepreneurial success

36

Ecommerce and logistics set for growth

39

Is the food sector stuck in a low growth cycle?

54

2014 conference schedule

58

Local businesses should capitalise on African potential 84 Should South Africa follow BRIC's energy example?

116

National Business Awards 2013 recap

132

Index

Research Sandra Bock

TOPCO STUDIO Production Director Van Fletcher

Managing Editor Nick Krige: nick.krige@topco.co.za Editorial Assistant Alexandra Nagel Editorial Intern Krysia Gaweda

Reviews

139

Gadgets for businesspeople

140

Business books

146

Places to stay

150

Cars

153

Top 500 companies index

155

Creative Director Emil Lime Designer Michelle Rademeyer Kamiela Abrahams Traffic Manager Jody Kallis: artwork@topco.co.za Distribution & Subscriptions Ingrid Johnstone Printers Paarl Media Images ŠshutterstockŽ

8 News

Head Office Top Media & Communications (Pty) Ltd T/A Topco Media Bree Street Studios, 2nd Floor 17 New Church Street, Cape Town Tel: 086 000 9590 Fax: +27 (0) 21 423 7576 Email: info@topco.co.za Website: www.topco.co.za DISCLAIMER

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior written consent of Top Media & Communications (Pty) Ltd T/A Topco Media Reg. No. 2011/105655/07. While every care has been taken when compiling this publication, the publishers, editor, and contributors accept no responsibility for any consequences arising from any errors or emissions. ISBN: 9780620531054

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FOREMATTER

CONTRIBUTORS & FEATURED CLIENTS

Jayson Coomer

Sarrah Bassett

Jayson is a Director at eMergeCore Consulting, a cross-border firm specialising in business turnarounds and succession management. He holds a Masters degree in Financial Management from the University of Cape Town. Every weekday morning, he is the primary blogger and Editor of RollingAlpha.com.

Sarah is a Cape Town-based financial journalist and Editor with a passion for all things African business, entrepreneurship, and travel. When she is not gallivanting around the continent, she can be found unearthing stories in the insurance and financial service sectors.

Anton Pretorius

Neesa Moodley-Isaacs

Anton is a journalist and Editorial Assistant at various financial and outdoor magazine titles. In 2013, Anton was awarded with a PICA Editorial Excellence Award (highly commended) for business-to-business Feature Writer of the Year. Anton enjoys 4x4-ing, photography and music.

Neesa is a seasoned financial writer with more than 10 years of experience in the field. While some question her choice of career, she loves every minute and finds the field of financial journalism both challenging and fascinating. She has been nominated for numerous journalism awards during the course of her career.

Elizabeth Fletcher

Sarah Gurney Sarah read a BA Honours degree in English Literature and Law at Rhodes University, after which she gained experience in the media and marketing world working at various communications firms in Johannesburg and Cape Town.

Elizabeth read a Masters degree in South African crime fiction before working as a freelance writer in Cape Town. She went on to establish Pomegranite, an online presence consultancy, which focuses on helping people communicate and promote themselves online.

A-Z OF FEATURED CLIENTS

A

AQRate Verification Services……….…..130

F

Fidelity Security Group….……..............114

P

Aramex.………....…....…....…....…...…..….128

Fleet Africa.................….…....…...….....…..72

G

Productivity SA....................................110

GIBB Engineering and Architecture.....96

South African Airways...…….................82

Aurecon..........…….....………....................46

B

Bigen Africa……….……….……….…….…..120 Business Connexion.….…....…...…..….122

C

Claremart Auction Group…….……….....77 CTICC.........................….…....…...…..…...60

D

Durban ICC.......................…….……….....56

E

ENRA Technologies…….……….............118 Eskom.........................….…....…...…..…..86

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Gateway Theatre of Shopping……...…...99 Growthpoint Properties........................62

I

Internet Solutions…….………..................68

Pfizer South Africa...............................113 Protea Coin Group................................70

S T

The Waste Group.……...........................138

L

The Workforce Group...........................117

Vektronix..............................................119

M

Manhattan Corporation….……...............94

U V

Motlekar Holdings…....…...…..…............98

VKB Group............................................121

Nashua Limited….…….............................52

WSP.........................................................112

Lesedi Nuclear Services…….……............104

N

UCT Graduate School of Business........74

W


EDITOR'S LETTER

FOREMATTER

Benchmarking the best All of those business champions and rising stars are represented in this book, and we could not be prouder of them. In addition to featuring the crème de la crème of South African business and government organisations, we have some world class editorial to keep your nose firmly glued to Top 500’s pages. Janine Everson and Craig O’Flaherty, Directors of the Centre for Coaching at the University of Cape Town’s Graduate School of Business, reveal the contribution internal coaching is playing in helping local organisations achieve and exceed performance objectives on page 90. A new generation is beginning to play a significant role in the workforce and it is estimated that by 2020, as much as 50 percent of the global workforce will be represented by so called millennials. On page 64, Sarah Gurney takes an in depth look at what the emergence of the millennial will mean for the business world. Dear Reader, It would seem like a ridiculous claim for any company to declare themselves one of the top companies in South Africa. However, some are clearly better than others, which is why our research team gathers all the data and ranks South Africa’s Top 500 companies. So we can do the bragging for them. It has been a busy time at the Topco Media offices, with South Africa 20 Years of Success: Government & Business and Top 500 being finished within a couple of weeks of each other. Needless to say, the late nights and fatigue induced shouting matches were obviously worth it because two books that we are immensely proud of have been completed and published. The South African economy has not been without its problems this year. The five-month platinum strike was the longest and costliest strike in South Africa’s history, in terms of lost revenue, lost earnings for the striking miners, and the stagnation of the South African economy. However, it is not all doom and gloom. The combined turnover for the Top 500 companies, as measured by Topco Media, is in excess of R3.5 trillion and rising. Despite a few economic hiccups, many industries continue to thrive in South Africa, and are making waves in the international business scene as well.

Small businesses are often on the back foot when trying to compete with larger, more liquid counterparts, but the emergence of social media, and the immediacy of response required by consumers on those platforms, has allowed smaller companies to gain the edge somewhat. Elizabeth Fletcher details the lessons that big business can learn from their smaller adversaries about social media on page 70. We also feature stories on South Africa’s top entrepreneurs (page 40), the triumphs of our tertiary institutions (page 48), common pitfalls encountered when restructuring a business (page 124), the growing trend of communal office space (page 18), and a bumper reviews section starting on page 139. I hope you enjoy reading this book as much as we did putting it together. All the best,

Nick Krige Editor

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FOREWORD

FOREMATTER

A nation’s nucleus As demonstrated by Koeberg, nuclear power is base load power and has an excellent record of availability. Furthermore the operational cost is significantly cheaper than many other forms of power and nuclear power is most certainly green energy. As leaders in the power industry, this for us means greater opportunity to extend our expertise on the continent and in the country. Our extensive track record – which includes a successful supplier relationship with Eskom – is testament to our capabilities and our expertise in localised engineering procurement and construction projects. Energy cannot be created or destroyed, it can merely be converted from one form to another. Like energy, Lesedi Nuclear Services is constantly evolving to ensure that we stay ahead of our competitors. Our vision is to be the company of choice and leader in the power generation industry, delivering on quality technical solutions, and our association with Top 500 goes a long way to cementing this position.

Francis Carruthers, Chief Executive Officer, Lesedi Nuclear Services

New methods of generating electricity have again made headlines in South Africa as the country’s base load power continues to struggle to meet demand. The construction of two new coal power stations at Medupi and Kusile, as well as numerous renewable-energy projects, will go a long way to alleviating that stress on the national grid. Without electricity, the South African economy will be crippled and government’s recent commitment to act decisively on energy constraints in the country, and subsequent forming of an energy security sub-committee could not have come at a more critical time.

The research criteria for entry into the Top 500 include sustainable financial growth; identifying, recruiting, and retaining quality employees; skills development; enterprise development; and transformation of South Africa’s workplace, which all speak to Lesedi’s own mission statement. The companies listed among the pages of Top 500 are undoubtedly the cream of South African business and Lesedi is immensely proud to be featured among them. The potential of the South African economy is vast and it will be through working together that we will have the power to unlock it. This year, South Africa celebrates 20 years of freedom and democracy. Both Lesedi and the country have come a long way in those two decades, and we can all be proud at what we have achieved together.

President Jacob Zuma's announcement in his state of the nation address that the expansion of nuclear energy should be seen as part of the broader process of industrialisation in South Africa is fantastic news for Lesedi as leaders in nuclear power expertise in South Africa.

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NEWS SNIPPETS By Alexandra Nagel

refilwemodise.blogspot.com

NMMU

commercial opportunities,” says NMMU.

Discovers new biofuel technology

Waste coal now has a use benefiting the petrochemical industry. Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University (NMMU) have found a way to convert dust from coal back into a new coal substance by mixing it with an algae biomass. Funded by the Department of Science and Technology’s Biofuels Demonstration Programme, researchers at NMMU fused waste coal together with algae, causing it to act as glue to hold the coal molecules together to form coalgae. “If you mix coal dust and algae biomass, the algae [collects] onto the surface of the coal and binds the dust together. The result is a coal-algae composite, for which they have coined the name Coalgae,” says Ben Zeelie, a Professor from NMMU’s Institute of Chemical Technology, InnoVenton.

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sanord.uwc.ac.za

It can undergo a further process to become a variety of different fuels such as diesel, gasoline, and kerosene. Coalgae can also substitute fuel in cases where coal is required. The substance is able to reduce the biofuel production process since the raw materials have already been blended together. Coalgae will benefit the country by offering an alternative to coal, which is a natural resource that is growing increasingly more scarce. It is an advancement in technology that is extremely cost-effective and offers many opportunities for commercial uses. “Carbon sequestration, the upgrading of low-grade coal, and the production of clean water are among the advantages of the production of Coalgae, which, along with the production of the bio-crude oil, have presented

PLATINUM

Cripples SA economy

Over 70 000 mineworkers from the world’s leading platinum producing companies, Lonmin, Impala Platinum (Implats), and Anglo American, were on strike for five months from January until June 2014 demanding a wage increase. The Association of Mineworkers and Construction Union (AMCU) spearheaded the strike, calling on employers to pay workers R12 500 in wages, a significant increase from the R5 500 they recieved before. South Africa accounts for 80 percent of the globe’s platinum and the strike cost approximately R20.8 billion, with R14.4 billion lost on sales and R6.4 billion lost in wages. The South African economy experienced little economic growth this year, only increasing by two percent. “It is a human tragedy first


NEWS

www.destinyconnect.com

and foremost, not only in its current effects, but also in the unfortunate future likely effects,” says former CEO of Business Leadership South Africa Michael Spicer. “It is also a tragedy for the South African economy. Again, not just for the industry but the broader economy as we have seen by some of these statistics that have been emerging on the impact of this strike.” AMCU entered into negogitations with the companies in an attempt to find middle ground. Amplats and Impala offered to raise wages annually at around 10 percent until 2017, where wages will be at AMCU’s desired amount of R12 500. “We believe the deal is only slightly improved for workers compared to the offer which was proposed within a month of the strike," says Goldman Sachs analyst Eugene King. “Lonmin will likely rebound strongly post-strike as inventory can be converted to cash quickly and the mining restart will see concentrate coming through.” AMCU accepted the three-year wage deal offered by Lonmin, Anglo American, and Implats. A R1 000 increase will be given for the first three years for the two lowest categories of workers and the rest will see a 7.5 percent to eight percent increase. Benefits will be dependent on inflation. “Comrades, you’ve made history in South Africa. This victory is

en.wikipedia.org

not just for us, but for the entire country,” said AMCU Secretary General Jeff Mphahlele. The platinum strike is the longest in South Africa’s history with the 1987 gold strike by 200 000 mineworkers only lasting three weeks.

SOUTH AFRICA

Looks to alternative power sources

Producing enough electricity to power the country has placed a siginifcant amount of pressure on South Africa’s energy sector, with loadshedding a regular occurrence around the country. To combat this, Eskom implemented load reduction schedules and called on South Africans to reduce power usage in order to relieve stress on the country’s constrained power sources. The nation’s maximum capacity is 36 000MW and can push to 36 051 MW in order to supply the demand. However, a permanent solution was needed. “This situation calls for a radical transformation of the energy sector, to develop a sustainable energy mix that comprises coal, solar, wind, hydro, gas, and nuclear energy,” said President Jacob Zuma. “The transformation will require structural changes in the manner in which government departments, affected state-owned companies, and the industry as a whole, address the energy challenges.”

FOREMATTER

www.techcityng.com

Nuclear energy can generate over 9 000MW of power and it is a more reliable form of alternative energy than solar or wind power. It is also cheaper to generate, cost of uranium is relatively low, and greenhouse gas emissions are reduced since no methane is released during the production process. “Nuclear energy will provide base load electricity. It will allow our country to lower its carbon footprint and meet its international obligations,” says Nuclear Energy Corporation of South Africa (NESCA) CEO Phumzile Tshelane. A new power station is currently being built in Lephalale, Limpopo called Medupi, a greenfield coal-fired station, which will also contribute to reducing power constraints in the country. The project is worth R105-billion and a total capacity of 4 800MW of power. It will be the world’s largest dry-cooled, coal-fired power station with six boilers each generating 800MW of power. Medupi is expected to be completed by 2017.

MTN

Ranked top brand in Africa

MTN, once again, was the only African company to rank on the Millward-Brown Brandz Top 100 Most Valuable Global Brands 2013 survey. Moving up from nine places since last year, MTN came 79th overall

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en.wikipedia.org

and experienced a 23 percent increase in brand value. “The Millward-Brown Brandz Top 100 Global Brands 2013 listing is particularly exciting and timely, as we embark on our new vision to lead the delivery of a bold, new digital world to our customers,” says Jennifer Forrester, Executive for Group Marketing, MTN. Formerly M-Cell founded in 1994, MTN acquired Investcom by 2007, which allowed the company to expand its network to 10 more countries such as Sudan, Cyprus, and Nigeria. MTN now has over 200 million customers from Africa, Asia, and the Middle East. It is a leader in 70 percent of the markets it operates in, with its main competitors being Vodacom, Cell C, and 8ta in South Africa. “As MTN, this is further acknowledgement that we are on the right track with our on-going efforts to enhance customer experience in our various touchpoints in the markets,” says Forrester. “To this end, we pledge to continue with our quest to make the lives of our customers a whole lot brighter.” Brandz Top 100 surveys over 150 000 entries and is the only survey that allows for consumer data to be considered in the ranking. To be ranked amongst the best, companies need to ensure their brands are meaningful, unique, and salient.

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“Retailers who want to remain salient in the minds of consumers must find new and innovative ways to differentiate themselves in the 24/7 consumer environment of today to develop, maintain, and create new connections with its consumers,” says Millward Brown’s Johnny Panagiotidis. “For many retailers, this will mean a push to extend their brand deep into the lives of their current and potential consumers.”

UCT

Places in BRICS university list The University of Cape Town (UCT) was named as one of the top 10 universities among the BRICS nations and is the only South African university to make the list. Last year, UCT ranked 11th. The majority of the list consists of Chinese universities, taking six places, followed by Brazil with two and Russia one. “UCT also scored well on number of international students and faculty members, and in the academic reputation indicator,” says Quacquarelli Symonds (QS) Head of Research Ben Sowter. “At a time when government spending is stalling in much of the West, the BRICS nations have set their sights on developing world-class universities sooner rather than later.” British research company QS ranks the world’s best universities with the QS World University

Rankings. It analyses over 800 universities and comparisons are drawn by region, field of study, research citations, and more. There are three types of rankings: Academic, research, and multi. The indicators include academic and employer reputation, faculty member to student ratio, percentage of staff members with a PhD, number of research papers published by academic staff, amount of times papers are cited, and the percentage of international faculty members and students at the university. “The acronym BRICS has become standard shorthand for the idea that the world’s economic future is not in the hands of traditional players such as the US, Europe, and Japan," says QS. “However, to compete in a global scene, these fast growing economies need world-class university systems. This years’ QS University Rankings: BRICS, identifies China as the BRICS nation that is closer to that goal.” In the top 200 best ranked universities, China comes out on top again with 71 institutions ranked, Russia with 53, and South Africa 11. University of Witswatersrand places 31 followed by Stellenbosch University at 34, and University of Western Cape at 92.


NEWS

FOREMATTER

www.techcabal.com

NEW INTERNET SCHOOLS

With help from the sun Samsung’s Hope for Children has launched the Solar Powered Internet Schools Initiative (SPIS) which set up solarpowered internet schools in 11 African countries. SPIS gives students living in rural areas the opportunity to access the internet for educational purposes, as well as to connect with the rest of the world. The SPIS was launched at the Dakar Financing Summit for Africa’s Infrastructure, which took place this year in Senegal. “The Dakar Summit aims at accelerating the implementation of projects in transport, rail, ports, energy, and ICT. Samsung’s Internet school cost-effectively addresses two of these areas, bringing connectivity, electrification, and education to rural areas by harnessing the power of the sun,” says Ntutule Tshenye, Head of Public Affairs and Corporate Citizenship at Samsung Electronics Africa. The classrooms are shipping containers which hold up to 24 learners at a time. The roof is a giant solar panel generating nine hours of electricity daily. It is engineered to withstand inclement weather conditions, allowing constant access to

the facility even on a rainy day. Solar-powered electronic boards, notebooks, and tablets are availbale to each learner in the classroom. “We realised there was a global need to bridge the digital divide,” says Samsung Vice President and Head of Corporate Citizenship Jinuk Shin. “So we set out building better educational environments – using the latest innovative technology – for young people in developing countries.” The first solar-powered Internet schools were launched in Angola, Botswana, Kenya, Nigeria, and South Africa in 2011 and by 2013, SPIS had provided access to 30 000 students. “The exclusively solarpowered, mobile, and completely independent classroom is geared towards increasing accessibility to education and connectivity across Africa,” says Shin. “It is designed specifically for use in remote areas with limited or no access to electricity.” Samsung is working with governments and NGOs in expanding this initiative into

other areas of need too, such as access to healthcare. Solarpowered health centres with trained medical staff, ultrasound, and xenodiagnosis offering treatment to one million people is another initiative in the pipeline.

SUPASWIFT Joins Fedex

FedEx Express has acquired couriering company Supaswift, with its sights set on improving service delivery locally and abroad, as well as open a window on new markets in Africa. FedEx Express, a subsidairy of FedEx Corp, took over Supaswift businesses operating in South Africa, Botswana, Malawi, Mozambique, Swaziland, and Zambia. The company now has networks that reach over 220 countries globally. FedEx Express is improving logistics in Africa, now accessing 40 facilities and introducing an additional 1 000 staff members to the global FedEx family of

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300 000. The company came to Africa in the 1990s with Global Service Providers, realising the market opportunities these developing countries had to offer. “Southern Africa is a key region for us," says Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer of FedEx Corp Frederick Smith. “The region offers tremendous opportunities for both local and international customers to access new markets and increase market share.”

BT

Gives De Beers a hand in IT Telecommunications company BT successfully landed a bid with De Beers Group, worth R390 million, to provide networking services such as fibre optic, and microwave and satellite linkage technologies to 70 of De Beers’ international mining sites. “Whether it’s connecting our mining assets or our global distribution network, we need a partner with a strong track record,” says De Beers Group Chief

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Information Officer Craig Charlton. “Using BT’s network will better connect our global operations.” Through BT Web, the private backup network allows staff to store large amounts of data online. Conference calls are also made available through BT One Voice. This will benefit De Beers significantly as many of its sites are located in developing regions like South Africa, Canada, the Middle East, and Europe where travelling for business purposes can be costly. “IT has become an art as much as a science,” says BT Global Services CEO Luis Alvarez. “We’re working together with De Beers to orchestrate people, applications, and systems around highly-tuned intelligent networks to deliver the best performance at the most competitive cost. “BT networks will bring together all De Beers sites whether they’re in the frozen north of Canada, which can only be reached in person for three months of the year, or the far reaches of Botswana,” says Alvarez.

De Beers is the largest diamond mining company in the world and dominates in diamond trading, retailing, and manufacturing.

SA BITCOIN SPORTSBOOK First of its kind

BetVIP is the first-ever licensed sportsbook exclusive to Bitcoin. South African Daniel Schwartzkopff founded the platform based on the principles of “transparency and legitimacy” describing Bitcoin as a reliable medium for online wagers. “We might trade in an anonymous currency, but we are providing complete transparency and accountability in order to build trust with our players,” Schwartzkopff says. Users make a bid and then get paid out in Bitcoin if they win a bet. It is active in South Africa and Malta with its gaming license in Curacao. Powered by BetTech, BetVIP allows for both pre-match and in-play betting on a range of global sporting codes.


NEWS

“Our gaming license and strict bet acceptance policy demonstrates our commitment to the longevity of the currency. There is a massive opportunity to provide both a secure and reliable platform for Bitcoin holders and take on the traditional online sportsbooks,” he says. Bitcoin is an electronic currency that operates without the need of a central bank. It is not subjected to Reserve Bank clearances or currency exchanges. The currency allows users faster transactions and better control of funds at a very low Bitcoin exchange cost. “Given the embryonic status of Bitcoin, we understand that it is surrounded by concern and confusion. At BetVIP, we are determined to help the growing movement of people that want to normalise the currency and bring it into everyday use,” says Schwartzkopff. Schwartzkopff is the founder of telecom start-up FSMS, with 325 000 users, as well as Dataprophet which offers financial consultant services.

FOREMATTER

PUBLIC PROTECTOR WINS PRISA President’s Award

Advocate Thuli Madonsela was awarded the President Award at the Public Relations Institute of Southern Africa’s (PRISA) annual meeting. Madonsela was nominated for her public relations and activism in South African society. Madonsela mentioned in her acceptance speech that President Jacob Zuma has partially complied with the standing on her Nkandla report. “The President has partially complied while asking Parliament for more time as he awaits a special investigating unit (SIU) report that deals with aspects of the matter forming the subject of my report.” The report investigated the R246 million spent on security upgrades to Zuma’s Nkandla homestead and found it to have possibly allocated a portion of state funds to do this. Zuma agreed to respond to Madonsela’s report once the

SIU was established and an investigation into the allegations was taken further. Madonsela’s efforts as Public Protector received significant recognition outside South Africa’s borders. She secured a spot on Time Magazine’s list of 100 most influential people this year, along with other leading women such as Hillary Clinton and Angela Merkel.

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FOREMATTER

QUOTES

LEARN FROM THE BEST Quotes from successful people

Being successful is hard work and sometimes it can be difficult to find the motivation to persevere. The following are a collection of inspirational quotes by successful people from all walks of life.

GENERAL

SUCCESS

“Whether you think you can or whether you think you can’t, you’re right.” – Henry Ford

“Success is often achieved by those who don’t know that failure is inevitable.” – Coco Chanel

“Sometimes when you innovate, you make mistakes. It is best to admit them quickly and get on with improving your other innovations." – Roy L. Smith “Work expands so as to fill the time available for its completion.” – Cyril Northcote Parkinson “I like thinking big. If you’re going to be thinking anything, you might as well think big.” – Donald Trump “Only when the tide goes out do you discover who’s been swimming naked.” – Warren Buffett

SPORT IN RELATION TO BUSINESS “Yesterday’s home runs don’t win today’s games.” – Babe Ruth “Victory goes to the player who makes the next-to-last mistake.” – Savielly Grigorievitch Tartakower “You miss 100 percent of the shots you don’t take.” – Wayne Gretzky “Winning is not a sometime thing; it’s an all-time thing. You don’t win once in a while, you don’t do things right once in a while, you do them right all the time. Winning is habit. Unfortunately, so is losing.” – Vince Lombardi “The more I practice, the luckier I get.” – Gary Player

HUMOROUS BUT THOUGHT PROVOKING “There are two essential strategies in business: One, never reveal all you know.” – Anonymous “A meeting is an event at which the minutes are kept and the hours are lost.” – Anonymous “Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler.” – Albert Einstein

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“Successful people are the ones who are breaking the rules.” – Seth Godin “There is no secret to success. Did you ever know a successful man that didn’t tell you all about it?” – Kin Hubbard “The critical ingredient is getting off your butt and doing something. It’s as simple as that. A lot of people have ideas, but there are few who decide to do something about them now. Not tomorrow. Not next week. But today. The true entrepreneur is a doer, not a dreamer.” – Nolan Bushnell “It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.” – Charles Darwin

LEADERSHIP “Leadership is a potent combination of strategy and character. But if you must be without one, be without the strategy.” – Norman Schwarzkopf “Leadership is the art of getting someone else to do something you want done because he wants to do it.” – Dwight Eisenhower “The art of leadership is saying no, not saying yes. It is very easy to say yes.” – Tony Blair


TIPS

FEATURE

Tips on doing business in Africa By Alexandra Nagel

Africa is a thriving continent with numerous business opportunities. Despite the turmoils of the past. Africa continues to surprise the global community with its untapped potential. We have a few tips for businessmen looking to capitalise on that potential. COME TO AFRICA To do business in Africa, you need to first set foot on the continent before you can begin to expand your corporate horizons. Plan your trip a couple of days before the conference, meeting, or summit in order to get the feel of the different cultures the continent has to offer. If you have a meeting scheduled with a company in South Africa, take time out to explore the bustling cities, like Johannesburg, Cape Town, or Durban. Johannesburg is one of the most economically powerful cities in Africa, generating approximately 17 percent of South Africa’s total wealth. Known as the City of Gold, Johannesburg is a business hub, rich in trade, production, financial services, and more.

LEADING BUSINESS HUBS IN AFRICA: Lagos, Nigeria Cairo, Egypt Kinshasa-Brazzaville, Democratic Republic of the Congo Mogadishu, Somalia Khartoum-Omdurman, Sudan Dar es Salaam, Tanzania Abidjan, Cote d’Ivoire Casablanca, Morocco Accra, Ghana Nairobi, Kenya Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Kampala, Uganda Maputo, Mozambique Harare, Zimbabwe

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Explore Africa’s cities not with a holiday in mind, but rather with a business mindset. Walk the streets of Angola, Sudan, and Nigeria to experience first-hand the day-to-day life as a local. Keep an eye out for market and investment opportunities that could benefit your business along the way. The knowledge that you have about commerce and industry brought over from your hometown can be applied in Africa’s corporate sector as well, so you will not be completely in the dark. Your sense on what’s hot and happening in the business arena back home will give you a fresh outlook on how African corporations conduct business here. You will have the ability to evaluate their processes from a new point of view. Use what you know to your advantage, but leave room for new knowledge to stream in.

UNDERSTAND THE WAY OF LIFE Africa has emerged from a past of colonialism and war, with economies booming and markets just waiting to be tapped into. To really get to know Africa’s cities, taking the time to understand the variety of cultures, traditions, and languages will aid in your business venture. Businesses will notice the small things, like understanding local lingo will demonstrate to them how interested you are to learn about Africa’s traditions and cultures. It shows determination to learn about your new business environment and the compassion to take the local culture into account, rather than trying to impose your own views on them. Both are outstanding leadership qualities. It is important to remember that Africa is a developing continent and does have limited resources, such as access to internet. Lengthy conference calls over Skype are not going to cut it. Remember to keep an open mind when visiting these cities, you are entering the third world, but by no way does it undermine the potential of the economies.

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WAYS TO SAY HELLO IN AFRICA: Angola: Bom Dia (Portuguese) Botswana: Dumela mma/rra (Setswana) Cote d’Ivoire: In-i-che (Dioula) Egypt: Salaam aleikum (Arabic) Ethiopia: Teanastellen (Amharic)  hana: Ete-sen (Twi); Meeng-gah-bou G (Ga); Kawula (Dagbani); Sannu (Hausa) Kenya: Habari/Jambo (Swahili) Lesotho: Lumela (South Sotho) Libya: Salaam aleikum (Arabic) Madagascar: Salama (Malagasy); Bonjour (French) Malawi: Moni (Chichewa) Mali: I-ni-cheh (Bambara); Bonjour (French) Nigeria: Bonjour (French); Bah-oh (Yoruba); Ee-bow-lah-chee (Igbo); Sannu (Hausa) Sierra Leone: How de body? (Krio) South Africa: Sawubona (Zulu); Molo (Xhosa); Hallo (Afrikaans) Sudan: Salaam aleikum (Arabic)  ganda: Salama/Jambo (Swahili); U Oli otya (Luganda) Zambia: Muli shani (Bemba)  imbabwe: Mhoroi (Shona); Sawubona Z (Ndebele)

A simple greeting in their language could lighten their attitude towards you, admiring your interest and time for taking that extra mile. Do an additional 30 minutes of research or speak to locals to get an idea of the type of tongue spoken in and around town.

MAKE A FRIEND OR TWO Networking is key in any circumstance and even more so when you are pursuing new business interests. Getting in touch with officials in the country you wish to begin your business in is crucial. Present them with your business plan to give

them an idea of your intentions and how it will benefit the economy, as well as to find out about any legal and administrative issues that you might be facing. Think of this as a diplomatic mission, creating strong ties with a variety of different leaders in the business world will be mutually beneficial. Building trust is important in any business and the people you meet along the way could be potential stakeholders in your business. Bringing a team over with you or even a business partner will be immensely beneficial, especially if they have knowledge of your new business location. You can bounce ideas off each other and delegate tasks that you cannot carry out yourself. They will act as a solid and familiar support structure, which you will need when starting fresh in a new country. All of this can be very daunting, overwhelming, and disorientating. It is a great opportunity for them to experience a different working environment that is outside of their comfort zones. Four types of people that would be ideal to bring with you, as adapted from entrepreneur.com:  he cheerleader: The individual T who supports all of your weird and wonderful ideas, believing in your entrepreneurial skills 100 percent.  he role model: Someone you T admire and aspire to emulate. You would trust them with your life, and they are the ideal business partners because of this.  he expert: The person who is an T absolute professional in business and who knows the ins and outs of your chosen field. You can learn a lot fromthis one.  he techie: Every start-up T company needs an IT-whiz, especially when travelling to a new destination where the ICT systems are different from what you are used to.


TIPS

IDENTIFY KEY SECTORS In order for your business to thrive, it is important to point out what the strengths of the country are, such as, whether it is import or export-orientated. South Africa is one of Africa’s thriving hegemons, with a broad range of industries contributing to its success. : After you have an idea of what the core

industries are, it will be easier for you to orient your business in the sector you would like to operate in. It will be useful to familiarise yourself with the heads of industry and their work; who the key players are, what sets them a part from the rest, what the challenges are, and what markets they focus. This way, you can keep an eye out on competitors, but also know who to turn

FEATURE

to if you need some advice on any problems your business may be facing. Although you are in Africa mainly for business purposes, remember to enjoy the journey along the way. The more comfortable you become with the cultures, people, and way of life, the easier it will be for you to transit as well as embrace what Africa has to offer. Soon enough, you will feel right at home.

Here is a breakdown of the key sectors that made up the country’s GDP in 2013, as adapted from mediaclubsouthafrica.com and Statistics South Africa

South Africa's key sectore: Contribution to GDP Growth in

2013

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Sharing is caring: The growing trend of communal workspaces By Anton Pretorius

The world of entrepreneurship is a lonely and uncertain one. Stepping out from the corporate world and into your own business can be scary, which is why the internationally growing trend of shared office spaces is not altogether surprising.

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TRENDS

FEATURE

“For small business owners and startup companies, this route not only provides cheaper overheads for workspace, but also helps develop these young start-ups with great networking opportunities.”

Leaving a company, the steady pay check, social office environment, and the security of a ‘go-to’ colleague or employer to bounce ideas off, is a daunting prospect. In light of this (and let’s not forget the high overheads of running an office), there is a growing trend for communal workspaces shared by several young start-ups, as an alternative to running a business from home. It’s no secret that today’s modern office is a joyless and neutral venue in most people’s lives – think boxy cubicles, no natural light, or incoherent design. Experiments to improve office spaces are nothing new, but the 21st century workforce, increasingly telecommuting or bouncing from job to job and city to city, is making those late 20th-century office concepts feel old-fashioned.

EMERGING TREND In Johannesburg, there is currently a small but growing demand in the market for shared office space. This involves a sole proprietor or a small business renting one or more desks in an office space and receiving the tools to help grow their business,

such as phone lines, printing facilities and internet access. For small business owners and start-up companies, this route not only provides cheaper overheads for workspace, but also helps develop these young start-ups with great networking opportunities. Westleigh Wilkinson is the Managing Director at The OPEN Collaborative Workspace, situated in Maboneng south of downtown Johannesburg. OPEN was founded by his two partners Paul Keursten and Mark Seftel. Keursten owns a space in Utrecht, Netherlands called Maliebaan 45 with lots of experience in collaborative workspaces. Seftel develops ‘ecosystems’ that provide the best in technology, innovation, and comfort for start-ups and small businesses. Wilkinson says that communal workspaces are places where entrepreneurs, professionals, corporate leaders, government officials, and representatives of civil society get together to make a positive difference and solve tough problems. “OPEN designs and manages inspiring and comfortable spaces to work, meet, learn, cooperate, and hold events. Our spaces offer a platform for developing entrepreneurship, for innovation and new solutions,” he says.

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According to him, the international communal workspace trend is on the increase, especially in the USA, where prime offices space is so costly; the economics of sharing makes better business sense. “A trendsetter is WeWORK, who dominate the international market with great concepts. I was lucky enough to visit their Washington and San Francisco spaces and was blown away by the type of people who were working in the space.” Nazeem Martin, Managing Director of Business Partners, says there is a growing trend for communal workspaces locally and internationally. “According to the 2014 Co-working Forecast, a global coworking survey, the current need for coworking spaces outstrips the availability of vacant spots. Seven out of 10 co-working facilitators reported that the availability of desk space in shared professional spaces cannot keep up with the demand in general,” he says.

BENEFITS FOR ALL Martin says that communal work spaces hold several benefits for young entrepreneurs. “Co-work spaces are often occupied by similar types of businesses, thereby creating an environment that not only encourages a young diverse group of entrepreneurs to share, discuss and develop ideas, but also a competitive setting that can further motivate young entrepreneurs to push their capabilities.” He adds that co-work spaces provide young, similar-minded entrepreneurs an opportunity to develop a collaborative ecosystem to support one another. The shared workspace aims to offer young entrepreneurs access to all infrastructure of an office, without the usual overhead costs. “The entry to market is very low. Packages start at R1 500 (excluding VAT) per month and runs on a month-tomonth basis. No contracts and no capital needed to get the office kitted out and running. The value of a shared space and the economies of sharing give the startup the best possible environment to be successful,” says Martin.

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According to Wilkinson, a traditional lease of a 25 square metre space in Bryanston for a minimum of one year, could cost you around R50 000. “This includes lease of about R2 500 (R100 per square metre), services of R30 000, furniture of around R15 000, and internet can run you between R500 and R6 000.” When sharing, R18 000 per year gets you the added benefits of having a custom-built nine-hole putting green to take a break from work, or have a cappuccino at our coffee bar, or book a boardroom with full AV set up. Financially for any business, co-working trumps the traditional workspace,” Wilkinson says. Martin agrees that the renting of communal work space is way more affordable compared to traditional private office space. “Yes, it is definitely more affordable. Many of the spaces come equipped with high-speed internet connections, meeting rooms, reception services and business equipment. These are available for flexible periods as required by the entrepreneurs without the usual high price, which is what young entrepreneurs usually require,” Martin says.

COLLABORATIVE ECOSYSTEMS Another benefit of sharing workspace is collaboration between all the businesses who share the space. “We have a growing community of entrepreneurs within the Maboneng space. This helps them feed off each other’s energy and collaborate on projects. We also host many events focussed on networking and pitching concepts and giving tools to entrepreneurs to grow their business,” he says. However, according to Wilkinson, the biggest benefit of sharing space is motivation. “When you see so many other businesses working on projects and growing their business, it creates a competitiveness in the spaces which drives growth. It’s not the same in a traditional office environment where you are closed off to other businesses or

you’re stuck in a home office. This can challenge your productivity,” he adds.

“Every entrepreneur, especially the younger and less-experienced entrepreneur, needs at least one outside confidant or a goto person to bounce ideas off.” Martin says that while business ownership offers countless rewards, it can be a lonely pursuit, and the increase of co-working spaces available in South Africa is reducing the sense of isolation experienced in home offices, and increasing networking opportunities, at cost-effective rates. “Our involvement with young entrepreneurs is to provide finance, mentorship, and business premises. We are not yet involved in communal office space, however we have business mentors on our database who provide support at cost to entrepreneurs who require it. We also host events where entrepreneurs can learn from experienced entrepreneurs and our internal experts,” Martin says. The trend internationally is that these cowork spaces are often occupied by similar types of businesses, thereby creating an environment that encourages a young, diverse group of entrepreneurs to share, discuss and develop ideas. “Every entrepreneur, especially the younger and less-experienced entrepreneur, needs at least one outside confidant or a go-to person to bounce ideas off. These co-work spaces provide young, similar-minded entrepreneurs an opportunity to develop a collaborative ecosystem to support one another,” Martin says.


TRENDS

OPEN doesn’t offer programs for mentoring yet, however, the company consists of several seasoned businesses all offering advice and guidance where they can and to those in need of it. “And if we cannot help, we have friends and corporate partners who are always willing to give sound insight into whatever problem,” Wilkinson says.

ON TO GREATER SUCCESS He also says that OPEN has several success stories and a few businesses that are currently making big waves internationally. “But we cannot claim them as our own. We only provide a platform and it’s up to the business owners to make a success of it. While working space has an impact on your success, it’s the actual work itself, like the products, services, and innovation of the business, that’ll truly determine success,” he explains. Jean-Claude Pienaar, Managing Director at ApexMedia, began as a start-up at OPEN and has progressed to a successful business. “Working in a communal space has and continues to be a wonderful experience, a lesson in collaboration, and a journey of exploration. The facilities and people are second to none,” he says.

and life existence. It’s a great place for small business owners, consultants and remote workers to get into a more professional environment. It’s quieter, cleaner, faster, and less crowded than trying to work at the local coffee shop. Like a professional office, this communal workspace offers open workplaces, private workplaces, and meeting workplaces,” he says.

FEATURE

CO-WORKING BY THE NUMBERS According to Deskmag’s annual Global Co-working Survey, there are several reasons why co-working will give your business a huge boost, even if you’re not an entrepreneur or freelancer. 50% of co-workers access their work space around the clock

He adds that they offered rooms with video conferencing enabled, perfect for your Skype meetings with people across the world. “Do you have to host a meeting or present an idea to a client? They offers facilities like interactive whiteboards, LED flatscreens, and you could also print, copy, or fax,” he says.

71% report a boost in creativity since joining a co-working space

“By using a shared workplace, you can save substantially on renting or overhead costs and the stress of managing your own business and the perils that come with it. In addition to saving on money, these community workplaces have the added benefit of a supportive cooperative environment,” he concludes.

70% of co-workers feel healthier than in traditional office

62% said their standard of work has improved in co-working space 90% of workers report an increase in self-confidence

64% of co-workers are better able to complete tasks on time

“Attracting like-minded entrepreneurs who are pushing innovation ensures that we are constantly exposed to great people doing great things and helps us to not rest on our laurels too often. Naturally, a great space is nothing without great facilities and good access to opportunities. Gustav van der Merwe, who runs a start-up from Johannesburg, only had a shoestring budget to work with when he started his own web development company. So he decided to spend some time in the USA to pursue his career. While in the States, he read about the communal workspace idea and was immediately hooked. One year later, Gustav’s business took off. “The communal workspace I used is a workspace dedicated to helping business professionals embrace a balanced work

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SOUTH AFRICA'S TOP 500 COMPANIES

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TOP 500

RESULTS

RESEARCH CRITERIA Top 500 ranks the top five companies in 100 business sectors across South Africa. Topco Media’s research department critically analyses each company’s performance against three main criterions: Financial performance, empowerment, and policy and accreditation. FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE Companies need to be continuously innovative and broadening their horizons to sustain growth if they hope to gain an advantage in any sector of South Africa’s burgeoning economy. To be considered the best in sector, companies must be dynamic, industrious, and have a vision to expand. The four main factors considered for financial performance are turnover, turnover rate, rand turnover growth, and turnover per employee. EMPOWERMENT South African companies have a responsibility to embody transformative strategies and principles government has put in place to right the wrongs of the country’s checkered past. Companies are scored based on how committed they are to empowerment and what initiatives they have in place to accelerate transformation and empowerment of previously disadvantaged individuals, women, and people with disabilities. POLICY AND ACCREDITATION Companies that are heavily engaged in community outreach programmes and corporate investment projects score highly in this category. The company is further judged on the amount of their written policies that focus on employment equity, skills development, HIV/Aids, health and safety, and the environment.

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PRIMARY RESOURCES

1. COAL

2. GOLD

3. PLATINUM

Exxaro Coal (Pty) Ltd

Gold Fields Limited

Anglo American Platimun Limited

Sasol Mining (Pty) Ltd

AngloGold Ashanti Limited

Impala Platinum Holdings Limited

Optimum Coal Holdings Limited

Sibanye Gold Limited

Lonmin Plc

Sumo Coal (Pty) Ltd

Harmony Gold Mining Company Limited

Aquarius Platinum South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Anglo Operations (Pty) Ltd

DRD Gold Limited

Royal Bafokeng

Anglo American Platinum is crowned the best in the sector, dominating the Platinum sector once again. The mining giant scores an 11.1 percent growth in turnover, followed by Impala Platinum Holidings with an impressive 30.2 percent increase in turnover. However, despite placing third overall, Lonmin has the greatest growth in turnover out of the top five at 46.2 percent.

Listed on JSE’s Socially Responsible Investment (SRI) index as one of the best companies in its sector, Exxaro Coal claims gold with an outstanding annual turnover. Operating in 37 different countries, Sasol took the second spot with the second highest turnover and a turnover growth rate of 9.7 percent. Taking the third is Optimum Coal Holdings followed by Sumo Coal.

With eight mines operating from Australia to many African cities, Gold Fields acquires about 2.02 million ounces of gold per year. Reigning supreme, the company takes number one with the highest turnover growth rate of 32.7 percent. AngloGold Ashanti takes second place with a 23.2 percent increase in turnover, and Sibanye Gold third place overall.

4. METALS AND MINERALS

5. DIVERSIFIED MINING

6. GAS

Kumba Iron Ore Limited

Anglo American South Africa Limited

Assmang Limited

African Rainbow Minerals Limited

The Petroleum, Oil and Gas Corporation of South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Palabora Mining Company Limited

Exxaro Resources Limited

Foskor (Pty) Ltd

BHP Billiton SA Holdings Limited

Merafe Resources Limited

The sector maintains a 26.3 percent turnover growth rate this year, with Kumba Iron Ore taking the lead once again, having the greatest turnover per employee. Assmang climbs three spaces, coming in second with the highest turnover growth rate at 47.3 percent. Also moving up a position is Palabora Mining Company with an impressive 31.4 percent turnover growth rate.

Despite the mineworkers’ strikes taking place at the beginning of 2014, the diversified mining sector still manages a 27.9 percent turnover growth. Accounting for approximately 40 percent of the globe’s mined platinum, Anglo American South Africa performs exceptionally well with the highest annual turnover. Following with the second highest turnover is African Rainbow Minerals.

Sasol Gas Limited Afrox Easigas (Pty) Ltd Air Liquide (Pty) Ltd Air Products South Africa (Pty) Ltd

PetroSA takes number one with an outstanding turnover growth of 30.6 percent. The company began operating the world’s very first gas-to-liquid (GTL) refinery in South Africa and now there are five operating globally. Sasol Gas, holding a supply network of 2 500 kilometres, experiences a 6.7 percent turnover growth, followed by Afrox Easigas at 11.1 percent.

SECONDARY BASIC INDUSTRIES 7. DIAMOND MINING

1. SPECIALITY CHEMICALS

2. PAINT MANUFACTURERS

De Beers Consolidated Mines Limited

Sasol Limited

Kansai Plascon Africa (Pty) Ltd

Alexkor Limited

AECI Limited

Dulux Akzonoble (Pty) Ltd

Trans Hex Group Limited

Omnia Holdings (Pty) Ltd

Petra Diamonds Southern Africa (Pty) Ltd

Afrox

Rockwell Diamonds Incorporated

Clariant Southern Africa (Pty) Ltd

Occupying the world’s largest diamond reserve, De Beers Consolidated Mines outshines the rest with an exceptional turnover growth rate at 41.2 percent. Following is Alexkor, despite having the lowest turnover at the end of the financial year. In third place is Trans Hex Group with the second highest annual turnover as well as the second highest percentage of black employees at 86 percent.

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Despite the sector not experiencing much growth in turnover, Sasol wins top honours another year in a row. The company has the highest rate of turnover per employee out of the top five. AECI comes next, climbing a rank from last year and claiming the second highest rate of female employees out of the five at 34.8 percent. Omnia falls down a place to third overall and takes the second highest turnover per employee.

Dekro Paints (Pty) Ltd Luxor Paints (Pty) Ltd Chemspec Prominent Paints

The sector sees the same champion as last year, but under a new name. Kansai Plascon Africa, formerly Freeworld Coatings, experiences a drop in turnover growth this year, escaping Dulux Akzonoble, coming in at second place. Dulux has the highest turnover per employee in the sector, with Dekro, the only company with a positive turnover growth, taking third.


TOP 500

3. BUILDERS MERCHANTS

4. BUILDERS & CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS

Massbuild (Pty) Ltd t/a Builders Warehouse, Builders Express, Builders Trade Depot

PG Bison Limited

Italtile Ceramics Limited Cashbuild South Africa (Pty) Ltd Iliad Africa Trading (Pty) Ltd Distribution & Warehousing Network Ltd

Owned by mega corporation Massmart, Massbuild has leading hardware stores operating across the nation, from Builders Warehouse to Builders Express stores. With both the highest turnover and turnover growth rate, Massbuild steps up as the sector’s winner. In second place with a turnover growth rate of 12.3 percent is Italtile Ceramics with Cashbuild South Africa coming in third, despite having the second highest turnover overall.

5. CEMENT Pretoria Portland Cement Ltd (PPC)

Corobrik (Pty) Ltd

Afrisam South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Ceramic Industries Limited

Lafarge Industries South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Afrimat Limited

Afrimat Limited

Infrasors Holdings Limited

A leader in wood-based products, as well as in its sector, PG Bison reeled in the highest turnover, stealing the first-place crown from Corobrik with 9.4 percent growth in turnover. PG Bison managed a turnover growth rate of 7.4 percent. Ceramic Industries claimed third position from Afrimat, claiming a 16.6 percent growth in turnover.

RESULTS

Supplying cement to 70 percent of the globe, PPC is crowned champion of the cement company sector, with the highest annual turnover. Following in second is Afrisam, a proud cement producer for 75 years to many countries in the southern African region. Third position goes to Lafarge Industries South Africa and open-pit mining company Afrimat takes the fourth spot overall.

6. CONSTRUCTION GROUPS

7. FORESTRY & FOREST PRODUCTS

8. STEEL

Aveng (Africa) Limited

Sappi Southern Africa (Pty) Ltd

ArcelorMittal South Africa Limited

WBHO Construction (Pty) Ltd

Mondi Limited

Hulamin Limited

Basil Read Holdings Limited

Komatiland Forests (Pty) Ltd

Evraz Highveld Steel & Vanadium Limited

Murray & Roberts Holdings Limited

York Timber Holdings Limited

Aveng Trident Steel (Pty) Ltd

Stefanutti Stocks (Pty) Limited

Hans Merensky Holdings (Pty) Ltd

Macsteel Services Centre South Africa (Pty) Ltd

With over 200 brands, the South African Breweries (SAB) comes out on top with highest turnover. Following in second is Brandhouse Beverages with a turnover growth rate at eight percent. Halewood International takes third and has the highest turnover rate at 18.2 percent out of the five. Namibian Breweries and Sedibeng Brewery take fourth and fifth spot respectively.

GENERAL INDUSTRIALS

Sappi produces approximately 6 million tons of paper per annum and is the largest manufacturer in the world that dissolves wood pulp, producing 1.3 million tons per annum. The company is crowned sector winner and has a 24.4 percent turnover growth, followed by packaging and paper solutions company Mondi, placing second overall. With an exceptional turnover growth rate at 63.4 percent, Komatiland Forests takes third.

Powering its way to the top of the sector is ArcelorMittal South Africa, experiencing a turnover growth of 4.1 percent, as well as the highest turnover per employee this year. New entry this year Hulamin swipes up second place with an impressive 19.8 percent turnover growth and 90 percent black employees. In third place, Evraz Highverld Steel and Vandium moves up from last year and experiences a nine percent increase in turnover.

1. AEROSPACE AND DEFENCE

2. DIVERSIFIED INDUSTRIALS

3. ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT

BAE Systems – Land Systems South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Barloworld Limited

Power Technologies (Pty) Ltd

The Bidvest Group Limited

Actom (Pty) Ltd praising

Denel (Pty) Ltd

KAP Industrial Holdings Limited

Circuit Breaker Industries: Low Voltage

ARMSCOR (Armaments Corporation of South Africa) Limited

Eqstra Holdings Limited

Voltex (Pty) Ltd

Argent Industrial Limited

Ellies Holdings

Saab Grintek Defence (Pty) Ltd Reutech Radar Systems

The company worth saluting is BAE Systems for ranking first in the aerospace defence sector. With a growth in turnover at 9.9 percent, the company is the captain in turret systems both on land and offshore. In second place is Denel, still remaining a top priority to the South African Government as its single shareholder.

With a worldwide presence in 24 countries, Barloworld is crowned the sector winner. The company boasts 19 600 South African employees and in 2013, won first place for Customer Management. Following is Bidvest Group, the company with the highest annual turnover of the five. KAP Industrial placed third with the highest annual turnover growth rate at 24.3 percent.

Powering to the top of the sector is Power Technologies, with the highest annual turnover. Founded in 1978, Powertech offers services in four main categories, namely cables, transformers, batteries, and system integrators. With an employee base of approximately 7 500 people and the second highest annual turnover, ACTOM follows behind the sector champion. CBI Electric Low Voltage takes third position with the third highest annual turnover and turnover growth rate at 12.7 percent. T O P 5 0 0 / 6 th E D I T I O N

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4. ELECTRONIC PRODUCTS

5. INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTS AND EQUIPMENT

6. HEAVY MACHINERY

Reunert Limited

Barloworld Equipment

Bell Equipment Limited

Allied Technologies Limited

Invicta Holdings Limited

Babcock Africa (Pty) Ltd

Siemens (Pty) Ltd

Hudaco Industries Limited

ELB Equipment Holding (Pty) Ltd

Saab Grintek Technologies (Pty) Ltd

Shefa Group (Pty) Ltd

Komatsu Southern Africa (Pty) Ltd

Vektronix (Pty) Ltd

Winhold Limited

HPE Africa (Pty) Ltd

Despite the sector only experiencing a 3.3 percent annual turnover growth, Reunert takes the top spot with the highest annual turnover. Allied Technologies closely follows in second place and German engineering company Siemens places third, experiencing a significant growth in turnover at 44.3 percent.

7. ENGINEERING GROUPS Aurecon South Africa (Pty) Ltd WSP Group Africa (Pty) Ltd AECOM SA (Pty) Ltd Kaulani Civils (Pty) Ltd

Reigning supreme in the engineering groups sector is global engineering company Aurecon. With a network expanding across 26 countries, Aurecon won the 2013 Bulk Handling Facility Of The Year at the Australian Bulk Handling Awards. Following is WSP with the second greatest turnover. The group operates in a range of markets, from aviation to sports and offers services in mining, buildings, environment, and more. Operating in 150 countries, AECOM SA takes third place overall.

CYCLICAL CONSUMER GOODS

8. CONSULTING ENGINEERS - MINING INFRASTRUCTURE Gibb (Pty) Ltd Bigen Africa Services (Pty) Ltd Tenova Mining & Minerals SA (Pty) Ltd SMEC SA (Pty) Ltd Arup (Pty) Ltd

Taking first place is leading engineering company Gibb, the best in the sector this year. The company is a South African multidisciplinary engineering consulting firm and has been operating since 1956. In second position is Bigen Africa, a company who prides itself on creating infrastructure that will improve our lifestyles in an eco-friendly manner. Following in third position is Tenova Mining & Minerals SA.

This year, Bell Equipment Limited has found itself back on top. With the highest turnover along with the highest turnover growth totaling a fierce 47.85 percent, it comes at no surprise why this company claims the title once again. A close competitor was SA French with the second highest turnover growth.

9. MINING SERVICES Murray & Roberts Cementation (Pty) Ltd Sentula Mining Limited Metso Minerals South Africa (Pty) Ltd Orica South Africa (Pty) Ltd Manhattan Corporation (Pty) Ltd

Murray & Roberts shines in first place, with 112 years of experience in the construction and mining field. The company manages a 6.4 percent turnover growth, followed by Sentula Mining at 10.3 percent. Metso Minerals South Africa takes third place with a turnover growth of 7.1 percent, as well as the highest turnover per employee.

1. AUTOMOBILES

2. COMMERCIAL VEHICLES

3. AUTOMOTIVE COMPONENTS

Mercedes-Benz South Africa (Pty) Ltd

MAN Truck & Bus South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Metair Investments Limited

Toyota South Africa Motors (Pty) Ltd

UD Trucks Southern Africa (Pty) Ltd

Mahle Behr South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Volkswagen South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Hino South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Bosal Afrika (Pty) Ltd

Ford Motor Company of Southern Africa (Pty) Ltd

Iveco South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Feltex Automotive

Fiat Group Automobiles South Africa (Pty) Ltd

TATA Automobile Corporation SA (Pty) Ltd

Faurecia Emission Control Technologies (Pty) Ltd

Whilst competing with global manufacturing giants China and India, South Africa’s automobile industry continues to thrive however. Mercedes-Benz South Africa is crowned best in the sector with the highest turnover overall. The German-born corporation's “21 Icons” of 2013 and Aids awareness programme initiated in 2000 are prime cases of the company’s excellent performance beyond the automotive industry.

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Barlo Equipment wins with the highest turnover growth rate at 50.1 percent, almost doubling Hudaco Industries', which has the second highest turnover growth in the sector. Invicta Holdings is also recognised for having the second highest turnover in the sector. Overall, black and female representation is relatively strong within the sector.

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The commercial vehicle sector experienced a bit of a dip at the start of 2014, selling 5.39 percent less than at the start of 2013. Despite this, top of the sector is MAN Truck & Bus South Africa with the highest annual turnover of the five. UD Trucks Southern Africa takes the second spot with a turnover growth of 4.2 percent and Hino South Africa experienced a turnover growth rate at 7.5 percent.

Staying true to their vision of generating great value for stakeholders, Metair Investments Limited managed did just that, swooping in at number one. The company experienced a turnover growth of 14.4 percent, which was second highest to Bosal Afrika at 23.5 percent. Behr South Africa takes second with an eight percent turnover growth and the second highest turnover, placing the company second overall.


TOP 500 NON-CYCLICAL CONSUMER GOODS 4. HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES Defy Appliances (Pty) Ltd Home of Living Brands (Pty) Ltd Nu World Holdings Limited Whirlpool South Africa (Pty) Ltd

With a remarkable turnover and rand growth, Defy is at number one once again. Other impressive results include Home Living Brands holding the highest turnover growth and Nu World Holdings Limited claiming the highest turnover per employee out of the five.

1. BEVERAGES – SOFT DRINKS Amalgamated Beverage Industries Coca-Cola South Africa (Pty) Ltd Appletiser South Africa (Pty) Ltd Ceres Fruit Juices (Pty) Ltd Quality Beverages 2000 (Pty) Ltd

A division of South African Breweries, as well as one of the country’s greatest suppliers of Coca-Cola products, Amalgamated Beverage Industries is crowned number one with the greatest annual turnover, highest amount of black employees, and largest turnover growth rate at 12.1 percent. Selling on average 1.8 billion beverages a day worldwide, Coca-Cola takes second place. It is one the most recognised brands in the world.

2. BEVERAGES – BREWERIES The South African Breweries (Pty) Ltd Brandhouse Beverages (Pty) Ltd Halewood International South Africa (Pty) Ltd) Namibian Breweries Limited Sedibeng Brewery (Pty) Ltd Mica Investment (Pty) Ltd

With over 200 brands, the South African Breweries (SAB) comes out on top with highest turnover. Following in second is Brandhouse Beverages with a turnover growth rate at eight percent. Halewood International takes third and has the highest turnover rate at 18.2 percent out of the five. Namibian Breweries and Sedibeng Brewery take fourth and fifth spot respectively.

3. DISTILLERS AND VINTNERS

4. AGRICULTURE

5. FARMING

Distell Group Limited

Senwes Limited

Rainbow Chicken Limited

DGB (Pty) Ltd

Afgri Operations Limited

Astral Foods Limited

Orange River Wine Cellars Co-operative Limited

VKB Landbou Beperk

Country Bird Holdings Limited

KWV South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Kaap Agri Bedryf Limited

Sovereign Food Investments Limited

Stellenbosch Vineyards (Pty) Ltd

A merger in 2000 between William Charles Wonshaw’s creation Stellenbosch Farmers’ Winery (SFW) and Dr Anton Rupert’s Distillers Corporation saw the birth of Distell Group, the leader of the sector this year. With an exceptional turnover in the last financial year, the Group has won a series of awards in the brandy, wine, and whisky categories for 2014. Receiving a special mention for their Bernard Series Chenin Blanc at the 2012 Vancouver Wine Festival, DGB is in second lace with the second highest turnover. Orange River Wine Cellars takes third spot overall despite KWV South Africa having the third highest turnover out of the three.

GWK Beperk

Senwes supplies 18 percent of South Africa’s grain and has a Level 8 B-BBEEE ranking, making it one of the most diverse in worker relations. Despite a 13 percent drop in revenue in the first six months of the 2014 financial year, Senwes still managed to stay ahead of the rest with a 44 percent growth in turnover. Afgri Operations ranks second overall, followed by VKB Landbou Beperk coming in with the second highest turnover growth at 16.5 percent.

RESULTS

Crowned the farming sector winner is Rainbow Chicken, a company that has supplied the South Africans with chicken to braai with friends and family. Approximately 5000 people are employed at Rainbow Chicken, with over half being female. Astral Foods places second with a 2.8 percent growth in turnover and is followed by Country Bird in third with a substantial turnover growth rate of 26.7 percent.

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6. FISHING

7. DIARY PRODUCTS

8. FOOD PROCESSING GROUPS

Oceana Group Limited

Clover South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Tiger Brands Limited

Irvin & Johnson Limited

Parmalat South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Pioneer Food Group

Sea Harvest Corporation (Pty) Ltd

Dairy Belle (Pty) Ltd

AVI Limited

Premier Fishing SA (Pty) Ltd Marpro Trawling

Supplier some of the nation’s most popular canned fish products Lucky Star and Lucky Pets, Oceana plunges to the top of the sector with the highest annual turnover and turnover growth rate at 6.8 percent. With over 53 South African brands, Irvin & Johnson follows with the second highest annual turnover with a turnover growth rate of 8.2 percent. Sea Harvest takes the third position with a turnover growth rate at 10.2 percent.

9. SUGAR Tongaat Hulett Limited TSB Sugar RSA Limited Illovo Sugar Limited

For the third time in a row, Tongaat Hulett takes the first place ribbon with a 24.3 percent growth in turnover, as well as the highest percentage of black employees at 90.2 percent. Second place is awarded to TSB Sugar RSA, claiming the highest turnover per employee with Illovo Sugar following in third, also with an impressive turnover per employee.

10. MEDICAL AID SCHEMES Discovery Health (Pty) Ltd Bonitas Medical Fund MediHelp Medical Scheme BestMed Medical Scheme Fedhealth Medical Scheme

Swiping up the gold again is Discovery Health, with a turnover growth of 12.6 percent. Second best in the sector is Bonitas Medical Fund, boasting 30 years experience in the field. Placing third overall, MediHelp Medical Scheme experiences an 8.4 percent turnover growth, which is the third highest turnover rate out of the five.

McCain South Africa (Pty) Ltd Premier Foods

Tiger Brands has performed exceptionally well with the highest turnover growth rate of 5.8 percent. The company offers a range of consumer brands from Energade and Oros to All Gold and Black Cat, catering for a wide range of tastes and interests. In second position is Pioneer Foods, suppliers of popular brands like Bokomo, Ceres, and Sasko. AVI only experienced a three percent increase in annual turnover at the end of the financial year and frozen food producer McCain coming in after at fourth.

11. MEDICAL AID ADMINISTRATORS Discovery Health (Pty) Ltd Metropolitan Health (Pty) Ltd Sechaba Medical Solutions (Pty) Ltd Allcare Administrators Private Health Administrators

Discovery Health performs the best in the sector, once again, with an impressive beneficiary market share of 45.7 percent. Not too far off is Metropolitan Health with a 41 percent beneficiary market share, placing second overall. Sechaba Medical Solutions jumps up a place from last year, claiming the third spot with a five percent beneficiary market share.

12. HOSPITAL MANAGEMENT & LONGTERM

13. PACKAGING

14. CONSUMER ELECTRONICS

Nampak Limited

LG Electronics South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Netcare Limited

Mpact Limited

Samsung Electronics South Africa

Life Healthcare Group Holdings Limited

Bowler Plastics (Pty) Ltd

Sony South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Medi Clinic Southern Africa Limited

Golden Era Group of Companies (Pty) Ltd

Hisense SA Sales Holdings South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Clinix Health Group Limited Melomed Hospital Holdings Limited

Netcare Limited is labeled number one for the sixth year now running. Along with the highest turnover and a great turnover per employee, it is still the most profitable in the sector. In addition, Medi-Clinic International Limited has the highest turnover per employee and Clinix Health Group Limited has the highest turnover growth at an impressive 22.4 percent.

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Clover South Africa performs the best in its sector, achieving the highest annual turnover with a turnover growth rate of 9.1 percent. To ensure its products are of excellent quality, the company sends products through 55 quality tests. A winner at the 2013 Gold Pack Awards for the most unique packaging design, Parmalat claims second place overall with the second highest turnover and a turnover growth rate of 26 percent. Winner of the 2013/2014 TGI Icon Brands Award in the yoghurt category, Dairy Belle comes in at number three with the third highest annual turnover.

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APL Cartons (Pty) Ltd

Top of the sector yet again is Nampak. The company boasts the highest number of female employees in the sector, as well as a high turnover per employee rate. Mpact climbs up a spot, ranking second overall with an 8.7 percent turnover growth rate, followed by Bowler Plastics with the greatest increase in turnover at 14.1 percent.

Philips South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Electronic devices are ruling the lives of consumers, now called prosumers, a combination of professional and consumer, where everything can be done from the convenience of a tablet. Leading the sector with the highest turnover growth rate at 20.4 percent is LG Electronics South Africa. Coming in after is Samsung Electronics South Africa, with the highest annual turnover of the five. Sony South Africa takes third spot overall with the third highest turnover.


TOP 500

15. PERSONAL PRODUCTS

16. BEAUTY PRODUCTS

17. PHARMACEUTICALS

Unilever South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Estee Lauder Companies

Aspen Pharmacare Holdings Limited

Kimberly-Clark South Africa (Pty) Ltd

L'Oreal South Africa Holdings (Pty) Ltd

Pfizer Laboratories SA (Pty) Ltd

Colgate-Palmolive (Pty) Ltd

Revlon South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Adcock Ingram Holdings Limited

HPC a division of Tiger Brands

Avroy Shlain Cosmetics (Pty) Ltd

Cipla Medpro South Africa Limited

Johnson & Johnson (Pty) Ltd

Annique Health & Beauty (Pty) Ltd

Gold goes to Unilever South Africa, claiming the title of sector winner with a turnover growth rate of 4.6 percent, as well as the highest turnover per employee. Taking silver in second place is Kimberly-Clark South Africa, having the highest turnover growth in the sector at 16.1 percent. ColgatePalmolive follows with the third highest turnover per employee.

From a small project started by a husband and wife in New York, now a global leader in cosmetics, Estèe Lauder Companies is the beauty products sector’s number one, with the highest turnover growth at 13 percent. L’Oreal South Africa places second with a turnover growth of 3.5 percent, bagging the highest turnover out of the five. Revlon South Africa has the second highest turnover, despite coming in third overall.

RESULTS

Astrazeneca Pharmaceuticals (Pty) Ltd

Apen Pharmacare reigns supreme once again, taking number one in the sector. The company has a turnover growth of 11.4 percent this year, which Pfizer Laboratories narrowly beat at 16.5 percent turnover. Adcock Ingram is bumped down to third with a 7.8 percent growth in turnover.

TERTIARY

CYCLICAL SERVICES 1. SHOPPING CENTRES

2. DIVERSIFIED RETAILERS

3. RETAIL - SOFT GOODS

Sandton City Shopping Centre

Shoprite Holdings Limited

Edcon Holdings (Pty) Ltd

Victoria & Alfred Waterfront (Pty) Ltd

Massmart Holdings Limited

The Foschini Group Limited

Eastgate Shopping Centre

Pick ‘n Pay Holding Limited

Truworths International Limited

Canal Walk Shopping Centre

Woolworths Holdings Limited

Mr Price Group Limited

Gateway Shopping Centre

JD Group Limited

Rex Trueform Clothing Company Limited

Sandton City Shopping Centre takes gold this year. With over 300 leading local and international retailers, as well as its prestigious location in Sandton Central Management District in Northern Johannesburg, Sandton City is a one-of-a-kind premier fashion and leisure destination. Not far off is Victoria & Alfred Waterfront (Pty) Ltd, a shopping mall situated in the Mother City.

Shoprite is ranked 93 in the Global Powers of Retailing report in 2013 for sales, operating across Africa. The company bags first place, having the greatest annual turnover of the sector. Massmart, trading names include Builders Warehouse, Game, and Makro, is second in line, with Pick n Pay following in third.

At number one is Edcon Holdings, with a 2.9 percent in turnover growth. Foschini Group jumps to second place this year with the highest turnover growth rate in the sector at 15.5 percent. Truworths has a 13.3 percent increase in turnover, taking the bronze in third place.

6. GAMING AND LEISURE

4. FURNITURE RETAILERS

5. SPORTS APPAREL

JDG Trading (Pty) Ltd

Nike South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Lewis Group Limited

Adidas South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Tsogo Sun Holdings Limited

Ellerines Holdings Limited

Hi-Tec Sports Distributors (Pty) Ltd

Phumelela Gaming & Leisure Limited

OK Furniture

Puma Sports Distributors (Pty) Ltd

Peermont Global (Pty) Ltd

Reebok South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Gold Circle (Pty) Ltd

Incredible Connection, Joshua Doore, and HiFi Corp are just a few of the big brands owned by JDG Trading, the leading company in the sector this year with a 7.3 percent turnover growth rate. Boasting a credit customer base of around 700 000, Lewis Group takes second with an 11.6 percent turnover growth rate. Ellerines, home to Beares, Diala-bed, Wetherlys, and more, claims third overall and manages a two percent growth in annual turnover.

American multinational Nike is crowned sector winner again this year, having the highest turnover per employee, as well as one of the greatest number of black employees at 69.3 percent. Remaining in second is Adidas South Africa, having the second highest turnovers per employee. Following is Hi-Tech Sports Distributors, moving up from fifth spot taking third, claiming the highest turnover growth rate in the sector at 14.4 percent.

Sun International Limited

Championing the gaming and leisure sector, Sun International sees a 14 percent turnover growth, overtaking Tsogo Sun Holdings at a 21.7 percent growth. Phumelela Gaming and Leisure places third overall with a four percent turnover growth, Peermont Global fourth with a minimal turnover growth of 2.1 percent, and finally Gold Circle swiping up fifth and generating no increase in turnover.

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7. HOTELS Tsogo Sun Hotels Protea Hospitality Group (Pty) Ltd City Lodge Hotels Group Three Cities Management Limited Legacy Hotels and Resorts (Pty) Ltd

Tsogo Sun Hotels finds itself in the lead this year with an impressive rand growth. Protea Hospitality Group was a close second with an exceptional turnover and second highest rand growth. City Lodge Hotels is also recognised for its turnover growth at 5.5 percent, the highest in the sector.

9. BROADCASTING CONTRACTORS

Thompson Corporate Travel

MultiChoice South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Club Travel South Africa (Pty) Ltd

South African Broadcasting Corporation Limited

Flight Centre South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Primedia Limited

HRG Rennies Travel (Pty) Ltd

African Media Entertainment Limited

South African Travel Centre

etv (Pty) Ltd

Thompson Corporate Travel takes the lead this year along with the highest turnover growth per employee. Other strong competitors within this sector include Sure Travel with an impressive turnover growth of 23.3 percent and Tourvest Holdings with the highest rand growth in the sector.

Since 1995, MultiChoice South Africa has been supplying the country with digital satellite broadcasting and has now expanded its reach from TV to mobiles and computers. Not only did the company claim number one spot in turnover, but also in the number of black employees at 82 percent. State broadcaster SABC took second place with the second highest turnover and retained the second highest amount of black employees at 79.2 percent, not too far off the sector’s champion.

10. MEDIA GROUPS

11. MEDIA AGENCIES

12. BRANDING AND DESIGN AGENCIES

Naspers Limited

Omnicom Media Group (Pty) Ltd

Exp SA (Pty) Ltd

Times Media Group Limited

Media Edge CIA (Pty) Ltd

The Switch Group (Pty) Ltd

Kagiso Media Limited

Initative Media (Pty) Ltd

Grid Worldwide Branding and Design (Pty) Ltd

Caxton and CTP Publishers and Printers Limited

The MediaShop (Pty) Ltd

Thirtyfour Degrees South Marketing (Pty) Ltd

Primedia (Pty) Ltd

Network BBDO (Pty) Ltd

The Brand Union (Pty) Ltd

Remaining in the spotlight is media giant Naspers, claiming the title of best in the sector yet again. The company has one of the highest turnovers per employee out of the five. Claiming second is Times Media Group with a turnover growth of 12.3 percent and Kagiso Media at third, moving up a spot from last year.

Sector champion is marketing and corporate communications company Omnicom Media Group with one of the highest proportion of female employees. Media Edge CIA is awarded second place and has the highest turnover per employee. Following is Initiative Media with an outstanding turnover growth of 41.7 percent, the highest out of the five companies.

13. ADVERTISING

14. OUTDOOR MEDIA

Ogilvy & Mather South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Wideopen Platform (Pty) Ltd

TBWA Hunt Lascaris JHB (Pty) Ltd

Continental Outdoor Media (Pty) Ltd

J Walter Thompson SA (Pty) Ltd

Primedia Outdoor

Saatchi & Saatchi South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Outdoor Network Limited

Draftfcb South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Operating in 120 countries, Oglivy & Marther South Africa achieves top of the sector with a the highest turnover rate at 11.1 percent. With top advertisements like “Klein Kimmie” for Halls and “Tastes Like Home” for KFC, it does not come as a surprise that this company took first place. Saatchi & Saatchi South Africa comes in second with a turnover growth of 3.7 percent and TBWA Hunt Lascaris JHB following at 1.6 percent.

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8. TRAVEL AND TOURISM

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With an impressive turnover growth rate of 15.2 percent, as well as the highest turnover per employee, Wideopen Platform reigns supreme in the sector. Next to best is Continental Outdoor Media with the second highest turnover per employee. Third goes to Primedia Outdoor which moved down a position from last year.

EXP SA leads the pack with the highest turnover, and growth in turnover at 28.8 percent. The Switch Group has the second highest turnover with Grid Worldwide Branding and Design placing fourth overall, despite having the second highest turnover growth at 7.3 percent.

15. FOOD SERVICES Bidvest Food Services Air Chefs (Pty) Ltd Compass Group South Africa (Pty) Ltd Royalmnandi (Pty) Ltd Feedem Pitseng (Pty) Ltd

Best in the food services sector is broad line supplier Bidvest Food Services. Bidvest operates nationally and offers a range of brands, from Seafrost to Blue Marine frozen foods. To the skies, Air Chefs experienced a 9.7 percent increase in annual turnover with Compass Group South Africa taking third with a dip in annual turnover.


TOP 500

16. LEGAL SERVICES Cliffe Dekker Hofmeyr Incorporated Webber Wentzel Werksmans Incorporated Adams & Adams Bowman Gilfilan

The legal services sector experiences a mild turnover growth at 3.9 percent, with one of South Africa’s largest law firms Cliffe Dekker Hofmeyr taking the lead at a 12.9 percent increase in turnover. Webber Wentzel places second, mantaining their turnover amount, followed by Werksmans Incorporated at third with the highest turnover per employe in the sector.

17. EXHIBITION AND CONFERENCE FACILITIES

ICC Durban (Pty) Ltd Cape Town International Convention Centre Company Sandton Convention Centre CSIR International Convention Centre Gallagher Convention Centre

Remaining at the top of the sector this year is ICC Durban, winner of the 2013 International Star For Leadership In Quality Award. ICC Durban hosts a variety of highprofile events, such as these 2014 events, MTV Africa Music Awards, Durban International Film Festival, and International Conference on Chemical Thermodynamics. Cape Town International Convention Centre achieves second spot, despite having the greatest annual turnover out of the five. In third place is the Sandton Convention Centre, the chosen venue for the 2014 Summit on 20 years of Economic

18. BUSINESS PROCESS OUTSOUCING Innovation Group (Pty) Ltd Direct Channel Holdings (Pty) Ltd Aegis Outsourcing South Africa (Pty) Ltd Syntell (Pty) Ltd Global Telesales (Pty) Ltd

Sailing to the top of the sector is Innovation Group. Providing services on a global scale, this company has the greatest turnover with Direct Channel Holdings taking the second prize. Coming in third is Aegis Outsourcing South Africa, but with the second highest turnover growth rate at 1.3 percent.

19. RESEARCH COMPANIES

20. RECRUITMENT GROUP

21. WASTE MANAGEMENT

TNS Research Surveys (Pty) Ltd

Adcorp Holdings Limited

Enviroserv Holdings

AC Nielsen Marketing & Media (Pty) Ltd

Workforce Holdings Limited

The Waste Group (Pty) Ltd

African Response (Pty) Ltd

Cozens Recruitment Services (Pty) Ltd

Interwaste Holdings Limited

Ipsos SA

Kelly Group Limited

Plus94 Research

Manpower South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Overall the sector did not perform exceptionally, only seeing a 1.6 percent growth in turnover. Championing the sector is TNS Research Surveys, once again. AC Nielsen Marketing & Media ranks second in the sector, with new third place winner, African Response.

Defending their title as sector best is Adcorp Holdings, experiencing the highest turnover growth out of the five at 19.3 percent. Moving up a place is Workforce Holdings with a turnover growth of 17 percent, as well as a fairly high turnover per employee. Climbing up to third spot from sixth last year is Cozens Recruitment Services, experiencing a 6.3 percent increase in turnover.

Enviroserv Holdings retains its title this year. Dominating the sector with the highest turnover growth of 22 percent, the highest overall turnover, and turnover per employee, it comes as no surprise. Waste Group follows in second, with Interwaste Holdings Limited taking third place. Interwaste Holdings is noted for holding a strong overall turnover and turnover growth out of the three.

22. COPORATE SECURITY SERVICES

23. PRIVATE SECURITY SERVICES

24. AIRLINES

The Protea Coin Group (Pty) Ltd

ADT Security (Pty) Ltd

South African Airways (Pty) Ltd

Fidelity Security Services (Pty) Ltd

Chubb Security SA (Pty) Ltd

Comair Limited

G4S Secure Solutions (PTY) Ltd

Securitas Specialised Services (Pty) Ltd

SA Airlink (Pty) Ltd

Stallion Security (Pty) Ltd

Command Security Services SA (Pty) Ltd

Mango Airlines (PtY) Ltd

Bidvest Magnum Group

Crowned sector winner is the Protea Coin Group with the highest turnover in growth at 24.8 percent and claims the highest turnover per employee out of the five. Second place goes to Fidelity Security Services experiences a 10.6 percent turnover increase, with G4S Secure Solutions coming in after. Overall, the sector experiences a mild increase in turnover at 11 percent.

For the second time in a row, ADT Security steps up as number one and manages one of the highest rates int turnover per employee. Chubb Security SA remains at number two with a 3.5 percent increase in turnover, and Securitas Specialised Services takes third with an exceptional turnover growth of 130.6 percent this year.

RESULTS

South African Express Airways (Pty) Ltd

South African Airways has its wings painted gold as it swoops in at first place once again. The star alliance member operates 21 900 flights per day to 1 328 different airports across the globe. Comair Limited had the highest turnover growth however, soaring to a height of 19.2 percent. Landing third is South African Airlink, bumping up a position from last year.

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24. CAR HIRE Avis Rent A Car South Africa Budget Rent A Car a division of McCarty Limited

Fleet Africa (Pty) Ltd

Europcar

Eqstra Holdings Limited

First Car Rental and CMH Fleet Solutions

Digicore Holdings Limited

Dollar Thrifty Car Rental

Altech Netstar (Pty) Ltd

One of the country’s leading car hire companies, Avis Rent-A-Car South Africa, wins first place this year. Budget Rent-A-Car has an impressive turnover growth rate of 61.9 percent, placing first in this regard and second overall. French car hire company Europcar takes third place with the second highest annual turnover out of the five.

27. COURIER SERVICES Skynet Worldwide Express & Logistic Solutions Ram Hand-to-Hand Couriers Aramex South Africa (Pty) Ltd TNT Express Worldwide SA (Pty) Ltd The Courier & Freight Group SA (Pty) Ltd

Delivering to over 450 towns in southern Africa on a daily basis, Skynet Worldwide Express and Logistic Solutions has the greatest annual turnover in the sector. Ram Hand-to-Hand Couriers takes silver with the second highest annual turnover, and Aramex South Africa is awarded third place overall with a turnover growth of 3.4 percent.

NON-CYCLICAL SERVICES

Mix Telematics Africa(Pty) Ltd

In addition to being a leader in specialised fleet management and full maintenance leasing solutions for both the public and private sector, Fleet Africa (Pty|) Ltd is the leader of this year’s fleet management and vehicle tracking sector. Egstra Holdings Limited saw itself in second place this year, creating its value through its ability to extract optimal value throughout the lifespan of equipment.

28. ROAD FREIGHT Imperial Logistics Super Group Limited Value Logistics Limited Unitrans Holdings (Pty) Ltd Cargo Carriers Limited

Imperial Logisitcs wins the trophy for the best in the sector, with a 33 percent turnover growth, as well as the second highest rate of turnover per employee. Following is Super Group, claiming second spot with a 12.1 percent turnover increase. Value Logisitcs performed well with a 17.6 percent turnover growth, placing third best in the sector overall.

26. FREIGHT FORWARDING Bidvest Panalpina Logistics DHL International (Pty) Ltd Kintetsu World Express South Africa (Pty) Ltd Megafreight Services (Pty) Ltd Hellmann Worldwide Logistics

Bidvest Panalpina Logisitcs is crowned sector winner with a turnover growth rate of 7.9 percent. Founded in 1910, the company provides a range of freight services from air to ocean. With the vision to be the “The logistics company of the world”, DHL International places second in the sector and has an 11 percent increase in annual turnover. Operating in 44 cities, Kintetsu World Express South Africa takes third with over 100 percent increase in annual turnover.

29. SHIPPING Grindrod Limited Berry & Donaldson (Pty) Ltd Toll Global Forwarding South Africa (Pty) Ltd Safmarine (Pty) Ltd MOL South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Taking the top spot once again is Grindrod. The company has a turnover growth of 18.8 percent and an impressive turnover per employee. Berry & Donaldson leaps from third place up to second, with a 33.3 percent turnover growth, followed by Toll Global Forwarding South Africa, experiencing a 5.2 percent turnover growth.

2. TELECOMMUNICATIONS (WIRELESS)

3. TELECOMMUNICATIONS (FIXED-LINE)

Shoprite Holdings Limited

Vodacom Group Limited

Telkom South Africa Ltd

Woolworths Holdings Limited

MTN Group Limited

1. FOOD RETAILERS

The Spar Group Limited Pick ‘n Pay Stores Limited Fruit & Veg City Holdings (Pty) Ltd

Claiming gold once again is Shoprite, winner of the food retailers sector with a turnover growth of 14.4 percent. The company has ties in the OK franchise as well as in the fast food market through the Hungry Lion. Woolworths sees an 11.5 percent increase in annual turnover and Spar a 12.2 percent spike.

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25. FLEET MANAGEMENT & VEHICLE TRACKING

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Cell C (Pty) Ltd

Vodacom is seen, once again, leading the sector, with a grand turnover of over R61 million. With only three competitors, this sector shows great strength and turnover growth across the sector. MTN stands out with the highest rand growth while Vodacom also secures a high turnover growth at 4.5 percent.

Neotel (Pty) Ltd

As seen in previous years, Telkom South Africa has dominated the sector and does so again this year. However, Neotel has stepped up as a worthy competitor. Telkom South Africa shows a strong overall turnover and turnover growth within this sector, whilst Neotel shows a great rand growth and turnover per employee.


TOP 500

UTILITIES

FINANCIAL

1. WATER

1. BANKS

2. SHORT-TERM INSURANCE

FirstRand Limited

Santam Limited

The Standard Bank of South Africa Limited

The Hollard Insurance Company Limited

Capitec Bank Limited

Mutual & Federal Insurance Company Limited

Nedbank Group Ltd

Regent Insurance Company Limited

ABSA Group Ltd

AIG South Africa

Rand Water Johannesburg Water Mhlathuze Water Umgeni Water Sedibeng Water

Number one in this year’s water sector is Rand Water. Rand Water is the largest player in the sector, both in terms of employee size and overall turnover. However, Johannesburg Water is hot on its heels coming in at second place. Third in the sector is Mhlathuze Water, who must be noted for holding the highest turnover growth at 23.5 percent.

With the vision to be Africa’s financial services group of choice, FirstRand Limited has certainly set the bar high, coming in at number one this year. The company empowers people to run their businesses as if they are their own, by aligning businesses via group strategies, shared values, and principles. FirstRand Limited is definitely the deserving winner this year.

3. LIFE INSURANCE

4. INVESTMENT HOLDING COMPANIES

Sanlam Limited

Remgro Limited

MMI Holdings Limited

Royal Bafokeng Holdings (Pty) Ltd

Old Mutual

Hosken Consolidated Investments Limited

Liberty Holdings Limited

Brimstone Investment Corporation Limited

Hollard Life Assurance Company Limited

Mvelaserve Limited

Taking the lead is Sanlam, a company founded in 1918. With a network that spans across Africa, Europe, India, US, and Australia, the company has one of the highest turnover per employee out of the top five in the sector. Coming in second is MMI Holidngs, experiencing a 13.9 percent increase in turnover and Old Mutual after with the third highest turnover per employee.

RESULTS

The sector experiences a 12 percent increase in annual turnover with Santam taking the lead once again this year. The company has a 7.7 percent turnover growth rate, as well as a significant turnover per employee rate. Taking second place is Hollard Insurance with a 16.9 percent, knocking Mutual & Federal Insurance down a spot.

Remgro Limited wins once again, with its highest turnover growth at 26.2 percent and largest turnover it comes at no surprise. Royal Bafokeng Holdings holds the highest turnover per employee, whereas Hosken Consolidated Investments is close to second with a high turnover overall, as well as turnover per employee.

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5. REAL ESTATE HOLDINGS & DEVELOPMENT Growthpoint Properties Limited Redefine Properties Limited Capital Properties Limited Motseng Investment Holdings (Pty) Ltd Resilient Property Income Fund Limited

Ranking first once again is Growthpoint Properties. The company takes gold, claiming a growth in turnover at 9.1 percent. Redefine Properties remains at number two this year, with a 5.8 percent turnover increase and the second highest tunover per employee. Capital Properties enters the top five in third, boasting an outstanding turnover growth of 174.3 percent.

7. MICRO FINANCE

ClareMart Auctioneers (Pty) Ltd

African Bank Investments Limited

Aucor Sandton (Pty) Ltd

Real People Investments Holdings (Pty) Ltd

Strauss & Co

Finbond Mutual Bank

Michael James

Blue Financial Services Limited

The real estate and automotive market continues to experience the crunch of inflation as the cost of living continues to rise. Not letting this falter their outstanding performance, leaders in real estate ClareMart Auctioneers achieve the top position with the best turnover at the end of the 2013 financial year. The company also conquered with the highest turnover per employee with Strauss & Co coming second, despite placing third overall.

The title winner this year is Africa Bank Investments. The company has the highest turnover growth rate at 22.8 percent, as well as turnover per employee. Real People Investments strikes a 15.6 percent turnover growth, placing second overall with Finbound Mutual Bank following in third position.

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

8. ASSET MANAGEMENT

9. ACCOUNTING AND CONSULTING

1. COMPUTER HARDWARE

Coronation Fund Managers Ltd

PriceWaterhouseCoopers South Africa

IBM South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Old Mutual Investment Group

Deloitte

Dell Computer (Pty) Ltd

STANLIB Asset Management Ltd

KPMG

Mustek Limited

Investec Limited

Ernst & Young South Africa

Hewlett-Packard South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Allan Gray (Pty) Ltd

Grant Thornton THL Consulting (Pty) Ltd

Acer Africa (Pty) Ltd

South Africa’s uneasy financial start to the year did not seem to falter Coronation Fund Managers as they found their footing at the top of the podium. The company has banked on its promise of stimulating longterm investment for their clients as evident by their staggering turnover growth at 58.7 percent, overshadowing Old Mutual Investment Group by 44.4 percent. STANLIB Asset Management took third place with a growth in turnover at 18.8 percent.

Despite South Africa’s issues with budget and trade deficit, one particular accounting firm reigned supreme. With a client base of over 8 500 people from across 32 countries, PriceWaterhouseCoopers South Africa has been crowned number one in the sector with the highest turnover growth at 32.9 percent. Global industry firm Deloitte is awarded silver with the second highest turnover at 7.6 percent. The company has also looked to “Smart Cities” in hope of improving African urbanisation.

American multi-national company IBM South Africa comes out best with the greatest turnover in the sector. IBM has started its 2014 Smarter Cities Challenge, where a team of IBM experts selects cities globally to give professional advice on how to make their city smarter. With the Dell PowerEdge VRTX winning Pro Server of the Year for 2013, Dell claims second place overall with the third highest annual turnover after Mustek.

2. TELECOMMUNICATIONS EQUIPMENT

3. IT COMPONENT DISTRIBUTERS

4. OFFICE AUTOMATION

Ericsson South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Pinnacle Technology Holdings Limited

Nashua Limited

Altech Alcom Matomo (Pty) Ltd

Sahara Computers (Pty) Ltd

Itec Group South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Alcatel-Lucent South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Tarsus Technologies (Pty) Ltd

Bytes Document Solutions

Tellumat (Pty) Ltd

Incredible Connection

Taking first place this year in the telecoms equipment sector is Ericson South Africa (Pty) Ltd. With the vision to be the prime driver in an allcommunicating world, Ericson South Africa has certainly taken a step in the right direction. Second place is awarded to Altech Alcom Matomo (Pty) Ltd, a company specialising in radio and telemetry products.

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6. AUCTION HOUSES

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Rectron (Pty) Ltd

Once again, the largest provider of information and communication technology products in Africa takes the win. Pinnacle Technology Holdings holds the highest turnover growth rate at an impressive 56.6 percent. Sahara Computers places after with the second highest turnover growth. Overall, the sector has a strong black representation.

Kyocera Document Solutions (Pty) Ltd Ricoh South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Nahsua steals the spotlight as sector winner with a 3.7 percent increase in turnover and one of the highest tunovers per employee out of the top five. Following with a turnover growth of 7.4 percent, Itec Group SA overtakes Bytes Document Solutions, claiming the highest growth in turnover at 16 percent.


TOP 500 5. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY GROUPS

6. TELECOM SOLUTION

7. INTERNET SERVICE PROVIDERS

Dimension Data (Pty) Ltd

Westcon South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Datatec Limited

Internet Solutions a Division of Dimension Data

TeleMasters Holdings Limited

Business Connexion (Pty) Ltd

Huge Telecom (Pty) Ltd

EOH Holdings Limited

Vox Telecommunications (Pty) Ltd

T-Systems SA (Pty) Ltd

Tellumat (Pty) Ltd

With the highest turnover, Dimension Data is the winner of its sector. EOH Holdings is commended for holding the highest turnover growth, a remarkable 40.1 percent and the highest turnover per employee. Datatec Limited comes in at a close second place with the second highest turnover growth.

Westcon South Africa is crowned sector winner. Westcon is the leading distributor of converged communications solutions, focusing on tailoring voice, security, mobility, storage, and power stations. TeleMasters Holdings Limited, a converged operator and worthy competitor with its own IPC and Point of Interconnection, sees itself in second place, followed by Huge Telecom.

8. BUSINESS SOFTWARE SOLUTIONS

9. SERVICE DELIVERY

Software AG

Eskom Holdings Limited

Microsoft South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Transnet SOC Limited

ENRA Technologies CC

Telkom SA (SOC) Limited

SAP South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Airports Company South Africa (SOC) Limited

SAS INSTITUTE (PTY) Ltd

South Africa post office (SOC) Limited

With the rapid advancement in technology, businesses in South Africa need to take the digital approach to stay ahead of the game. Software AG reigns as the champion in the sector, adopting a more digital way of life to produce better customer service. Mircosoft follows with the second highest turnover and highest percentage of female employees at 30.1 percent. Turnkey solutions provider ENRA Technologies follows with the third highest turnover.

RESULTS

MTN Business Solutions (Pty) Ltd MWEB Connect (Pty) Ltd Vox DataPro iBurst (Pty) Ltd

Internet Solutions takes the lead again, with the highest turnover and strong turnover per employee. Close competitors are MWEB Connect, with the highest turnover growth of 23.3 percent and MTN Business Solutions, with the highest turnover per employee. Overall, the sector has both a strong black and female representation.

Eskom Holdings SOC (Pty) Ltd takes the lead in the service delivery sector . Eskom is the largest electricity producer on the continent and generates 95 percent of South Africa’s power. Following in second is Transnet, a company that specialises in freight transport, with Telkom taking third place overall.

EDUCATION

1. UNIVERSITIES

2. BUSINESS SCHOOLS

University of South Africa

University of Cape Town Graduate School of Business (GSB)

Stellenbosch University University of Cape Town

Wits Business School – University of Witwatersrand

University of KwaZulu-Natal

Gordon Institute of Business Science (GIBS)

University of Witwatersrand

University of South Africa (UNISA) Graduate School of Business Leadership (SBL)

This year, the University of South Africa sees itself on top. With a strong financial performance and the highest overall turnover, the University of South Africa wins the best-managed university of the year. The University of KwaZulu-Natal must also be commended for having the highest turnover growth of the sector at 33.1 percent.

University of Stellenbosch Business School (USB)

Ranking in the top 100 for full-time MBAs by the Financial Times, UCT’s GSB scored first place with the highest turnover out of the five. GSB is one of the only business schools to be triple-crown accredited out of 59. Johannesburg-based Wits Business School has the secondhighest turnover, with the third greatest amount of black students enrolled at 60 percent.

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Calculated risks can contribute to

entrepreneurial success By nature, entrepreneurs are to a degree risk takers, as it is likely that they have taken a big risk by leaving a corporate environment and a steady salary to start their own business. The reality however is that many entrepreneurs are more cautious and risk-averse than what is perceived to be. Christo Botes, Executive Director of Business Partners, says that the fear of failure is a common occurrence in any entrepreneur’s journey, and that this fear can discourage business owners from taking the

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essential, calculated risks needed to further develop and expand their business. “Although the ability to take risk is an essential trait in an entrepreneur, not many entrepreneurs possess the ability to do so and instead view risk negatively, associating it with possible danger and loss. However, in the process of doing so, they can also sabotage their own success by falling into a comfort zone, ultimately prioritising their fear of failure above the search for success. This fear can inhibit a business from remaining innovative, which is necessary in an ever changing economy faced with differentiating consumer demands.�


ENTREPRENEURS

FEATURE

Botes says that calculated risk is an integral part of a business, and entrepreneurs should look at it as an opportunity and challenge to overcome the unknown and in the process, grow their business. “Having the ability to spot an opportunity, investigate the options and then take the calculated risk is what sets entrepreneurs apart from others that may take reckless risks.” He adds that entrepreneurs who are calculated risk takers understand that there is a clear distinction between risk and danger. “Entrepreneurs who are able to take calculated risks and manage them, are confidently able to find a balance between maintaining a need for security, while making the necessary decisions or investments needed for the future growth and success of their business. This equilibrium is a crucial trait that a business owner should posses.” Botes offers the following practical tips on how entrepreneurs can manage their risks:

KNOW YOUR CUSTOMER BASE Interact regularly with your customers, employees and make a concerted effort to stay up to date with new technologies that may benefit, or hinder, your business. If you are aware of what your market requirements are ahead of time, you can minimise your chances of loss. For example, this type of research will enable you to avoid costly mistakes, such as entering a new product that wouldn’t appeal to your customer base.

EMBRACE RISK BY ESTABLISHING SHORT TERM GOALS Get comfortable with the idea of risk, as it is part of your daily business operations and will play a major role in determining your success as an entrepreneur. Start by setting achievable goals that you will be able to accomplish in a short period of time. Achieving these short term goals will give you the courage and experience to avoid decisions which carry greater risk for your business later on, without being discouraged by the fear of potential losses.

KNOW YOUR MARKET ENVIRONMENT Information and research are the key ingredients to increasing your risk tolerance. The best way to manage your risk is to create a deep understanding of the market the business is operating in. Being familiar with the opportunities and risks in your marketplace will give you an advantage over your competitors, and enable you to distinguish more easily between risk and danger.

SEEK ADVICE FROM FELLOW ENTREPRENEURS Becoming an entrepreneur is risky no matter how you look at it. However, by seeking mentorship from seasoned entrepreneurs you will empower yourself to unleash your own, and your business’ full potential. In other words, the more you know, the less you fear. If you're having difficulty accomplishing your goals, it could be beneficial to brainstorm ways to manage your risks by seeking mentors that have the information or skill set that you require for the issue at hand. “The secret to entrepreneurial success is to aim for the maximum reward for the lowest risk possible, but this is not always possible in a competitive business environment. If business decisions were solely based on the amount of risks associated, entrepreneurs would probably never commit themselves to a business decision. To be successful, an entrepreneur must therefore have the ability to calculate and consider the risk and then commit themselves to their decision to ensure results,” concludes Botes. T O P 5 0 0 / 6 th E D I T I O N

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GIBB is a leading multi-disciplinary engineering firm Leaders in engineering consulting

Operating in:

Dams, Hydropower and Tunnelling Environmental Integrated Infrastructure - Water Cycle - Housing

Power and Energy Transportation -

Airport and Aviation Railway Engineering Roads and Highways Traffic and Transportation

Architecture

+27 11 519 4600 marketing@gibb.co.za | www.gibb.co.za GIBB is a Level 2 BBBEE contributor

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ECOMMERCE

FEATURE

GLOBAL E-TAILING 2025 Ecommerce and logistics set for growth in sub-Saharan Africa

Over the next 10 years, online retail will continue to gain popularity in both developed and emerging markets and as a result, logistics companies are set to play a key role in providing vital supply chain management solutions. This is one of the key findings in the DHL Global E-Tailing 2025 study, which analyses the role that eCommerce will play in consumer’s lives in the year 2025, and how it will influence consumerism, retailing, and logistics. The different future projections are based on a detailed analysis of the most influential factors effecting economies – from energy and raw material prices to technological, political and social factors, to retail and consumption patterns.

FOUR POSSIBLE SCENARIOS ARE: Hybrid consumer behaviour in convergent worlds of retailing A strong global economy and stable middle class establishes a true model of “everywhere commerce” where smartphones and tablets remain consumers’ constant companions. Interactive displays are ever-present in city streets, serving as interfaces to the virtual world, and the retail sector targets customers through a variety of channels, such as these interactive displays, as well as offers their goods online and in stationary stores, which results in consumers being able to access and purchase products at all times. Artificial intelligence in the digital retailing sphere The global economy thrives, despite exhibiting significant volatility in preceding years. A highly developed digital culture evolves in this scenario, which sees all products being sold online, and consumers receiving support of virtual consultants, which will not only check the authenticity of a product and monitor purchase and delivery, but also place the actual order online. Self-presentation in virtual communities The world economy experiences rapid growth and the increase in wealth creates an affluent consumption-oriented middle class, whose values have shifted away from work and more towards leisure. Niche retail websites, which offer selective and a dynamically-changing assortment for individual lifestyles, becomes the focal point of regional and global lifestyle communities primarily driving online retail. Collaborative consumption in a regionalised retailing landscape A crisis scenario whereby consumer consumption patterns develop after the global economy suffers another financial crisis. Under these circumstances, a high degree of protectionism brings international retailing to a complete standstill. The powerful shift of the economy leads to a substantial change in consumer habits and results in consumers buying locally, as a rule. According to Sumesh Rahavendra, Head of Marketing for DHL Express Sub Saharan Africa, e-tailing has exploded globally, especially in emerging countries and despite the various possible future scenarios , it is clear e-tailing will continue to boom. “The factor which all scenarios have in common is that the competition in electronic retail, whether on global, national or regional level, will become more intense. We don’t know for certain what the world will look like in 2025, but the study’s various scenarios show how rapid the global retail sector, both online and offline, is changing and that logistics will be a focal point of these change processes,” concludes Rahavendra.

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South Africa's top entrepreneurs By Neesa Moodley-Isaacs

Over the last 20 years, a new generation of top South African entrepreneurs have emerged. Daring and of bold vision, these entrepreneurs have one thing in common: They all started from humble beginnings and diligently worked to make their dreams a reality. We take a look at 10 of South Africa’s top entrepreneurs.

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SA ENTREPRENEURS

FEATURE

“Tertiary education is important simply because it’s one thing that no one can take away from you, coupled with life experience, it will stand you in good stead, no matter what life throws at you.” - Basetsana Kumalo

A survey released late last year by global wealth consultancy, New World Wealth, found that the number of black dollar millionaires in South Africa has increased by 81 percent since 2007. The spike in black dollar millionaires was significantly greater than that for millionaires in general, which stood at just 14 percent.

THESE ARE OUR TOP 10 SOUTH AFRICAN ENTREPRENEURS, IN NO PARTICULAR ORDER:

The number of previously disadvantaged dollar millionaires grew from 4 300 to 7 800. In contrast, there are 36 500 white male and 4 400 white female millionaires. Millionaires were defined as owning assets in excess of US$1 million (R10.7 million), in addition to their primary residence. The survey looked at director databases; private jet, yacht, and property sales; and income distribution trends from the World Bank, in its research.

Stephen Saad He is the head of a multi-billion rand pharmaceutical company with an estimated net worth of R16-billion, but in 1997, Stephen Saad took a huge leap of faith in himself when he started

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Aspen Pharmacare from his Greyville home. He had no notion at the time that the pharmaceutical sales company would burgeon into the country’s largest drug manufacturer. He made his first appearance on the initial 40 richest Africans list on Forbes. com in 2011. Today, Aspen Pharmacare is listed on the JSE and is one of the top 20 manufacturers of generic medicines globally. The company has 18 manufacturing facilities on six different continents and, over the last 10 years, has picked up the lion’s share of the South African government’s anti-retroviral drug supply contracts. There are approximately 8 200 employees working for the company. Saad says much of the group's success is due to the teams he has working for him in South Africa and the rest of the world. "There's a basic value system we drive in the business. We give ownership and trust to our people and let them make lots of the decisions. That's probably the biggest aspect to Aspen's success." With a 16 percent share of the South African pharmaceutical market and 31 percent share of the generics sector, Aspen is ranked the number one pharmaceutical company in the country by IMS Health. Nearly one in four scripts dispensed by pharmacists in South Africa is for an Aspen product. After buying Sigma Pharmaceuticals for R5.9 billion in 2011, Aspen now has a four percent share of the Australian pharmaceutical market and 16 percent of its generics sector. In Australia, one in seven scripts is for an Aspen product. Saad was inducted by the Ernst & Young World Entrepreneur of the Year Hall of Fame in 2005. “I have seen so many small businesses fail because people want to go straight into a fancy office and have a big car and do all the things that supposedly come with running your own business. “That can wait. There will be a time for that. First make sure your business is successful, because most businesses fail in those first few years. If you can get over those first few years then you will be successful. Yes, you will not be able to play golf every Saturday… but those are some of the sacrifices you might have to make to become successful

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in your business,” he says. Aspen’s half-year revenue for the six months to December 2013 was R12-billion. Two major projects currently on the go are are the extension of production facilities at Fine Chemicals Corporation in Cape Town and the construction of a high containment suite in Port Elizabeth, which will further strengthen the group’s strategic manufacturing capabilities

economic freedom, you have to really strive for it yourself… And I think that people need to be conscious of the fact that they need to rely on their own initiatives, their own drive,” he says.

Wendy Luhabe

Herman Mashaba Twenty-nine years ago at the young age of just 24, Herman Mashaba spotted a gap in the market and established South Africa’s first black hair care company – Black Like Me. He started the company in GaRankuwa township in Pretoria with three partners and a R30 000 loan. Mashaba is a Non-Executive Director of Black Like Me and Executive Chairperson of Lephatsi Investments, a broad-based black economic empowerment company with investments in financial services, mining, transport and logistics, and construction. In 1997, he sold 75 percent of Black Like Me to Colgate-Palmolive in a strategic partnership and stayed on as Managing Director, but he bought the company back in 1999. Although Mashaba retired as CEO of Black Like Me in 2004, he remains a majority shareholder and a Non-Executive Director of the company. “My advice to young entrepeneurs is to rely on your own personal instinct and your own personal drive. Please don’t be misled by thinking that the politicians are going to be the ones to give you economic freedom. If you want

One of the most successful women in the country, Wendy Luhabe founded the Women’s Investment Portfolio Holdings (Wiphold) in 1993. It was the first female-owned company to be listed on the JSE and is considered a historic milestone on the path of South African women participating in South Africa’s economic landscape. Ten years later, Luhabe pioneered another first for South Africa when she launched the multi-million rand Private Equity Fund for women-owned proprietary enterprises. Luhabe is not averse to sharing her expertise with others and is passionate about empowering young women. “Women’s leadership in the developing world is too often undervalued, underutilised, and gets very little recognition in traditional systems currently in place in much of the developing world. “I have found in my experience that many women do not recognise their own leadership capabilities, though most are very aware of what has to be done to enact change. Leadership amongst women is unfortunately too often discouraged, leading potential female change-makers to allow traditional systems to invalidate their contributions,” she says.


SA ENTREPRENEURS

Not just one to pay lip service to her ideals, Luhabe has set up a website – www.wendyluhabe.org – which includes regular blogs focusing on topics from interaction and learning in the workplace to career path obstacles. Luhabe has also included an opportunities exchange, which regularly features opportunities for youth. It currently features a post about Absa looking for unemployed commerce graduates. She also founded Bridging the Gap, a social entrepreneur programme designed to prepare young graduates to join the corporate world.

is a gift from heaven. If I had not had a Laurie Dippenaar when I started, Discovery would be a very different company today,” Gore says.

Adrian Gore

Mark Shuttleworth

It is a well-known story in the financial services industry. Two employees went to the top management at Liberty with an idea they thought would be groundbreaking for the healthcare market. But Liberty turned the idea down flat.

The first African in space, Mark Shuttleworth shot to fame when he sold his fledgling internet security company, Thawte, to VeriSign for more than R6 billion. After receiving a Business Science degree in Finance and Information Systems at the University of Cape Town, Shuttleworth went on to found Thawte. He started the company in his parents’ garage.

Undeterred, the pair went off on their own, obtained funding, and launched Discovery Health, which is now the country’s largest medical scheme.

The company has since grown exponentially and has blossomed from a healthcare services provider to a fullfledged financial services group with investment, short-term insurance, and long-term insurance arms. Earlier this year, Gore hit the headlines when he first bought a R25-million apartment in Clifton and then splurged on a R103-million three-bedroom apartment in New York.

Laurie Dippenaar, who was then with First Rand Bank, agreed to fund the company as a start-up and went on to become Chairman of Discovery for 15 years. “When you start a business, there are things that not only have you never experienced, but you’ve never even considered.

In a heartwarming move, Shuttleworth gave R1 million to each member of his staff of 40, including the gardener and the cleaning lady. From humble beginnings in the Free State town of Welkom, Shuttleworth’s vision led him to become one of the country’s most famous entrepreneurs with a net worth of R5.3 billion two years ago in 2012.

“Many entrepreneurs think they don’t need a Board — that it’s a waste of time — but having a bunch of smart, experienced people giving you input

He is keen to encourage the take-up of science and technology among South African youth. He launched Hip2Bsquare, which encourages high

FEATURE

school learners to focus on these two sectors and regularly features competitions for young innovators. The Shuttleworth Foundation funds the Free High School Science Texts project, which is aimed at developing and disseminating free and open textbooks and supporting materials for use in the teaching of science and maths for grades 10 through12. More recently, Shuttleworth founded the Ubuntu project, which produces topquality open-source operating systems supported by the latest software, freely available across the globe.

Patrice Motsepe Billionaire Patrice Motsepe began his business career as a child when he would wake early to help his entrepreneurial father by selling liquor to mineworkers at his father's shop. "I must have been about eight when my dad said one day, ‘We make so much money when you're behind the counter you should take over the business when you grow up’. “But it was hard work, from 6am to 8pm. I soon realised I needed to choose a career that would keep me away from that shop. That's how I came to decide, when I was only eight, that I'd become a lawyer." True to his word, he went on to earn a BA degree from Swaziland University and an LLB degree from Wits University. Today, he is the biggest single shareholder of the world's fifth-largest

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father, and school teacher mother in Soweto. She helped supplement the family’s income while she was growing up by making and selling sandwiches.

gold mining company. His firm, African Rainbow Minerals (ARM), controls 19.8 percent of Harmony. His family trust owns 43.1 percent of ARM. In addition to his mining investments, Motsepe sits on the board of financial services giant, Sanlam.

In 1994, the same year as South Africa’s first free and fair election, Kumalo won the coveted title of Miss South Africa. Winning the crown not only catapulted her to fame, but also led to her establishing her production company Tswelopele Productions, which is responsible for the glitzy and immensely popular Top Billing show.

Forbes magazine rated him 642 on the world’s top richest list and he is considered to be South Africa’s first black billionaire with an estimated net worth of close to R28 billion as at March this year. "We have a country of exceptional business and entrepreneurial talent in both the black and white communities and we should build on that going forward, not as black and white, but as South African business.The strength of this country is its people," he says. In January last year, Motsepe became the first African to join Bill Gates’ and Warren Buffett’s Giving Pledge when he announced that he would give away half the income generated from assets owned by his family to the Motsepe Family Foundation. He has pledged to make R533 million available to his foundation over the next three to five years. The Motsepe Foundation invests in programmes focusing on education, health, unemployment, and the advancement of women.

In December 2011, China Investment Corporate purchased 25 percent of Shanduka for R2.6 billion. Ramaphosa first came to prominence in the 1980s as founder and promoter of the National Union of Mineworkers, created to improve the rights of black African workers. He also happens to be married to Patrice Motsepe’s sister, Tshepo.

In 1999, Tswelopele merged with Union Alliance Media and listed on the JSE. “Tertiary education is important simply because it’s one thing that no one can take away from you, coupled with life experience, it will stand you in good stead, no matter what life throws at you,” she says.

In May this year, Ramaphosa announced that he had completely divested his interests in Shanduka in order to fully commit to his political career. “I will continue to be involved in the Shanduka Foundation, a non-profit organisation that works in the areas of school development, skills development, and enterprise development,” he says.

Cyril Ramaphosa Currently Deputy President of South Africa, Cyril Ramaphosa is estimated to be worth R7.46 billion. His majorityblack-owned Shanduka Group owns stakes in Shanduka Coal, Seacom, MTN, Standard Bank, Liberty, Alexander Forbes, and has 70 percent shareholdings in the McDonald's South African subsidiaries and Coca-Cola bottling plants.

Tokyo Sexwale

Basetsana Kumalo In a rags-to-riches story, Basetsana Kumalo was born in 1974 to a bus driver

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When he filed for divorce last year, Sexwale’s assets were revealed for the world to see. They included vineyards, a yacht, Learjet, and even a R750million island. He is reputed to be worth R2.1-billion and is the founder of Mvelaphanda Group (Mvela), a listed black economic empowerment (BEE) investment firm with significant interests in blue chips, such as media giant Avusa, Absa Group, Group Five, and Life Healthcare. In 2005, Sexwale hosted


SA ENTREPRENEURS

the South African version of the reality game show, The Apprentice. In 2013, he made the Forbes Top 10 African Millionaires to Watch list. Through Ophir Energy, he has oil and gas interests in 15 countries around Africa. Mvela has oil rights in Nigeria, Saõ Tomé Principe, Gabon, and Tanzania, among others. The company has interests in mines in Congo Brazzaville, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Sudan. “It’s a high risk business and requires very deep pockets. It’s not for the fainthearted and requires advanced technologies in exploration and development,” Sexwale says. In South Africa, Mvela is involved with PetroSA in exploring the gas field at Ibubesi. In Angola and Namibia, he has interests in diamonds and, through TransHex, is second only to De Beers in diamond mining interests. Mvela, with Jurang Construction Company, which was instrumental in the new redesign of Singapore and Shanghai, is constructing a US$2.66-billion (R28.5 billion) new city in Bayelese in the Nigerian delta and another in Equatorial Guinea, Malabo Two. “Other foreign oil companies have come to Africa, dug holes, taken the oil, and gone,” he says. “We intend giving back prosperity to communities where we operate. We have to be sensitive to the interests of the country we operate in and have consideration for smaller enterprises.” Mvela’s major shareholding in South African construction company, Group Five, which operates in around 20 African countries, enables it to build roads to diamond fields in remote areas and erect clinics and small stores to create new communities for surrounding villagers and those who work on projects. They even undertake inoculation programmes among local children.

He sits on the international board of JP Morgan in New York with former American Secretaries of State Henry Kissinger and George Schultz. Mvela has the biggest black shareholding in South Africa’s largest bank, Absa, which Barclays has the major shareholding in and which is active across Africa. As if that is not enough, Mvelaphanda has major shareholdings in South African security groups Protea Coin, Royal Sechaba in food, and in top international hotel group Radisson, as well as transport group Unitrans, and interests in fruit farming, including wine.

FEATURE

In 1965 in Upington, a group of friends, including Renier van Rooyen, founded Pep stores using a then considerable R125 000. Wiese, then a young 24-year-old, soon joined the company. This fateful step ultimately led to the takeovers of Shoprite in 1979, Ackermans in 1986, and Checkers, Stuttafords and Cashbuild in 1991. In 1986, Shoprite was spun out from the group and listed separately on the JSE, while Pepkor became the listed entity for the clothing interests. Wiese believes that business should continue training entrepreneurs. “We have enormous training programmes within our companies. Here and there someone will use that training to start his own business. But businesses can perhaps do more of that. “The most important thing we can do is to create role models to show people that ordinary people can start one little shop and grow it into 6 000 shops, like we have done. We were not rocket scientists, just a bunch of ordinary people from Upington,” he says.

Christo Wiese South Africa’s retail landscape would not be the same without the contribution of retail magnate, Christo Wiese. One of the country’s richest entrepreneurs with a personal fortune of more than R37 billion, according to Forbes magazine. Wiese is the chairman of Pepkor and Shoprite. Shoprite, Africa's largest food retailer, has stores in 17 African countries. He also owns the JSE-listed Tradehold, which is a property investment and financial services company whose assets are all held offshore.

“The number of previously disadvantaged dollar millionaires grew from 4 300 to 7 800.”

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T of di do gr 30 co ar m w m


Engineering your success

Aurecon provides engineering, management and specialist technical services to public and private sector clients globally. With an office network extending across 26 countries, Aurecon has been involved in projects in over 80 countries across Africa, Asia Pacific, the Middle East and the Americas and employs around 7 500 people. We seek to foster human achievement in all aspects of our work.

Markets: Construction Data and Telecommunications Defence Energy Government International Development Assistance Manufacturing

The key to our success lies in our business model which focuses on establishing our clients’ definition of success and tailoring the best Aurecon team across markets, expertise and locations to engineer that success.

Oil and Gas Property Resources Transport Water

We look forward to partnering with you to achieve your goals. Your success is our success. Aurecon South Africa (Pty) Ltd is a certified Level 2 BBBEE contributor. For more information contact T +27 12 427 2000 E aurecon@aurecongroup.com

Aurecon Advert.indd 1

2014

30-Jan-14 8:40:39 AM


AURECON

COMPANY PROFILE

TONY MCCUSKER ACTING CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

VALUE PROPOSITION Aurecon provides engineering, management and specialist technical services for government and private sector clients globally. The company has been involved in projects that span multiple markets across Africa, Asia Pacific, the Middle East, and the Americas. Aurecon understands that success means different things to different people. The company’s business model gives it the ability to deliver its full range of services globally by creating the best teams for its clients, developing strong relationships and delivering innovative solutions that are built on a deep understanding of the markets in which it operates. Aurecon’s collaborative business model nurtures the development of market leading expertise. Ranked the Number One Company in South Africa in the Engineering Groups Sector by Topco Media’s Top500 Best Managed Companies publication in 2014, Aurecon’s success can be attributed to its shift beyond engineering – acknowledging that its staff and its relationships with its clients are at the very heart of its business. Aurecon’s values form the foundation of its commitment to client relationships and the contribution it makes to the communities in which it operates.

www.aurecongroup.com

COMPANY INFORMATION Year founded: 2009 Founding members: Africon 1951, Connell Wagner 1934, Ninham Shand 1932 Employees: >7 500 employees worldwide Branches: Offices in over 26 countries Memberships: Consulting Engineers South Africa (CESA), Association of Consulting Engineers Australia (ACEA) CONTRACTS & AWARDS

• Three CESA Aon Engineering Excellence Awards in 2013 •  South African Institution of Civil Engineering (SAICE) Award for the Dr Chota Motala Interchange upgrade in 2013 •  Four South African Property Association (SAPOA) Innovative Excellence Awards in 2013 • Three Retail Design and Development Awards in 2013 • 2013 Institute of Risk Management South Africa (IRMSA) Award in the Environmental Initiative category • Three Diamond Arrow Awards from the Professional Management Review Africa (PMR Africa) journal in 2013

• Three Golden Arrow Awards from the PMR Africa journal in 2013 • Number One Company in South Africa in the Engineering Groups Sector according to the Top500 Best Managed Companies publication for the seventh consecutive year in 2014 TRAINING, EMPOWERMENT & CSI Training programmes: Comprehensive skills development and mentorship programmes Empowerment initiatives: Growing black enterprises through targeted enterprise development initiatives CSI initiatives: Aurecon Cares is an on-going programme which aims to encourage all staff to embrace a philosophy of giving back to the communities in which we operate through various outreaches like old age homes, hospitals, rural schools, child care centres, etc. EMPOWERMENT STATUS BEE contribution rating: Aurecon has been verified as a Level 2 contributor to B-BBEE

CONTACT INFORMATION Acting Chief Executive Officer:

Tony McCusker Chairperson:

Teddy Daka (Global)

Managing Director:

Albert Geldenhuys (General Manager South Africa) Chief Financial Officer:

Fanus le Roux (Africa and Middle East)

Marketing and Communications Manager:

Jeff Isaacson (Africa and Middle East) Human Resources Manager:

Swarna Bhargava (Africa and Middle East) Physical address:

Aurecon Centre, Lynnwood Bridge Office Park, 4 Daventry Street Lynnwood Manor, Tshwane 0081 Postal address:

PO Box 74381, Lynnwood Ridge 0040

Telephone: +27 (0)12 427 2000

Fax: 086 556 0521 Email: aurecon@aurecongroup.com Website: www.aurecongroup.com

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TERTIARY TRIUMPHS By Elizabeth Fletcher

According to the Times Higher Education (THE) world university rankings, five South African universities have made it onto the list of the top 100 institutions in emerging economies THE assessed more than 700 universities in the five BRICS countries: Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa – and 17 other countries that the FTSE Global Equity Index classifies as emerging economies. The five South African institutions in the top 100 are the University of Cape Town (at number three), the University of the Witwatersrand (15), Stellenbosch University (21), the University of KwaZulu-Natal (45), and the University of Pretoria (78). While only three South African universities made it into the THE global rankings (UCT at number 126, Wits in the 226-250 bracket, and Stellenbosch at 301-350),

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EDUCATION

FEATURE

RANKINGS RESERVATIONS In a recent interview with the Mail & Guardian, Sean Muller, an Economics lecturer at UCT commented, “I don't think we in South Africa should pay too much attention to such rankings. They're crude and inaccurate measures of what's going on at our universities and, particularly, of what's important in our higher education systems. For instance, does the heavy weighting such rankings give to reputation adequately capture the importance to us of undergraduate teaching quality?" Muller went on to acknowledge that while rankings do appeal to university managers, we should not allow rankings to dictate development goals for universities. "Where that can become dangerous is when they change their institutions to align them with criteria that global rankings promote." How can one gain insight into these institutions without relying on ratings studies? It will take more time and effort than glancing at a list, but digging into information about a potential university is invaluable for a fuller impression of the institution. WAYS TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT A UNIVERSITY INCLUDE:

Quacquarelli Symonds included five South African universities in their rival rankings, the QS World University Rankings:

University

South Africa

Global

UCT

1

145

WITS

2

Stellenbosch

3

Pretoria

4

471-480

UKZN

5

501-550

313

387

According to THE Editor, Phil Baty, their annual rankings use 13 separate performance indicators to examine a university's strengths against all its core missions – teaching, research, knowledge transfer and international outlook. Although delighted with the acknowledgement, some universities also felt compelled to highlight the need to critically assess the criteria used in various global rankings in the light of South Africa's specific national priorities.

Visiting the campus and education expos where possible

Researching faculties of interest and their lecturers

Looking up their websites and social media presences

Talking to recent alumni

Exploring news and achievements

What universities choose to highlight will give you a sense of their strengths, ethos and what’s happening on the ground. The following are some of the recent top achievements from five South African universities: THE SPACE RACE Cape Peninsula University of Technology (CPUT) students have created South Africa's first CubeSat nano-satellite. The ZACUBE-1 made history late last year when it was launched atop an RS-2OB rocket (Dnepr) at the Yasny base in Russia. Funded by the Department of Science and Technology, the satellite was designed and built by postgraduate students at the French South African Institute of Technology (F'SATI) at CPUT. Running on the same amount of the power as a five-watt bulb, ZACUBE-1 contains 4 000 electronic components and one computer, and took 30 000 combined hours of manpower to build. It carries a high-frequency beacon that will be used to study radio waves in the ionosphere, providing valuable

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space weather data to the South African National Space Agency (SANSA) Space Science Directorate. It will orbit Earth up to 15 times a day at an altitude of 600km and the Ground Control Station at CPUT’s Bellville Campus will track the satellite, collect the data, and command it.

GOING GREEN

A national competition by the DST invited high school learners to get involved in South Africa's space programme by giving the cube satellite a truly African name. The winning entry was the choice of Chachane Kgothalang, a grade 9 learner from Matatiele in the Eastern Cape who named the satellite “Tshepiso” meaning “a promise” in Tswana.

Located at their Second Avenue Campus in Summerstrand and due to open this year, NMMU’s new R116 million Business School was developed by the university’s infrastructure planning office in line with its vision towards a sustainable future. Architect and NMMU graduate, Nikhil Tricam worked as part of the design team from The Workplace Architects who won the two-stage national competition to determine the project team and design direction of the new building.

Measuring only 10x10x10cm and weighing 1.2kg, this satellite is about 100 times smaller than Sputnik 1, the first satellite launched into space in 1957. CubeSats were originally developed in 1999 by California Polytechnic State University and Stanford University in the United States to help universities worldwide perform space science and exploration. The Director of F'SATI, Proffessor Robert van Zyl, believes that the strength of the satellite programme is its use of CubeSats as technology platforms for practical, hands-on skills training and applied research. "This approach offers students a unique learning experience and prepares them very well to participate in the South African space industry," he says. The team at CPUT is already busy developing ZACUBE-2, which will be three times larger than their first successful nano-satellite.

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University ( NMMU) Business School is South Africa’s first public building to be awarded the Green Building Council of South Africa prestigious accreditation.

“It's a significant landmark for NMMU, as it signals a new direction of thinking for them. That is to say that the institution as a whole is adopting an ethical, sustainable growth and development pattern,” says Tricam. The new 5 500m² building uses green materials, such as low-VOC paints, “smart” glass, and timber that is approved by the Forestry Stewardship Council (an international body promoting the sustainable management of forests). The smart glass, for example, assists in reducing unnecessary heat gain, keeping lecture rooms and offices naturally cooler. From an energy and water savings perspective, it has been estimated that the new building will use 60 percent less energy than a building of similar size and design, and 75 percent less water due to low flow fittings, the use of

air-cooled chillers, water-wise irrigation, and six 5 000m³ rainwater harvesting tanks for use in the toilets. The protected courtyard also allows for increased day lighting into the four-wing building. Mechanical engineers will ensure that the new systems operate at peak efficiency during the first year to achieve optimum performance since the building will be used on a daily basis by more than 1 000 people, both during the day and at evening classes. RELENTLESS RESEARCH Stellenbosch University is rated as South Africa’s most productive research intuition. The university has the highest output of research articles in peerreviewed publications per academic staff member in the country. It has become the first university in South Africa to exceed the three weighted research output units per permanent academic staff member, and in the process exceeded its previous record when it generated a total of 2 169 publication units for 2013. Recent data confirms Stellenbosch University’s standing as the most researchproductive academic institution at the national level for the sixth consecutive year. The institution now has 14 A-rated researchers across the fields of human and social sciences, science, engineering and agrisciences and medicine, and health sciences. An A-rated scientist is regarded as a world leader in his or her field of expertise. The university now has 347 rated researchers – the second highest number of rated researchers in the country.


EDUCATION

CENTRE OF EXCELLENCE Wits University has been awarded a new Centre of Excellence (CoE) in Mathematical and Statistical Sciences. The Department of Science and Technology (DST) and the National Research Foundation (NRF) have awarded the Centre, which will focus on two themes reflecting the pure and applied nature of the mathematical sciences. These themes are: Mathematics paradigms for the Earth and the environment, and mathematical, statistical, and computational modelling of the Earth and the environment.

The aim of the CoEs is to promote collaborative research, and provide support and training in priority research areas. Minister of Science and Technology, Derek Hanekom, says, “The new CoEs will contribute to South Africa's knowledge-generation capacity, increase the number of world-class researchers, and attract and retain research excellence.” GLOBETROTTERS Five of the eleven South Africans selected for this year's Rhodes Scholarships were UCT students.

The University is also currently in negotiations for another new CoE in Child Development and Livelihoods, in collaboration with the University of KwaZulu-Natal (UKZN). This centre will focus on increasing South Africa’s understanding of child development and livelihood challenges in the first 1 000 days, and on finding costeffective interventions to overcome these challenges to ensure that children are given a better start in life.

Outstanding intellect, character, leadership, and a commitment to service are the qualities that have won these graduates the prestigious Rhodes Scholarship to conduct postgraduate study at the University of Oxford.

“Wits, as a leading research university on the continent, is pleased to be involved in two new Centres of Excellence, in mathematical and statistical sciences, and child Development and livelihoods,” says Wits Vice-Chancellor and Principal, Professor Adam Habib. “We welcome the enabling research environment provided by these Centres, and the fact that they facilitate continued scientific collaboration with other universities in the country.”

Established in 1903 under the will of Cecil Rhodes, Rhodes Scholars are chosen for their potential to become leaders for the world's future able to fight the world's fight and promote international understanding and peace.

A total of 83 scholars have been selected from across the globe for one of the oldest and most prestigious international graduate scholarship programmes in the world.

FINDING THE BALANCE Tertiary education cultivates growth in life experience as much as it does in academic achievement. These factors feed into one another, and choosing an institution with an atmosphere that puts a student at ease

FEATURE

can often help facilitate discipline, creativity and intellectual development. While it can be argued that university rankings provide a skewed representation of an institution – an arbitrary calculation based on an algorithm rather than an individual’s needs – they do give a sense of the perceived value of a qualification from that institution in an international context. This is important for further studies abroad and international certification. There are ways of using university rankings in a way that is more specific to a student’s needs. For instance, one could assess an institution through several different rankings, understanding the criteria of each. Many of the rankings (including the THE and QS systems) now rank universities within faculties so it’s possible to focus on criteria more relevant to the individual student. The scope of these rankings is also growing. For instance, there is one that ranks universities around the world in terms of their environmental sustainability: the GreenMetric World University Ranking compiled by the University of Indonesia. By identifying areas of interest, conducting your own research into the institutions and using rankings with an awareness of how they were developed, one can gain a more thorough understanding of everything that a potential university has to offer in both a national and global context


brandinc/3993/e

“When you reach the top, keep climbing” - Ancient Proverb To achieve excellence you need to be constantly searching for a new foothold, anchor or mantle that will help you reach the next summit. You need to be innovative, thoughtful, progressive and able to adapt to an ever-changing environment. That’s why Nashua has moved into Managed Document Services, a move that gives Nashua’s customers a marked advantage in terms of improving their business efficiency and streamlining their document workflow.

If you’re looking to reach new heights, look to Nashua. Visit www.nashua.co.za/services, or email us: solutions@nashua.co.za /NashuaLTD

@nashuasolutions


NASHUA OFFICE AUTOMATION GROUP COMPANY PROFILE

DAVE HALLAS ACTING CEO

VALUE PROPOSITION Nashua Limited is a leading provider of managed document solutions (MDS) and digital office automation printing products. First established in 1973, Nashua Limited has constantly been an innovation thought leader in the office automation industry. Nashua Limited’s MDS approach analyses processes and document workflow in organisations. Working with the company can revolutionise the way organisations manage their data. Nashua’s Solutions Consultants aim to implement workflow and data management solutions that reduce complexity and increase operational cost saving, thus improving a company’s overall effectiveness. As the world’s largest independent distributor of Ricoh printing equipment, Nashua Limited is able to provide customers with state-of-the-art technology from a globally-recognised and trusted source. Nashua Limited endeavours to provide its customers with peace of mind by offering comprehensive and innovative hardware and software business solutions such as digital storage, variable data printing, managed print services and managed document services. The company’s fully comprehensive range of products are agile and flexible enough to fit into any company’s operations, and ensures that its pay-off line, “Saving you time. Saving you money. Putting you first”, is a reality for customers.

www.nashua.co.za

COMPANY INFORMATION COMPANY HISTORY Year founded: 1973 Founding members: Founded by the Nashua Corporation Employees: 144 people are employed at Nashua Limited’s head office Branches: Over 40 franchises with 60 offices located nationwide BUSINESS & FINANCE Operating profit: R363 million Holding company: Reunert TRAINING & CSI Empowerment initiatives: Nashua Kopano CSI initiatives: Nashua Children’s Charity Foundation (NCCF)

EMPOWERMENT STATUS Black empowerment level – shareholding (%): 25.1%-50% black shareholding Gender empowerment level – shareholding (%): 5%-25% female shareholding Black empowerment level – executive directors/senior management (%): 5%-25% black executive directors Gender empowerment level – executive directors/senior management (%): 5%-25% female executive directors Black empowerment – total staff (%): 25.1%-50% black staff Gender empowerment – total staff (%): 5%-25% female staff What is your BEE contribution level? Level 4 B-BBEE rating by EMPOWERDEX

CONTACT INFORMATION

Financial Director: Robin Botha Marketing and Communications Manager: Jessica Midlane Sales Manager: Peter Vieira and Michael Powell Human Resources Director: Lindelwe Kunene Physical address: Woodmead North Office Park 54 Maxwell Drive Woodmead, Sandton Postal address: PO Box 39524 Bramley, 2018 Telephone: 011 232 8000 Website: www.nashua.co.za

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SOUTH AFRICAN FOOD SECTOR CAUGHT IN LOW GROWTH CYCLE The low economic growth environment in South Africa is putting local food value chains under increasing pressure, according to Herman Marais, Managing Partner at Agri-Vie, a food and agribusiness private equity investment fund. He says that the prices of essential goods and services are escalating at a higher rate than consumers are earning, which is resulting in decreased consumer spending power and is having a negative impact on the retail and food processing sector, as well as farmers. DECREASED SPENDING POWER Marais says that most South African consumers are under pressure financially, struggling to make ends meet. “Consumer’s living standards are declining as their spending power decreases, and the prices of essential goods and services are escalating at a higher rate than consumer earnings, resulting in decreased affordability for luxury items and increased price comparison behaviour.” He adds that retailers are feeling the impact of dwindling consumer spending power. “The average grocery trolley in the supermarket cost just over R400 in December 2013, which was up by only 1.6 percent from the previous period. This indicates that consumers are cutting back, as this increase is more than four percentage points below the inflation rate.Marais says that food processors are being pressurised by price resistance at retail level, with labour and energy costs rising dramatically in the recent past. “Traditionally, the South African food manufacturing sector, like the rest of manufacturing in SA, was to a large extent built on the basis of competitively

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priced energy (electricity) and labour costs, however, South Africa’s increased labour and energy costs have become less competitive in comparison to global peers.” COST AFFECTING COMPETITIVENESS He says that so far this has resulted in a structural change for the worse within the food manufacturing sector. He refers to the results of the Deloitte 2013 Manufacturing Competitiveness survey for South Africa, which suggests that South Africa’s competitiveness ranking will decline over the next five years. “Cost and availability of labour and materials are the highest rated factors by South African manufacturers contributing towards competitiveness. Unit labour costs in the manufacturing sector rose by an average of 5.8 percent per year from 1998 to 2012. Over the same period, unit labour costs in many European countries have fallen due to productivity gains. “In addition, man-days lost to a surge in industrial action since 2012, particularly in the mining, agricultural, and transport sectors, are likely to have had a negative impact on manufacturing productivity.” Furthermore, the survey revealed that for much of the past three decades, electricity prices in South Africa have been low and declining (in real terms). From 2008, however, the trend in real electricity prices took a dramatic turn and increased by 78 percent between 2008 and 2011. The sharp and sudden increase in energy costs, coupled with an unfavourable economic climate, put many food manufacturers under nearfatal pressure.


FOOD SECTOR

The all Farm Requisites Price Index (FRPI), which is the official measure of the increases in prices of farming inputs, has more than doubled in the period since 2005, while the PPI (Producer Price Index) has experienced a materially smaller increase. The input costs that have mainly contributed to this increase have been fertilizers, herbicides, pesticides, energy and equipment, to name but a few. Therefore farmers, who by nature stand at the back of the local food value chain are currently in the weakest position as they bear the brunt of rises in input costs while having little leeway to pass on higher prices to food processors and retailers.

Strategies to contend and overcome these challenges include the following key elements:  ocusing on quality as well as reliable delivery: These F are characteristics that set thriving companies apart from average companies.  ontinuous improvement programmes to streamline C business processes: An unrelenting focus on costefficiencies through constantly questioning each aspect of the business pays rich dividends  ertical integration: Forwards and backwards vertical V integration create strong supply chains with greater efficiencies as well as cost advantages  alue chain partnerships: Experience has shown that V participants in business value chains that adopt a broader perspective across the entire food value chain ultimately fare better than those concentrating only on their narrow self-interest  ew markets: While the South African market for food N products remains in a low growth environment, the same applies to many of South Africa’s traditional export markets in Europe, where recovery is still at a very early, fragile stage. However, the economies of many Sub-Saharan countries North of South Africa are growing consistently at between six and seven percent annually, which is being fuelled by rapid urbanisation and a rising middle class. This  creates opportunity for food value chains originating in South Africa to enter new, high growth markets either through exporting or through setting up operations in-country. Focus on sustainability: Global research into corporate performance confirms that a focus on environmentally and socially sustainable business leads to superior financial performance in the longer run while also being good for people and the planet.

FEATURE

An unrelenting focus on cost-efficiencies through constantly questioning each aspect of the business pays rich dividends


*Voted Africa’s Leading Meetings and Conference Centre 12 times at the World Travel Awards.


DURBAN ICC

COMPANY PROFILE

JULIE-MAY ELLINGSON CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

VALUE PROPOSITION Opened by former president Nelson Mandela in 1997, the Durban International Convention Centre (ICC) was South Africa’s first International Convention Centre and has played a pioneering role in attracting international events to its shores since its inception.This world-class facility, renowned for its high standards of service excellence, has successfully staged some the world’s most prestigious and complex events. This multi-award winning venue has been voted Africa’s Leading Meetings and Conference Centre by the World Travel Awards no fewer than 12 times since 2001. It has been rated amongst the World’s Top 20 convention centres by the International Association of Congress Centres (AIPC). The Durban ICC offers the largest flat floor, column-free multi-purpose event space in Africa and service excellence is at the heart-beat of the Durban ICC team. The Durban ICC offers full technical capacity for live broadcasts as well as house lighting suitable for production filming.The business centre offers an internet café, as well as banking, foreign exchange facilities and medical services.

www.icc.co.za

The Durban ICC delivers a five-star events and meeting experience, with innovative solutions geared to delivering on client’s expectations in a sustainable and proudly African way. Little wonder then, that the Durban ICC is where the world meets Africa.

COMPANY INFORMATION COMPANY STATISTICS / DEMOGRAPHICS / HISTORY Year founded: 1997 Employees: 150 permanent employees, 300500 temporary employees Trade affiliations: Durban KwaZulu-Natal Convention Bureau, South African National Convention Bureau and the Tourism Grading Council of South Africa Memberships: International Congress and Convention Association, International Association of Convention Centres, Global Association of the Exhibition Industry (UFI), Southern African Association for the Conference Industry (SAACI). Strategic partnerships: Global Congress Centre Alliance BUSINESS & FINANCE Turnover: R157-million Operating profit: R37-million Net profit: R36-million Financial year-end: 30 June ECONOMIC IMPACT Durban ICC is a catalyst for economic development in the KwaZulu-Natal. In the 2013 financial year, the company contributed R2.94billion to South Africa’s GDP and R2.73-billion to the KZN GGP.

INDUSTRIAL STANDARDS ISO9001 – Quality Management; ISO14001 – Environmental Responsibility; ISO22000 – Food Safety; SANS10330 HACCP – Food Safety; 5-Star Grading - Tourism Grading Council of South Africa CONTRACTS & AWARDS Recent awards: Africa’s Leading Meetings and Conference Centre – World Travel Awards 2013, Africa’s Best Meetings and Conference Centre – Business Destinations Travel Awards 2013 Recent major contracts: Congress of the International Union of Architects 2014, World Medical Association Congress 2014, World Routes Development Forum 2015, International AIDS Conference 2016 TRAINING & CSI Durban ICC offers student and graduate programmes in the hospitality and tourism disciplines. CSI initiatives: Support the IBV/Durban ICC Children’s Day, Durban Children’s Home, Ikusasa School of Cooking

CONTACT INFORMATION

Finance Director: Melanie Rambally Operations Director: Nicolette Elia-Beissel Marketing Sales and Events Director: Mala Dorasamy Executive Chef: John Moatshe Physical address: Inkosi Albert Luthuli ICC Complex 45 Bram Fischer Road Durban 4001 Postal address: PO Box 155 Durban 4000 Telephone: +27 (0)31 360 1000 Fax: +27 (0)31 360 1005 Email: sales@icc.co.za Website: www.icc.co.za

EMPOWERMENT STATUS Level 3 - Izikhulu B-BBEE ratings T O P 5 0 0 / 6 th E D I T I O N

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GONE CONFERENCING

Summits, conferences, and indabas are great networking tools and offer industry leaders the chance to exchange valuable knowledge and information about products and services in their sector. The following is a comprehensive list of all major conferences scheduled in South Africa for the rest of 2014, from www.southafrica.info, so you can plan accordingly.

AUGUST 2014 Ethics in Multi-Disciplinary Health Care Ruslamere Conference Centre, Durbanville 2 August

 he International World Congress of T Architects (UIA) 2014) Conference International Convention Centre, Durban 4-9 August

 he SAVCA-GIBS Foundation Programme T for Private Equity Gordon Institute of Business Science (Gibs) Campus Illovo, Johannesburg 6-8 August

Institute for Mindfulness South Africa Conference Science and Application in an Emerging Society STIAS Conference Centre, Stellenbosch 4-6 September

NOSHCON 2014

Champagne Sports Resort, Winterton 9–12 September

 ASRIM 2014: 8th Annual Congress of the S South African Society for Research in Music University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 12-14 September

Total Plant Management

Hyatt Regency, Johannesburg 12-13 August

Crowne Plaza Hotel and Resorts The Rosebank, Johannesburg 15-17 September

 AERA 2014: South African Education S Research Association

 9th World Small Animal Veterinary 3 Association Congress

Supply Chain Africa Summit

Researching Education: Future Directions Innovation Centre, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 13-15 August

Affordable Housing Africa

African Pride 15 on Orange Hotel, Cape Town 18-20 August

The Great African Vet Adventure International Convention Centre, Cape Town 16-19 September

Urology Congress 2014

The Bay Hotel, Camps Bay, Cape Town 18-21 September

7th World Congress for Psychotherapy Psychotherapy Meets Africa International Convention Centre, Durban 25-29 August

 erious Games to the Rescue: 1st S International Conference on Serious Games Quest Conference Estate, Vanderbijlpark 27-29 August

SEPTEMBER 2014 Safeguarding Conference 2014 Keeping Children Safe Vineyard Hotel and Spa, Cape Town 3-5 September

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 outhern African HIV Clincians Society 2nd S Biennial Conference International Convention Centre, Cape Town 24-27 September

 th Annual Teaching & Learning Higher Education 8 Conference Edgewood Campus, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Pinetown 25-27 September


CONFERENCES

OCTOBER 2014  014 International Conference on Arts, Culture, 2 Heritage, and the National Development Plan: Vision for 2030 Faculty of Arts Tshwane University of Technology 1-3 October

2014 Joburg Indaba

Investing in Resources and Mining in Africa The Inanda Club, Johannesburg 8-10 October

Results-Based Accountability (RBA) Summit Hyatt Regency, Rosebank, Johannesburg 8-10 October



Planning Africa 2014: South African Planning Institute Conference Making Great Places International Convention Centre, Durban 19-22 October

The Inaugural Maendleleo Africa Conference on Growth and Harmonious Development

Managing Inclusive Growth and Harmonious Development in Africa Gauteng Conference Centre, Johannesburg 20-25 October

Envass Environmental Conference 2014 Indundla Game Lodge, Pretoria 22-24 October

FEATURE

Nickel Processing '14 Vineyard Hotel, Cape Town 24-25 November

International Conference on Construction Materials and Structures School of Tourism and Hospitality, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 24-26 November

 th International Conference on Engineering, 5 Project, and Production Management Proteas Marine Hotel, Port Elizabeth 26-28 November

DECEMBER 2014  irst Biennial Scientific Conference on Medicines F Regulation in Africa: Building Partnerships for Sustainable Capacity Development in Medicines Regulation in Africa Birchwood Hotel, Johannesburg 2-3 December

International Conference on Sustainable Development 2014 Protea Hotel Water Front, Richards Bay 2-3 December

ESD – Experts in Stone Disease Conference The Westin, Cape Town 10-13 December

Sports & Events Tourism Exchange International Convention Centre, Durban 28-30 October

NOVEMBER 2014 9th International Respiratory Syncytial

Virus Symposium

Spier Wine Estate, Stellenbosch 9-13 November

Process Mineralogy '14 Vineyard Hotel, Cape Town 17-19 November

e-Skills 2014 Conference

University of Cape Town, Cape Town 17-21 November

Precious Metals '14

Vineyard Hotel, Cape Town 20-21 November

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Experience Extraordinary There’s a place where meetings, conferences and corporate events are transformed from ordinary gatherings into extraordinary experiences. A destination, at the tip of the mighty African continent, where two oceans meet in the shadow of one of earth’s seven natural wonders. Where creativity comes to life, the unforgettable is experienced, and the impressions created last a lifetime. This place is Cape Town International Convention Centre. And to experience it is to experience extraordinary.

To transform your special event into an extraordinary experience contact CTICC: +27 21 410 5000 sales@cticc.co.za www.cticc.co.za


CTICC

COMPANY PROFILE

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER RASHID TOEFY

TRANSFORMING EVENTS INTO EXPERIENCES For those looking to host a typical meeting or old-fashioned conference, any venue will probably suffice. However, memorable events are never achieved by the plain and ordinary. To attain the results you desire from your meeting, conference or convention, and generate the return on investment you deserve, you need to create a truly unforgettable experience. The Cape Town International Convention Centre (CTICC) is the place to do just that. Situated at the foot of one of the world’s most iconic mountains, in the heart of South Africa’s vibrant and welcoming Mother City, the CTICC’s undeniable charm is exceeded only by its professionalism and versatility. From its bright and airy double volume public gathering spaces and highly advanced technology to its uniquely scrumptious Afro-global cuisine and legendary attention to service excellence, every detail is meticulously attended to. On-site five-star accommodation completes the appealing picture of absolute convenience and extraordinary service; while easy access to Cape Town’s world-famous visitor attractions means the CTICC is far more than a venue, it’s a destination.

www.cticc.co.za

So, if you’re ready to transform your meetings into business-building moments, convert your conferences into conversation pieces, or host conventions that are anything but conventional, make CTICC your convention centre of choice.

COMPANY INFORMATION COMPANY HISTORY Year founded: Founded in 1999, Cape Town International Convention Centre Company SOC Ltd (Convenco) owns and manages CTICC. It is jointly owned by the City of Cape Town (50.2 percent shareholding), Provincial Government of the Western Cape (25.1 percent shareholding), and SunWest International (Pty) Ltd (24.7 percent shareholding) Memberships • Cape Chamber of Commerce and Industry • Federated Hospitality Association of Southern Africa (Fedhasa) • Global Association of the Exhibition Industry (UF) • International Association of Congress Centres (AIPC) • International Congress and Convention Association (ICCA) BUSINESS AND FINANCE Contributed R2.99-billion to South Africa’s GDP in 2012/2013 INDUSTRIAL STANDARDS In 2009, CTICC was the first convention centre in Africa, and the second in the world, to obtain three management system

certifications simultaneously. CTICC was awarded the following certifications: ISO 9001 – Quality Management ISO 14001 – Environmental Management OHSAS 18001 – Occupational Health and Safety; HACCP (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points) Food Safety RECENT AWARDS • The Global Association Of The Exhibition Industry (UFI) Award For The Best Sustainability Reporting • The EXSA Award For The Best Exhibition Venue Of The Year CSI INITIATIVES: CTICC has social and environmental considerations at its core. This is achieved through the centre’s NOW (Nurture Our World) Team. The CTICC’s four community partners are the Haven Night Shelter Welfare Organisation, Foundation for Alcohol Related Research (FARR), Abalimi Bezekhaya and Harvest of Hope, and the Mitchell’s Plain School of Skills

CONTACT INFORMATION National Business Development Manager: Lindy Geyer National Business Development Manager: Adele De Wet Physical address:

Convention Square 1 Lower Long Street Cape Town 8000 Postal address:

PO Box 8120 Roggebaai Cape Town 8012

Telephone: +27 21 410 5000 Email: info@cticc.co.za Website: www.cticc.co.za Twitter: @CTICC_Official Facebook: Facebook.com/CTICC

EMPOWERMENT STATUS Level 2 - B-BBEE contributor by Empowerdex

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SIZE US UP Growth is an interesting concept. You see, while we may be the largest property company in the country, we don’t see ourselves as a one-size-fits-all business. With a national footprint of retail, office and industrial properties, we make space for business to boom in prime locations countrywide. Yet even the biggest of companies can’t afford to forget about the little things. Large or small, we pinpoint the needs of all our clients, and offer personal service to help them spread their wings. Because size only matters if it makes a big difference.

It’s a Go | GP-Top500 | 2448

It’s a Go | GP-CM | 2063

FOR MORE DETAILS, CALL 011 944 6249 OR VISIT WWW.GROWTHPOINT.CO.ZA


GROWTHPOINT

COMPANY ADVERTORIAL

The Place, Office Sector

The mission of Growthpoint is to be the leading South African property company, consistently delivering superior value to all stakeholders, driven by our passion for property and our commitment to our core values. Growthpoint is included in the JSE SRI (Socially Responsible Investment) Index for the fourth consecutive year. For the second consecutive year, the Investment Analysts Society (IAS) awarded Growthpoint with its Best Reporting and Communications Award in the Financial Services Sector. Growthpoint’s Property Point enterprise development project and its schools literacy programme, Growsmart, continue to receive international and industry recognition. Furthering sustainability, Growthpoint continues to find new ways to provide space to thrive for clients’ businesses. OUR SOUTH AFRICAN PROPERTY PORTFOLIO Retail: Growthpoint’s retail property portfolio includes 430 prime property assets valued in excess of R24-billion with nearly a million square metres of retail space located in 52 shopping centres throughout South Africa. On average, vacancies are at 3.7 percent and Growthpoint continues to renew over 80 percent of all leases. Office: The office sector continues to grow their R14.6-billion premier office portfolio by investing in prime office nodes, geographicallyspread across South Africa’s major metropolitan areas. These properties are substantially let to blue chip tenants at marketrelated rentals, with a low-risk lease expiry profile. The sector purchases premium sites and develops aesthetically-desirable, operationally-efficient and cost-effective, sustainable buildings. This portfolio is due to grow substantially over the next few months. Industrial: Growthpoint’s industrial portfolio is located in the major industrial zones in Johannesburg, Pretoria, Cape Town, Durban and Port Elizabeth. Vacancies remain low at three percent and the sector was again acknowledged for its quality development, winning the SAPOA Innovative Excellence Award for Industrial Property Development for the second consecutive year.

V&A Waterfront: Growthpoint owns 50 percent of the V&A Waterfront, and our investment is valued at R4.9-billion. The V&A Waterfront is a mixed-use property development around the historic Victoria and Alfred Basin, which formed Cape Town’s original harbour. This quality property and unique location is South Africa’s premier tourist destination attracting 21 million visitors yearly. A landmark South African asset, it is a major attraction with historic significance and heritage sites on a working harbour. Growthpoint Properties Australia (GOZ): GOZ comprises of 55 percent industrial properties and 45 percent office buildings – with the total number reaching 47 properties overall. The portfolio boasts a gross lettable area of 974, 351 m2 with a total value of AUS$1.8-billion (R17.4-billion), which are spread throughout Australia. OUR COMMITMENT TO SUSTAINABILITY Most buildings are designed to Green Building Council of South Africa (GBCSA) and four-star Green Star rating specifications; meaning that the innovative design not only creates a stimulating working environment that reduces building utility costs, but also encourages the use of sustainable alternatives for tenants. Growthpoint has received several awards for its efforts in sustainable business practices including the SAPOA (South African Property Owners Association) Innovative Excellence Awards for Green Development, and the 2013 Nedbank Capital Sustainable Business Award. Growthpoint was also shortlisted for the Innovation Award at the 2013 African Legal Awards for its “Green Lease”. This shared cost of saving achieved through green initiatives between building occupant and owner will be used so even more resource-efficient operations can be achieved.

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MILLENNIALS It’s about more than the money

A new generation of employees is poised to reshape the workplace on a global scale.

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MILLENNIALS

FEATURE

“Certain characteristics attributed to millennials may be the result of their age; they are at a point in their lives where they do not have many responsibilities, and their priorities are likely to change as they grow older.” As the baby boomer generation enters the end phase of their working lives, the newest generation of workers, millennials, are entering the working world in vast numbers. This new generation, born between 1980 and 2000, are very different to their ‘generation X’ and ‘baby boomer’ predecessors; they have different career expectations and are motivated by different things. Considering the fact that by 2020 millennials will make up 50 percent of the global workforce, according to a PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) report Millennials at work: Reshaping the work space, it is critical that employers adapt their policies to attract and retain this influential generation of employees, poised to reshape the world of work.

MAKING A MILLENNIAL If you do a quick Google search for millennials, the terms that the search engine predicts are telling of the perceived characteristics of this generation: ‘millennials are lazy’; ‘millennials and technology’; ‘millennials and social media’; ’millennials rising’. There is the perception amongst baby boomers and generation x, as Google suggests, that, while millennials may be tech-savvy and intelligent, they lack motivation. Whether this stereotype is accurate or rather the result of a lack of understanding between generations is up for debate.

By Sarah Gurney

Certain characteristics attributed to millennials may be the result of their age; they are at a point in their lives where they do not have many responsibilities, and their priorities are likely to change as they grow older. However, it is ultimately up to employers to ensure that millennials are judged on performance rather than preconceptions.

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According to a worldwide survey conducted by PwC, aimed at providing insights into the career expectations and values of recent graduates entering the workplace, what sets millennials apart is their affinity with the digital world. The survey report, explains that millennials have grown up with broadband, smartphones, laptops, and social media being the norm and expect instant access to information. According to the report, this is the first generation to enter the workplace with a better grasp of a key business tool than more senior workers - leading to prominent generational tensions. It is not simply their affinity with technology that defines this generation, however. They behave differently and are not motivated by the type of incentives that have typically been used to encourage productivity and loyalty from previous generations of workers. They are an ambitious and optimistic generation who have been brought up to believe that they can succeed against the odds, and they expect to progress quickly along their chosen career path. Amanda Sevasti, Head of Social Media at Native VML – one of the leading digital agencies in South Africa believes that one of the defining characteristics of millennials is their drive. “Millennials are motivated, interested, and keen,” she says, “and the older generations don’t always know quite how to deal with that. They want to learn by being involved in things that aren’t strictly part of their job description.” A wise move, Sevasti explains, because the job market is changing so rapidly. The new generation of employees will have a lot more jobs over the course of their careers than previous generations. “My father would probably be horrified at the number of jobs I’ve had already,” she says. “I watched my parents in their careers – they followed the rules and made a living. Their jobs made them comfortable, but not happy or inspired.” This is another key attribute that sets the younger generation apart, according to the PwC survey – for millennials, money isn’t everything. While they value a decent

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salary, factors such as opportunities for career progression, training/development programmes and a healthy work/life balance are just as, if not more, appealing. While 44 percent of those questioned in the PwC survey said that competitive wages/financial incentives made an employer more attractive, 52 percent stated that opportunities for progression were the biggest draw card when choosing an employer. Google is correct, it seems; millennials are indeed rising. They expect to climb the career ladder rapidly. They’d like it if that process involved overseas travel. They’d like to work for a company with values they admire. Corporate social responsibility means something to them. What’s more – and this is what employers need to pay attention to – if millennials feel that these things are not being offered by their current employer, they are likely to look elsewhere for an employer who does meet these needs. Gone are the days where new graduates find a job and settle into it for the next 40 years. Employers not only have to look at new ways to attract millennials – they have to look at how to retain them too.

MIND THE GENERATIONAL GAP While millennials enter the working world in large numbers, their generation-x and baby boomer counterparts are still very much a part of the workplace culture they helped create. Thus, while it is crucial for employers to adapt and streamline their management policies to cater for millennials, they need to ensure that older generations are still taken into account when it comes to company culture, and that a generational balance is maintained. The tension between generations is greatest, Sevasti believes, when younger generations are not trusted with projects. “Rather than giving millennials tasks with no responsibility, they need to be given something they can own,” she advises.

“They need to be guided and helped, but, at the end of the day, if the project is successful, they should be given the kudos. And vice versa, if the project goes wrong. The biggest mistake that management can make in not understanding millennials is to treat them like children.” For the most part, millennials enjoy working with their more experienced counterparts. According to PwC’s survey, 76 percent of respondents indicated that they are happy working alongside older, senior management, and only four percent disagreed. However these millennials were aware of the generational tensions and the antipathy which, commentators believe, predominantly comes from older generations. Thirty-eight percent of those questioned believe that senior management struggle to relate to younger employees and 34 percent felt that their personal drive could be intimidating to older co-workers. Interestingly, women (31 percent) were less likely to feel this way than men (38 percent). Given the rapid growth in numbers of millennial employees, bridging the gap between generations needs to be a priority for HR departments. A solution identified by PwC is a ‘reverse mentorship’ programme, where more senior employees are paired with younger ones in an effort to help the older generation understand the millennials’ perspective. The older generation learns about the latest workplace trends and about social media, while the younger generation is given a valuable glimpse into the world of management via top-level access. This in turn results in a reduced turnover rate. This reverse mentorship would be particularly valuable in Africa – a region where generational tensions are highest when it comes to the use of technology. Seventy-five percent of millennials in Africa felt that their use of technology at work was not always understood by older generations (as opposed to 65


MILLENNIALS

percent of respondents worldwide). Duncan Phillips, a South African millennial who currently works as a software developer at Amazon after a stint working for Facebook in San Francisco, believes that these tensions stem from differences of opinion in terms of priorities. “I'm sure the vast majority of the older generations don't care much for keeping up with the Kardashians on Twitter,” he says. “I can understand that a lot of technology these days is seen as noise for them, useless or irritating, and this is probably where the frustration lies - a difference of opinion in terms of how one's time should be spent.” Phillips believes that, when it comes to the generational gap, the biggest shift is from a conservative attitude to taking greater risks. “Our generation seems to be happy to take on more risk for more reward,” he says, “often working harder and longer in the hopes of moving up the ladder faster. My career expectations are that the job I have will keep me engaged and challenged, whilst allowing me to support the lifestyle that I would like to lead.”

ATTRACTING THE NEXT GENERATION OF TALENT A good place to start when it comes to understanding what appeals to millennials is to look at the companies considered pioneers in crafting an entirely new kind of company culture. An international example of such a company is Facebook. Having worked at their San Francisco office for a year, Phillips paints a picture of this new approach to company culture. “Facebook certainly challenges the previous generation’s approach to the office culture and have grown an incredible culture of their own,” he says. “For me, the big thing they do is to focus on making sure that their employees have everything they needed to do their jobs, including all the small things. Engineers have the freedom to explore interesting product ideas; managers aren't there to micro-manage, they are there to move your ideas forward. The

FEATURE

campus has incredible on-site facilities such as a gym, arcades, restaurants, and a sweet shop.

rigid work styles. Give them positive and helpful feedback in real time – and then stand back and watch them grow.

“The restaurants have become the new 'water cooler', and often some of the best ideas and concept projects are born from a group of people having lunch together. They manage to maintain that feeling that you're a community who are coming together to build something great,” Phillips explains.

Ultimately, employers need to understand millennials and plan ahead when it comes to new recruitment and management policies. With this understanding comes the acknowledgment that millennials may not stick around as long as previous generations. They are always looking for ways in which to advance their careers, which means that employers should expect them to move on, and plan accordingly.

Closer to home, Quirk Marketing Agency (based in Cape Town, Johannesburg and the United Kingdom) decided to stop talking about empowering their employees and actually do so in a meaningful way. They formulated a process that allows any employee to suggest ideas via a big notice board prominently displayed in the office, garner support for them, and then have their suggestions implemented (if they manage to gather enough support). If an idea gets the required 12 votes on the board, the person responsible for the idea writes a one-page proposal which is submitted to Quirk’s leadership team. If the idea is approved, it is displayed on the ‘ideas in motion’ section of the board, and, once implemented, under ‘it’s happening’. Ideas that have not been successful are displayed in the ‘graveyard’, along with the reason why they were not implemented. Furthermore, if the leadership team does not approve an idea, it can still be put to debate and voted on within the company. This vote can thus overturn the decision of the Quirk leadership. It’s all about democracy – giving people a platform where their ideas are heard in a transparent and real way. Employers need to shift focus in terms of the benefits offered to employees; to offer new opportunities for growth and development, ways for employees to work their way up the ladder faster if they are willing to earn it, and mentorship from more senior employees. Mix teams generationally. Let employees learn from one other and see things from new perspectives. Give millennials the freedom they crave to get the job done unconstrained by

WHAT DO MILLENNIALS WANT? It’s not all about the money for millennials. So what else is important to them? Fast progression: The opportunity to learn as much as they can in order to fast-track their careers.  lexibility: The freedom to work where F and how best suits them, as long as they get the work done.  work/life balance: They will work hard A when it counts, but millennials are aware that work is not the sum total of their existence.  ravel opportunities: Most millennials T would like their job to include some overseas work experience.  egular feedback and praise: Annual R performance reviews are just too infrequent for millennials. They prefer to know how they’re doing much more regularly, and how they can improve.  ommon values: Millennials look for C employers with corporate social responsibility values that match their own. D  emocracy: They like to feel like their opinions are heard.

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Progress is always beyond what you see.

Join the conversation


INTERNET SOLUTIONS

COMPANY PROFILE

SAKI MISSAIKOS MANAGING DIRECTOR

VALUE PROPOSITION Internet Solutions (IS) is a Pan-African telecommunications service provider to all organisations wishing to establish a presence on the African continent. The company has been providing innovative end-to-end telecom solutions and related services for more than 20 years. Today, IS is at the forefront of rapidly innovating internet protocol-based technologies to build solutions and services tailored to organisations across the African continent. IS is geared at providing services to large public and private sector organisations, small and medium-sized organisations, and the wholesale market. The company leads in the South African enterprise access at 28 percent market share, South African enterprise hosting services at 21 percent market share, and voice over internet protocol (VOIP) services at 24 percent market share. The company was awarded an i-ECS and an i-ECNS license in 2009 and has one of the largest VSAT (very small aperture terminal) MPLS (multiprotocol label switching) networks with over 3500 VSAT terminals across the continent with teleports in South Africa, Mozambique, Nigeria and Germany. As a wholly-owned subsidiary of Dimension Data and part of the NTT Group, IS has an expanded capability with 12 000m2 of data centre space across the African continent and is the largest provider of alternate last mile services in South Africa.

www.is.co.za

COMPANY INFORMATION COMPANY STATISTICS / DEMOGRAPHICS / HISTORY Year founded: 1993 Founding members: Ronnie Apteker, Philip Green, Tom McWalter, Alon Apteker, David Frankel Employees: 2 000 Memberships: Internet Service Providers’ Association (ISPA), Alliance for Affordable Internet, Business South Africa Strategic Partnerships: Cisco, Microsoft and Symantec and is the sole Symantec Hosted Services Partner for Africa.

Products/services offered: Communications, cloud, connectivity and carrier services

BUSINESS & FINANCE Subsidiaries: Antfarm, AlwaysOn, Synaq Holding company: Dimension Data Bank: Standard Bank Accountants: KPMG Current customer base: Large corporates, government, SME, global carriers Major accounts / key clients: Bidvest, Engen, BP, Mr Price, Sun International, Growthpoint, Life Healthcare, ER24, Murray & Roberts, Avenge, Independent Electoral Commission, ACSA

EMPOWERMENT STATUS Black empowerment level - shareholding (%): 25.1%-50% black shareholding Gender Empowerment Level – shareholding (%): 5%-25% female shareholding Black Empowerment Level - executive directors/senior management (%): >50.1% black executive directors Gender empowerment level – executive directors/senior management (%): 25.1%-50% female executive directors Black Empowerment - total staff (%): >50.1% black staff Gender empowerment – total staff (%): 25.1%-50% female staff

NATURE OF BUSINESS Description of activity: Provider of ICT solutions and services

CONTRACTS & AWARDS Industrial standards: ISO/IEC 20000 Information Technology – Service Management certification TRAINING & CSI CSI initiatives: IS Incudata Programme, Value-based leadership – Columba Leadership programme, Community Individual Development Association (CIDA) initiative

CONTACT INFORMATION

Chief Operating Officer: Julian Sunker Chief Technology Officer: Prenesh Padayachee Regulatory Executive: Siyabonga Madyibi Chief Solutions Officer: Sean Nourse Chief Sales and Marketing Officer: Tony Koutakis Human Resources Executive: Soraya Bagus Physical address: The Campus, 57 Sloane Street Bryanston, South Africa Postal address: Private Bag X163 Bryanston, 2021 Telephone: +27 11 575 1000 Fax: +27 576 1000 Email: info@is.co.za

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INTERVIEW

BIDVEST PROTEA COIN

PETRUS VAN NIEKERK Petrus took over the reins as CEO for Protea Coin in 2009 after having served as COO for two years. He has more than 15 years’ experience in the security industry, 13 of which have been in an executive capacity. What services do your company provide?

Name Petrus van Niekerk Title CEO Previous Portfolios Chief Operating Officer University University of South Africa (UNISA)/ University ofWitswatersrand Qualification BCompt and Articles/Executive

Bidvest Protea Coin provides tailor-made security solutions to the parastatal, industrial, retail, financial, mining, corporate and residential sectors accross South Africa, as well as certain African countries and the United Arab Emirates. The Group’s end-to-end offerings include cash management solutions (such as cash-in-transit and provision of high-tech cash acceptance devices), technical security, fencing solutions, physical guarding, investigations, security/risk consultancy, reaction and response services – all powered by sizable infrastructure and a vast footprint.

What would you attribute your companies Top500 ranking this year to? The level of direct customer interaction through effective management and operational tiers provides the platform for service with a difference. This service is reinforced by providing value-adding service delivery through an entrenched culture of customer-first. An organisational structure that is flexible and adaptable further allows personnel to successfully focus on the unique requirements and preferences of individual customers.

What do you see as the three key challenges for SA business in 2014? Challenges for businesses in South Africa would include the alignment of above inflation labour expectations with the ability of various industry sectors and consumers to absorb such knock-on effects. Secondly, the below-par performance of the greater economy sets the stage for intensified control over spending. Lastly, the delivery of a sustainable or improved yield amidst the current economic, political and inflationary landscape.

What are the key marketing trends you see emerging to drive the sector? To find cohesion and synergy between brand offering and the consumer expectation.

What is your position on doing business in Africa? Bidvest Protea Coin has, for a number of years, been rendering a service to countries in Africa. Service-level demands are high and unique in Africa resulting in a shotgun approach not succeeding. Strong partnerships in Africa alone are seldom the recipe for success on the continent.

What skills do you think leaders of the future are going to need? Most importantly, to be forward thinking in a rapidly and consistently changing world. There is often anticipation linked with the skill to be the pioneer and not the follower.

What does ethical business mean to you, and how have you realised that? If you do not stand for something then you do not stand for anything. Ethical business is all about delivering on the promise to all stakeholders, including your business and customers alike. Unethical business, on the other hand, is shortlived and unsustainable.

Where do you hope to expand / improve? Protea Coin are very excited to be a part of the Proudly Bidvest stable and the opportunities this offers a company in realising its full potential, not only in South Africa, but throughout the continent.

“To be the service provider of choice, be known and respected for our ability to always deliver security excellence”

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BIDVEST PROTEA COIN

COMPANY PROFILE

PA VAN NIEKERK CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

VALUE PROPOSITION The Protea Coin Group is a proud member of the Bidvest Group. The acquisition of Mvelaserve, including Protea Coin Group as a subsidiary, by Bidvest in 2013 created one of the most exciting developments within the South African security industry. This winning combination has been strengthened by the recent integration of Bidvest Magnum with Protea Coin Group. Together, this establishment now operates as a single brand, namely Bidvest Protea Coin. Bidvest Protea Coin is known and respected for its ability to provide an integrated and holistic security service that is tailored to the specific requirements of its customers. Bidvest Protea Coin operates nationally, as well as in certain African countries and United Arab Emirates. The Head Office is situated in Centurion, Gauteng, with a vastly-experienced, competent, and efficient team. Bidvest Protea Coin is structured to enable direct management control over each division, and to unlock synergies in each of its operations, allowing the company to provide integrated security solutions.

www.proteacoin.co.za

The Bidvest Protea Coin philosophy ensures security excellence, and is based on responsiveness to client needs through its reliance on suitably-trained and committed personnel, active day-to-day management involvement, and an individualised approach to every customer. The company is humbled by, once again, being awarded the accolade as the No. 1 company in the security sector for 2014. CONTACT INFORMATION

COMPANY INFORMATION COMPANY INFORMATION Employees: 17 769 in South Africa Head office: Centurion Branches: 136 national branch offices and various international offices, including Ghana and UAE Trade affiliations: Private Security Industry Regulatory Authority (PSIRA) Memberships: Security Industry Association, Security Association of South Africa, South African Intruder Detection Services Association, South African National Security Employees Association, Security Services Employers Organisation Quality Assurance: SABS, ISO 9001:2008: BUSINESS & FINANCE Turnover: >R2 billion Financial year-end: 30 June Market share: Manpower - 5 percent; Market - 7 – 10 percent Owner: Bidvest Ltd

TRAINING Gijima, an industry-leading training academy established in house, develops personnel to provide the best services possible, irrespective of the skills required by the market. The academy underpins the company’s dedication to service excellence. PCG provide in-house training in PSIRA Grades A-E, firearm competency, mining security, residential estate security, cashin-transit, tactical response, VIP protection, soft skills and management developmental training. EMPOWERMENT STATUS B-BBEE: Level 3 contributor Recognition level – 110 percent Procurement recognition level – 137.5 percent

Chairman: JM Taylor Chief Executive Officer PA van Niekerk Deputy Chief Executive Officer: TA Mashigo Chief Operating Officer: BS de Waal Chief Financial Officer: A Still Director: D Crichton Director: E Grobler Director: BA Gosai Director: NT Madisa Director: MB Selepe Director: TD Pitikoe Physical address: The Protea Coin Group 222 Witch Hazel Avenue Highveld Technopark Centurion South Africa Contact details: Telephone: +27 12 665 8000 Fax: +27 12 665 0042 National: 0861 80 8000 Email: info@proteacoin.co.za Website: www.proteacoin.co.za

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YOUR PARTNER IN LEADING FLEET MANAGEMENT SOLUTIONS

Flagship Product : Full Maintenance Lease

for the use of selected vehicles over a set period of time and distance

Features Financing

Experience & expertise enable us to advise on cost saving options

Selection & procurement of vehicles

Burden of raising Capex can be directed to other operational budgets

Replacement Cycle

Enables clients to replace vehicles long before reaching economic life span ensuring high availability levels

All inclusive, hassle-free contract

We bear all risk, maintenance, tyres and disposal costs Known cost structure eases and enables budgeting and planing

Tel: +27 (0)11 523 4300


FLEETAFRICA

COMPANY PROFILE

KAMOGELO MMUTLANA CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

VALUE PROPOSITION FleetAfrica is a specialised fleet management company at the forefront of fleet management and full maintenance leasing industries in South Africa. The company provides a flexible range of product options on every vehicle class. FleetAfrica has managed some of the largest fleets including the City of Johannesburg and the Eastern Cape Provincial Government. Although solutions offered by the industry are standard and the company offers the same-named contract options, FleetAfrica recognises that not all clients are the same. Thus, FleetAfrica does not recommend a one size-fits-all, off-the-shelf solution across the board. FleetAfrica’s solutions are fully customisable, the company gets to know and understand a client’s operation before designing a tailor-made solution, because we take cognisance of the fact that every client has different needs and requirements. www.fleetafrica.com The company’s value proposition to clients is value for money, vehicle availability, risk containment and management.

COMPANY INFORMATION Year founded: 1987 Founding members: Super Group Board Branches: Head Office: Sandton Memberships: SAVRALA BUSINESS & FINANCE Turnover: R431.6 million Operating profit: R125.5 million Net profit: R118.5 million Financial year-end: June Holding company: Super Group Africa Pty Ltd Bank: First National Bank Accountants: KPMG Incorporated Major accounts/key clients: COJ, City of Polokwane, SAPO, Transnet, Sun City, Nampak, Transnet, Gold Fields NATURE OF BUSINESS Description of activity: Fleet management and maintenance solutions Products/services offered: Full Maintenance Lease (FML), Operating Lease (OL), Managed Maintenance (MM), Sale and Leaseback (SLB) CONTRACTS & AWARDS Industrial standards: ISO9001:2008 certified Recent awards: Top 500 Best Managed Companies: First in sector for fleet management and vehicle tracking

Recent major contracts: Transnet, SAPO, Vukani Slots, City of Polokwane, Elias Motswaledi Municipality TRAINING & CSI CSI initiatives: Bursary programme for students to study transport-related degrees; FleetAfrica also assists schools in need of improved learning conditions. EMPOWERMENT STATUS Black empowerment level - shareholding (%): 25.1%-50% black shareholding Gender empowerment level – shareholding (%): 5%-25% female shareholding Black empowerment level - executive directors/senior management (%): >50.1% black executive directors Gender empowerment level – executive directors/senior management (%): 5%-25% female executive directors Black empowerment - total staff (%): >50.1% black staff Gender empowerment – total staff (%): 25.1%-50% female staff What is your BEE contribution level? Level 2 B–BBEE online

CONTACT INFORMATION

COO: Christo Aucamp Financial Director: Bruce Mcdonald-Watson Marketing Manager: Lollita Pitso Physical address: 27 Impala Road Chislehurston Sandton Postal address: Private Bag X9972 Sandton 2164 Telephone: 011 523 4300 Fax: 086 641 9808 Email: info@fleetafrica.com Website: www.fleetafrica.com Toll-free / call centre / customer care number: 080 000 7135

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WHERE WILL YOUR THINKING TAKE YOU? At Cape Town’s prestigious UCT Graduate School of Business, all business programmes are offered in modular format, so no matter where in the world you live, you can still study at one of the best business schools out there.

EXcELLENcE SOCIAL INNOVATION

OPENNESS

FULLER LEARNING EXPERIENCE

INSPIRATION VIBRANCY

ENTREPRENEURSHIP

CREATION

INTELLECTUAL CURIOSITY

To discover a world within a city, contact the UCT Graduate School of Business on +27 (0)21 406 1338/9 or admissions@gsb.uct.ac.za

AGILITY


UCT GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS COMPANY PROFILE

PROFESSOR WALTER BAETS DEAN AND DIRECTOR

VALUE PROPOSITION As Africa’s leading business school, the University of Cape Town Graduate School of Business (UCT GSB) is actively promoting a new model of business school, focused on developing leaders in emerging markets, grounded in ethical values, and equipped to handle complexity, uncertainty, and continuous change. This approach has been internationally recognised; the GSB remains the only business school in Africa ranked in the Financial Times Full-Time MBA Top 100 for its full-time programme, and the Cape Town-based school is one of just 59 schools world-wide to be “triple-crowned” (schools which are accredited by AMBA, EQUIS, and the AACSB). The school was also ranked 59 in The Economist’s ranking of executive MBA programmes 2013, the only African business school to make the inaugural, ‘Which MBA?’ ranking. The GSB maintains its position as Africa’s top business school through its thought leadership, research, and teaching. The school is dedicated to pioneering inclusive business thinking, values-based leadership and social innovation in Africa. Key initiatives at the UCT GSB that are geared towards fulfilling this vision and mission include the:

www.gsb.uct.ac.za

• Bertha Centre for Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship • S  olution Space/Workshop 17, an innovation and entrepreneurship hub to foster African innovation • Allan Gray Centre for Values-Based Leadership Recognising that there are multiple realities and truths, the school teaches students to engage with different ways of understanding what’s real and true, leading to the discovery of new tools for living in the midst of complexity.

COMPANY INFORMATION COMPANY STATISTICS / DEMOGRAPHICS / HISTORY Year founded: 1964 Employees: 40 academic; 63 administrative and executive BUSINESS & FINANCE Turnover: R93 897 261 Operating profit: R7 327 865 Net profit: R7 327 865 Financial year-end: 31 December Bank: Standard Bank Accountants: Ernst & Young NATURE OF BUSINESS Description of activity: Higher education; business education; continuing professional development; research

Products/services offered: MBA, Executive MBA, Associate in Management, Postgraduate Diploma in Business Administration, Executive short courses, PhD programme, Masters specialising in Inclusive Innovation Export activity: The GSB has an exchange programme with 34 international business schools CONTRACTS & AWARDS Industrial standards: Triple crown accreditation (AMBA, EFMD (Equis), AACSB) Recent awards: Eduniversal Five palmes; Financial Times Top 100 Full-Time MBAs ranking

CONTACT INFORMATION

Dean and Director: Professor Walter Baets Business Development Director: Zandile Nkhata Marketing and Communications Manager: Saskia Hickey Human Resources Manager: Linzee Arendse Physical address: Portswood Road Green Point Cape Town Postal address: Private Bag X1 Rondebosch 7701 Cape Town Telephone: 021 406 1922 Email: admissions@gsb.uct.ac.za Website: www.gsb.uct.ac.za

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THOUGHT LEADERSHIP

UCT GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

Will we miss you when you are gone? By Walter Baets Leaders, both political and in business, should ask themselves what value they are adding to the world around them. On a rainy Wednesday morning in December, US President Barak Obama told the world that Nelson Mandela had set us a high bar. As South Africa enters into an election year, it is irresistible to ask – how are we going to measure up? How will the legacy left to us by the late and great Madiba play out in the country – not just in terms of political leadership – but in business and civil society? All too often the answer is ‘not too well’. In business, since the financial crisis, we have become more attuned to the need for more ethical business and perhaps be more outspoken about those who fall way below the bar. The corporation, seen in past decades as the cornerstone of our economic system, has a tarnished reputation. Although corporations have contributed to an increase of wealth in certain parts of society, they have had a negative effect in other parts of the world and on its people; it is time to remedy that. What most of these scandals show us is that, as long as profits and shareholder value are put at the centre of business decision-making, we limit the potential of business to make a more positive impact on the world. We are not suggesting that a business must do away with profit, but that it should seek first to add value and then to make profits. “Companies cannot afford to be just innocent bystanders in what’s happening around them. They have to begin to play their role in terms of serving the communities which actually sustain them,” says Harish Manwani, COO of Unilever. Manwani believes that leadership, more specifically values-based leadership, will play a key role in bringing about this shift. We are in great need of leaders who are able to refocus their organisations on the task of creating wealth while also adding value to society through meaningful, purposeful, and inclusive business. This means, among other things, finding ways to contribute to the development of the economy and society in which they are operating

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whether rich or poor, mature or emerging. The most commonly held view about Nelson Mandela is that he was a leader who embodied values. Whether you agreed with him or not, he refused to budge on his deepest beliefs of unity, freedom, and justice. This is largely why he has earned the respect of such a divergent group of people from all corners of the planet. Of course, we can’t all be Mandela – and neither should we want to be. As scholar of values-based leadership Harry M. Jansen Kraemer Jr says, “Becoming the best kind of leader isn’t about emulating a role model or a historic figure. Rather, your leadership must be rooted in who you are and what matters most to you.” Values-based leadership is intensely personal. It is about self-reflection, courage, honesty, and humility. It is about understanding the balance between your needs and those of others. In business, as in government and other sectors, it should be about creating organisations and institutions that people can’t do without. In trying to assess if we are measuring up to the bar that Mandela has set us, we should ask ourselves the question: “If your business went bankrupt or your organisation closed down tomorrow, what would be missing from society?” If the answer is nothing, then you probably are not adding the value that you could and should be. Walter Baets is Director of the UCT Graduate School of Business and holds the newly-established Allan Gray Chair in Values-Based Leadership based at the GSB.


CLAREMART AUCTION GROUP

COMPANY PROFILE

JONATHAN RUSSELL SMIEDT CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

VALUE PROPOSITION The auction industry has shown a complete transformation over the past few years and the ClareMart Auction Group is proud to have had a substantial impact in that metamorphosis. ClareMart Auction House pioneered the multiple auction model in the 1980s, now conducting up to 80 individual property auctions. ClareMart’s auction presentations are conducted with a multifaceted approach allowing interested parties countrywide to participate. The group has had increased market share over the last 24 months, ultimately entrenching a dominant position in the auction industry. The launch of the Platinum Property Multiple Auction in 2011 experienced great success in this sector despite global recessionary conditions. The company’s vision is to add value to its clients by the ethical uniting of seller and buyer through the auction mechanism. It further aims to satisfy both parties through the traditional auction process, while embracing the technology available in a modern business environment. Integrity, service and expertise form the foundation on which ClareMart conducts its business. There is an increasing scope for growth in the industry, and the group looks forward to another successful year in 2014.

www.claremart.co.za

COMPANY INFORMATION COMPANY HISTORY Year founded: 1976 Founding member: Jonathan Russell Smiedt Employees: 56 Branches: 2 Head Office: Cape Town Trade affiliations: Financial institutions, legal institutions, liquidators, trustees and executors, property funds, trusts and government agencies Memberships: Estate Agency Affairs Board of South Africa, Proudly South African Companies, Cape Chamber of Commerce, South African Institute of Auctioneers (Founding Member), South African Council for the Property Valuers Profession, South African Restructuring and Insolvency Practitioners Association

AWARDS Superbrands South Africa Volume Four 2013, Top300 Company in the Western Cape, Top300 Black Economic Empowerment Company (Western Cape), No. 1 Top500 Company in Auction Sector BUSINESS & FINANCE Approximate market share: 60 percent in its operating area

Current customer base: 8 900 database of buyers and clients in the private sector, as well as legal and financial services. NATURE OF BUSINESS Activity: Industry leader in the auction of immoveable and moveable property throughout South Africa. Services offered: Full complement of auction services including sale and marketing of property as well as professional evaluation, asset control, and financial services. TRAINING & CSI Training programmes: Extensive in-house training of staff to ensure actualisation and increased ability to advance within the group. CSI initiatives: Patron Pro-Bono Auctioneer to the Red Cross Children’s Hospital, Adele Searle 100 Club, Consular Corps Ball, National Sea Rescue Institute, Rotarian Clubs of the Western Cape, CANSA (in partnership with STBB), Cape Peninsula School Feeding Scheme, Solstice Foundation, Rotary International, Pink Ribbon Trust, St Patricks Trust

CONTACT INFORMATION CEO: Jonathan Russell Smiedt General Executive Director:

Andrew Koch

Executive Sales Director:

Farrell Perling

Executive Auction Director: Mike

Baigel

Legal Auctions Director:

MC Du Toit

New Business Manager:

Andrew Edelstein

Financial and Human Resources Manager: Marc Roberts Marketing Communications Manager:

Roberto Quintas

Physical Address: ClareMart House

49 Somerset Road, Green Point Cape Town 8001

Postal address: PO Box 1112 Green Point 8051 Telephone: +27 (0)21 425 8822

Fax: +27 (0)21 425 9212 Email: info@claremart.co.za Website: www.claremart.co.za

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DAVID VS GOLIATH: Social media lessons big business can learn from small companies By Elizabeth Fletcher

Large corporate companies may appear to dominate marketing platforms but this doesn’t guarantee successful engagement on social media. In fact, small businesses are often more resourceful and creative about how they connect. In the fight for community engagement on social media, it’s an age-old tale of power versus agility.

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SOCIAL MEDIA

FEATURE

“Born rogues, successful small businesses are constantly in survival mode. They ditch bulky campaigns and frothy buzzwords in favour of what makes social media pulse; the audience.”

THE CONTENDERS In blue corner we have corporates with impressive marketing budgets and major brand recognition. However they are not immune to fumbles and any misstep is amplified to catastrophic proportions because of the sheer size of their audience. Often brands will make a tenuous and desperate leap to be associated with a trending topic like the Nature Conservancy faux-pas on Martin Luther King Day this year. Others resort to poor taste to drum up some numbers in the case of Kelloggs UK in November 2013. In the red corner we have small businesses ready to muscle into the industry. At first glance the difference in size is laughable. Most are crushed by a lack of time, money, and experience that big corporates have at their disposal. However, we all know the stories of tenacious underdogs overcoming the odds and social media is often the site of unlikely and remarkable feats.

Born rogues, successful small businesses are constantly in survival mode. They ditch bulky campaigns and frothy buzzwords in favour of what makes social media pulse; the audience.

SMALL BUSINESS HERO One great example is Dear Rae, a small Cape Town-based jewellery design studio. Their social media style is pared down and unobtrusive, like their jewellery, and focuses on visuals to prioritise products. It is also intimate. Its social media platforms share moments in the lives of staff and customers alike, creating a family feel to the business. Fine artist, Amy Keevey, runs Dear Rae’s online marketing and describes their approach as being, “all about building trust and a relationship with our audience, not just about selling our jewellery. So whether it be posting a photo of the latest flowers in studio, or our gold rings in process at the workshop, we try to keep it authentic.”

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Their presence on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest provides regular competitions, sneak-peeks, and opportunities for feedback while showcasing their ranges available instore and on their website. Keevey says that they “like to keep our social media fun and strive to communicate on a more personal level with our audience. It’s important that our customers know that they aren’t just interacting with an automated computer, but rather one of our Dear Rae staff members who knows and cares about both our brand and those purchasing from us.” Some of its most popular marketing is happy customers’ engagement and wedding photos. Dear Rae also run simple but highly successful competitions such as a giveaway to the launch of the ‘Life of Pi’ range. The campaign consisted of a product range of three ring designs inspired by pivotal characters in the best-selling novel, Life of Pi by Yann Martel (recently released in a filmadaptation); a collaboration with local artist Katrin Coetzer, who illustrated limited edition prints of each of the animals and a competition on Facebook to win a ring and a matching limited edition print. All elements of the range, from product concept, to marketing and distribution, are weaved together with an emotive narrative, “Which animal delights you the most? The magnificent tiger Richard Parker, with his stripy paws hugging your finger; the slippery flying fish, raining down from the sky, caught in a moment between your fingers; or the bird, a sign of hope and land, perched firmly on your hand.” The competition garnered almost 800 shares on Facebook and a significant amount of attention from the press. What does Dear Rae think they can teach big business? Amy believes it’s to “not take themselves too seriously”. For her, it’s about considering your audience. “They want to know that you care about what they have to say and that when posting you are thinking of them, not just about

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selling your product or service,” she advises. She points out that, by nature, people are fascinated by other people and authentic, spontaneous, human interaction can bring consumers and brands closer than ever before. In this regard, small businesses often have the upper hand because they have the ability to offer personal interaction online.

BIG BUSINESS CHALLENGES This personal touch is one of the major challenges faced by big corporates. Sam Wilson, Digital Editor at retail giant, Woolworths, says it's often tricky not to come across as a faceless brand. To combat this, Woolworhs tries to avoid rote customer service-style answers, because that doesn’t work. “We do try to answer all questions though and currently boast a 96 percent answer rate in our analytics, which is very good for a large brand,” She adds. Wilson goes on to describe that an important part of Woolworths’ interactivity online is related to customer feedback. “We include a lot of social questions which we then feed back into our social communities as customer content pieces, hosted on our Woolworths website linked to the relevant product. For example, we asked our Facebook and Twitter followers for their favourite weekly family meals, and then turned that into a Top 10 article in our Tips and Recipes section, which we then link back into social, calling out our customer contributors.” Woolworths’ strategy also involves quirky elements which give the brand character, such as participating in “#throwbackthursday” by posting an historical image. They have gone so far as to start their own “#badpunwednesday” trend which Wilson confesses is doing “worryingly well”. When asked about her biggest challenge in managing corporate’s social media, Wilson believes that speed of response is key. “The hierarchy of a large business and the sheer volume of social queries and interactions makes it very difficult

to stay on the front foot on social media. I am extremely jealous of smaller, more agile businesses in that regard, and I'm always watching their techniques. This is a strong focus area for our business and we are getting faster and more engaging all the time.” Amanda Sevasti, Head of Social Media at Native VML, agrees that corporates can’t be quite as personal, simply because there are a lot of regulations about what you can and can’t say. It can take some time to filter that down to the social media team. Big businesses’ processes aren’t designed to have quick approval on things like that.

GETTING GOLIATH TO THINK LIKE DAVID While this might seem like a major disadvantage, Sevasti suggests that there solutions that fit the corporate model. “If you look at some companies in the States right now, they have roles like Chief Social Officer or Chief Digital Officer. Someone who is actually at a director level who can make decisions needed for a quick response turnaround. “I think this is the biggest challenge that big corporates face that small businesses don’t and if anything, it’s the most important lesson you can learn because as soon as you become more personal, you immediately see better results in terms of your sentiment from your community.” She goes on to explain that corporates also have the advantage of resources that can help develop a personal touch. “What big companies do have at their disposal that smaller businesses might not is databases. “They have a lot of information on their customers and can use it to create personal communication. Social customer relationship management (CRM) is really exciting when you can gather a deep level of data from birthdate to interests and can target communication at the relevant audience. In South Africa we have a long way to go here.”


SOCIAL MEDIA

So if you’ve got the size and muscle of Goliath, how do you start bobbing and weaving like David? Like a fight, it’s all about mind-set. For successful small brands, engagement on social media is a way of life, it comes from the inside. It needs to be integrated fully with all aspects of the business rather than added on from the outside by the marketing department under pressure to grow numbers. The good news for corporates is that it’s entirely possible to develop these habits. Here are five tips to help large companies thrive on social media platforms:

u CONTENT IS CURRENCY While the brand and products might be well-known, what will grow reach and keep followers is relevant, interesting, and useful content. Great content will not only give followers regular and positive interactions with the brand, it will also highlight the brand as a current and trend-setting voice when followers talk about interesting features, share tips, and use the apps that the brand offers. The quality of content is critical – invest in it and the results will follow. This is not limited to interactions with customers. Large corporate brands carry authority in their industries. Businessorientated social platform, LinkedIn has become a particularly strong platform for business-to-business commentary and discussion.

v STAFF ARE BRAND AMBASSADORS According to Tata Consultancy Service’s 2013 global trend study Mastering Digital Feedback: How the Best Consumer Companies Use Social Media, about a third of Fortune 500 CEOs today have their own presence on social media platforms – their own Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn or another account available for the public to view.

FEATURE

Staff members – from CEO to cleaner – offer potential networks to represent the brand and distribute the great content being created. This will not only grow reach but connect the team too.

y PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT TEAMS NEED TO HEAR THE CUSTOMERS

w BRANDS NEED A CHAMPION

With social media, the customer is right there – why is only the marketing team talking to them? Satya Ramaswamy, Global Head Digital Enterprise at Tata Consultancy Services, says that despite social media users basing many purchases on social media comments about goods in services only 27 percent of R&D/product development and 37 percent of product management departments regularly view social media comments from consumers. This is partly because social media activity is most commonly owned by marketing, customer services, and sales”.

Small businesses can communicate internally quickly, make decisions and take action swiftly, adapting their strategy with alacrity. Corporates often have to abide by guidelines and disclaimers that can reduce their presence online to a generic bore. Amanda Sevasti suggests appointing a champion for social media. “Try and create a separate role for social media that is not treated like the rest of your PR and marketing channels that can say ‘Yes, do this’ and that goes whether your social media is run in-house or by an agency.” This person should be well informed, passionate about the brand, and skilled in effective social media. Give that person the support to move fluidly through all aspects of the business to facilitate the relationship between the brand and its followers avoid becoming stagnant.

x DATABASES CAN BRING YOU CLOSER Companies can’t talk to all of their customers personally but the insights provided by the information gathered in databases can go a long way to customising interactions. Large corporates might have more than one customer profile and insights will highlight different purchasing habits, trends, and preferences. The better a company understands its customers, the more responsive it can be to their needs and the more it can tailor content and offers to their interests. Ultimately, the better a company can get to know its customers, the easier it is to create customer satisfaction and retention, securing loyalty.

What does all of this mean for the future of South African corporates? For many industries, South Africa is an entry point into the rest of Africa and it’s important to see social media within a greater context of growth. For small business and big corporates alike, social media in Africa is predominantly accessed through mobile devices and it’s crucial to bear these platforms in mind when looking at your future social media strategies.


HAVASWW10174/E

SOUTH AFRICA, MEET SAA. Meet more than 10 000 staff in 26 countries. Meet Africa’s most modern fleet. Meet friendly faces and the most comfortable seats - because flying should be enjoyed, not endured. Meet more than 700 destinations around the world, over 7 million passengers a year, and at least 145 flights a day. Meet South African Airways. Go to flysaa.com, call +27 11 978 1111 or contact your local travel agent to book. South African Airways. Bringing the world to Africa. Taking Africa to the world.


SOUTH AFRICAN AIRWAYS

COMPANY PROFILE

MONWABISI KALAWE CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

VALUE PROPOSITION

(internal and external) by tailoring each interaction to suit their specific needs.

MISSION To deliver commercially sustainable world-class air passenger and aviation services in South Africa, the African continent and our tourism and trading partners.

INTEGRITY Practising the highest standards of ethical behaviour in all lines of work and maintaining credibility by ensuring that SAA’s actions consistently match its words.

VISION To be Africa’s Leading World-Class Airline.

VALUING OUR PEOPLE SAA is committed to their satisfaction, development and well-being by treating them with respect, dignity and fairness.

The values that drive the achievement of the vision and realisation of our mission are outlined below SAFETY Adopting a zero defect philosophy and striving for zero safety incidents through proper training, work practices, risk management and adherence to safety regulations at all times. CUSTOMER FOCUSED Striving to meet the unique needs of our customers

ACCOUNTABILITY Taking responsibility for individual and team actions, decisions and results by establishing clear plans and goals and measuring progress against them.

www.flysaa.com

EXCELLENCE IN PERFORMANCE Setting goals beyond the best, reinforcing highquality performance standards and achieving excellence by implementing best practices

COMPANY INFORMATION Year founded: 1934 Employees: 11 491 (as at March 2014) Daily departures: 153 Passengers per year: 8.8 million Membership: IATA and Star Alliance Domestic Flights: 554 flights in total per week between Johannesburg – Cape Town, Durban, East London and Port Elizabeth, from its Johannesburg hub, as well as code-shared flights between Lanseria – Cape Town and Durban. SAA offers more frequencies than any other airline in South Africa. NATURE OF BUSINESS Description of activity: SAA’s core business is the provision of passenger airline and cargo transport services together with related services, which are provided through SAA and its four wholly owned subsidiaries. Subsidiaries: Mango, SAA Technical, Air Chefs, South African Travel Centre (SATC) Auditors: PricewaterhouseCoopers Inc. and Nkonki Inc.

consecutive years and Best Airline Service Africa for 3 years and Mango the best Low-Cost Airline Africa. Mango and SAA furthermore hold the number one and number two successive spots as South Africa’s most on-time airlines. TRAINING & (CSI) Reach for a Dream Foundation in collaboration with Voyager, Vulindlela aviation awareness programme, Take a girl child to work day, Mandela day, Annual Christmas party for orphaned and vulnerable children, The Mandela day libraries, Goodwill tickets. BOARD COMMITTEES A number of sub-committees of the board have been established, including the: • Audit and Risk committee; • Procurement and tender processes committee; • Social and ethics, governance and nominations committee; • Remuneration and human resources committee; • Long-Term Turnaround Strategy committee

CONTACT INFORMATION LEADERSHIP GROUP EXECUTIVES Chairperson: Duduzile Myeni Group CEO: Monwabisi Kalawe CEO of Mango: Nico Bezuidenhout Chief Financial Officer: Wolf Meyer Company Secretary: Sandile Dlamini General Manager Human Resources:

Thuli Mpshe

General Manager Commercial:

Sylvain Bosc

General Manager Operations:

Zukisa Ramasia

Registered office

Airways Park, Jones Road, OR Tambo International Airport, Kempton Park, 1627 Postal Address

Private Bag X13, OR Tambo International Airport, Kempton Park, 1627

ACCOLADES SAA is the winner of the Skytrax ‘Best Airline Africa’ Award in the regional category for 12 T O P 5 0 0 / 6 th E D I T I O N

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LOCAL BUSINESSES SHOULD

CAPITALISE ON AFRICA Due to Africa being home to seven of the 10 fastest growing economies in the world, the continent is fast becoming top of mind for many global businesses, according to Sumesh Rahavendra, Head of Marketing for DHL Express SSA. While the growing interest from global parties is beneficial for much-needed foreign investment, local businesses should also be encouraged to capitalise on the continent’s increasing economic growth. The Ernst & Young 2014 Africa Attractiveness survey recently revealed that Africa has become the second-most attractive investment destination in the world, up from the third-from-last position in 2011. In 2013, Africa’s share of global foreign direct investment (FDI) projects reached 5.7 percent, its highest level in a decade. Rahavendra says, “The rise of Africa has been well documented over the past decade and has now become one of the biggest frontiers for trade and investment.” He points to recent figures by the International Monetary Fund (IMF), which also tell the story of Africa rising. Its latest Regional Economic Outlook: Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) April 2014, revealed that real GDP growth in SSA is forecasted at 5.4 percent this year. He adds that this overall economic growth forecast is surpassed by many of the African countries prospects, especially lowincomes states, such as Rwanda and Sierra Leone, which are projected to grow by 7.5 percent and 13.9 percent. The 2014 Africa Attractiveness survey revealed that South Africa remained the largest destination for FDI projects, however, countries such as Ghana, Nigeria, Kenya, Mozambique, Tanzania, and Uganda, have become more prominent on investor’s radars. For example, FDI projects in Mozambique grew at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) in excess of 30 percent since 2007. In 2013, Mozambique received 33 FDI projects, up 32 percent from the previous year. While coal deposits and offshore gas fields attract investors, infrastructure projects are another focus, with the country currently having more than R344 billion worth of active infrastructure projects. A key focus area of these projects include developing road and rail transport networks to link the country’s coal reserves to the main corridors, as well as expanding port facilities.

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FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT

Although FDI projects into Angola declined in 2013, the country remains the fourth-largest recipient of FDI. The country is focused on increasing its infrastructure, especially airports and ports, to meet its aim of R43 billion in non-oil investments by 2017. Rahavendra adds that the discussion of foreign investment often overlooks the real potential of Africa, namely its people and businesses. “Many local entrepreneurs and small and medium enterprises (SMEs) have so much to offer to their respective countries, both in terms of services and sustained economic growth.” As economies grow in Africa, as will the demand for its services, and this demand will offer numerous opportunities to inspired entrepreneurs. “As household expenditure has increased over the years, resulting in rising consumer demand, there is a definite opportunity for SMEs to fill the gaps which are not being serviced by large global companies. We have over 25 000 SMEs who work with us across Africa and every day we work on understanding their needs better and help them to go global.”

FEATURE

“We are increasingly noticing retail and telecommunication customers expanding on the continent and local entrepreneurs should be encouraged to also capitalise on the continent’s growing markets, similar to the approach by international organisations. Other sectors where we have seen growth include fast moving consumer goods, health care products, retail, food, telecommunications, and other consumer related necessities.” Rahavendra adds that the continent’s competitiveness can be hindered in terms of growing the flow of goods within the continent itself. “With underdeveloped road and rail networks, and around 12 percent of cities served by just one flight per week, infrastructure and connectivity are among the most pressing challenges. “Extensive infrastructure is critical for ensuring the effective functioning of an economy and a well-developed network is vital for enabling local and global business to transport their goods and services to the market securely and timely,” concludes Rahavendra.

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COMPANY INTERVIEW

Name Zola Tsotsi Born 24 July 1946 Occupation and position Chairman First Job Assistant Researcher and Assistant Lecturer at the University of Zambia Qualifications Bsc Mathematics & Chemistry, UBLS (Lesotho) 1970; Bsc (Hons) Chemical Engineering, University of Surrey (UK) 1974


ESKOM

COMPANY INTERVIEW

ZOLA TSOTSI

Eskom Chairman

What steps has Eskom taken to drive transformation in the energy sector? At the broadest level, this refers to efforts to re-engineer the business to fit our present circumstances, including developing an Africa strategy that is being considered by the shareholders. Our Coal Supply Strategy includes the development of blackowned emerging coal and limestone miners to transform the supply chain. We are working to improve the labour relations environment. A confident workforce with high morale is key to the sustainability of our business. We want clear channels of communication with our employees and their representatives. We are also working to strengthen localisation, ensuring that black-owned companies are able to get into the mainstream of Eskom’s procurement.

and distribute power efficiently, while maintaining security of supply. At the same time, we must balance the need to raise funding for new investment with an obligation to assure affordability for households and businesses. Addressing these requirements, while continuing to ensure an uninterrupted national power supply in the context of a precarious supply-demand balance, requires a flexible approach. Trade-offs may be necessary to ensure both a sustainable Eskom and affordable electricity in the years ahead. The board and the executive team remain fully attuned to the situation we face and, in partnership with Eskom’s employees, will ensure that we successfully confront the challenges ahead.

What challenges face Eskom in the near future? An example is the urgent need to step up maintenance on our generation fleet. This will require an increase in planned maintenance outages of power station units over the winter, but will forestall a more rapid degradation of existing plants until new power stations come online. Questions of affordability must also be considered in the pace of implementing the renewables programme. Over the past year the board has strengthened its oversight role in several areas. We are strongly focused on ensuring that the Medupi, Kusile, and Ingula power stations come online as soon as possible. A board subcommittee exercises direct operative oversight of these uncluttered view of the status of the build programme. What change is in store for the company? Eskom buys electricity from, and sells electricity to, the countries of the Southern African Development Community (SADC). But the future involvement in African markets might be limited to those projects that have a direct impact on ensuring security of supply for South Africa.

“We are strongly focused on ensuring that the Medupi, Kusile, and Ingula power stations come online as soon as possible.”

What do the next five years hold for Eskom? Over the longer term, our plans will evolve as we shape the business to adjust to the new tariff levels approved by the regulator and respond to shareholder decisions on additional capacity over the next two decades. Eskom needs to generate

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A lot happens between pressing a button and printing your document. At Eskom, we perform over 6900 vital processes to generate, transmit and distribute the energy that powers your office printer. It’s something we do with passion because it’s so much more than just electricity. It makes your business tick. That’s why we’ll always do whatever it takes to make sure you have power at your fingertips every time you press a button. Good luck with your meeting! Eskom Holdings SOC Limited Reg No 2002/015527/06

Powering your world www.eskom.co.za


ESKOM

COMPANY PROFILE

VALUE PROPOSITION Eskom Holdings SOC Limited was established in South Africa in 1923 as the Electricity Supply Commission. In July 2002, it was converted into a public, limited liability company, wholly-owned by government. Eskom is one of the top 20 utilities in the world by generation capacity (net maximum self-generated capacity: 42 000 MW). Eskom generates approximately 95 percent of the electricity used in South Africa and approximately 45 percent of the electricity used in Africa. Eskom directly provides electricity to about 45 percent of all end-users in South Africa. The other 55 percent is resold by redistributors (including municipalities). Eskom generates, transmits, and distributes electricity to customers in the industrial, mining, commercial, agricultural and residential sectors, and to redistributors. Eskom sells electricity directly to about 3 000 industrial customers, 1 000 mining customers, 49 000 commercial customers, 84 000 agricultural customers, and more than four million residential customers (of whom the majority are pre-paid customers).

www.eskom.co.za

COMPANY INFORMATION Description of business activity: Generates, transmits and distributes electricity Products/services offered: Electricity Empowerment level: Level 2 B-BBEE contributor Stakeholders: Government, business, labour unions, NGOs Memberships: Corporate Council of Africa, International Chamber of Commerce (ICC), Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI), World Economic Forum Strategic partnerships: Energy Access Partnerships, 21st Century Power Partnerships, Consulting Engineers of South Africa (CESA) BUSINESS & FINANCE Turnover: R128.8 billion - 2012/13 Operating profit: R3.9 billion - 2012/13 Net profit: R5.2 billion - 2012/13 Financial year-end: 31 March Approximate market share: 95% Subsidiaries: Eskom Enterprises, Rotek Industries (Pty) Ltd, Roshcon (Pty) Ltd. Holding company: Eskom Holdings SOC Limited NATURE OF BUSINESS Description of activity: Electricity generation, transmission and distribution CONTRACTS & AWARDS Recent awards: Overall winner of the 2014 Nkonki SOC Integrated Reporting Award; and

the Squirrel Award which was awarded by the Investment Analysts Society. TRAINING & CSI Training programmes: Bursary contracts for 5826 technical learners in 2012/2013. Empowerment initiatives: Contractors for the capacity expansion programme are local and black-owned. CSI initiatives: Eskom Development Foundation EMPOWERMENT STATUS Black empowerment level - executive directors/senior management (%): >50.1% black executive directors Gender empowerment level – executive directors/senior management (%): >50.1% female executive directors Black Empowerment - total staff (%): >50.1% black staff Gender empowerment – total staff (%): >50.1% female staff What is your BEE contribution level? Level 3 by EVS (Express Verification Services) Company’s expenditure on staff skills development of total payroll: R1.9 billion 2012/13 Company’s total procurement sourced from black-owned and empowered enterprises of total procurement spend: 82.1% Company’s investment in black-owned and - empowered enterprises of total earnings before income tax: 4.7%

CONTACT INFORMATION

Chief Executive Officer: Collin Matjila, Acting Chief Executive Financial Director: Tsholofelo Molefe Group Executive - Human Resources: Mongezi Ntsokolo (Acting) Group Executive - Generation: Thava Govender Group Executive - Enterprise Development: Erica Johnson Group Executive - Sustainability: Dr Steve Lennon Group Executive - Technology and Commercial: Dan Marokane Group Executive - Distribution: Ayanda Noah Group Executive - Transmission: Mongezi Ntsokolo Physical address: Megawatt Park, 2 Maxwell Drive Sunninghill, Sandton, 2157 Postal address: PO Box 1091 Johannesburg, 2000 Telephone: +27 11 800 8111 Fax: +27 86 568 2969 Email: contact@eskom.co.za Website: www.eskom.co.za Toll-free / call centre / customer care number: 08600 37566

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THE EMERGING CONTRIBUTION

OF INTERNAL COACHING By Janine Everson and Craig O’Flaherty, Directors of the Centre for Coaching, UCT Graduate School of Business

Only a decade or so has passed since leading South African organisations began to access and integrate the modality of coaching into the running of their organisations. Like all new trends, there are always early-adopters, who take the risk to experiment with a fresh application and make their mistakes until the impact starts to show, but the experimental phase is over.

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COACHING & HR

“Local organisations are starting to understand the power of a blended model – where both external and internal coaches can be integrated in a mix that services the key concerns of the organisation.”

The success that coaching has helped companies achieve has resulted in local organisations scrambling to access and integrate this powerful tool into their human capital strategy. However, some discernable shifts are showing up in the trends of how and where it’s used. What was once a buzz-word and fad has now become an application for engaging and developing managers and leaders at all levels of organisations in unique ways. One of the largest shifts taking place is that coaching is no longer being considered a skill, intervention, or process applied largely by external resources, to only the most senior levels of companies. Affordability, linkage to confidential strategic outcomes, and building of internal capacity are among the reasons for this shift. Now, that is beginning to be balanced by internal resources taking a more significant role.

FEATURE

Janine Everson and Craig O’Flaherty, Directors of the Centre for Coaching, UCT Graduate School of Business

SHIFT FROM EXTERNAL TO INTERNAL In the early years, coaching was a strategic application, with resources hired externally and applied where it could be justified – at strategic (exco and board) levels in the organisation. The reasons for such resources being hired externally were sound: Coaching is a specialist skill and a relatively new competency and it didn’t exist in sufficient numbers internally at the time. In the early days of coaching, executives wanted the privacy and confidentiality that external coaches provided (many still do).

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Organisations wanted the objective perspective that external coaches could offer to ensure a balanced way forward for leaders being coached and their evaluation of progress. The last decade has seen notable shifts, with recent surveys showing where organisations in South Africa, who apply coaching, are using it:  ne-on-one coaching – 54 percent Are using a mix of O internal and external coaching resources for employees, managers, and leaders. Group and team coaching – 34 percent are beginning to use internal coaches to work at coaching teams of leaders, managers, and even supervisors, across the organisation as they work to unifying themselves and their teams.  uilding internal coaching skills – as 33 percent are B starting to deliver coaching-skills training to leaders, managers, and internal coaches-in-training internally, instead of relying solely on external resources.

54%

34%

33%

Some of the reasons driving these shifts are: Business case – managing down the cost of external coaching, which although highly impactful can be prohibitively expensive.  omplexity of on-boarding – integration of external C coaches requires time and effort, as well as trying to ensure that coaches with different approaches are headed in the same direction and the realisation that internal resources are needed to manage coaching relationships. Clear focus on the organisation’s need for retention – ensuring that a front-of-mind outcome of coaching is to ensure retention of key leaders and staff, rather than coaching them out of a role or the business as a whole.

CASE STUDY

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EQUIPPING HR LEADERS TO COACH One of South Africa’s largest banks wanted its HR leaders to become role models of coaching competence and be able to excite the divisional leaders they worked with into understanding the impact of coaching skills. Over a threeyear period, senior HR executives across the organisation were invited into a year-long programme to learn and embody coaching skills. The programme entailed learning the theory of coaching, being coached themselves, and having clients they worked with to embed the skills over that period. This programme was designed to balance the mix between external and internal resources being applied to coaching. Of the 100 who attended the programme, 60 are now in key leadership roles and providing coaching to high-performing resources in the organisation.

The applications of internal coaching Local organisations are starting to understand the power of a blended model – where both external and internal coaches can be integrated in a mix that services the key concerns of the organisation. This model is being applied to some specific outcomes. Firstly, that of trying to build and entrench a coaching culture. Trying to work with leaders and managers in a way that gets the skills of deep listening and incisive questioning (two key coaching competencies) embedded in ways that influence many kinds of interaction. Secondly, needing and wanting to build leadership, technical and behavioural competencies at all levels, rather than just higher up in the system. Thirdly, tailoring the development process of coaching to ensure that both the individual’s unique needs and levels of competency are balanced against the generic needs of the organisation as to what good looks like. Although a core focus of external coaching as well, internal coaches have shown a real capacity and resilience to work towards these outcomes coming from their access to and understanding of an organisations priorities. Recent surveys have shown that internal coaches have a unique concern for engaging with clients with a core focus on retention of staff, which significantly impacts on the bottom line.

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COACHING & HR

CASE STUDY

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BUILDING NEW LEADERS The challenge for this local division of a global oil and gas organisation was to build a cadre of leaders of the future. The organisation, in partnership with an external coaching services provider, realised that it needed the leaders of the future to learn to engage with themselves and their teams and clients in new ways. Building their competency to have powerful conversations, including coaching, having courageous conversations, and giving compelling feedback. A process was set into place which would equip these leaders-in-training to learn how to coach, to work in coachingcircles (groups of peers who coach one another), and to work with external coaches to enable the transfer of coaching skills across to them. The programme is now in its third year and organisational feedback centres on how they have stepped into their leadership roles in a more impactful way.

CASE STUDY

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CASCADING COACHING An industry-leading, fast-moving consumer goods organisation was taken over by an international CEO who wanted to cascade the competence of coaching to the shop floor. In an organisation-wide programme, all 2 000 employees over a period of three years were exposed to and equipped with coaching skills.

FEATURE

Other factors at play Some other interesting trends have emerged. Having coaching skills inserted in the organisation, either in full-time roles or applied as part of leadership skills, has helped organisations to achieve additional outcomes:  HR Downsizing – Worldwide trends show that, after the ballooning of HR skills in the 80s and 90s, the new millennium has seen HR skills and budgets downsized. This has meant that HR professionals have many more priorities to handle, with less capacity, and little ability to keep being the sole guardians of delivering applications like coaching. Managers and leaders are needing to step into coaching and developing staff for themselves, without it being an HR default responsibility. Midwives for Change – Once again, leaders and managers need to become ‘mid-wives’ for the changes that their teams and direct reports are encountering and the need for coaching skills is essential. Knowing who to coach, when and how is becoming less of a choice and more of an imperative.  Transferring Skills – Skill levels in this country continue to be a draining pot and the need for internal coaches on hand to hardwire new learning; through providing insight, challenge, and support, grows exponentially.

Future trends The swing away from coaching as solely an externally applied resource, to where it becomes a balanced offering between external provision of coaching services and the building internal coaching capacity, will continue. The fundamental outcome of any coaching is to leave an individual, a team, or even system to be self-correcting (able to identify issues and resolve them) and self-generating (able to apply the learning gained from coaching to other areas and make the changes themselves). So, the balance between outside-in (external coaches) and inside-out (internal coaches) resources working in partnership to build that capacity, is an outcome worth achieving.

These were transferred across by an external team of facilitators, but the emphasis was on leaving the language of coaching behind. In waves of offsite and on the shop floor interventions, the organisation was exposed to coaching and then encouraged and supported to apply this as part of their daily responsibilities.

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TURNKEY PROCESS PLANTS IMPROVED ROI | CUTTING EDGE TECHNOLOGY | PROCESS OPTIMISATION

FEASIBILITIES | DESIGN | ENGINEERING | CONSTRUCTION | IMPLEMENTATION | TURNKEY PROCESS PLANTS LATEST TECHNOLOGY EQUIPMENT NEW | REFURBISHED EQUIPMENT COST SAVING SOLUTIONS LOCAL & GLOBAL SUPPLIERS | MATERIALS HANDLING | POWER AUDITS AND OPTIMISATIONS POWER PLANTS | WATER FILTRATION PLANTS | MARKETING

PROJECT EXECUTION IN • Diamonds • Gold • Platinum • Coal • Copper • Base Metals

LEVEL 3 BBBEE STATUS For more information visit

www.ManhattanCorp.com

t. +27 11 748 8800 info@manhattancorp.com


MANHATTAN

COMPANY PROFILE

CHRIS POUROULLIS CHAIRMAN

VALUE PROPOSITION Manhattan Corporation provides turnkey process plants, equipment, and engineering services in the design, manufacture, supply, and installation of turnkey process solutions for mining and industrial companies throughout the world. Manhattan provides best value solutions to its client’s by understanding their needs and delivering on them. Process Plants, mining, and process equipment solutions are supplied, covering over 30 commodity applications with its key focus on base metals, gold, coal, diamonds, platinum, and uranium. Manhattan has delivered technical solutions to the mining industry for over 22 years, including the development of various diamond mining projects, and the development of its east rand gold mine. It has a client base of approximately 20 000, including BHP Billiton, Glencore-Xstrata, Rio Tinto, Anglo American, De Beers, Vale, Goldfields, African Governments and developmental institutions.

www.ManhattanCorp.com

Manhattan has continued to enhance its product offering through its strategic partnerships with various original equipment manufacturer (OEM) agencies. These manufacturers, selected for their exceptional quality and track record performance, offer impressive turnaround times, and world class standards on supplied products.

COMPANY INFORMATION Year founded: 1992 Founding member: Chris Pouroullis Head office: East Rand, Johannesburg, South Africa Representative offices: Botswana, Democratic Republic of Congo, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Guinea, Ghana, Ivory Coast, Mali, Namibia, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bolivia, Ukraine, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Mauritius, Moldova, Tajikistan, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Nigeria BUSINESS & FINANCE Turnover: + R500 000 000 Financial year-end: February Market share: Approximately five percent Holding company: Manhattan Corporation Current customer base: 20 000 Key clients: Exarro, ADP Pojects Pty Ltd, Anglo American, Anglo American Platinum, Rio Tinto, BHP Billiton, Vale, Glencore-Xstrata, Goldfields, De Beers, Kumba, Sasol, Group 5, Anglo Gold Ashanti, Impala Platinum, Lonmin Platinum, Various State Mining companies throughout the African continent.

EMPOWERMENT STATUS (Sanas Accredited): Empowerment rating: Level 2 BBBEE for Manhattan Corporation North West Empowerment rating: Level 1 BBBEE for Manhattan Process Engineering Empowerment rating: Level 3 BBBEE for its RSA Process Plant Company Manhattan Mining Equipment Empowerment rating: Level 2 BBBEE for KD Technical Services Empowerment rating: Level 2 BBBEE for Manhattan Operations Douglas

CONTACT INFORMATION

Chief Executive Officer: Michael Pouroullis Financial Director: Theo Pouroullis Business Development Director: Manhattan Operations Africa: Oupa Sekhukhune Physical address: 1 Hospital Road, Brakpan 1541 Postal address: PO Box 750, Benoni 1500 Telephone: +27 (0)11 748 8800 Email: info@manhattancorp.com Website: www.ManhattanCorp.com

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COMPANY INTERVIEW

GIBB

Richard Vries

Group CEO, GIBB Richard Vries, Group CEO, GIBB

GIBB has been independently rated as a market leader in the consulting engineering industry. The firm has been operating since 1923, with the South African chapter of GIBB starting in 1956. The firm delivers world-class solutions across a diverse range of markets and has the technical know-how to achieve the best results for clients. GIBB is a 100 percent African-owned firm with 67 percent black ownership. They have a reliable network spanning the African continent. In-depth consulting, design and management approach allows for a good working relationship between clients and the firm to fully meet the needs and outcomes required on any project. This is underpinned by GIBB’s ISO 9001 quality system which has been independently certified for since 1999. The markets GIBB operates in are: • Transportation • Freight and logistics • Power and energy • Water • Sanitation • Housing and community Infrastructure • Property developments • Geotechnical and tunnelling • Natural and built environment • Mining infrastructure • Health infrastructure • Education facilities • Housing and community infrastructure • Property developments in retail, hospitality, commercial, and residential What do you see as the three key challenges for South African business? Consulting engineering, and construction as a whole, needs to improve its image. Government’s

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responsibility regarding social delivery has got to do with providing infrastructure and unless you get people to see engineering and construction as a positive contributor to society, it will struggle to progress.

“In-depth consulting, design, and management approach allows for a good working relationship between clients and the firm...” The second problem is the principle of value over cost. This is linked directly to the image aspect of the industry: people viewing consulting engineering purely as a cost. Engineers (if procured on their value proposition rather than fees only can substantially reduce the lifestyle costs on asset. The third challenge is cyclical spending patterns. If you want to get the best resources you should be able to plan at least five years ahead. The industry was extremely buoyant before the World Cup. It attracted resources from all over the world. After the big spending cycle, the industry had to look outside South Africa resulting from the reduced utilisation of human resources. And this is not just from consulting engineers’ point of view – manufacturers and contractors were equally effected.


GIBB COMPANY INTERVIEW

What are the key marketing trends you see emerging to drive the next decade? With strong competition in the engineering sector, there is a strong focus for GIBB to ensure that the firm is attracting the best talent in the industry, as well as ensuring that the firm is retaining existing talent. With this in mind, it is important for the firm to showcase the value in joining a company like GIBB to the greater market and the strides made in training, development and knowledge sharing. GIBB is constantly engaging with clients through Customer Relationship Management (CRM) platforms and surveys to ensure the firm is delivering the highest standard of quality and excellence and adapting to the needs of our clients. With Africa being a continent of choice for business and infrastructure development, it is vital to understand market conditions, and adapt accordingly while promoting GIBB’s business, skillset and expertise. Firms want to conduct business with black-owned and managed firms. With GIBB being 67 percent black-owned with a Level two BBBEE rating, it is important for the firm to highlight the strides made in this arena. The engineering sector is highly specialised with relatively scarce skills in the industry. To contribute to the growth and development, the firm has made a concerted effort in the area of skills development. How does the future fare for the industry? I am cautiously optimistic about the industry’s growth plans. The Presidential Infrastructure Coordinating Commission’s (PICC) work on developing the 18 Strategic Integrated Projects (SIPS)

has brought a sense of comfort to the industry about government’s capacity toimplement its infrastructure programme. One can also see that lessons learnt from past projects are being heeded. Technical capacity is being built within government to carry out the projects. Centralised decisionmaking is also encouraging. South Africa’s success during the World Cup came from its ability to make decisions, and make them quickly. These factors make the infrastructure environment look good at face value. The PICC’s SIPS are multidisciplinary and encapsulate a broader vision for national infrastructure. Africa is seen as the next big thing in business terms, what is your position on doing business on the continent? Africa has huge potential for infrastructure projects and the question is no longer “if” in Africa, but rather “how.” In this regard GIBB is building up a strong track of successful delivery in Africa. The firm does this by not only responding to public proposals, but also creating our own opportunities where developers, contractors and financiers are involved. What skills do you think leaders of the future are going to need? How do you identify those leaders in your business? Leaders of tomorrow need to be visionaries. They have to possess the skills and attributes that make them good leaders; strategists; managers; implementers and communicators. Leaders must have the ability to inspire, and, at the same time, strong abilities to execute the strategy of a firm. How important is social media to your firm? How have you integrated it into your strategy? In the ongoing evolution of social

“With Africa being a choice continent for business and infrastructure development, it is vital to understand market conditions, and adapt accordingly while promoting GIBB’s business, skillset and expertise.” media, with the engineering industry being a business-to-business sector, the use of social media will be utilised differently from the way that consumer brands engage on platforms. The opportunity exists for thought leadership engagement and general brand awareness. Social media, as a means of communications, has great potential for GIBB. And the firm is building it into its brand and communication strategies. What change is in store for the firm? GIBB is constantly growing and expanding on its business reach and expertise. In times of constant change, it is important to adapt to market trends and developments. Sustainability is a buzz word in the industry at the moment and GIBB has incorporated sustainable designs into its projects. The firm is looking at strong vertical and horizontal linkages in our value chain, and foresees a trend where, particularly outside South Africa, clients are looking for total solutions.

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COMPANY PROFILE

MOTLEKAR HOLDINGS

FAIZAL MOTLEKAR CHAIRMAN

VALUE PROPOSITION Motlekar Holdings is an African private equity enterprise headquartered in Johannesburg that focuses on strategic investments across a broad range of industries. It provides both product and service-driven solutions for its clients through successful operating brands. Strategically, Motlekar Holdings seeks to position itself as a leader in its selected industries and, in doing so, providing sustainable returns to shareholders. Since its inception, the enterprise has been propelled by a two-pronged operating principle. The first is to uplift, reward and make colossal strides towards sustainable empowerment on a social, environmental and economic level. The second is to attract and retain talented, black employess and to channel these human resources to areas of the business where they can impact both communities and the business arena positively, thus embracing a shared vision for success. While the company enjoys success with its underlying investments, the core driver of the organisation is to further black economic empowerment in a respectful and meaningful manner. The nimble and talented team works tirelessly to achieve the clearly defined empowerment milestones for every African on the continent. This approach to fair and equitable economic benefit is what knits the fabric of the organisation’s DNA.

www.motlekar.co.za

COMPANY INFORMATION Year founded: 2004 Founding member: Faizal Motlekar Employees: 35 Branches: 2 Trade Affiliations: South Africa Syria Business Council, Saudi Arabia South Africa Holding (SASAH), South Africa Malaysia Business Council Memberships: Maputo Corridor Logistics Initiative (MCLI)

Strategic partnerships: Itec, Cyclocor, Group Five, Citrine, Work on Temp, Blue Group, HiTek, Global Tailings Solutions, Tarman, Kilken Platinum, Motlekar Loss Control, Motprop, GDS-Tech, and Motlekar Cape EMPOWERMENT STATUS Shareholding: Greater than 50.1% black shareholding Executive Directors/Senior Management: Greater than 50.1% black executive directors

CONTACT INFORMATION

Chief Operating Officer: Andile Mkhosana Chief Financial Officer: Yazeed Evans Physical address: Woodmead 703 Office Park 20 Morris Street East Woodmead Johannesburg 2191 Postal Address: PO Box 77570 Eldoraigne Pretoria 0171 Telephone: +27 (0) 86 178 9111 Fax: +27 (0) 11 234 7331 Email: info@motlekar.co.za Website: www.motlekar.co.za

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GATEWAY THEATRE OF SHOPPING

COMPANY PROFILE

AKASH MAHARAJ CENTRE MANAGER

VALUE PROPOSITION Gateway Theatre of Shopping, managed by Old Mutual Propery, aims to remain the greatest entertainment and shopping complex in the Southern hemisphere by offering the latest in high-end fashion and family entertainment. The 166 636 square metre complex is situated on the east coast of South Africa, in the city of Durban. Home to 400 stores from local and international brands across all categories, Gateway boasts a broad range of fashion and entertainment under one roof. With this unique combination of world-class stores, the latest in entertainment and high-end fashion, Gateway truly represents a theatre of shopping. From boutiques like Forever New, Jenni Button, The Space and Hilton Weiner to large international brands such as Guess, Hugo Boss, Mango, Lacoste, Pringle and Zara, Gateway has something for every fashionista. Visitors to Gateway will be spoilt for choice when it comes to entertainment with the likes of the Wave House, Barnyard Theatre, IMAX and a variety of up-market restaurants to choose from. Gateway also prides itself on providing shoppers with world-class promotions and campaigns, for which they have achieved gold and silver status both locally and abroad.

www.gatewayworld.co.za

COMPANY INFORMATION CONTRACTS & AWARDS 2013 • Gateway Theatre of Shopping was awarded the Annual HeadCount Busiest Day Of The Year Award • SOLAL Awards (International Shopping Centre Awards) - Gold – Gateway’s Material World/Vodacom Durban July Preview Fashion Show (Sales, Promotions and Events) - Silver – Gateway Theatre of Shopping VIP Launch (Digital Marketing) - Silver – Gateway Hotel Takeover (Digital Marketing) • Footprint Awards (South African Shopping Centre Marketing Awards) - Gold - Gateway VIP Launch  (Digital Marketing) - Gold - Gateway’s Material World/Vodacom Durban July Preview Fashion Show 2012 (Sales and Promotion) - Gold - Gateway’s sponsorship and income generation strategy (Alternative Revenue) - Gold - My Gateway (Visual Merchandising) - Silver - Gateway’s Luscious Loot (Sales and Promotion)

• SPECTRUM (Overall Footprint Award) Gateway VIP Launch • Top500: South Africa’s Best Companies - Gateway placed in the Top 5 of the shopping centre sector 2012 • Gateway Theatre of Shopping was awarded the Annual HeadCount Busiest Day Of The Year Award • Footprints Awards - Gold – Gateway’s 10th birthday celebration (Sales, Promotions and Events) - Gold – Gateway’s Right Royal Affair/ Vodacom Durban July - Silver – Gateway Hotel Takeover (Digital Marketing) - Silver – Gateway’s holiday lineup (Sales, Promotions and Events) • SPECTRUM (Overall Footprint Award) Right Royal Affair/ Vodacom Durban July • SOLAL Awards - Silver – Gateway’s 10th birthday celebration (Grand Opening, Expansion and Renovation)

CONTACT INFORMATION

Centre Manager: Akash Maharaj Marketing Manager: Penny Barlow Physical address: 1 Palm Boulevard Umhlanga Ridge New Town Centre, Durban South Africa Postal address: PO Box 1366 Umhlanga Rocks, 4320 Telephone: 031 514 0500

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Double life: The automotive industry’s inorganic twin By Alexandra Nagel

Colourful balloons, shiny ’SALE’ banners, and salesmen with either a gold chain or a bowtie could be a thing of the past in the automotive industry. Human interaction has become so inorganic that all is needed from salesmen need are their fingers and a mobile device.

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AUTOMOTIVE

FEATURE

“Despite the general thread of instantaneity weaving social media platforms together, each have their own unique frameworks and public spheres…”

The rows and rows of cars parked at the local dealer now have a double life; one online and one still parked in the parking lot. Instead of potential buyers coming in to browse the physical shiny bonnets of vehicles, consumers are now picking their own dream cars online, personalising them according to which rims glitter more on the website. Social media platforms such as Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram have put a new spin on human interaction. Dubbing these sites ‘social’ is ironic. An actual person has been replaced by a medium from which you interact in order to communicate with an actual person. Businesses can now create personal profiles tailored to how they wish the world to see them and the only way to check if their online life mirrors their offline one is to go back to the most natural form of interaction, by actually visiting that auto dealer on the corner.

UNDERSTANDING THE AUDIENCE Different social platforms create different atmospheres and shape conversations according to the rules and regulations of that particular site. Despite the general thread of instantaneity weaving social media platforms together, each have their

own unique frameworks and public spheres in which specific discourses are created based on what can and cannot be done on the site. Twitter for instance, only allows 140 characters of text per tweet therefore the user has to get their point across very quickly. Facebook, on the other hand, allows users to compose status updates close to the length of a scholarly essay. These public spaces form a new place for people to discuss a variety of issues. As grand as this opportunity is for the advancement of communication, in a country as stratified as South Africa, these online public spheres only serve as another means of conversation for those who already have access to these platforms. The majority of South Africans live beneath the poverty line with no access to clean running water, let alone social media platforms. According to a survey conducted in 2012 by Stats South Africa, less than 10 percent of South Africans have access to the internet at home and only 40.6 percent have at least one member who is able to access the internet outside of home, either at university or work.

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MANAGING RESOURCES All in all, it comes down to who has the resources to participate. The degree of online presence a company has across the different platforms will determine how connected and involved it can be in a variety of conversations. Auto dealers that do not have profiles on Pinterest, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and LinkedIn will be plagued by the fear of always missing out on what’s hot and happening in those particular public spheres. Most importantly, the company is likely missing out on potential consumers. It all depends on the money, time, and the human capital a company has to carve out a presence on all of these sites. This is a place where consumers can raise concerns about their vehicle’s performance and expect a quick response due to the instantaneous atmosphere the platform creates. If the resources are not in place to address queries and complaints quickly and efficiently, it is probably better not to have an online presence at all.

COMMUNICATING WITH THE CUSTOMER Consumers will definitely interact more with someone who engages with them in return, answering their concerns and even by ‘liking’ or ‘favouriting’ their comments. Volkswagen South Africa, for instance, is an auto dealer that effectively utilises Twitter and Facebook to keep up with the everchanging needs of customers. “We communicate with over 100 000 customers on Facebook and various other platforms,” says Volkswagen South Africa, “Whilst, like advertising, it remains difficult to attribute exactly what contributes to what sale, we do know that it is essential to have an active presence in the digital world.” Nissan South Africa is another example, it boasts a large social media presence and uses it to its advantage. “Social media not only allows us to communicate the latest innovative developments within and about the organisation, but it allows us to address any concerns a customer may have in an open and transparent forum, thereby building trust,” says Managing Director for Sales and Marketing Stuart Norman. “It has given us the opportunity to celebrate the successes of our consumers and build an army of diehard fans and ambassadors that support the brand, quiet ferociously at times.” A company’s online presence is a great way to receive direct feedback from customers on what they think of products. Consumers find these online platforms comfortable enough to honestly discuss with friends what they think of the vehicles performance.

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The time in which auto dealers respond to Facebook posts and tweets is what will determine how many effective its online presence is. “We have built a thriving social media platform for customers and potential Kia owners to engage with the brand via any social medium they prefer,” says Kia Motors South Africa’s Marketing Director David Sieff, “Our fans and followers enjoy the ability to raise concerns and communicate their experience first hand. I see it as an opportunity to resolve issues quickly and provide positive feedback to the people that deserve it”.

A TECHNOLOGICAL WORLD The rapid change of the technological world is what is keeping the automotive industry in top gear. The retention of customer loyalty in an inorganic form is just as important, if not even more so, than doing so face-to-face. Interaction can depend on the type of vehicles being sold, as this creates a diverse market base. Volkswagen sells vehicles that are aimed at young life-starters, like the Polo and Citi Golf, as well as for business men and women who have their eyes set on luxury vehicles, like the Phaeton for instance. Volkswagen has to have a diverse personality online, to appeal to as many people as possible. Ford Southern Africa views an online presence as crucial when engaging with customers. “With the amount of engaging new content, campaigns, and competitions that we as Ford put out onto our social media platforms, we not only educate and engage our customers, but also strive to give them the best Ford experience on social media,” says Communications Manager Rella Bernardes, “This turns ordinary citizens into brand advocates and has resulted in Ford South Africa leading the way in social media engagement levels across Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.”

TAILORING EXPOSURE By posting a specific kind of content on these platforms, certain types of responses from followers will be fostered according to how the company shaped it to be. Continuously posting comments about the car company’s great deals, as opposed to telling consumers to avoid purchasing a vehicle whilst inflation is high, will create two completely different conversations. Ford South Africa acknowledges how shaping discourse indirectly shapes the response to a degree, “Social media plays an important part in telling Fords story and communicating to customers about our vehicles to gain awareness and to enforce greater brand loyalty.”


AUTOMOTIVE

By posting specific types of material, it will create a conversation about the company that Ford South Africa particularly wants to be discussed about them. This can be said about Kia Motors South Africa as well. Sief highlights how the content produced is critical to drive loyalty and engagement, but it gives people the information they came for in the first place.

THE FUTURE OF COMMUNICATION While Android, Blackberry, and Apple are ruling interaction via inorganic means, this online social life does open possibilities for people to discuss whatever they wish. Twitter and Facebook are now replacing coffee shops and corner cafes as places of common interest, a new space for cross-

FEATURE

border groups to form and is an excellent way for companies to get in touch with consumers with just the click of a button. Different platforms bring together different types of people that are all potential consumers. Not having a profile on Twitter for example, could cost you. South Africa has the tenth largest Twitter user base in the world according Canadian research company Sysomos. Any business, in any industry, should not turn a blind eye to these numbers if they wish to become more successful, profit-wise or not. Having a double identity will play out to your advantage; not all twins are evil.

“It has given us the opportunity to celebrate the successes of our consumers and build an army of diehard fans and ambassadors that support the brand.�

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COMPANY OF CHOICE

Lesedi Nuclear Services provide comprehensive engineering solutions in South Africa’s power generation sector Lesedi Nuclear Services, formerly known as Intens Engineering Services, was founded in 1984. This followed several years of a good supplier relationship with Eskom through work done before and after the commissioning of Koeberg Nuclear Power Station (KNPS). Since 2001, Lesedi Nuclear Services was created and has expanded its offering into the industrial energy sector and now operates on a global scale, boasting successfully completed Nuclear services contracts in the USA, China, Brazil, and Europe. As an engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) company of choice in power generation, Lesedi has completed numerous projects in the nuclear, conventional, and, more recently, renewable energy environments. A key project delivery milestone was established through Lesedi’s involvement in the construction of the open gas turbine (OCGT) power plants in the Western Cape between 2006 and 2009. The company is now part of a consortium executing the EPC contract for the balance of plant (BoP) for Eskom’s Medupi Coal Power Station, still under construction in the Limpopo Province. In addition to its majority shareholder, AREVA – a world leader in the design and construction of nuclear power plants and the supply of fuel, maintenance, and plant modernisation services – Lesedi also aknowledges Group Five and the J&J Group as shareholders, alongside Lesedi local management shareholders. Core competencies • Project management • Construction management • Design engineering • Engineering procurement and construction (EPC) • Specialised shutdown maintenance activities (Globally) • Provision of technical personnel • Heating, ventilation and air conditioning • Power plant construction • Nuclear, gas turbine, coal power stations • Biomass, bioenergy, hydrogen, hydro, waste-to-energy • Quality control and documentation Integrated Management System Certified by Bureau Veritas – Internationally accredited • ISO 9001: 2008 • ISO 18001: 2007 • ISO 14001: 2004 • RD-0034 (Nuclear) o AREVA NP – FRA 100/E Lesedi provides comprehensive engineering solutions for all phases of a project, from initial design data and feasibility studies through to conceptual and detailed planning, construction start-up, and commissioning, handover, and production support. Its expertise range from traditional disciplines such as electrical,

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LESEDI

mechanical, piping, and structural engineering to advanced specialties, including simulation, enterprise integration, and interactiive 3D and 4D modeling. Project management services • Planning, contract packaging, and administration • Work breakdown structure definition • Construction methodology • Scheduling, cost estimating, monitoring, and reporting • Change and risk management • Procurement, quality assurance, and control • Construction procedures, engineering, supervision, administration, and commissioning Inspired by the motto “Think Satefy, Wake Safely”, Lesedi’s project teams have achieved 2.83 million hours without lost time due to injury across all projects since August 2008. Safety remains Lesedi’s pride over the 25 years of its supplier relationship with Eskom. Nuclear • Provision of maintenance and outage services to Koeberg since 2001 and Internationally since 2008 o Values & Pumps o Refuelling o Steam Generators o Reactor Cooling Pipes • Supplier of technical personnel o RSA, France, USA, Brazil, UK • Plant upgrades engineering • Project management • Procurement • Completed over 150 different modifications at Koeberg to date

COMPANY ADVERTORIAL

Nuclear safety • RD-0034 o The promotion of nuclear safety awareness as part of the company culture o Employees receive achievement certificates for their active promotion of safety awareness Lesedi has been providing key skilled nuclear engineering personnel to nuclear facilities in Spain, North and South America, the United Kingdom, and France. The company has also provided continuous operational support to Eskom and AREVA, steam generator (SG) water lancing, pumps, and valve maintenance, primary pump maintenance, and reactor refuelling. In 2013, Lesedi Nuclear Services formed a strategic consortium with Group Five Nuclear Construction Services and, together, secured a strategic nuclear copnstruction contract from Eskom. This new project involves the design, manufacture, and replacement of the 1 800m3 re-fuelling water storage tanks (PTR tanks) at Eskom’s Koeberg Nuclear Power Station. The strategic importance of this contract lies in the role it will play in developing and expanding nuclear engineering and construction experience in South Africa. Lesedi Nuclear Services is the lead partner in this Level 3 B-BBEE consortium, a significant status for a nuclear project of this nature. Summary Lesedi has a track record in engineering and energy infrastructure projects that extends over 15 years. Its focus on localising engineering know-how continues to keep the company at the helm of the energy power industry; and Lesedi’s procurement and training strategies are aligned to meet stringent contractual requirements in adherence with both the National Development Plan (NDP) and Supplier Development and Localisation (SD&L) objectives.

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Francis Carruthers

Chief Executive Officer, Lesedi Nuclear Servies Francis Carruthers, Chief Executive Officer, Lesedi

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What are the key challenges facing the South African energy sector? Bringing online baseload power is at the forefront of the challenges facing the South African energy industry. The construction of the large scale 4800MW Medupi and Kusile coal power stations has certainly been a key challenge to our energy industry. It has also been a steep learning curve for many contractors involved in the projects. From Lesedi’s perspective as a leading local South African EPC (Engineering Procurment and Construction) organisation, executing turnkey projects and the localisation of engineering know how in South Africa are topics that should certainly be put into the mix of challenges.

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The localisation of construction activities is typically the norm in many new build programmes. However, the localistion of engineering and procurement is often not included in the mix.

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As a result, amongst others, of a decline or stagnant project pipeline in their countries and the opportunities in our country, many foreign EPC organisations are either executing or in pursuit of power projects here in South Africa. It is important to note that, typically, engineering and procurement activities often get performed and managed within the foreign organisation while only the construction part gets localised. What are some of the solutions to those challenges? Localisation strategies imposed on major projects should certainly be more prescriptive on engineering know-how, procurement and skills develoment targets. A tranfer of skills in all these areas is essential to ensure that our

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energy industry moves forward to execute these projects sustainably. No doubt, South Africa has the ability to execute complex engineering projects. Lesedi prides itself specifically on the localisation of engineering and procurement associated with energy projects here in South Africa. Our tack record of succefully executing a turnkey EPC type contract for the construction of the 14 X 150MW OCGTs in Atlantis and Mossel for Eskom pays testement to our ability, as a South African compmany, to perform the engineering and procurement of an EPC contract. Furthermore, the continued roll out of the resepective IPP programmes, including the Cogeneration and Baseload programmes, should also encourage GDP growth and security of energy supply in our country. Directly linked to this rollout is job creation, a key poverty poverty eradication driver as set out in South Africa’s National Development Plan 2030.. What would you count as Lesedi’s greatest achievement over the last 12 months? Safety is the number one priority in our organisation. Reaching 3 million man hours without a Lost Time Injury in June 2014, with the last LTI dating back to July 2008, is certainly an achievement that we can be extremely proud of. What, do you think, has been the primary reason for Lesedi Nuclear Services stellar performance over the last 12 months, resulting in it being listed as one of South Africa’s Top500 companies? The culture of performance and unity across the organisation to execute complex projects successufly.


LESEDI

What engineering services does Lesedi offer? At Lesedi, we provide comprehensive engineering solutions for all phases of a project. Our involvement starts with the initial design data and feasibility studies through to conceptual and detailed planning, procurement, construction start-up and commissioning, and goes right up to handover and production support. Our expertise ranges from traditional disciplines to advanced specialities (Mechanical, Electrical, Process, Control and Instrumentation), including enterprise integration and interactive 3D and 4D modelling.

contractor on a 16.5 MW Biomass project in northern KZN for round three of the South African REIPPP. The project is currently being taken to finanical close.

What major projects is Lesedi Nuclear Services currently involved in? In 2013, we formed a strategic consortium with Group Five to work on a contract secured from Eskom. This project involves the design, manufacture and replacement of the 1 800m3 re-fuelling water storage tanks (PTR tanks) at Eskom’s Koeberg Nuclear Power Station. For us, this project is of strategic importance for its role in devloping and expanding our nuclear engineering and construction experience in South Africa.

Lesedi continuously identifies the appropriate talents to secure and nurture through the company’s skills development programmes. Whether it be learnerships, engineer-in-traning (EIT) or apprenticeships, Lesedi’s training progammes are designed to further skill and hone each employee’s expertise on complex engineering projects, directly and indirectly.

Lesedi is also busy completing the Balance of Plant (BoP) contract at the Medupi Coal Power Station. The latter entails the design of 18 different systems on the BOP, as well as the procruement of all associated equipment. It will culminate in the installation and commissioning of the system. This contract is the largest contract Lesedi has ever performed to date and is certainly a proudly South African performed EPC contract! What renewable energy projects has Lesedi been involved in over the last year? Lesedi has succesfully bid as the EPC

What initiatives has Lesedi implemented to drive transformation and skills development in the energy and engineering sectors? As a Level Four B-BBEE company, Lesedi Nuclear Services always strives to build on the local talent in this country. From the black skilled and non skilled employees to the carefully selected women in the ranks at the organisation,

What are the advantages of nuclear energy over other forms of power generation available to South Africa? As demonstrated by Koeberg, Nuclear power is baseload power and has an excellent record of availability. Furthermore the operational cost is significantly cheaper than many other forms of power. In addition, nuclear power is most certainly green energy. How vital is nuclear power to meeting South Africa’s energy needs and, by extension, South Africa’s economy as a whole? As a growing economy, South Africa needs a reliable baseload that doesn’t rely too heavily on changing weather patterns. Nuclear energy will provide suc a basload, especially because it

COMPANY INTERVIEW

“Lesedi continuously identifies the appropriate talents to secure and nurture through the company’s skills development programmes. ” is, in the long-term, relatively cheap to maintain once all facilities are in place. President Jacob Zuma recently announced that government would be accelerating the procurement of nuclear energy solutions. What will this mean for Lesedi Nuclear Services going forward? As leaders in the power industry, this for us means greater opportunity to extend our expertise on the continent and in the country. Our extensive track record – which includes a successful supplier relationship with Eskom - is testament to our capabilities and our expertise in localised EPC projects, thus putting us at the forefront of most engineering companies. As a South African company boasting an exclusively local talent pool of personnel with international experience, we hold great localised engineering know-how and therefore are better equipped to conceptualise, plan, and implement local projects. Importantly, we have a clear understanding of the local landscape and are able to project manage any contract from start to finish.

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Lesedi Nuclear Services, leaders in the South African Power Industry

Home grown Lesedi Nuclear Services is a leading EPC (Engineering, Procurement and Construction) company with extensive experience in the execution of turnkey engineering projects. It has operational footprints throughout the South African power Industry.

Lesedi is now a level Four B-BBEE (Value Added) company and has registered 9ME, 9EP & 8SF certification levels with the Construction Industry Development Board. The company’s main shareholder is global nuclear company, AREVA,

Having completes numerous projects in both nuclear and conventional

with the remaining shares split between Group Five, the J&J Group and local

environments, primarily at Eskom’s Koeberg Power Plant, constructed the

Lesedi management.

Open Cycle Gas Turbine Power Plans in the Western Cape, and executing EPC contracts for the balance of plants to Eskom’s Medupi and Kusile Coal Power Plants - still under construction - Lesedi is well-placed to play a leading role in offering competitive EPC services to the country’s power infrastructure industry.

Lesedi’s Competencies Include: • Project Management • Construction Management • Design Engineering • Engineering Procurement and Construction (EPC) • Specialised Shutdown Maintenance activities (Globally) • Provision of Technical Personnel • Quality Control and Documentation • Heating, Ventilation and Air – Conditioning • Power Plant Construction • Nuclear, Gas Turbine, Coal Power Stations • Biomass, BioEnergy, Hydrogen, Hydro, Waste-to-Energy

Since 2001, Lesedi Nuclear Services has provided a wide range of services to Koeberg Nuclear Power Station. Our major involvement has been in the supply of technical personnel for plant upgrades, engineering, project management, procurement and maintenance. To date, over 150 different modification have been completed by Lesedi at Koeberg. Our Outage services division also provides key nuclear skilled personnel to various nuclear facilities internationally, notably in Europe, North America and South America. Lesedi also provides continuous operational support to both Eskom and AREVA with up to 300 technical personnel working on-site during outage periods. Other services include Steam Generator (SG) Water Lancing, Pumps and Valve Maintenance, Primary Pump Maintenance and Reactor Refuelling. LESEDI NUCLEAR SERVICES (PTY) Ltd Lesedi Nuclear Services, Edison Way, Century City, 7441, Cape Town, South Africa Tel: +27 21 525 1300 or 0861 551 1049 Fax: +27 21 525 1333 Email: lesedi@lesedins.co.za www.lesedins.co.za www.areva.com


LESEDI

COMPANY PROFILE

FRANCIS CARRUTHERS CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

VALUE PROPOSITION Lesedi Nuclear Services provides integrated engineering solutions for all phases of a project. This includes initial design data and feasibility studies, from conceptual and detailed design to planning, construction, start-up and commissioning, handover and operational support. Lesedi has a track record in engineering and energy infrastructure projects that extend over 15 years. It is a Level 4 B-BBEE contributor. Since 2006, Lesedi has diversified to be a major Engineering, Procurement and Construction (EPC) organisation having completed numerous successful projects in both nuclear and non-nuclear environments, primarily at Eskom’s Koeberg Nuclear Power Station in the Western Cape, the construction of the Open Cycle Gas Turbines in Atlantis and Mossel Bay and currently an EPC contractor for the Balance of Plant (BOP) at the Medupi Coal Power Station in Limpopo. More recently, for the third window of the Renewable Energy Independent Power Producer Program (REIPPP) in South Africa, Lesedi is the EPC contractorwhich was given preferred bidder status in October 2013, with the expactancy of reaching finance close before December 2014 for the first Biomass project 16.5 (MW) in Northern KZN.

www.lesedins.co.za

Lesedi’s procurement and training strategies are aligned to meet stringent contractual requirements in adherence with both the National Development Plan and Supplier Development and Localisation (SD&L) objectives. Localisation of engineering know how to execute complex EPC contracts is key at Lesedi, as such Lesedi’s strategy is be the lead contractor implementing such type of contracts, using its local EPC expertise.

COMPANY INFORMATION Year Founded: 2001 Employees: 250 Branches: Head Office: Edison Way, Century City Site Offices: Koeberg Nuclear Power Station (Western Cape) and Medupi Coal Power Station (Lephalale, Limpopo) Memberships: French Chamber of Commerce, Cape Chamber of Commerce, ANC Progressive Business Forum (PBF) and NIASA, (Nuclear Industry Association of South Africa) Strategic Partnerships: Shareholders – Lesedi Local Management, AREVA, Group Five and the J&J Group BUSINESS & FINANCE Sales: R400 million Financial year-end: 31 December Major accounts: Eskom, AREVA TRAINING & CSI Training programmes: Learnerships, Engineers in Training, Draughtsmen and Apprenticeships Empowerment initiatives: Women in Leadership training for female employees CSI initiatives: Lesedi is proud to be a

supporter of a range of community and social organisations. With the organisation’s greatest CSI work being with the Orion Organisation in Atlantis, Lesedi always ensures it engages CSI initiatives in all locations where it’s executing projects, such as Lephalale in Limpopo. EMPOWERMENT STATUS Black Empowerment Level – shareholder (%): 25.1% - 50% black shareholding Black empowerment level – executive directors/senior management (%): 25.1% - 50%black executive directors Black empowerment – total staff (%): 25.1% - 50% black staff Gender empowerment – total staff (%): 5% - 25% female staff Level 4 (value added) verified by Empowerdex • Company’s expenditure on staff skills development as a proportion of total payroll: three percent • Company’s total procurement sourced from black-owned and empowered enterprises as a proportion of the total procurement spend: fifty percent of turnover spent on procurement

CONTACT INFORMATION

CEO: Francis Carruthers CFO: Jerome Sion Business Development Manager: Shane Pereira Human Resources Manager: Simon Mosuwe Physical address: Edison Way, Century City, 7441 Cape Town, South Africa Postal address: PO Box 36640, Chempet 7442 Cape Town, South Africa Telephone: +27 (0) 21 525 1300 Fax: +27 (0) 21 525 1333 Email: Lesedi@lesedins.co.za Website: www.lesedins.co.za

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Guess who? ‌promotes productivity in south Africa and is shaping the future of competitive business.

Ideas Institute /PSA 00281/IMP

?

At Productivity south Africa we facilitate, plan and implement business strategies that integrate local and global markets making for world class business. We have helped thousands of South African companies and people to be more productive even in declining world economies. For over 40 years we have been at the frontier of South African business, today through our *programmes: work Place Challenge, Turnaround solutions and Productivity organisational solutions, we continually improve today’s living standards and inspire a more competitive nation. *All programmes are subsidised

For more information call: 011 848 5300 www.productivitysa.co.za


PRODUCTIVITY SA

COMPANY PROFILE

BONGANI COKA CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

VALUE PROPOSITION Productivity SA is a Schedule 3A Public Entity and its governing board comprises of representatives from labour, government and business. Productivity SA’s mandate is primarily to enhance the productive capacity of South Africa by meeting the following objectives: promote a culture of productivity in workplaces; develop relevant productivity competencies; facilitate and evaluate productivity improvement and competitiveness in workplaces; maintain a database of productivity and competitiveness systems and publicising these systems; undertake productivityrelated research; and support initiatives aimed at preventing job losses. Productivity SA aims to be the champion of productivity in South Africa, executing its mandate and strategy by highlighting the fact that productivity matters as it has influential consequences on the growth of its economy. The company’s mission is to improve productivity by advising, implementing, monitoring and evaluating solutions aimed at improving South Africa’s competitiveness. Productivity SA core organisational values are: service excellence through the implementation of relevant solutions; market leadership through creative and innovative solutions; working together as a team to achieve common goals; partnering with stakeholders pursuing solutions to South Africa’s productivity challenge; honesty, integrity and professionalism. These are the cornerstones of all our business. It is through our effective business technology tools and programmes that we are able to successfully compete on a global scale.

COMPANY INFORMATION Year founded: 1969 Founding members: Dr J Visser Current employees: 102 Branches: Midrand, Durban and Cape Town Memberships: Pan African Productivity Association (PAPA) Strategic partnerships: Small Enterprise Development Agency (SEDA), South African National Apex of Co-operatives (SANACO), International Labour Organisation (ILO) South African Security Seta (SASSeta), Youth Group of Companies, Economic Development Departments, National and Local Chambers of Commerce and Industry. BUSINESS & FINANCE Turnover: Grant Funding of R73 663 000 Financial year-end: March Bank: Nedbank Accountants: Nexia SAB&T

CLIENTS & AWARDS Recent major contracts: Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), Tshwane University of Technology, Intersite, Department of Education, Sheltered Employment Factories, Energy Seta, Delta EMD, Vumo Waste, Soweto LED, Tshwane LED, South African Women Entrepreneurs’ Network (Sawen), Harmony Mine, Mafikeng Municipality, Rand Water Board, Unemployment Fund Project, Transnet and the City of Johannesburg TRAINING & CSI Training programmes: Productivity improvement training aimed at all levels of employees in public, private and labour sectors of the economy. Empowerment initiatives: South African Graduate Development Agency (SAGDA) i.e. internship programme

www.productivitysa.co.za

CONTACT INFORMATION Financial Director: Bheki Dlamini Marketing and Communications Manager: Rebecca Phalatse Human Resources Manager: Tracey Wereley Productivity Organisational Solutions Executive Manager: Lalane Janse van Rensburg Value Chain Competitiveness Executive Manager: Sello Mosai Regional Manager Western Cape: Albert Brink Regional Manager KwaZulu-Natal: Amelia Naidoo Turnaround Solutions Executive Manager: Mudzunga Mashamba Physical address: International Business Gateway, Cnr New and Sixth Road, Midrand, 1685 Postal address: Private Bag 235, Midrand, Gauteng, 1685 Telephone: +27 (0) 11 848 5300 Fax: +27 (0) 11 848 5555 Email: info@productivitysa.co.za Website: www.productivitysa.co.za

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COMPANY PROFILE

WSP

MATHIEU DU PLOOY CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

VALUE PROPOSITION WSP is a world leading engineering and design company with 17 000 staff in more than 300 offices in 35 countries, and as the one of the largest multi-disciplinary firms on the continent we have more than 650 people in South Africa. We work across property, transport, infrastructure, industry, environment, energy, and mining – demonstrating technical depth and excellence in each and every project. Our expertise ranges from land remediation to urban planning, from engineering iconic buildings to designing sustainable transport networks and from developing the energy sources of the future to enabling new ways of extracting essential minerals. Our experts have wide-ranging backgrounds and complementary skills, united by their pride in their work and their passion for solving clients’ problems. Our unique combination of specialist skills backed by global reach enables us to offer the latest thinking and best client service, whatever and wherever the challenge. Through continuous improvement of customer services, we strive to be the outstanding supplier of integrated services to the built and natural environment and we provide leadership, resources and training to our staff when necessary so that they can obtain the optimum knowledge, ability and confidence to contribute towards a continuing success. Our business is structured in four core divisions, offering a wide range of specialist or fully integrated services - property; environment; transport and infrastrucutre; management and industrial. We are Africa’s leading provider of sustainability services and a Gold Founding Member of the Green Building Council of SA.Whether it’s optimising the performance of the greenest buildings, master-planning a city precinct or advising governments on regional sustainability strategies, we bring an in-depth understanding of the drivers of sustainability for our clients and the most advanced methods of achieving them.

COMPANY INFORMATION STATISTICS / DEMOGRAPHICS / HISTORY Employees: 650 Memberships: Consulting Engineers South Africa (CESA), Green Building Council of South Africa, South African Property Owners Association (SAPOA) Our people are members of engineering organisations relevant to their discipline, including SAICE and IMIESA CONTRACTS & AWARDS Recent awards: SAPOA awards main prize for Innovation: Vodacom Century City Photo Voltaic installation PMR.Africa Awards: • Civil Consulting Engineers – Diamond Arrow

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• • • • •

Structural Consulting Engineers – Diamond Arrow Combined Civil and Structural Consulting Engineers – Diamond Arrow Electrical Consulting Engineers – Gold Arrow Mechanical Consulting Engineers – Gold Arrow Combined Electrical and Mechanical Consulting Engineers – Gold Arrow

EMPOWERMENT STATUS What is your BEE contribution level? WSP Group Africa (Pty) Ltd had a Level-3 B-BEE rating in 2013, which is currently being verified for 2014

www.wspgroup.co.za CONTACT INFORMATION

Physical address: WSP House, Bryanston Place 199 Bryanston Drive Bryanston 2192 Telephone: +27 11 361 1300 Fax: +27 11 361 1301 Website: www.wspgroup.co.za BRANCHES: Bedfordview Tel: +27 11 450 2290 Bryanston (Head Office) - Tel: +27 11 361 1300 Bloemfontein - Tel: +27 51 447 0152 Cape Town - Tel: +27 21 481 8700 Durban - Tel: +27 31 240 8800 Nelspruit - Tel: +27 13 752 2457 Pietermaritzburg - Tel: +27 33 347 5391 Pretoria - Tel: +27 12 762 1200 Stellenbosch - Tel: +27 21 883 9260 Witbank - Tel: +27 13 653 6335


PFIZER SOUTH AFRICA

COMPANY PROFILE

BRIAN DANIEL CEO, COUNTRY MANAGER AND GLOBAL ESTABLISHED PHARMACEUTICAL BUSINESS LEAD

VALUE PROPOSITION Pfizer South Africa has been in existence for 60 years this year and locally operates five different businesses- Global Established Pharmaceutical Business; Global Innovative Pharmaceutical Business; Vaccines Business; Oncology Business and the Consumer Health Business. The company’s vision of “Living our full potential in striving for a healthier southern Africa”, forms part of its ethos to give every southern African access to quality healthcare. Pfizer’s global corporate responsibility activities are focused on investing its full range of resources to broaden access to medicines and strengthen healthcare delivery for underserved people around the world. “Pfizer is committed to making a meaningful difference in the lives of ordinary South Africans. Through our extensive corporate social responsibility programme, we are privileged to touch the lives of those less fortunate,” says Brian Daniel, CEO, Country Manager and Global Established Pharmaceutical Business Lead. One of the hallmarks of the Pfizer culture is its ability to adapt and continue to grow in the face of an ever-changing landscape. There is no doubt that its people drive this success. “It’s simple really,” Daniel states. “In our business, people drive technology. And it is through our effective business technology tools and programmes that we are able to successfully compete on a global scale.”

www.pfizer.co.za

COMPANY INFORMATION COMPANY HISTORY Year founded: 1849 in Brooklyn and in 1954 registered in South Africa Founding members: German-American cousins: Charles Pfizer and Charles Erhardt Head Office: Johannesburg Branches: Durban, Port Elizabeth, Bloemfontein and Cape Town Memberships: Pfizer is a member of Innovative Pharmaceutical Association South Africa (IPASA). The company drives an organised business affiliation and is corporate members of Business Unity South Africa (BUSA) and the South African Chamber of Commerce and Industry (SACCI) BUSINESS AND FINANCE Holding company: Pfizer Inc. New York Key Stakeholders: Healthcare professionals, pharmacy groups, hospital groups, and government Major country markets: United States of America, Japan, Italy, Canada, France, United Kingdom and Germany NATURE OF BUSINESS Description of activity: Pfizer is regarded as one of the world’s leading researchbased pharmaceutical companies providing healthcare products Products/services offered: Pfizer’s vast product range covers a variety of therapeutic

areas, including oncology, vaccines, cardiovascular, biological medicine, neuroscience, urology, anti-inflammatory, anticoagulation, anti-infectives, pain medication and ophthalmology CONTRACTS AND AWARDS Recent awards: Pfizer was presented with the Best Employer Award by the CRF Institute for three consecutive years in the Pharmaceutical category Other awards include: 2011/2012 Deloitte Best Company To Work For; 2011/2012 SA’s Leading Managers; 2011 Diamond Arrow Award in the Business Sector; 2011 Top Gender Empowered Company In Healthcare at the Top Women Awards; 2010 Top Pharmaceutical Company For Healthcare Excellence at the National Business Awards

CONTACT INFORMATION

Physical address: 85 Bute Lane Sandton 2146 Postal address: PO Box 783720 Sandton 2196 Telephone: +27 (0) 860 Pfizer (734 937) Website: www.pfizer.co.za

Empowerment initiatives: Pfizer South Africa is currently a Level 7 on the BEE scorecard and is working tirelessly to improve this score CSI initiatives: North West University’s HART Clinic; Pfizer “Big Hearts” initiative to inspire volunteerism within the company; SOS Children’s Village; University of Witwatersrand; University of KwaZulu-Natal; Rhodes University; University of Free State; University of North-West T O P 5 0 0 / 6 th E D I T I O N

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FIDELITY SECURITY SERVICES

COMPANY PROFILE

WAHL BARTMANN GROUP CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

VALUE PROPOSITION Fidelity Security Group is southern Africa’s largest integrated security solutions provider and the industry leader in protection innovation. Excellence in service delivery and implementation are fundamental to their impressive track record. By keeping abreast of the latest trends and technological developments globally, the Group is continuously evolving whilst remaining a frontrunner in the security solutions market. With 57 years of experience, the company’s strength lies in exceptional leadership, an unwavering commitment to excellent corporate governance, a comprehensive infrastructure and an aggressively proactive approach to staying at the forefront of the security field. The Fidelity Group’s strategic and highly successful transformation through BEE initiatives has made it South Africa’s largest black economically-owned Integrated Security Solution Provider. The Fidelity Training Colleges pioneered training in South Africa and played a vital role in professionalising this sector by developing the first learnership programme for security officers with SASSETA (NQF Level 3). The Group’s Cash Solutions business continues to grow and has quickly become a serious competitor in the market, garnering a large number of high-profile national contracts and bringing state-of-the-art technology backed by Fidelity’s hands on approach to the market.

www.fidelitysecurity.co.za

COMPANY INFORMATION COMPANY STATISTICS / DEMOGRAPHICS / HISTORY Year founded: 1957 Employees: +36 000 Branches: 82 BUSINESS & FINANCE Turnover: R2.6 billion Operating profit: R200 million Net profit: R12 million Financial year-end: February Approximate market share: eight percent Holding company: Fidelity Security Group Bank: Absa Accountants: PwC Current customer base: 4 000 Major accounts / key clients: British American Tobacco, Cash Paymaster Services, First National Bank NATURE OF BUSINESS Services offered: Guarding Services, Cash Solutions, Armed Response, Electronic Solutions, Specialised Services, Tactical Air Support Unit, Parking Management Services EMPOWERMENT STATUS Black Empowerment Level - shareholding (%): >50.1% black shareholding

Gender Empowerment Level – shareholding (%): 5%-25% female shareholding Black Empowerment Level - executive directors/senior management (%): >50.1% black executive directors Gender empowerment level – executive directors/senior management (%): 5%-25% female executive directors Black Empowerment - total staff (%): >50.1% black staff Gender empowerment – total staff (%): 5%-25% female staff What is your BEE contribution level? Level 2 B-BBEE by Empowerdex Company’s expenditure on staff skills development of total payroll: 3% Company’s total procurement sourced from black-owned and empowered enterprises as a of the total procurement spend: 72.54% Company’s investment in black-owned and empowered enterprises as a proportion of total earnings before income tax, depreciation and amortisation (EBITDA): 12%

CONTACT INFORMATION Group Chief Executive Officer: Wahl Bartmann Group Chief Financial Officer: Shaun Maharaj Group Corporate Affairs Director: Simon Mahlangu National Operations Executive and Gauteng Regional Executive: Leon Bartmann KwaZulu-Natal Regional Executive: Francois Bartmann Northern Cape and Free State Regional Executive: Gert Pretorius Mpumalanga and North West Regional Executive: Mickey Bartmann Group Business Development Executive: Malcolm Stephens Physical address: Fidelity Corporate Park, 104D Mimosa Road, Helderkruin 1734 Postal address: Private Bag X5 Westgate 1734 Telephone: +27 011 763 9000 Fax: +27 (0)11 768 5034 Email: media@fidelitysecurity.co.za Website: www.fidelitysecurity.co.za

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FEATURE

ENERGY STRATEGY

SOUTH AFRICA URGED TO FOLLOW

BRIC ENERGY STRATEGY Opinion editorial by Arthur Chien, Vice President of Talesun Energy

South Africa’s energy intensive industries should look towards some of its fellow BRIC nations, including countries such as Brazil, China, and India, as examples of leaders in decentralised renewable energy solutions such as solar photovoltaic energy. In doing so, they will not only be able to decrease crippling electricity costs and assist in easing the pressure the country’s energy supply is currently under, and benefit the South African economy in becoming fit enough to be at a level playing field. CONSIDERING ALTERNATIVES South Africa’s energy sector is critical to the economy as many key industries, such as the mining and manufacturing sector, are energy-intensive and are reliant on the country’s energy supply. In order to support this intensive load, South Africa, a coal dependant nation, needs to increase its focus on renewable energy solutions, which will diversify its powergenerating capacity. Considering the alternative energy plans, South Africa is in the process of pursuing the Renewable Energy Independent Power Producer Procurement Programme and the Carbon Disclosure Project. The country was also named the fastest-growing renewable energy market in the Group of 20 major economies. It is clear that South Africa has the potential to become a leader in renewable energy among its BRIC counterparts. Countries such as Brazil, China, and India have taken extraordinary strides to create and use clean sources of energy like hydropower, solar energy, and wind power. BRICS INITIATIVES Studies by Fast Market Research reveal that Brazil’s renewable energy sector created revenues of R990 billion in 2012 and the country depends largely on hydropower for its electricity. The Itaipu dam on the Paraná River located on the border between

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Brazil and Paraguay for example, is the largest operating hydroelectric facility, in terms of annual energy generation, in the world. Wind, solar, and biomass production is also on the increase within the country. India on the other hand is aiming to install 20 gigawatts (GW) of solar power by 2020. It is well on the way to achieving this, having evolved from installing only 30 megawatts (MW) of solar capacity in 2010 to an astounding 2 000 MW in 2013. China recently announced that its major push for renewable energy will see the number of wind turbines double in the next six years. From a current installed capacity of 75 GW, the aim is to achieve a staggering 200 GW by 2020. China is also a global leader in solar photovoltaic projects and accounted for approximately one-third of all large-scale solar PV capacity added in 2013. Under the draft of the Chinese Bureau of Energy’s new proposal, new solar installations in China are forecasted to reach 12 GW in 2014. According to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), South Africa’s emissions per-capita are considered high compared to China or Brazil. As the OECD pointed out, renewables make up a small percentage of South Africa’s coal-heavy total electricity generation and grid connection is still nascent and complex. CHALLENGES AHEAD The transition from a carbon-intensive economy to a lowcarbon future present many challenges, one of them being that the majority of energy financing goes to centralised, gridconnected power plants. To achieve its ideal of a greener future South Africa needs to work on areas such as on-going development and implementation of sustainability energy technologies, infrastructure development, efficient planning and strategies to encourage communities, and entrepreneurs to implement their own energy initiatives.


THE WORKFORCE GROUP

COMPANY PROFILE

LAWRENCE DIAMOND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

VALUE PROPOSITION The Workforce Group is a large diversified group of companies offering an extensive range of integrated employer-centric, value-adding human resources management solutions. To serve a broad range of industries, an extensive branch network, currently comprising 147 branches, spans the country’s province, and neighbour Mozambique. Our operating structure is made up of five segments, including staffing and recruitment, process outsourcing, training and consulting, employee health management, and financial and lifestyle products. Within each segment, the group’s services are delivered through multiple brands in the market place, each of which targets a specific market/industry. Integrating the services of each of the closely aligned specialist business units enables the group to add value to all aspects of the human resources management matric across a broad range of industries. The extensive range of solutions offered by the group’s specialist business units, enable our clients to focus on their core business without spending important management time on onerous administrative and legislative compliance burdens. The group continues to play an important role in skills development of the youth and job creation, particularly at grass-roots level, where first-time job seekers use temporary assignments as an entry into the job market and improve their employability as a result of on-the-job training and skills development provided.

www.workforce.co.za

COMPANY INFORMATION Year founded: 1972 Founding member: Mr RS Katz Employees: 977 (permanent) 25 533 (temporary) Branches: 147 Trade affiliations: CAPES Current customer base: 3 400 Your company’s top brands: Workforce Staffing, Training Force, Babereki Employee Support Services, Programmed Process Outsourcing, Fempower, ONLY the BEST, Teleresources, Allmed Medical Professionals New products: Essential Employee Benefits BUSINESS & FINANCE Turnover: R1.7 billion Operating profit: R20 710 Net profit: R7 604 961 Financial year-end: December 2013 Direct subsidiaries: Babereki Employee Support Services, Training Force, Workforce Software, Workforce Worldwide Staffing, Workforce Healthcare (50 percent) Holding company: Workforce Holdings Limited Bank: ABSA Auditors: Howarth Leveton Boner JSE listing and date: November 2006 NATURE OF BUSINESS Description of activity: Staffing, Recruitment & Human Resources Management

Products/services offered: Staffing and recruitment; financial and lifestyle products; training and consulting; employee health management; and process outsourcing CONTRACTS & AWARDS Industrial standards: CAPES and APSO certification Environmental health & safety standards: Manages processes, materials, and people to reduce environmental impact of operations. TRAINING & CSI Training programmes: Learnerships, skills programmes, apprenticeships, internships Employee incentive schemes: Share Appreciation Rights Scheme Empowerment initiatives: Management-intraining and directors-in-training programmes CSI initiatives: Direct donations, project support and sponsoring of and participating in fundraising events. EMPOWERMENT STATUS Black empowerment level - shareholding (%): 5%-25% black shareholding Black empowerment level - non-executive directors (%): 25.1%-50% black shareholding Black empowerment level - total staff (%): >50.1% black shareholding Empowerment rating: Level 3

CONTACT INFORMATION Chairman:

Ronny Katz Chief Executive Officer:

Lawrence Diamond

Financial Director:

Willie van Wyk

Corporate Communications:

Susan Marx

Physical address:

11 Wellington Road Parktown 2193 Postal address:

PO Box 11137 Johannesburg 2000

Telephone: 011 532 0000 Email: susanm@workforce.co.za Website: www.workforce.co.za

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COMPANY PROFILE

ENRA TECHNOLOGIES

RAEES MUKUDDEM CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

VALUE PROPOSITION ENRA Technologies aims to be recognised as South Africa’s leading black empowerment business support provider in the areas of ICT the company specialises in. Our business is a specialist IT services and solutions provider in the areas of strategic consultation, audio visual, security and IT. ENRA Technologies’ unique business model is based on configuring, integrating and maintaining innovative business solutions designed to meet its clients’ strategic and operational needs. ENRA Technologies Level 1 AAA empowerment rating makes the company one of the most sought after and preferred integrated ICT partner to a considerable client base of users in both the private and public sectors. The company’s knowledge and intellectual capacity allows it to provide clientele with world-class ICT solutions and services through its national footprint. With offices in Cape Town, Johannesburg, Port Elizabeth and Durban, ENRA Technologies was founded in 2008 by a group of young, likeminded individuals with acute intuition of the ICT market developments. ENRA Technologies has thus been able to deliver exceptional service by well-trained, experienced staff; affordability; high-quality product range; reliable workmanship and on-time project completion. ENRA Technologies seeks to partner and acquire similar ICT companies requiring an exceptional and well-established BEE partner.

COMPANY INFORMATION COMPANY STATISTICS / DEMOGRAPHICS / HISTORY Year founded: 2008 Founding members: Raees Ahmed Mukuddem and Enver Variawa Branches: Cape Town/Johannesburg/ KwaZulu-Natal/Port Elizabeth Strategic partnerships: Strategic partners within the ICT sector and beyond BUSINESS & FINANCE Financial year-end: February Holding company: ENRA Technologies Bank: Nedbank Current customer base: Blue chip corporate/ public sector clientele across all industry sectors, including security, financial, retail manufacturing, education, telecoms and construction. CONTRACTS & AWARDS Recent awards: Public Sector National IT Managed services contract Impumelelo Award Winner Top 500 Best Managed Companies

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TRAINING & CSI Training programmes: Extensive in-house training of staff to ensure quality and consistency of service delivery. Empowerment initiatives: In-house mentor and apprenticeship programmes that will empower young graduates to become certified in the areas of ICT. CSI initiatives: Two Oceans Aquarium; Mustadafin Foundation feeding schemes; South African National Zakaah Fund; Basket of Hope; Love His Children home for the orphans; Habibia Mosque feeding scheme and Muslim Hands EMPOWERMENT STATUS Black empowerment level – shareholding (%): >50.1% black shareholding Black empowerment level – executive directors/senior management (%): >50.1% black executive directors Black empowerment - total staff (%): >50.1% black staff Gender empowerment – total staff (%): >50.1% female staff What is your BEE contribution level? Level 1 contributor verified by Grant Thornton

www.enra.co.za

CONTACT INFORMATION

Chairman: Enver Variawa Operations Director: Reza Adams Physical address: 75 Harrington Street Cape Town 8001 Postal address: PO Box 50999 Waterfront 8002 Telephone: (021) 836 7721 Fax: 086 297 4452 Email: info@enra.co.za www.enra.co.za


VEKTRONIX

COMPANY PROFILE

CRAIG TYZACK MANAGING DIRECTOR:

VALUE PROPOSITION Vektronix (Pty) Ltd is a privately-owned contract electronics manufacturer, based in Wilsonia, East London. Originally established as one of the first four television manufacturers in South Africa in 1974, it has since diversified into an independent contract manufacturer, manufacturing a wide range of electronic products, and not owning any intellectual property for any of these. Vektronix has a Level 3 B-BBEE certification, and has 38.7 percent black ownership. Through its working relationships, especially with Samsung and Pace, Vektronix has implemented worldclass manufacturing procedures and now boasts one of the best electronics manufacturing facility in South Africa. The company has enjoyed significant financial support from the Industrial Development Corporation of South Africa (IDC) since 2009, and in 2013 was awarded their prestigious Most Improved Business Partner Award. As one of the major players in the South African electronics manufacturing industry, Vektronix is extremely well-positioned to play a significant role in the country’s Digital Migration programme. This will see the South African government needing to procure millions of set-top boxes (decoders) before 2015, to cater for the country’s transition from analogue to digital television broadcasts. Vektronix boasts a long and proud history of electronics manufacturing in South Africa and is set to build on these successes as it shapes its own, and the country’s, future.

www.vektronix.com

COMPANY INFORMATION Year founded: 2003 Founding members: Craig Tyzack, Peet Diedericks, Ian Stap, Rainer Wiethoff, Rici Hanekom, Julie Skinner Employees: 259 Branches: East London Memberships: South African Communications Forum, Border-Kei Chamber of Business NATURE OF BUSINESS Description of activity: Electronics Contract Manufacturer Products/services offered: Electronic Manufacturing Services TRAINING & CSI Training programmes: Vektronix has embarked on a programme of learnerships, skills programmes and bursaries for its employees. The company is entering its second level of learnerships with its first group of 21 employees having graduated recently. Once this process is complete, they are given the opportunity to meet with our Skills Development Manager and a development path is designed around their strengths. CSI initiatives: Vektronix has previously made generous contributions to various charities

and local NPO’s however, a decision has been made that, for 2014, all of Vektronix’s efforts will be directed towards one particular school in its community. This focussed approach will have far more meaning and result in greater benefit.

CONTACT INFORMATION

Financial Director: Peet Diedericks

EMPOWERMENT STATUS Black empowerment level - shareholding (%): 25.1%-50% black shareholding

Business Development Director: Kobie Pienaar

Gender empowerment level – shareholding (%): 5%-25% female shareholding

Human Resources Manager: Chantell Barnard

Gender empowerment level – executive directors/senior management (%): 5%-25% female executive directors

Operations Director: Ian Stap

Black empowerment – total staff (%): >50.1% black staff Gender empowerment – total staff (%): >50.1% female staff What is your BEE contribution level? Level 3 by Mazars East London Company’s expenditure on staff skills development as a proportion of total payroll: 3.5%

Physical address: Bert Kipling Road, Wilsonia East London, 5210 Postal address: PO Box 1273 East London, 5200 Telephone: +27 43 707 1000 Fax: +27 43 707 1001 Email: info@vektronix.com

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COMPANY PROFILE

BIGEN AFRICA

DR SNOWY KHOZA CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

VALUE PROPOSITION Bigen Africa is skilled in integrating the entire value chain of the infrastructure development process through in-house capabilities and strategic partnerships – from feasibility studies, through to project preparation, management and implementation to on-going asset management. The Group believes that the success of any cost-effective and sustainable project starts with the effective integration of the four cornerstones of civil society and sustainable communities, namely; the social, institutional, financial, and physical elements of the project. The Group provides its clients with a complete solution to all facets of a project, based on, amongst others, its intimate understanding of the requirements of the public sector, private sector, and other stakeholders.

Doing good while doing business.

COMPANY INFORMATION Year founded: 1971 Founder: Francois Swart Employees: 533 BUSINESS AND FINANCE The Bigen Africa Group delivered a reasonably strong performance in a year that was characterised by a weakening economic environment and unforeseen isolated events. Strong cash flows, robust balance sheet, and a healthy forward pipeline of project work continue to support the Group’s focused business model. Bigen Africa’s financial stability is underpinned by a strong management team and resources to continue aggressive growth; strong accountability, risk management, and compliance; zero tolerance to theft; and operational efficiencies and cost control. Subsidiaries: Bigen Africa Services (Pty) Ltd, Intatakusa Consulting (Pty) Ltd, Bigen Africa Project Investments (Pty) Ltd, Bigen Africa Consulting Engineers (Pty) Ltd, Bigen Africa Project Management (Pty) Ltd, PDV Consulting Engineers (Pty) Ltd, ZMS Management Services, Bigen Africa Consulting Consortium (Pty) Ltd, Bigen Africa Offshore Holdings, Bigen Africa Ghana Limited, Bigen Africa Services Zambia Limited, Bigen Africa Services Namibia (Pty) Ltd Holding Company: Bigen Africa Group Holdings AWARDS 2014 Industry Awards: Top 500 companies in South Africa, Top 500: Second in the Top Consulting Engineering companies, PMR Gold Award

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Structural Consulting Engineers Category, PMR Bronze Award in the Combined Civil and Structures Consulting Engineers Category, PMR Bronze Award in the Civil Consulting Engineers Category and Impumelelo Award for Top Empowerment Companies TRAINING AND CSI Skills development is given high priority for all staff, where personal development plans are supplemented. This is achieved through in-house coaching and mentoring, technical lectures that are accredited by ECSA, talent pipeline programmes, a Bigen Bursary programme, Candidacy programme, and an in-service programme. Through focused Corporate Social Investment, we empower the communities in which we service. EMPOWERMENT STATUS Black empowerment level – shareholding (%): 5%-25%black shareholding Black empowerment level – executive directors/senior management (%): 25.1%-50% black executive directors Gender empowerment level – executive directors/senior management (%): 25.1%-50% female executive directors Black empowerment – total staff (%): 25.1%-50% black staff Gender empowerment – total staff (%): 25.1%-50% female staff BEE contribution rating: Bigen Africa is a Level 3 BEE contributor.

www.bigenafrica.com

CONTACT INFORMATION Chairman:

Dr Iraj Abedian

Chief Executive Officer:

Dr Snowy Khoza

Chief Operating Officer:

Anton Boshoff

Human Capital & Marketing Director:

Loyiso Ndlovu

Chief Financial Officer:

Sulette van Graan

Physical address:

Allan Cormack Street off Hotel Street The Innovation Hub Cnr Meiring Naude Road Pretoria Postal address:

PO Box 29 Innovation Hub Pretoria 0087 Telephone: 021 842 8700 Email: pretoria@bigenafrica.com Website: www.bigenafrica.com


VKB

COMPANY PROFILE

KOOS VAN RENSBURG MANAGING DIRECTOR

VALUE PROPOSITION VKB is a primary agricultural enterprise owned by its producer members, with the primary aim of optimum wealth creation for its members. VKB is a dynamic enterprise: Over the years, it has created an infrastructure and serves as an anchor to the agricultural community. It is also an enterprise which its business partners and interested parties are keen to be associated with. The cooperative principles of this dynamic and visionary business are still very much in line with the reasons for its establishment 95 years ago. The modern, rapidly changing business environment requires revolutionary thinking to ensure that the company continues to comply with its strategic values and achieve sustainable growth. In recent years the VKB Group has been well documented and published. Our strategy for growth, through strategic investment in the food value chain, transforms the business that initially focused on the provision of products and services to support the agricultural producer in effective and profitable farming, into a modern, dynamic, multi-national organization. This is achieved through the identification and utilization of synergies and opportunities in all segments of the agricultural and food value chain, internally and externally, to unlock value for both shareholders and stakeholders.

www.vkb.co.za

The VKB Group and brand is growing in stature and has establish itself amongst the leading agricultural companies in South Africa. Dedicated, skilled employees, satisfied and loyal customers, a visionary board and innovative, effective, involved management with dedicated suppliers are some of the influencing factors culminating the success that is achieved.

COMPANY INFORMATION Year founded: 1909 Headquarters: Reitz, Eastern Free State Retail Outlets: 50 Associations: Authorised Financial Services Supplier (FSB 4813), Authorised Credit Supplier (NCRCP 477)

BUSINESS & FINANCE Turnover: Over R5 Billion Bank: Standard Bank Key stakeholders: The company has 3 500 shareholders whom are all agricultural producers. VKB has a unique cooperative business model where the biggest section of the company’s yearly profit, before tax, is awarded to clients as an incentive. Description of activity: VKB’s primary business revolves around the supplying of production inputs to the agricultural producers, as well as the handling, storing and marketing

of grain. Services accompanying this include finance, insurance, mechanisation, agricultural development and seed processing. Furthermore, VKB is involved in value-adding activities such as mills, animal feeds, a chicken abattoir, soya oil press and a factory that supplies packaging. COMPANIES & PARTNERSHIPS Nu-Pro Feeds (Pty) Ltd, Nu-Pro Commodities (Pty) Ltd, Grain Field Chickens (Pty) Ltd, Free State Oil (Pty) Ltd, NTK Agricultural (Pty) Limited, Crown Bag (Pty) Ltd, Venda Roller Mills COMPANY COMMITEES Nomination Committee Audit and Risk Committee Social and Ethics Committee Human Resources Committee Grain Industry Committee

CONTACT INFORMATION

Chairman: Paul Carshagen Managing Director: Koos van Rensburg Executive Director – Financial: Markus Mittermaier Excutive Director – Transfomation: Dr Moses Maine Physical address: 31 President CR Swart Street Reitz 9810 Postal address: PO Box 100 Reitz 9810 Phone: 058 863 8111 Fax: 058 863 8527 Email: vkb@vkb.co.za Web: http://www.vkb.co.za

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By Krysia Gaweda

COMMON PITFALLS

OF RESTRUCTURING A BUSINESS Restructuring is a common business procedure where businesses ultimately change the strategy or direction of its organisation. We take a look at the worst problems encountered by businesses when restructuring.

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RESTRUCTURING

FEATURE

“Companies must realise that restructuring is a process that involves extraordinary effort and patience in order to achieve the anticipated results.�

A corporate restructure is not uncommon today and is often associated with the failing of a business model or with the need to downsize. While it is known for restructuring to often help companies move forward and improve business, the process does come with its own set of issues for both the company and employees. The key is to anticipate these common pitfalls and difficulties before they happen. This will help companies to deal with them and thus, reduce the negative impact on the company and employees. Often, with the right direction, these changes in management capabilities and communication

can be implemented successfully and without, or with limited, resistance. During restructuring, companies may feel the need to dismiss employees, eliminate departments, or close some of its operational locations. In an attempt to downsize, businesses may feel the need to outsource parts of their operations that have been running inefficiently. In addition, restructuring can involve the reassignment or alteration of duties within the organisation in order to improve performance or incorporate new technologies.

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Companies undergo restructuring for various reasons, all with the common aim of improving the business. Restructuring can be carried out to align with new strategic intent, to new drivers for cost saving and operational efficiencies, or in some cases as a result of mergers and acquisitions where teams have to be integrated. Other reasons for restructuring may include a change of ownership or ownership structure, demerger, or a response to a crisis or major change in the business, such as bankruptcy, repositioning, or buyout. Restructuring may also be described as corporate restructuring, debt-restructuring, or financial restructuring. Strategic restructuring of a business can reduce financial losses, simultaneously reducing tensions between debt holders and the company to facilitate a prompt resolution of a distressed situation. For companies that have taken too many hits from an extended downturn, often restructuring is the best option, and may even be the only viable one. What is important to remember is that even at the best of times, a company needs to work with the resources it has and work within the existing market. In the current economy, it is important to be proactive and to constantly monitor your company’s performance, as well as competitors, clients, and customers. When restructuring, companies should look at having a recovery strategy before one is even needed owing to the fact that it is a lot more difficult to come up with alternatives when the company is in the midst of crisis. Companies need to be cautious when attempting to restructure and must be aware of the common pitfalls that may occur when implementing a restructuring process. There are many reasons major restructurings fail. In order to protect the businesses during restructuring, Seugnet van den Berg, Managing Director at management consulting firm Bizmod, explains a few common pitfalls companies experience during the restructuring process.

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u NO DELIVERABLES OR TIMELINE

In order to restructure your business successfully, your restructuring initiatives must be run as projects and not as part of operational activities until they are completely bedded down. There should be a defined timeline, clear and concise approaches, and deliverables with dedicated resources. It is key to remember that speed is of the essence and it is particularly important that design principles are agreed up front and adhered to throughout the project. A great deal of focus must be shifted from the normal daily operations to the restructuring initiative. Ultimately, if restructuring is not prioritised above regular business activities, little restructuring would be affected on the company.

v OPERATIONALING TOO EARLY

Let us assume that management has the competencies to design and implement the restructure. Often a common mistake is to operationalise, or to run, the initiative too early. The general trend is to assume that once a structure is defined, the initiative can be operationalised. Assuming this, large areas are left undefined such as functional boundary clarification, role clarification, delegation of authority, and escalation, leaving it up to lower management levels to define and agree amongst themselves. By activating an initiative like this too early, it makes consistent communication, human resources (HR) approach, and surfacing of risks and issues difficult to deal with. This could result in dragging the restructure, losing control, credibility, and in turn not delivering the return on investment aligned to the initial strategic intent. In order to combat this, it is important for the initiative to be handled like a project. The project must be resourced

correctly, including full-time resources assigned to the project, such as project manager, business analyst, HR, change management, legal, and so on. The project must also ensure that project communication is credible and consistent, as well as trustworthy. It must be approachable and coherent; once the process has been defined it must operate with intent and speed. The sooner the process is completed, the sooner employees will understand their roles and where they fit in, allowing them to put their focus back onto operational activities. Never underestimate the level of insecurity that a restructure can introduce into a system.

w LACK OF COMMUNICATION Most of the general planning, decision-making, and implementing of a restructuring process is done by higher-level management. The higher management will have certain focus areas. However, communicating these ideas and intentions right down to lower management can be difficult, especially in large companies, due to the size, complexity, and number of employees in the company. This is a problem because the lower levels of management are generally the key drivers of the business’s regular activities. For example, if it’s a car making firm, the managers in the factories are directly involved in the main business activity; making cars. These lower-level managers of the car-making firm are in fact more directly involved in the business’s regular operations than the higher-level management. If restructuring plans are not effectively communicated to the lower levels of management, little or adverse changes to the business’ regular activities could be made. Companies can resolve this issue by planning the restructure around the entire workforce and not just by concentrating on top management. The design principles


RESTRUCTURING

and methodology must be defined clearly and concisely, making sure resources are provided to guide assistance of methodology implementation across the different management levels. Essentially, the restructuring must combine initiatives with coaching for management.

x OMITTING EDUCATION METHODOLOGY

Omitting the education of the staff and management of the methodology used in restructuring is a problem for employee morale and work ethic. More often than not, restructuring has an unsettling effect on the employees of the company. They begin to fear for their jobs (as mentioned, restructuring often includes downsizing) and feel strained with the changes in their usual work strategies. This can result in employees losing focus on their work or even seeking new employment. Employees become even more worried if the company isn't forthcoming with details about the restructure. What is important to note is that while the company may not have the option of sharing all of the details of the restructuring ahead of time, a sense of transparency that allows employees to have some idea of what's happening may put them at ease. It is important for higher management to maintain transparency and direct communication with its employees during the restructuring process.

y DISCONNECT BETWEEN CHANGE AND SUPPORT FOR HR

In other words, this disconnection would be the difference between what higher management (those implementing the restructuring) want in terms of new hires and firing existing employees, in line with their restructuring plan, and the actions carried out by HR in achieving higher managements goals. This difference is clearly a problem not only in carrying out an effective restructuring,

but also because HR is able to change employees careers. What may occur is that employees, with years of experience and a large skill set, are let go and replaced with fewer and less capable employees. Also, a majority of HR departments are not geared to deal with the influx of project-based HR activities, such as those required during restructure initiatives. HR departments are mostly focused on resources that include transactional change activities. There are very few HR departments that are able to focus exclusively on the transformational change required for projects like restructuring.

z NOT MEETING REQUIRED COMPETENCIES

In most cases, it is seen that a valued resource doesn’t fit specifically into the new defined structure. What often happens next is instead of giving up on that resource or taking the extra time to decide whether or not the competency that the resource brings is still required, a place is found for them in the company. This is also seen when decisions around the restructuring of the business are based on relationships and emotions rather than logic and structure and what is truly best for the company at that given time. During the restructuring process, resources are often quite scarce. The company is under strain and cash flows are limited. Resource allocation must be done as effectively and economically as possible in order to increase the success of the restructure and of the company. If resources are not allocated efficiently, owing to personal relationships or emotions, the company may find itself in the same position that it began in and the restructuring will fail.

{ IGNORING FUNCTIONAL

BOUNDARY CLARIFICATION

FEATURE

departments, and scope of the operations. What often happens is that many companies stop at structure definition as they assume that boundary and role clarification, which are the duties and responsibilities of each management level, department, and operation, are clear from the structure. However, the same as the blue print of a house doesn’t allocate furniture, an occupant, or cleaning duties to each room, neither does structure definition allocate boundary clarification and role clarification to the restructuring of the company.

| FAILURE TO EMPOWER PERSONNEL

This is often typical of a major corporate restructuring and usually even after the plan has been issued and implemented and all the new players are in place, a vast authority still rests in the higher management or at least it seems that way to the employees. It is difficult for the new players to begin making their decisions and asserting their power as they are unsure of the rules, strategies, and activities as a result of the restructuring. Drawbacks that companies can encounter include losing sight of the strategic intent, getting caught up in the politics of the restructure and on who owns what, instead of what it will look like when it works well. Ultimately, what companies need to realise as a guiding principle for restructures, in many cases the how is very important. Long after the company has been restructured, the look and feel of the company and how well the company is performing in the market is the result of how the company was restructured. Despite these common pitfalls, there are times of accomplishment during the restructuring of a company. After all, the vision for the restructuring process often promises a brighter future.

Business restructuring is a labour intensive activity that should always follow structure definition. This is the blue print of each level of management, the various

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ARAMEX

COMPANY PROFILE

ANDY VAN DER VELDE CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

VALUE PROPOSITION Aramex is a leading global logistics and transportation solutions provider. Founded in 1982 as an express operator, the company rapidly evolved into a global brand recognized for its customized services and innovative multi-product offering. In an exciting move, Aramex acquired Berco Express in December 2011, bringing improved technology, best logistics practices and a committed global team to the company. A publicly traded company on the Dubai Financial Market (DFM: ARMX), Aramex employs more than 13 000 people in over 360 locations, across 60 countries worldwide, leading a strong alliance network by bringing together 40 independent express companies from around the world. Aramex South Africa offers a broad range of services including: International Express, Freight, Logistics and Warehousing solutions, Domestic Express, Automated Mailroom Solutions, E-Commerce Solutions and Online Shopping services. Store-to-Door Courier services are available at Pick n Pay, FreshStop and 3@1 stores. The business comprises of 16 branches and 3 warehouses nationwide, and employs more than 900 people.

www.aramex.co.za

In 2010, the company introduced a ‘Store-to-Door’ courier service offering and is currently in over 370 Pick n Pay, FreshStop and 3@1 Stores. The Aramex Drop Box offers a fast, reliable and convenient store-to-door courier service to consumers and small businesses delivering packages throughout South Africa to main centres, Monday to Friday, before 10h30 in the morning. Following the success of the domestic store-to-door courier service, Aramex have extended the offering and introduced an International Document Express option. This offers consumers a flat rate for delivering documents anywhere in the world. The documents are delivered within 3 – 7 working days, depending on the destination. More recently, Aramex South Africa has partnered with the 3@1 Franchising Group to launch Aramex International Express at the 3@1 franchise stores. Aramex Express offers easy, fast and convenient international shipping solutions to consumers and small businesses.The future at Aramex looks equally exciting. From a corporate point of view, there are finite plans to expand across Southern Africa with the opening of additional warehouses and offices. Globally, Aramex’s core focus is on emerging markets and with their own established offices and infrastructure in 14 African countries already, further expansion into Africa is an important focus for 2014.

COMPANY INFORMATION STATISTICS / DEMOGRAPHICS / HISTORY Year founded: 1982 South African CEO: Andy van der Velde South African Country Manager: Nick Brown NATURE OF BUSINESS Activity: International Express, Freight, Logistics and Warehousing solutions, Domestic Express, Automated Mailroom Solutions, E-Commerce Solutions and Online Shopping services. Store-to-Door Courier services are available at Pick n Pay, FreshStop and 3@1 stores.

Mission: To be recognised as one of the top five global logistics and transportation companies Purpose: To enable and facilitate regional and global trade and commerce

CONTACT INFORMATION HEAD OFFICE Physical address:

1 Quark Crescent, Linbro Park, Sandton 2065 Postal address:

PO Box 260584, Excom 2023

Telephone: +27 (0)11 457 3000 Fax: +27 (0)11 457 3126 Website: www.aramex.co.za Facebook: www.facebook.com/AramexSA Twitter: @AramexSA

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AQRATE

COMPANY PROFILE

CHRIS VAN WYK CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER: GAUTENG & WESTERN CAPE

VALUE PROPOSITION AQRate has its roots in the auditing and legal professions. We are able to offer our clients multidisciplinary professional knowledge in a profession that is fraught with legislative discrepancies and risk. Our uncompromising attitude towards interpretational ethics and our passion for transformation provides our clients with assurance that what they claim to be their B-BBEE status is not only legally defendable but also ethically justifiable. This approach to B-BBEE verification has kept us in good stead with businesses that has embraced transformation. Today, we verify more of the top 100 listed companies in South Africa than any of our competitors. The JSE, itself a client of AQRate, has engaged us for the last few years to oversee their survey of the black ownership of the Top 100 listed company segment. During this process we pioneered the measurement of mandated investors in South Africa. This is still the only empirical research done to date on the subject matter. We believe that our success in the listed company market segment is testimony to our approach to doing business as much as it is evidence of the listed environment ever so more embracing transformation. With the revised B-BBEE codes coming into operation in 2015 we trust that we will be able to help our clients navigate the sometimes murky waters of the codes with the same vigour, clarity, and professionalism they have come to expect from us in the past.

www.aqrate.co.za CONTACT INFORMATION AQRate Gauteng and Western Cape: Chief Executive Officer: Chris van Wyk

Chief Operating Officer: Etienne van As AQRate Kwazulu-Natal: Chief Executive Officer: Linda Ncgobo Chief Operating Officer: Brigitte Brun

COMPANY INFORMATION

Telephone: 0861 277 283 Email: enquiries@aqrate.co.za

STATISTICS / DEMOGRAPHICS / HISTORY Year founded: 2003 Founding members: Chris van Wyk, Linda Ngcobo, Brigitte Brun Employees: 55 Branches: 3 (Gauteng, KZN, Cape Town) Trade affiliations: South African National Accreditation System (SANAS); International Regulatory Board of Auditors (IRBA) Memberships: Association of BEE Verification Agencies (ABVA)

Website: www.aqrate.co.za

BUSINESS & FINANCE Major accounts / key clients: JSE, Sanlam, Santam, Old Mutual, Mutual & Federal, Discovery, OUTsurance, Clientèle, Allan Gray, Prudential, Capitec, PSG , Curro, Steinhoff, Imperial, Grindrod, Smit Amandla Marine, Pioneer Foods, Distell, Naspers, Media 24, Engen, Shoprite, Truworths, Lewis; Spar, Tongaat Hulett, Hulamin, Kwazulu-Natal Provincial Government; and many more.

EMPOWERMENT STATUS Black Empowerment Level - shareholding (%): A >50.1% black shareholding Gender Empowerment Level – shareholding (%): A >50.1% female shareholding Black Empowerment Level - executive directors/senior management (%): B 25.1%-50% black executive directors Gender empowerment level – executive directors/senior management (%): A >50.1% female executive directors Black Empowerment - total staff (%): B 25.1%-50% black staff Gender empowerment – total staff (%): A >50.1% female staff What is your BEE contribution level? Level 1 B-BBEE

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THE OSCARS OF SOUTH AFRICAN BUSINESS


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JUDGES’ DENNIS DYKES, CHIEF ECONOMIST, NEDBANK

ELOUISE KELLY, HEAD OF MARKETING, SABC LIMITED

Dennis Dykes is the Nedbank Group’s Chief Economist. He joined the Group in December 1983 and was appointed Chief Economist in May 1994. He is a director of the South African Chamber of Commerce and Industry (SACCI) and is the business convenor on the Nedlac Public Finance and Monetary Policy Chamber.

Elouise Kelly has worked at some of the most prominent companies locally and abroad. As a Branding, Communication and Business Strategist, Kelly has revamped content for TV channels, launched brands, and successfully helped companies meet their objectives.

LANCE FANAROFF, JOINT CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER, INTEGR8

LEIGH GUNKEL-KEULER, PUBLIC AFFAIRS, POLICY, AND COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR, PFIZER SOUTH AFRICA

A Professor at the London School of Business describes him as, “A marketing man and master deal-maker”. Through sheer grit and determination, Fanaroff co-founded Integr8 IT from a tiny bedroom in 2001 to its glamorous headquarters today.

DR NAMANE MAGAU, CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER, B & D SOLUTIONS

Lulama Mokhobo received a BA degree from the University of Botswana, Lesotho, and Swaziland, and completed a Master’s degree in Science at Utah State University in the United States. In 2005, Mokhobo joined the SABC as Head of Public Broadcasting services and later became the Group Executive.

Dr Namane Magau is the owner and executive/director of B & D Solutions, a management consultancy which she established in 2005. She has extensive experience in education, executive leadership, management, training and development.

Nomaxabiso Majokweni has been the CEO of BUSA since September 2011. She is no stranger to management of complex stakeholder relations and aims to position BUSA as a fully-representative, apex business organisation that contributes to a vibrant, transforming, and growing.

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Leigh Gunkel-Keuler is the Public Affairs, Policy, and Communications Director for Pfizer South Africa’s biopharmaceutical division. She currently serves on SACCI, as well as plays both a strategic and instrumental role at Business Unity South Africa (BUSA).

LULAMA MOKHOBO, GROUP CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER, SABC LIMITED

NOMAXABISO MAJOKWENI, CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER, BUSA

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RAJ DHANLALL, PARTNER, PRICEWATERHOUSECOOPERS Raj Dhanlall is a Chartered Accountant, holding further qualifications as a Fellow of the Institute of Internal Auditors and a Certified Fraud Examiner. He is a Partner at PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC), heading up the Gauteng Private Company Services Group.


CUSTOMER FOCUS AWARD WINNER

DIVERSITY IN THE WORKPLACE SPONSORED BY AIRPORTS COMPANY SOUTH AFRICA (ACSA) WINNER

FINALISTS

ESG AWARD WINNER

FINALISTS

FAST GROWTH SMME AWARD SPONSORED BY TELKOM BUSINESS WINNER

FINALISTS

FINALISTS

INNOVATION THROUGH TECHNOLOGY AWARD SPONSORED BY AIR TRAFFIC & NAVIGATION SERVICES

INVESTING IN PEOPLE AWARD

WINNER

WINNER

FINALISTS FINALISTS

LOGISTICS AWARD SPONSORED BY KINTETSU WORLD EXPRESS (KWE) WINNER

FINALISTS

MULTINATIONAL AWARD WINNER

FINALISTS

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THE

OSCARS

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THE CORPORATE CITIZENSHIP AWARD WINNER

SOUTH

AFRICAN

BUSINESS

YOUNG EXECUTIVE OF THE YEAR (<35 YEARS) AWARD CHRYSTAL POOLE (HR MANAGER) WINNER

FINALISTS FINALISTS

TOP PERFORMING ENTREPRENEUR OF 2013 AWARD WENDY KEMP (MANAGING DIRECTOR / OWNER) WINNER

FINALISTS

TOP PERFORMING BUSINESSWOMAN OF THE YEAR AWARD LYNNETTE MAGASA (CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER) WINNER

FINALISTS

TOP PERFORMING BUSINESSMAN OF THE YEAR AWARD SPONSORED BY TUMI STEVEN KARK (CEO) WINNER

FINALISTS

TOP PERFORMING GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENT AWARD WINNER

FINALISTS

TOP PERFORMING PARASTATAL / AGENCY OF THE YEAR AWARD SPONSORED BY THE S.A POST OFFICE WINNER

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THE

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SOUTH

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BUSINESS

BUSINESSWOMAN OF THE YEAR AWARD WINNER

BUSINESSMAN OF THE YEAR AWARD WINNER

Lynette Magasa, CEO of Boniswa Corporate Solutions

STEVEN KARK, CEO OF PAYCORP

How did it feel when you heard your name being called out?

What do you think set you apart from your peers for this award?

It felt like a dream come true, I was filled with overwhelming joy. For the first time in my life, I heard my name called as a winner. It made me strongly believe that nothing is impossible in life as long as you have faith and hope.

That’s not for me to say, although I do know what sets my company apart. We’re truly innovative. We’re passionate about providing financial inclusion to as many people and businesses as possible through our growing range of payment products and services. We care very deeply about the facilitating payments so that we can make a difference to people’s lives – people’s livelihoods depend on being paid. These are not just words. This is the state of mind I’ve engendered throughout Paycorp.

What do you think set you apart from your peers for this award? My peers are all from well recognised industries and very competitive. I guess my faith and commitment in the telecommunication industry and innovation with our strategic partners has put us on the map.

What is your secret to success? It is to have passion in what you do, that will see you through. Accept failure, but learn from those mistakes.

What impact do you feel the National Business Awards have on South African business? The National Business Awards is an excellent platform that helps South African businesses to stay competitive. It gives businesses recognition, not only as a marketing tool, but also works as a guideline for every business to become smarter and more professional.

What is your secret to success? I’ve thought about this and I think, in the end, it comes down to our so-called ‘secret sauce’: To have fun, make money, and do good. For many businesses, ‘making money’ is the main event but if you – and your staff – are not having fun and not doing good in the process, that money is never going to satisfy you. To me, a strong business leader is one who surrounds himself with the best possible team. I’ve built a leadership team that has the interests of the business at heart. This is carried through to every staff member, which means that we are a high performing business that operates effectively and efficiently.

Do you have any advice for potential future business men and women of the year award winners to achieve their goals? If they want to succeed they should do something they really believe in and care about, and they should remember it’s not just about the money. T O P 5 0 0 / 5 th E D I T I O N

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OVERVIEW For over 27 years, The Waste Group has been revolutionising the waste and recycling management industry. We offer sustainable solutions, including the implementation of customised solutions for all waste and recycling commodities; treatment; disposal; transportation; education and training; transparent monitoring and reporting; skills development; auditing, etc. The Waste Group was established in 1986 and has since evolved into one of the leading waste management groups in South Africa. ISO 14001 Accreditation 27 Years in business National Footprint Top 500 Best Managed South African Company Embracing the 5 R始s (Rethink, Reduce, Re-use, Recycle, Remove)

simplifying waste & recycling solutions...

OUR MISSION & VISION Mission: We offer peace of mind through the most professional people, systems and technology in waste management. Vision: Managing waste for a friendlier environment.

WASTE AND RECYCLING ASSESSMENTS: We conduct assessments of recycling and waste stream evaluations for municipalities, businesses (commercial, retail and industrial), schools and residential estates to help reduce costs associated to landfill and waste transportation costs. Onsite and offsite customised recycling programmes from office blocks to large scale sites; single stream recycling solutions are offerred.

The Waste Group始s projects and initiatives have drawn recognition by numerous organisations, government departments and municipalities in acknowledgement of our efforts.

WE ARE PASSIONATE ABOUT WASTE & RECYCLING! WE DO IT, LIVE IT, TEACH IT & PROMOTE IT!

National call centre: 0861 2 waste (92783) Fax: 0861 3 waste (92783) Website: www.wastegroup.co.za


CONTENTS

REVIEWS

TOP 500 REVIEWS MUST HAVE GADGETS FOR BUSINESS PROFESSIONALS

Top dogs vs scrappy rivals: Laptops and smart phones

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Top 10 business gadgets

143

BUSINESS BOOKS

The undercover economist strikes back – Tim Harford

146

Economics: The user’s guide – Ha-Joon Chang

147

Capital in the twenty-first century – Thomas Piketty

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Flash boys – Michael Lewis

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SA’S TOP BUSINESS ACCOMMODATION 150 CARS

Citroen DS3

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Peugot 208 GTI

154

Lexus ES 250

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TOP TOOLKIT: Gadgets for business

"Choosing a model of these devices is a big decision. It’s a financial investment as well as a lifestyle choice."

By Elizabeth Fletcher

There is an overwhelming array of gadgets to help you get the job done, from USB sticks the size of a R2 coin to a mouse that behaves like a laser. We’ve compared the pack masters to the underdogs in the smartphone and laptop markets so that you can make the right choice to suit your needs. The way we work has changed dramatically over the last few decades due to the constant evolution of the technology we use. With the incessant stream of new products, it’s easy to forget that we have more tools available to us than ever before. At the centre of business in most industries today are the computer and mobile phone. Choosing a model of these devices is a big decision. It’s a financial investment as well as a lifestyle choice. It’s worth investigating thoroughly because market-dominating brands are constantly being rivalled by increasingly dynamic and value-for-money alternatives.

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GADGETS

REVIEWS

TOP DOGS AND SCRAPPY RIVALS: Laptops and phones BEST SMARTPHONE ON THE MARKET: iPhone 5s 64GB

VALUE-FOR-MONEY ALTERNATIVE: HTC one

It should come as no surprise that, when it comes to the 2014 smartphone market, the iPhone 5s is top dog. Sporting Touch ID, a better camera than its predecessor, and iOS 7, the iPhone 5s is the phone of the moment – and Apple’s most powerful phone to date.

As HTC’s flagship Android smartphone, the HTC One is built to compete with the likes of the Samsung Galaxy S4 and the iPhone 5.

The standout features of this smartphone are the latest upgrades, including the 64-bit architecture, the M7 motion co-processor, the brand new iSight camera, and Touch ID. Once Touch ID has recorded your fingerprint(s), it has 360° readability of your digits. This means that you can unlock your phone no matter which way up you happen to be holding it. The iSight camera includes impressive features like the 3x video zoom, burst mode at a zippy 10 photos per second, auto image stabilisation, 30 frames per second panorama with varying light control, and fantastic slo-motion video capture. The screen size remains the same as the iPhone 5 at four inches, with a resolution of 1136x640 at 26ii. The weight, size, and build are much the same too at 7.6mm deep, 123.8mm tall, and 112g. This makes the iPhone 5s slimmer than both the HTC One and Samsung Galaxy S4. It comes in three colours: Silver, gold, and space grey. Various reviews of the iPhone 5s tend to agree; the phone is lightweight, but feels reassuringly premium. Navigation is intuitive, multi-tasking is speedy and, overall, it feels slicker than any Android or Windows phone on the market. Price: From R9 899.00 (64GB)

While it may not be the latest and greatest HTC model (that title belongs to the HTC One M8, released earlier this year), in terms of a value-for-money alternative to the iPhone 5s, this smartphone is the leading contender. In terms of build quality, the HTC One not only gives the Samsung S4 a run for its money, but the iPhone 5 too. Its dimensions of 137.4 x 68.2 x 9.3mm make it just slightly thicker than the iPhone 5. In terms of features, the most notable update is BlinkFeed, a customisable news aggregator that includes updates from your social networks. The 4.7 inch 1080p Full HD screen produces outstanding levels of contrast and colour reproduction – all the better to view the impressive images taken on the 4MP Ultrapixel camera. One of the best smartphone cameras out there, its ability to capture low light images is particularly noteworthy. The 1.7GHz quad-core processor along with 2GB of RAM makes the HTC One one of the fastest smartphones on the market. Not only that – it’s more than R3 000 cheaper than the iPhone 5s.

Price: From R6 055.00

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TOP LAPTOP ON THE MARKET: Macbook air 13.3" Intel Core i5

VALUE-FOR-MONEY ALTERNATIVE: Asus UX31 Zenbook 13.3" Intel Core i5

The MacBook Air remains one of the classiest, most portable laptops around, and the features of the 13.3” Intel Core make it a better buy than the (much pricier) MacBook Pro Retina, which comes with limited SSD storage and poor battery life.

Asus’s range of high-performance slim laptops are giving Apple’s MacBook Air a run for its money. Not only is it a beautiful piece of equipment, it also comes with a significant level of the latest technology, fantastic battery life, and impressive speakers.

The size and build of the MacBook Air 13.3” remains much the same as its predecessor – the same weight, but with improved battery life (up to 12 hours of internet-enabled usage). The tapered edges and wow-design make it feel even slimmer than it is. Weighing just 1.35kg, the MacBook Air 13.3” is 32.5cm wide, 22.7cm deep and 1.7cm high – at its thinnest point, a mere 0.3cm. Like all other Mac laptops, the keyboard is backlit – a feature you’ll struggle to live without the moment you’ve experienced it. Improved features include a faster Wifi capability and a 1 440 x 900 pixels display – so good that you might not even notice the lack of Retina. The 128GB of flash storage, 1.3GHz dual-core Intel Core i5 chip, and 4GB of onboard RAM make this a fast laptop. You can get faster – and this isn’t a match for the pricier Pro – but it’s hard to beat the joy of using the slim, light Air.

Price: From R16 036.16

Add to that a good R4 000 saving in price tag, compared to the MacBook Air 13.3”, and you have a serious value-formoney contender. The Zenbook is wedge-shaped in design, measuring 17mm at its thickest point and 3mm at its thinnest point when closed. Its features include two USB ports, one of which is USB 3.0, plus a USB card slot, mini HDMI, and mini DisplayPort for connecting to an external monitor. The Zenbook is not just a pretty face – it’s as quick as it is sexy. The Core i7 processor allows the laptop to handle demanding programmes easily, and the 4GB of RAM keeps it working speedily. Reviewers of the Zenbook agree that neither portability nor power have been sacrificed when it comes to this impressive laptop. One of the best ultraportable laptops on the market, the Zenbook 13.3” is well within the same league as the extraordinary MacBook Air – at a considerably more attractive price. Price: From R12 237.00

“The way we work has changed dramatically over the last few decades due to the constant evolution of the technology we use. With the incessant stream of new products, it’s easy to forget that we have more tools available to us than ever before.”

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10 GREAT WORK GADGETS u THE SONY SMART WATCH

REVIEWS

TUFF-‘N’-TINY™ USB Drive definitely lives up to the name. This memory stick is perfect as an everyday storage solution: It fits all standard USB ports and resists dust, water, and is static discharge-resistant. PC Magazine dropped a brick on it and the drive didn’t even notice. You can also attach it to your keys so you’ll always have it at hand to share files. At four, eight, or 16GB, there’s plenty of storage for quick and easy file transfers at work – whether it’s a document, presentation or video clip. With this simple tool, there’s no fussing with Wifi connections or networking. You can give and receive files anywhere and the device even offers to protect your information with a simple programme to password-protect some or all of the on-board storage. What’s novel about the TUFF-’N’-TINY™ is that the exposed connector is adhered right to the plastic case, instead of how most flash drives use a case with a slide-out connector. It’s a solid, compact solution available in green, red, black, and purple.

Scramble to dig out your phone from the bottom of your bag. Or look at your wrist. The Sony Smartwatch now offers a new kind of hands-free experience that allows full access to your phone from its stylish wrist-strap. The Android-powered device lets you see all of your vital notifications on the 1.3-inch OLED touchscreen. Fully customisable, you can make this eye-catching device exclusively yours by downloading compatible applications on Google Play, and replace the stylish wristband with your own. Functionality is impressive: You can manage calls, read text messages, emails, Facebook posts, and tweets,and thanks to the increasing number of apps, you can even use the SmartWatch to listen to music. The device is ideal for staying connected while you’re exercising, or keeping up with important notifications during meetings or social functions without burying your head in a phone.

v THE VERBATIM TUFF-‘N’-TINY™

w THE HP TOPSHOT PRINTER

HP’s TopShot printer defies scanning’s 2D reputation. Built on a laser colour printer, this multi-purpose device has gone where no scanner has gone before: The third dimension. Located on a collapsible arm perched where you'd expect the scanner lid to be, HP has added something it calls a TopShot scanner, which is actually an 8MP camera that copies or scans by snapping a picture. This means you can grab a quick snap of a 3D object as easily as you can a signed form. It works by taking six pictures at slightly different angles, three using the in-built flash and three without. These are then compiled into a single composite image, reducing the shadows and glare you'd get if a single exposure was used. These images can then be printed, saved onto your computer, or uploaded directly to the web. If you need to scan 3D objects – for showing products on your company website, say – this might be the multifunctional printer you've been waiting for.

No thicker than a R2 coin and water-impermeable, the Verbatim

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x GRID-IT!

a simple software utility that enables users to control two computers, with different Windows OS, simultaneously. For example, you can turn the second notebook's monitor into a second display for the first computer. You can also change the position and choose from four different display modes – primary, extended, mirror, and rotation – from the host computer.

z THE TIKI USB MICROPHONE When you’re travelling, it’s easy to forget the paraphernalia that accompanies all of the equipment in our lives. It seems like every device has a battery, charger, cable, bag, cover, and card. Grid-It! is a simple organisation system that makes keeping all of these parts in one easy place. It’s made up of dozens of elastic bands that hold devices firmly to the inside case. Its design allows for endless configurations of objects, digital devices, and personal effects. This snug fit also helps to protect your devices from being flung around by unruly airport baggage handlers and prevents them from filtering through your clothes in your luggage. It's slim and features a rear zippered pocket for more storage. Grid-It! comes in various sizes, ideal for anything from just the items in your purse to heavy duty photography equipment.

y T HE J5 CREATE WORMHOLE KM SWITCH

A Skype call with a client can be made confusing and awkward by poor sound quality. Background noise and interference can ruin an important conversation. One great gadget to prevent this is the Tiki USB microphone. It’s the first of its type to use advanced digital signal processing (DSP), which mimics the intelligence of human hearing by focusing on desired sounds, minimising background noise, and knowing when to mute. The device’s two modes adapt to the type of sound you want to capture: Speech Mode brings your voice to the forefront, cancelling background noise, and Natural Recording Mode captures a wide range of sources from vocals to instruments with clarity. Tiki is as compact as a standard flash drive, and plugs directly into your laptop's USB port, with driverless installation on both PCs and Mac, or you can make use of the included dock, a brown and silver metal sled that holds the microphone securely and offers a very useful three feet of cable if your USB port isn't in an ideal position.

How many times have you wanted to share files with a client but you’re on different operating systems and you don’t want to go through the hassle of going through a network or file sharing programme? The Wormhole KM Switch solves all of this instantly. You plug the USB cable into both computers (Mac or PC) and away you go. The Wormhole includes software on the USB connector that you install on each computer, and you can then copy files. The keyboard and mouse on one computer can control the second computer. Wormhole Switch DSS comes with

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{ THE COBRA TAG G5

So this one isn’t strictly for business, but it can prevent you going on a goose chase to get to work. The Cobra Tag G5 ensures that your day-to-day essentials never go astray so you can focus on the job at hand.


GADGETS

This clever little gadget uses Bluetooth wireless technology to create a two-way separation alarm between your smartphone and your valuables (your keys, for example). When that connection is broken by a separation of more than nine meters, both your phone and the Cobra Tag device on your essential start ringing to let you know something is being left behind.

REVIEWS

which is mapped with thousands of dots that the Smartpen uses to track your writing, digitise your notes, and anchor the audio. This data is also available on your desktop programme.

Should your phone slip between the couch cushions, just press a button on the fob, and it will make your phone ring. And should the keys attached to the tag disappear, you can use the Cobra app on your smartphone to find out where the tag was last. The Cobra Tag works with phones running iOS 5.0, Blackberry OS 4.5 or higher and Android OS 2.1 or higher. No more running around the house searching for something in a panic.

| THE LOGITECH WIRELESS SOLAR KEYBOARD K750

Here's when the real magic happens: The Smartpen records everything you hear or say as you write. Later, if you tap a word, the Smartpen will play back whatever was recorded at the time those notes were taken. Recorded audio is anchored to the notes. Now that's useful.

~ THE GYRATION AIR MOUSE

You love a wireless keyboard, but constantly changing batteries is such a hassle. You work on a computer, but you’re aware of the world outside your window. This incredible keyboard is for you. The Logitech Wireless Solar Keyboard charges itself whenever there’s light – and stays charged for at least three months in total darkness. At less than a centimetre thick, it’s ideal for desktop or laptop use. The advanced 2.4 GHz wireless unifying receiver means you can work or play in more places – like your comfy couch. The long-range wireless connection virtually eliminates delays, dropouts, and interference. It also means that you can easily add a compatible wireless mouse or keyboard, without the hassle of multiple USB receivers.

} THE LIVESCRIBE ECHO SMARTPEN

Rise up from your mouse page and navigate your computer from the air. The Gyration Air Mouse transforms the humble pointer into a remote control that you can wave around in the air, rather than roll across the table. The Air Mouse turns your natural wrist movements into functions, letting you highlight text, flick between screens, zoom in and out, as well as easily browsing the web and controlling media content. This great mobile mouse, with its 100’’ wireless range and integrated laser mouse technology, enables intuitive onand off-the-desktop computing for business. The device’s MotionTools software allows you to customise your Air Mouse experience. You can programme simple gestures for activating commands, launching applications, and much more.

This Smartpen is ideal for meetings or interviews where you want to take important notes, but not have to worry about writing down extensive detail. It also has incredible functionality for working with your notes after the meeting.

The long range RF technology works at a range of up to 100 feet, without line-of-sight limitations. The device has an elegant, ambidextrous design with three programmable buttons for customised control of application commands.

While the Smartpen allows you to take traditional ink notes, it simultaneously makes a digital copy of everything you write through the proprietary dot paper of your specialised notebook,

An electronic device can never replace solid graft, but having the right tools makes life more pleasant and makes your work more efficient.

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BUSINESS BOOK REVIEWS

Reading a business book is not the same as reading a novel. In a novel, you want to be surprised by the twist at the end. But with the business section, you’re reading with purpose. Unfortunately, that’s where it book in order to know whether it’s worth reading.

By Jason Coomer

The segments that follow are both review and overview, so that you can decide whether one of them is worth your time. Chang is also a fan of A Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, so you should expect to see the occasional reference to the number 42 “f” word in its title (!). The eccentricities aside, you must own this book. Reading the chapter that gives a brief economic history of the world should be a prerequisite for voting in any general election. His section on the various economic schools of thought (Keynesian, Marxist, Behavioralist, Neoclassical, Schumpeterian, and so on) is wickedly understandable. It’s not the list of qualities, succinct and clever summation of what those schools believe, and

by Ha-Joon Chang Ha-Joon Chang is an economics professor at Cambridge. He grew up in South Korea before it was rich; and as a result of his student experience in a non-rich Korea, he encourages the use of pirated copies of his books if the reader lives in a country with a GDP per capita that’s below R10 000. Meaning that he’s not the most orthodox of economists. He’s occasionally dismissive of free markets; he’s often a fan of state intervention; and he takes real umbrage with any economist that talks about their subject as though it can explain life, everything, and the Universe (like Tim Harford does).

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If I were honest, I’d be forced to say that I did not have high hopes for this book. Most people know Ha-Joon Chang for Bad Samaritans, his take-down of foreign aid and the neoliberalist preaching of the Washington Consensus, and 23 things they don’t tell you about capitalism, Chang’s criticism of free market theory. I’ve read both, and both were clumsy and awkward to follow. But It reads like the collection of the best and most incisive arguments that he has ever made during his career as a lecturing economist. wanted to make those), I learned things. Notably: Economists should be pluralists, trained in multiple ideologies. For each has their own merit.


STRIKES BACK

macroeconomic policy. It called into question the assumption that macroeconomic predictions could be based on the

Having told this story in the introductory chapter, Harford then breaks the narrative into a direct conversation with you, dear reader, where he helpfully asks questions on your behalf, and then proceeds to answer them.

by Tim Harford Tim Harford, that no-longer-so-undercover economist, often gets called the Malcom Gladwell of Great Britain. He’s out misconception, and breaking down the jargon for the masses.

Wait a minute – suddenly the economy is my problem? Relax. It’s a big responsibility, I know: n economy is for life, not just for Christmas. But you’re an intelligent person and you’re eager to learn. Cringe.

He takes mathematical broccoli and turns it into pizza. Or more accurately: He takes convoluted academic papers, and turns them into stories.

Then he tells the story about the great baby-sitting recession of Capitol Hill, (parable number two). The story involves babysitting coupons that functioned as scrip, and how a shortage of them led to hoarding (what Paul Krugman would call a saving glut).

In The Undercover Economist Strikes Back, Harford sets out to explain why macroeconomics is so frustratingly complicated.

The recession was eventually solved by the baby-sitting

particular parables.

smoking New Zealander of humble farming stock, who would rise to become the Indiana Jones of the economics world. Bill is most famous for the Phillips Curve, his namesake, which he developed in his doctoral thesis.

although this policy eventually led to a very different type of recession, where there were not enough baby-sitters, but plenty of scrip. The moral of the story: Government intervention is sometimes a good thing, but you can also have too much of it.

Harford eventually gets round to parable number three: The economics of prisoner of war camps. It involves food parcels from the Red Cross, an extraordinarily well-adjusting system and everyone nearly dying after the supply of Red Cross packages dried up.

So instead, Harford turns our attention to Phillips’ invention of

tanks through which water could circulate.

can devastate in a way that has nothing to do with how well the economy works.

national income, foreign trade, government spending, and

If anyone was paying close attention, you might have noticed recession, and the P.O.W. camp crisis sounded a lot like a

There were tanks for the banking sector and for foreign of economic activity.

So if you’ve ever wondered why the Republicans want austerity and the Democrats favour spending programmes, then this is a book you should read.

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CAPITAL IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY

divided class structure formed on the back of dynastic wealth. If you can wade through the academic thickness, you’re water system that once resembled an Egypt, with only the Nile and not much water in the surrounding desert. Then the cataclysmic events of the 20th century broke the banks and thrust up the river-bed, causing water to spread everywhere and making for a time of greenness.

geography to build dams. Gradually, the amount of water that gets lost through leakages and evaporation starts to reduce.

by Thomas Piketty

Capital in the Twenty-First Century is pretty close to the top of the have been discussed, criticised, and defended by everyone that’s anyone (and some that aren’t) in the economics world. Here’s Paul Krugman:

There is progressively less rain and there comes a point at which the rate of evaporation (g) is overtaken by the rate at which the water is accumulating in the deepening dams (r). Piketty’s argument is that the events of the 20th Century did not result in the fundamental change of economic forces, whatever modern economists might like to think. What happened was a temporary disruption of those forces; and the data suggests that the world is now on the cusp of returning to equilibrium.

“Piketty has written a truly superb book. It’s a work that melds

data analysis… This is a book that will change both the way we think about society and the way we do economics.” Piketty’s book is a tome of empiricism. It is dense and dataauthor loses some of his integrity by making some highly improbable policy recommendations. He opens the book with the Marikana platinum mine incident

"Piketty’s book is a tome of empiricism. It is dense and data-centric all the

wealth inequality can become. He then traces the issue back

when the chaos of communist revolution, two World Wars,

What followed was an economic free-for-all. The middle class boomed, growth was high, and economists hailed the successes of capitalism and the rise of the welfare state.

growth was higher than the rate of return to accumulated wealth: r < g

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few chapters, where the author loses some of his integrity by making some highly improbable policy recommendations."


we could, we don’t have direct feeds to the publishing houses or the departments of statistics that are releasing new data.

FLASH BOYS

So there is a good argument to be made that high frequency

To give you a quick example of a high frequency trade, let’s out tomorrow, and you feel that earnings above a certain level

You would just programme that decision into your computer’s by Michael Lewis reading the earnings report. Michael Lewis has a new book out about high frequency deliciously salacious.

those high frequency trading computers. Take that simplistic

The day after Flash Boys was published, the Federal Bureau of Investigation announced that it was launching an

variables in the report, and the reactions of other high frequency traders and the nuances in the wording of the report to determine if it’s negative news being spun in a positive way.

whether any insider trading or market manipulation was going Flash Boys

Then consider a scenario where you’ve placed your own trade with a broker, and your broker then goes to the market with your new bid, and in the instants before your broker accepts a trade, the high frequency traders transact in and out of the turn it into a movie. potential sell… High frequency traders transact at a speed that is faster than It blows the mind. means trading on information before it has become public. High frequency traders can post a trade in reaction to a newly-released piece of news mere microseconds after it’s published. Not milliseconds: Microseconds. The news gets pumped into these high-frequency trading computers via direct feeds from the publisher. The rest of us can’t react to news in microseconds and even if

"You would just programme that decision into your computer’s algorithm: And the instant the news gets blink – never mind reading the earnings report."

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TOP BUSINESS ACCOMMODATION By Sarah Bassett

When it comes to business travel accommodation, where you stay is a vital component to the success of a trip. The right location can be the difference between being ready to tackle business, after a restful nightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sleep and a good meal, and not being prepared at all.

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ACCOMMODATION

REVIEWS

There are some essentials and creature comforts that really do make all the difference. Whether you’re looking to impress the travelling big guns, or keep the budget down for a multi-stop, country-wide roadshow, here are our top picks for great places to stay in South Africa’s business centres.

All rooms include complimentary Wifi, 18-hour room service options, an electric safe, and all other standard business requisites. Conference facilities and meeting rooms are also on offer, as well as a fitness centre and a self-service business centre workstation.

JOHANNESBURG

NELSPRUIT

 outhern Sun OR Tambo International S Airport If you’re looking for something with maximum accessibility, the Southern Sun OR Tambo International Airport gets our vote. Less than a kilometre from the airport, the hotel is a five-minute walk from the Gautrain station and offers 24-hour check-in. Free shuttle service is available to both the Gautrain and airport. Facilities include a gym, a convenience shop, and a restaurant, as a well as business centre and conferencing facilities. For those with a little time on their hands, there is also a pool and day spa, and the Serengeti Golf Course is just 10 kilometres away.

Garden Court Hotel If you’re meeting with clients in the Sandton area of Johannesburg, it is wise to skip the traffic and stay close by. The Garden Court Hotel in Morningside is ideally located for the bustling Sandton central business district (CBD), while still offering suburban tranquillity after a busy day. It is known for its value for money, an opulent breakfast spread, and well-kitted fitness centre to work it off again. Guests have a choice between double twin beds or queen beds and rooms are fully equipped with all business requirements and satellite television. Wifi is complimentary and accessible throughout the hotel, though it is not particularly fast. A free Gautrain shuttle makes airport and city commutes easy.

PRETORIA Garden Court Hatfield Garden Court Hatfield is located in Pretoria’s trendy Hatfield suburb, is set against a backdrop of historic gardens, and offers easy access to major highways, the Pretoria CBD, and numerous government embassies, as well as the Gautrain. Visitors rank the hotel highly, noting the great personal service, convenient access to highways, quiet surrounds and on-site restaurant as top-notch.

The Orion Promenade Hotel The Orion Promenade hotel is conveniently situated in the city centre, less than 30 minutes from the Kruger Mpumalanga International Airport and just three kilometres from Nelspruit Golf Course, if such things tickle your fancy. The hotel offers a fitness centre, pool, and wireless internet access in all rooms. Lunch and dinner service is available from the on-site restaurant and a number of meeting and conference rooms are offered. Visitors note the friendly atmosphere, convenient location, and value for money as the highlights of this business travel spot.

DURBAN Southern Sun Elangani and Maharani The Southern Sun Elangani and Maharani is 31 kilometres from King Shaka Airport and travel time to and from is rarely more than 30 minutes. The interior was recently refurbished and offers a modern aesthetic and beautiful beach-side location, with easy access to all of Durban’s city centre. The hotel boasts extensive conferencing options and the restaurant gets a firm thumbs up, and the beach views make it a good space for meeting with and entertaining clients. The business centre offers all the modern amenities a business traveller needs and visitors highlight its convenient location and spectacular views as the perfect balance of business and pleasure.

The Benjamin If you fancy something smaller, with more of an intimate, home comfort feel as you travel the country, this bed and breakfast comes highly recommended by business travellers to Durban. The Benjamin is set in the heart of the city, offering easy access for business meetings and conference locations, including the Durban International Convention Centre, just five kilometres away. Wifi is available throughout and there is free secure parking on site.

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REVIEWS

ACCOMMODATION

No two of its 41 rooms are alike, though all offer all the standard air-conditioning, satellite television, and coffee facilities. Breakfast is served overlooking the garden and pool, and lunch and dinner can be found at a range of restaurant in the neighbourhood surrounds.

CAPE TOWN City Lodge Hotel V&A Waterfront The City Lodge Hotel V&A Waterfront is a three star hotel located within walking distance from the V&A Waterfront, the Cape Town International Convention Centre, and the city centre. It offers easy access to highways, making it convenient for airport transfers and movement outside of the city. The hotel boasts a high standard of service and amenities given its three star status and visitors are frequently impressed with the value for money. It is known for its morning breakfast spread and is close to a variety of good restaurants for client meetings or a tasty meal at the end of a busy day. The north side of the hotel offers views of the mountain and a picturesque canal, so be sure to ask for a room on the front side of the hotel.

Cape Grace If you are looking to impress a top executive or key client with all the luxuries and elegance Cape Town has to offer, the Cape Grace has it all, while still offering a location convenient for city business. Located on a private quay between the working harbour of Cape Town’s famous V&A Waterfront the Cape Grace is a welcoming sanctuary of tradition, sophistication, and contemporary comfort. The services are famed for faultless attention to detail and personal touch, the dedicated team of multi-lingual guest liaison are just one example of this. The hotel provides full boardroom services, including secretarial and PA assistance. A luxury chauffeur service provides BMW limousine transfers free within the City Bowl and capped complimentary Wifi is available in all rooms and public areas. There are three communication terminals with 24-hour complimentary internet access, secure undercover parking, and a free introductory wine tasting experience on offer for evening entertainment. The Cape Grace achieves rave reviews all round, but you do have to pay for what you get.

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GEORGE Protea Hotel King George The Protea Hotel King George receives praise for its excellent facilities and exceptional value for money. It is centrally located in the heart of town, with the Outeniqua Mountains as a back-drop. It is a 10-minute drive from the George Airport and is minutes away from a choice of golf course action. Free Wifi is available on request throughout the hotel and the rooms are equipped with all business travel necessities, including laptop-sized safes. The hotel’s terrace restaurant offers elegant atmosphere, and delicious convenient dining options. Request a room in the main wing, overlooking the golf course for maximum splendour.

EAST LONDON Quarry Lake Inn The Quarry Lake Inn is in the centre of East London, minutes away from every destination, and on the edge of the old quarry, now a lake. Rooms are designed with the business traveller in mind, with all the requisite amenities. There is no lunch or dinner service, but there are a number of restaurants nearby. Visitors note the tranquil atmosphere, location, friendly staff, and design details – such as stand-alone showers – as highlights that make this the business travel spot of choice for the city.

PORT ELIZABETH The Boardwalk Hotel The Boardwalk Hotel gets our vote as the place stay on a business trip to the windy city. Located perfectly for easy airport access, it offers five star accommodation and full conference facilities if required. All rooms offer a sea view and are rated as vale for money on space and amenities, each with complimentary Wifi included. There is ample parking available, even when the hotel is fully occupied. Visitors note the attentive and friendly staff as a consistent highlight of the hotel, as well as the attention to detail, such as the offering of real coffee which can be brewed in your own room. When you’ve been on the road a while, it’s touches like these that can make all the difference.


CARS REVIEWS

REVIEWS

TOP 500

CAR REVIEWS EYE CATCHING ELEGANCE By Judy Chileshe The Citroen DS3 is more stylish inside than the C3, on which it is based, delivers a more engaging driving experience, and offers enough customisation options to make it unique. The DS3 is a remarkably good car, and is surprisingly practical with a generous boot and seems to have style and substance, making it a whole lot of fun to drive. It is available as a bold-looking three-door hatchback and a two-door cabriolet with a full-length slide-back roof rather than being a full convertible. Citroen fit a large media screen in the centre of the dashboard that is controlled by buttons below the screen, making it awkward for the driver to control while driving. Citroen has fitted a flat bottom steering wheel that feels great in your hands and gives you a sporty driving experience, but not so much that it rattles your teeth.

CITROテ起 DS3 SPECIFICATION SHEET

There is a choice of three petrol engines, which all produce just the right amount of power. The car has powerful breaks that definitely caught my attention, but it did take me awhile to get used to. Highlights include the eye-catching LED running lamps, and those black alloy wheels that make it stand out. Citroen says the DS3 was designed with three keywords in mind surprise, appeal, and vitality. From the looks of things they are living up to them.

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ASTONISHING POWER By Judy Chileshe Peugeot has once again out done themselves. The 208 GTI has a super 1.6-litre turbocharged enigine that produces an astonishing 200bhp. It will effortlessly take you from zero to 100km/h in 6.8 seconds. I fell in love with this French beauty because of its lady sized body, but do not be fooled by the exterior looks - it has the power and speed. Naturally, it picked up the 2013 award for International Engine of the Year. From the outside, the 208 is a feast of curves, 17 inch alloy wheels, red calliper brakes, and chromed twin exhausts. The word Peugeot glints in red lettering from under the bonnet, and the lower edge of the grille is a fuming metallic red â&#x20AC;&#x201C; squint at it and it looks like it's got a thick lip. Inside, the steering wheel is tiny yet somehow still somehow manages to obscure the instruments. Overall, it feels and drives like a well-considered, well-made premium product that Peugeot can feel proud of.

A JOYOUS CRUISE By Van Fletcher This is the type of vehicle I always expect from a brand such as Lexus. The Lexus ES250 has sophistication, luxury, poise, and a smooth ride, all the ingredients that make this vehicle such a joyous place to relax and cruise, especially when you see the price tag. Everything seems to be where and how you want it to be, such as the camera that has guidelines to warn you when you come close to any objects while reversing. After all, its a big spacious vehicle. Additionally, it comes with some highly advanced safety features, which include lane-change cameras with a blind-spot monitor, anti-lock brakes, vehicle stability control, and 10 airbags. Driving the ES, I couldn't have been happier. It handled like a small coupe and the chassis delivers a smooth ride quality that serves as a base for its more-than-adequate engine. The engine delivers 135kw at 6 000rpm, it is a 2.5 litre dual VVT-I twin-cam four-cylinder engine, which will take you to 0-100km/h in less than 10 seconds. Hitting top speed will take you over the 200km/h mark. The two things that will attract prospective buyers are the fuel consumption, which averages around 8l/100km, and the purchase price of R449 000.

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A-Z INDEX

Top500 Companies Index Sorted by company name, sector, and telephone number

A ABSA Group Limited Banks...................................................................... (+27 86) 000 8600

Acer Africa (Pty) Ltd Computer hardware...............................................(+27 87) 151 3400

AC Nielsen Marketing & Media (Pty) Ltd Research companies............................................. (+27 11) 495 3000

Actom (Pty) Ltd Electrical Equipment...............................................(+27 11) 820 5111

Adams & Adams Legal Services......................................................... (+27 12) 418 8560

Adcock Ingram Holdings Limited Pharmaceuticals.....................................................(+27 11) 635 0000

Adcorp Holdings Limited Recruitment Group................................................(+27 11) 244 5300

Adidas South Africa (Pty) Ltd Sports Apparel.......................................................(+27 21) 442 6200

ADT Security (Pty) Ltd Private Security...................................................... (+27 86) 010 0911

AECI Limited Speciality Chemicals............................................. (+27 11) 806 8700

AECOM SA (Pty) Ltd Engineering groups............................................... (+27 11) 666 2000

Aegis Outsourcing South Africa (Pty) Ltd Business process outsourcing ............................ (+27 11) 461 9000

Afgri Operations Limited Agriculture..............................................................(+27 11) 063 2347

African Bank Investments Limited Micro finance......................................................... (+27 11) 256 9000

African Media Entertainment Limited Broadcasting contractors..................................... (+27 86) 123 7234

African Rainbow Minerals Limited Diversified Mining.................................................. (+27 11) 779 1300

African Response (Pty) Ltd Research companies..............................................(+27 11) 709 7888

Afrimat Limited Building and construction materials/Cement.. (+27 21) 917 8840

AfriSam South Africa (Pty) Ltd Cement....................................................................(+27 11) 670 5500

Afrox Specialty chemicals...............................................(+27 86) 002 0202

AIG South Africa Short term insurance.............................................(+27 11) 551 8000

Air Chefs (Pty) Ltd Food services............................................................(+27 11) 397 1331

Air Liquide (Pty) Ltd Gas........................................................................... (+27 11) 389 7000

Airports Company South Africa SOC Ltd Service delivery.......................................................(+27 11) 723 1400

Air Products South Africa (Pty) Ltd Gas............................................................................(+27 11) 570 5000

Allied Technologies Limited (Altech) Telecoms equipment.............................................. (+27 12) 648 3100

Alexkor Limited Diamond mining................................................... (+27 11) 788 8809

Allan Gray (Pty) Ltd Asset management................................................(+27 21) 415 2301

Allcare Administrators

Aveng Trident Steel (Pty) Ltd

Medical aid administrators.................................. (+27 11) 290 6200

Steel...........................................................................(+27 11) 861 7111

Allied Technologies Limited

AVI Limited

Electronic products................................................(+27 11) 715 9000

Food processors.......................................................(+27 11) 502 1300

Altech Alcom Matomo (Pty) Ltd

Avis Rent A Car South Africa

Telecoms equipment............................................ (+27 11) 235-7640

Car hire.....................................................................(+27 11) 387 8431

Altech Netstar (Pty) Ltd

Avon Justine South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Fleet management and vehicle tracking.............(+27 11) 207 5000

Beauty products.....................................................(+ 27 10) 205-5000

Amalgamated Beverage Industries

Avroy Shlain Cosmetics (Pty) Ltd

Beverages – Soft drinks........................................(+27 86) 000 0224

Beauty products.......................................................(+27 11) 655 3500

Amatola Water

Axiz Workgroup (Pty) Ltd

Water....................................................................... (+27 43) 707 3700

IT components........................................................(+27 11) 237 7000

Amka Products (Pty) Ltd Personal products................................................... (+27 12) 674 0400

Anglo American South Africa Limited Diversified mining.................................................. (+27 11) 638 9111

Anglo American Platinum Limited Platinum..................................................................(+27 11) 373 6246

AngloGold Ashanti Limited Gold..........................................................................(+27 11) 637 6273

Anglo Operations (Pty) Ltd Coal.......................................................................... (+27 11) 638 9111

ArcelorMittal South Africa Limited Steel.........................................................................(+27 12) 424 8800

Argent Industrial Limited Diversified Industrials...........................................(+27 31) 791 0061

Arup (Pty) Ltd Consulting engineers............................................(+27 11) 218 7600

Aspen Pharmacare Holdings Limited Pharmaceuticals.................................................... (+27 80) 012 2912

Assmang Limited Metals & Minerals.................................................. (+27 13) 256 5000

Astral Foods Limited Farming .................................................................. (+27 12) 667 5468

Astrapak Limited Packaging................................................................ (+27 11) 615 8011

Annique Health & Beauty Beauty products.................................................... (+27 12) 345 9800

Appeltiser (SA) (Pty) Ltd Beverages – Soft drinks.........................................(+27 11) 263 9250

Aquarius Platinum South Africa (Pty) Ltd Platinum................................................................. (+27 11) 880 3924

Aramex South Africa (Pty) Ltd Courier services.......................................................(+27 11) 457 3000

ARMSCOR Limited Aerospace and defence..........................................(+27 12) 428 1911

AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals (Pty) Ltd Pharmaceuticals...................................................... (+27 21) 447 3000

Aucor Sandton (Pty) Ltd Auction houses .......................................................(+27 11) 237 4444

Audi South Africa (Pty) Ltd Automobiles............................................................(+27 86) 043 4838

Aurecon South Africa (Pty) Ltd Engineering groups............................................... (+27 12) 427 2000

Austro (Pty) Ltd Industrial products and equipment....................... (+27 21) 856 4370

Aveng (Africa) Limited Construction groups................................................(+27 11) 779 2800

B Babcock Africa (Pty) Ltd Consulting engineers/ heavy machinery........... (+27 21) 951 8088

BAE Systems - Land Systems South Africa (Pty) Ltd Aerospace and defence.......................................... (+27 11) 747 3300

Barloworld Equipment Industrial products and equipment................... (+27 11) 929 0000

Barloworld Limited Diversified industrials...........................................(+27 11) 445 1000

Basil Read Holdings Limited Construction groups..............................................(+27 11) 418 6300

Bell Equipment Limited Heavy machinery................................................... (+27 11) 928 9700

Berry & Donaldson (Pty) Ltd Shipping................................................................. (+27 21) 462 4190

BestMed Medical Scheme Medical aid schemes.............................................(+27 86) 000 2378

BHP Billiton SA Holdings Limited Diversified mining...................................................(+27 11) 376 9111

Bidvest Food Services Food services...........................................................(+27 11) 772 8700

Bidvest Group Limited Diversified industrials...........................................(+27 11) 772 8700

Bidvest Magnum Group Security services.................................................... (+27 86) 124 3770

Bidvest Panalpina Logistics Freight forwarding ................................................(+27 31) 302 3811

Bidvest Protea Coin Group (Pty) Ltd Security services....................................................(+27 12) 665 8000

Bigen Africa Services (Pty) Ltd Consulting engineers............................................(+27 11) 802 0565

Bigfoot Express Freight (Pty) Ltd Road freight . ..........................................................(+27 31) 737 1000

Bloem Water Water....................................................................... (+27 51) 403 0800

Blue Financial Services Limited Micro finance......................................................... (+27 11) 504 6204

Bonitas Medical Fund Medical aid schemes.............................................(+27 86) 000 2108

Bowler Plastics (Pty) Ltd Packaging................................................................(+27 11) 392 5835

Bowman Gilfilan Legal services . .......................................................(+27 11) 669 9000

Brandhouse Beverages (Pty) Ltd Beverages – Breweries........................................... (+27 80) 027 2634 T O P 5 0 0 / 6 th E D I T I O N

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Brimstone Investment Corporation Limited

Clicks Group Limited

Dekro Paints (Pty) Ltd

Investment holding companies.......................... (+27 21) 683 1444

Diversified retailers............................................... (+27 86) 025 4257

Paint manufacturers...............................................(+27 21) 903 3131

BSi Steel Limited

Clientele Limited

Dell Computer (Pty) Ltd

Steel......................................................................... (+27 11) 398 0000

Life insurance..........................................................(+27 11) 320 3000

Computer hardware............................................... (+27 11) 709 7710

Budget Car and Van Rental (Pty) Ltd

Cliffe Dekker Hofmeyr Incorporated

Deloitte

Car hire.................................................................... (+27 11) 398 0000

Legal services..........................................................(+27 11) 562 1000

Accounting and consulting . ............................... (+27 21) 427 5300

Buildmax Limited

Clinix Health Group Limited

Denel (Pty) Ltd

Building and construction materials..................(+27 861) 691 177

Hospital management.......................................... (+27 11) 429 1000

Aerospace and defence......................................... (+27 12) 671 2700

Business Connexion (Pty) Ltd

Clover SA (Pty) Ltd

Deutsche Bank Securities (Pty) Ltd

Information technology groups......................... (+27 21) 550 3000

Daiary products . ...................................................((+27 11) 471 1400

Investment banks..................................................(+27 11) 775 7000

Bytes Document Solutions

Club Travel SA (Pty) Ltd

DHL International (Pty) Ltd

Office automation.................................................. (+27 11) 928 9111

Travel and tourism................................................ (+27 21) 427 1900

Freight forwarding.................................................(+27 11) 921 3666

Bytes Technology Group South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Coal of Africa Limited

DigiCall Solutions (Pty) Ltd

Information technology groups..........................(+27 11) 715 9000

Coal . .......................................................................(+27 10) 003 8000

Business process outsourcing .............................(+27 10) 211 5000

Coca-Cola South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Digicore Holdings Limited

Beverages – Soft drinks . ...................................... (+27 86) 011 2526

Fleet management and vehicle tracking............ (+27 12) 450 2222

Colgate-Palmolive (Pty) Ltd

Dimension Data (Pty) Ltd

Personal products................................................. (+27 11) 898 2300

Information technology groups..........................(+27 11) 575 0000

Comair Limited

Direct Channel Holdings (Pty) Ltd

Airlines......................................................................(+27 11) 921 0111

Business process outsourcing............................. (+27 11) 399 6000

Command Security Services SA (Pty) Ltd

Discovery Health (Pty) Ltd

Private security....................................................... (+27 21) 511 5109

Medical aid administrators.................................. (+27 11) 529 2888

Compass Group South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Distell Group Limited

Food services.......................................................... (+27 11) 209 2400

Distillers and vintners..........................................(+27 21) 809 7000

Consol Glass (Pty) Ltd

Distribution & Warehousing Network Limited

Packaging............................................................... (+27 12) 318 8800

Builders merchants................................................(+27 11) 323 0450

Continental Coal Limited

DGB (Pty) Ltd

Coal..........................................................................(+27 11) 881 1420

Distillers and vintners ..........................................(+27 11) 653 1000

Continental Outdoor Media (Pty) Ltd

Dollar Thrifty Car Rental

Outdoor advertising...............................................(+27 11) 514 1400

Car hire.....................................................................(+27 86) 100 2111

Control Instruments Group Limited

Draftfcb South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Electrical equipment..............................................(+27 11) 627 2500

Advertising............................................................. (+27 11) 566 6000

Coronation Fund Managers Ltd

DRD Gold Limited

Asset management................................................(+27 80) 022 1177

Gold ........................................................................ (+27 11) 470 2600

Corobrik (Pty) Ltd

Dulux AkzoNobel (Pty) Ltd

Building and construction materials.................. (+27 31) 560 3111

Paint manufacturers..............................................(+31 20) 502 7555

C Canal Walk Shopping Centre Shopping centres..................................................(+27 21) 529 9600

Cape Gate (Pty) Ltd Steel..........................................................................(+27 16) 980 2121

Cape Town International Convention Centre Exhibition and conference facilities................... (+27 21) 410 5000

Capital Properties Limited Real estate holdings and development...............(+27 11) 612 6870

Capitec Bank Limited Banks.......................................................................(+27 86) 010 2043

Capital Properties Limited Real estate holdings and development...............(+27 11) 612 6870

Capitec Bank Limited Banks.......................................................................(+27 86) 010 2043

Cargo Carriers Limited Road freight............................................................(+27 11) 485 8700

Cashbuild South Africa (Pty) Ltd Builders merchants................................................(+27 11) 248 1500

Caxton and CTP Publishers and Printers Limited Media groups.........................................................(+27 11) 889 0600

Chemspec Prominent Paints Paint manufacturers..............................................(+27 21) 552 7733

Cipla Medpro South Africa Limited Pharmaceuticals.................................................... (+27 21) 914 0520

Circuit Breaker Industries: Low Voltage Electrical equipment............................................. (+27 11) 928 2000

Citizen Surveys Research companies............................................. (+27 21) 447 4484

City Lodge Hotels Group Hotels.......................................................................(+27 11) 552 7600

Cell C (Pty) Ltd Telecoms (wireless)............................................... (+27 84) 174 4000

Ceramic Industries Limited

Country Bird Holdings Limited Farming................................................................... (+27 11) 447 6044

Courier IT South Africa (Pty) Ltd Courier services . ................................................... (+27 11) 928 8300

Cozens Recruitment Services (Pty) Ltd Recruitment group................................................. (+27 11) 318 0177

CSE/Northmec Heavy machinery....................................................(+27 11) 922 2300

CSIR International Convention Centre Exhibition and conference facilities................... (+27 12) 841 3884

Cullinan Holdings Limited Travel and tourism..................................................(+27 11) 770 7511

E Easigas (Pty) Ltd Gas............................................................................(+27 11) 389 7700

Eastgate Shopping Centre Shopping centres..................................................(+27 80) 045 4863

Edcon Holdings (Pty) Ltd Retail – soft good................................................... (+27 11) 495 6000

Edward Nathan Sonnenbergs Incorporated Legal services . ....................................................... (+27 11) 269 7600

ELB Equipment Holding (Pty) Ltd Heavy machinery................................................... (+27 11) 306 0700

Ellerines Holdings Limited

Ceres Fruit Juices (Pty) Ltd

D DairyBelle (Pty) Ltd

Beverages – Soft drinks........................................ (+27 23) 316 9100

Diary products....................................................... (+27 11) 286 0360

Electrical equipment............................................. (+27 11) 490 3800

Chubb Security SA (Pty) Ltd

Datatec Limited

Enforce Security Services (Pty) Ltd

Private security.......................................................(+27 86) 100 2211

Information technology groups..........................(+27 11) 233 1000

Security services.....................................................(+27 31) 573 7600

Claremart Auctioneers (Pty) Ltd

Dawn Wing Express Logistics (Pty) Ltd

ENRA Technologies CC

Auction houses...................................................... (+27 21) 425 8822

Courier services..................................................... (+27 86) 122 3224

Clariant Southern Africa (Pty) Ltd

DeBeers Consolidated Mines Limited

Specialty chemicals............................................... (+27 11) 929 5800

Diamond mining.................................................... (+27 53) 839 4111

Clear Freight (Pty) Ltd

Defy Appliances (Pty) Ltd

Freight forwarding.................................................(+27 11) 626 1920

Household appliances......................................... (+27 21) 526 3000

Building and construction materials.................(+27 16) 930 3600

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Furniture retailers................................................. (+27 10) 201 2000

Ellies Holdings Limited

Business software solutions.................................(+27 21) 836 7721

Enviroserv Holdings Waste management.............................................. (+27 800) 192 783

EOH Holdings Limited Information technology groups..........................(+27 11) 607 8100


Eqstra Holdings Limited

Gibb (Pty) Ltd

HPE Africa (Pty) Ltd

Diversified industrials.......................................... (+27 11) 966 2000

Consulting engineers........................................... (+27 21) 469 9100

Heavy machinery....................................................(+27 11) 397 4670

Ernst and Young South Africa

Gijima Group Limited

HRG Rennies Travel (Pty) Ltd

Accounting and consulting................................. (+27 21) 443 0200

Information technology groups......................... (+27 12) 675 5000

Travel and tourism.................................................(+27 11) 407 2400

Ericsson South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Glencore Xstrata

HSBC

Telecoms equipment ........................................... (+27 11) 844 2000

Coal......................................................................... (+41 41) 709 2000

Investment banks................................................. (+27 11) 676 4200

Eskom Holdings SOC (Pty) Ltd

Global Telesales (Pty) Ltd

Hudaco Industries Limited

Service delivery....................................................... (+27 11) 800 8111

Business process outsourcing ..................................(011) 411 2000

Industrial products and equipment....................(+27 11) 657 5000

Estee Lauder Companies

Globeflight Worldwide Express Logistics (Pty) Ltd

Huge Telecom (Pty) Ltd

Beauty products.................................................... (+27 800) 390 011

Courier services.....................................................(+27 21) 380 6800

Telecoms solutions............................................... (+27 11) 603 6000

eTV (Pty) Ltd

Gold Circle (Pty) Ltd

Hulamin Limited

Broadcasting contractors......................................(+27 11) 537 9300

Gaming and leisure............................................... (+27 11) 562 9700

Steel..........................................................................(+27 33) 395 6911

Europcar

Golden Era Group of Companies (Pty) Ltd

Hyprop Investments Limited

Car hire.................................................................... (+27 11) 479 4000

Packaging.................................................................(+27 11) 839 3117

Real estate holdings and development ............. (+27 11) 447 0090

Evraz Highveld Steel & Vanadium Limited

Gold Fields Limited

Steel..........................................................................(+27 13) 690 9911

Gold......................................................................... (+27 11) 562 9700

Exp SA (Pty) Ltd

Gordon Institute of Business Science

IIBM South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Branding and design agencies..............................(+27 11) 549 5340

Business schools....................................................(+27 11) 771 4000

Computer hardware............................................... (+27 11) 302 9111

Exxaro Coal (Pty) Ltd

Grant Thornton THL Consulting (Pty) Ltd

iBurst (Pty) Ltd

Coal......................................................................... (+27 12) 307 5000

Accounting and consulting..................................(+27 11) 322 4500

Internet service providers.................................... (+27 87) 720 2020

Exxaro Resources Limited

Graduate School of Business Leadership

ICC Durban (Pty) Ltd

Diversified mining................................................. (+27 12) 307 5000

Business schools....................................................(+27 11) 652 0369

Exhibition and conference facilities................... (+27 31) 360 1000

FFair Cape Dairies (Pty) Ltd

Grid Worldwide Branding and Design (Pty) Ltd

Iliad Africa Trading (Pty) Ltd

Branding and design agencies............................. (+27 11) 502 4600

Builders merchants................................................(+27 11) 847 7300

Grindrod Limited

Illovo Sugar Limited

Shipping..................................................................(+27 31) 304 1451

Sugar....................................................................... (+27 31) 508 4300

Group Five Limited

Impala Platinum Holdings Limited

Construction groups............................................. (+27 21) 763 6100

Platinum.............................................................................Platinum

Growthpoint Properties Limited

Imperial Logistics

Real estate holdings and development ............. (+27 11) 944 6001

Road freight............................................................(+27 11) 677 5000

GWK Beperk

Incredible Connection

Agriculture..............................................................(+27 21) 180 4216

IT components....................................................... (+27 86) 001 1700

Dairy products........................................................(+27 21) 557 7600

Fedhealth Medical Scheme Medical aid schemes............................................. (+27 86) 000 2153

Feedem Pitseng (Pty) Ltd Food services...........................................................(+27 11) 439 2300

Fiat Group Automobiles South Africa (Pty) Ltd Automobiles.......................................................... (+27 10) 252 5000

Fidelity Security Services (Pty) Ltd Security services.....................................................(+27 31) 737 1000

H

Infrasors Holdings Limited Building and construction materials.................(+27 12) 664 5649

Finbond Mutual Bank

Halewood International South Africa (Pty) Ltd)

Initiative Media (Pty) Ltd

Micro finance......................................................... (+27 12) 460 7288

Beverages â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Breweries............................................(+27 11) 746 4200

Media agencies...................................................... (+27 11) 780 6200

First Car Rental & CMH Fleet Solutions

Hans Merensky Holdings (Pty) Ltd

Innovation Group (Pty) Ltd

Car hire.................................................................... (+27 11) 230 9999

Forestry....................................................................(+27 11) 482 1770

Business process outsourcing..............................(+27 11) 790 5200

FirstRand Limited

Harmony Gold Mining Company Limited

Internet Solutions a Division of Dimension Data

Banks ...................................................................... (+27 11) 282 1808

Gold .........................................................................(+27 11) 411 2000

Internet service providers.....................................(+27 11) 575 1000

Fleet Africa (Pty) Ltd

Hellmann Worldwide Logistics

Interwaste Holdings Limited

Fleet management and vehicle tracking.............(+27 11) 523 4300

Freight forwarding................................................ (+27 21) 935 5280

Waste management...............................................(+27 11) 323 7300

Flight Centre SA (Pty) Ltd

Hertz Rent a Car

Investec Bank Limited

Travel and tourism................................................ (+27 87) 740 5000

Car hire.................................................................... (+27 21) 410 6800

Investment banks................................................. (+27 11) 286 7000

Ford Motor Company of Southern Africa (Pty) Ltd

Hewlett-Packard SA (Pty) Ltd

Investec Property Fund Limited

Automobiles.......................................................... (+27 86) 001 1022

Computer Hardware..............................................(+27 11) 785 1000

Real estate holdings and development...............(+27 11) 286 7500

Foschini Group Limited

HHO Africa

Invicta Holdings Limited

Retail â&#x20AC;&#x201C; soft goods................................................. (+27 86) 057 6576

Consulting engineers............................................(+27 11) 257 8460

Industrial products and equipment................... (+27 21) 929 4780

Foskor (Pty) Ltd

Hino South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Ipsos SA

Metals and minerals............................................. (+27 11) 347 0600

Commercial vehicles............................................ (+27 80) 011 66 04

Research companies..............................................(+27 11) 709 7800

Fruit & Veg City Holdings (Pty) Ltd

Hisense SA Sales Holdings (Pty) Ltd

Irvin & Johnson Limited

Food retailers . ........................................................(+27 21) 914 8011

Consumer electronics......................................... (+27 860) 447 3673

Fishing.................................................................... (+27 21) 402 9200

G G4S Secure Solutions (PTY) Ltd

Hi-Tec Sports Distributors (Pty) Ltd

Italtile Ceramics Limited

Sports apparel.........................................................(+27 21) 551 4939

Builders merchants................................................(+27 11) 510 9050

Hollard Insurance Company Limited

Itec Group SA (Pty) Ltd

Short term insurance.............................................(+27 11) 351 5000

Office automation................................................. (+27 11) 236 2000

Home Of Living Brands (Pty) Ltd

Iveco South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Household appliances ..........................................(+27 11) 267 3300

Commercial vehicles............................................. (+27 80) 011 6967

Security services.................................................... (+27 10) 001 4500

Gallagher Convention Centre Exhibition and conference facilities................... (+27 11) 266 3000

Gateway Shopping Centre Shopping centres...................................................(+27 31) 514 0500

General Motors South Africa (Pty) Ltd Automobiles.......................................................... (+27 80) 042 2777

Hosken Consolidated Investments Limited HPC a division of Tiger Brands

JJD Group Limited

Personal products................................................. (+27 11) 840 4000

Diversified retailers............................................... (+27 11) 408 0408

Investment holding companies.......................... (+27 21) 481 7560

JDG Trading (Pty) Ltd Furniture retailers................................................. (+27 11) 408 0408

T O P 5 0 0 / 6 th E D I T I O N

157


JIC Mining Services

L’Oreal South Africa Holdings (Pty) Ltd

Mondi Limited

Mining services ..................................................... (+27 11) 564 9400

Beauty products ................................................... (+27 11) 286 0700

Forestry ....................................................................(+27 31) 451 2111

Johannesburg Water

Luxor Paints (Pty) Ltd

Motseng Investment Holdings (Pty) Ltd

Water ...................................................................... (+27 11) 688 1400

Paint manufacturers .................................................(021) 402 8946

Real estate holdings and development ............. (+27 11) 267 8000

Johnson & Johnson (Pty) Ltd Personal products .................................................(+27 11) 921 7100

JP Morgan Investment banks ....................................................1-212-270-6000

J Walter Thompson SA (Pty) Ltd Advertising ............................................................ (+27 11) 806 8000

K Kaap Agri Bedryf Limited Agriculture.............................................................(+27 22) 482 8000

Kagiso Media Limited Media groups ........................................................ (+27 11) 034 9200

Kansai Plascon Africa (Pty) Ltd Paint manufacturers ............................................(+27 86) 020 4060

KAP Industrial Holdings Limited Diversified industrials .........................................(+27 21) 808 0900

Kaulani Civils (Pty) Ltd Engineering groups.............................................. (+27 12) 658 0070

Kelly Group Limited Recruitment group............................................... (+27 11) 722 8000

Kia Motors SA (Pty) Ltd Automobiles ..........................................................(+27 11) 457 0200

Kimberly-Clark South Africa (Pty) Ltd Personal products ................................................. (+27 80) 011 5711

King James Advertising Cape Town Advertising ............................................................ (+27 21) 469 1500

Kintetsu World Express South Africa (Pty) Ltd Freight forwarding ................................................(+27 11) 573 5700

Komatiland Forests (Pty) Ltd Forestry .................................................................. (+27 86) 172 3265

Komatsu Southern Africa (Pty) Ltd \ Heavy machinery ...................................................(+27 11) 923 1000

KPMG Accounting and consulting ..................................(+27 11) 647 7111

Kuehne Nagel (Pty) Ltd Freight forwarding ................................................(+27 11) 574 7000

KWV South Africa (Pty) Ltd Distillers and vintners ..........................................(+27 21) 807 3911

Kyocera Document Solutions (Pty) Ltd Office automation ................................................ (+27 11) 540 2600

LLafarge Industries South Africa (Pty) Ltd Cement .................................................................. (+27 11) 657 0000

Legacy Hotels and Resorts (Pty) Ltd Hotels .....................................................................(+27 11) 806 6800

Lesedi Nuclear Services Consulting engineers ...........................................(+27 21) 525 1300

Lewis Group Limited Furniture retailers................................................. (+27 21) 447 6491

Liberty Holdings Limited Life insurance .........................................................(+27 11) 408 3063

Life Healthcare Group Holdings Limited Hospital management..........................................(+27 11) 219 9000

LG Electronics SA (Pty) Ltd Consumer electronics ..........................................(+27 80) 054 5454

Lonmin Plc Platinum .................................................................(+27 11) 218 8300

M Macsteel Service Centres SA (Pty) Ltd Steel .........................................................................(+27 11) 871 0000

Mango Airlines (Pty) Ltd Airlines................................................................... (+27 11) 086 6100

Manhattan Corporation (Pty) Ltd

Mr Price Group Limited Retail – soft goods ................................................ (+27 31) 310 8000

M-Tec (Pty) Ltd Electrical equipment ............................................ (+27 16) 450 8200

MTN Business Solutions (Pty) Ltd

Manpower SA (Pty) Ltd

Internet service providers ....................................(+27 11) 235 6500

Recruitment group................................................(+27 11) 465 6020

MTN Group Limited

MAN Truck & Bus SA (Pty) Ltd

Telecoms (wireless)...............................................(+27 11) 912 3000

Commercial vehicles .............................................(+27 31) 792 7464

Multichoice South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Marpro Trawling

Broadcasting contractors .................................... (+27 11) 289 3000

Fishing ...................................................................(+27 21) 440 5600

Murray & Roberts Cementation (Pty) Ltd

Masonite (Africa) Limited

Mining services ......................................................(+27 11) 201 5000

Building and construction materials .................(+27 11) 453 3260

Murray & Roberts Holdings Limited

Massbuild (Pty) Ltd

Construction groups............................................ (+27 11) 456 6200

Builders merchants .................................................(27 11) 517 0000

Mustek Limited

Massmart Holdings Limited

Computer hardware ..............................................(+27 11) 237 1000

Diversified retailers ...............................................(+27 11) 517 0000

Mutual & Federal Insurance Company Limited

McCain Foods South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Short term insurance ........................................... (+27 86) 022 5563

Food processors .................................................... (+27 11) 856 6000

Mvelaserve Limited

Mediaedge CIA (Pty) Ltd

Investment holding companies.........................(+27 87) 803 3400

Media agencies....................................................(+44 207) 803 2000

Mweb Connect (Pty) Ltd

The MediaShop (Pty) Ltd

Internet service providers ................................... (+27 21) 596 8300

Media agencies...................................................... (+27 11) 258 4000

N Namibian Breweries Limited

Medi Clinic Southern Africa Limited Hospital management ........................................(+27 21) 809 6500

MediHelp Medical Scheme Medical aid schemes ............................................(+27 86) 010 0678

Medscheme Holdings (Pty) Ltd Medical aid administrators ..................................(+27 11) 510 2000

Megafreight Services (Pty) Ltd Freight forwarding ................................................(+27 21) 413 4300

Melomed Hospital Holdings Limited Hospital management......................................... (+27 21) 637 8824

Menlyn Park Shopping Centre Shopping centres ................................................. (+27 12) 471 0600

Merafe Resources Limited Metals and minerals..............................................(+27 11) 783 4780

Mercedes-Benz South Africa (Pty) Ltd Automobiles ..........................................................(+27 12) 677 1500

Metorex (Pty) Limited Metals and minerals.................................................+27 11 215 4000

Metropolitan Health (Pty) Ltd Medical aid administrators ..................................(+27 21) 480 4511

Metso Minerals SA (Pty) Ltd Mining services ..................................................... (+27 11) 961 4000

Mhlathuze Water Water ...................................................................... (+27 35) 902 1000

Mica Investments (Pty) Ltd Builders merchants ...............................................(+27 11) 479 3300

Microsoft SA (Pty) Ltd Business software solutions............................... (+27 86) 022 5567

Mix Telematics Africa (Pty) Ltd Fleet management and vehicle tracking ........... (+27 11) 654 8000

MMI Holdings Limited Life insurance .........................................................(+27 12) 671 8911

Shipping ................................................................ (+27 11) 601 2000

T O P 5 0 0 / 6 th E D I T I O N

Packaging................................................................(+27 11) 994 5547

Mining services ......................................................(+27 11) 748 8800

MOL South Africa (Pty) Ltd

158

Mpact Limited

Beverages – Breweries ........................................(+264 61) 320 4999

Nampak Limited Packaging................................................................(+27 11) 719 6300

Nashua Limited Office automation ................................................ (+27 11) 232 8000

Naspers Limited Media groups .........................................................(+27 21) 406 2121

Nedbank Group Limited Banks....................................................................... (+27 86) 055 5111

Network BBDO (Pty) Ltd Media agencies ...................................................... (+27 11) 912 000)

Neotel (Pty) Ltd Telecoms (fixed-line) ........................................... (+27 11) 585 0000

Netcare Limited Hospital management..........................................(+27 11) 301 0000

New Balance SA (Pty) Ltd Sports apparel ....................................................... (+27 21) 705 6224

Nike South Africa (Pty) Ltd Sports apparel ........................................................(+27 11) 256 0700

Nissan South Africa (Pty) Ltd Automobiles .........................................................(+27 80) 064 7726

Northam Platinum Limited Platinum ................................................................ (+27 11) 759 6000

North West University Universities ...........................................................(+27 18) 299-4897

Norton Rose South Africa Legal services ........................................................ (+27 11) 685 8630

Notabene (Pty) Ltd Media agencies...................................................... (+27 11) 582 6200

Novartis South Africa (Pty) Ltd Pharmaceuticals .................................................... (+27 11) 929 9111


Nu World Holdings Limited

Resilient Property Income Fund Limited

Savino Del Bene South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Household appliances ..........................................(+27 11) 321 2111

Real estate holdings and development ............. (+27 11) 612 6800

Freight forwarding ................................................(+27 11) 437 3000

Reunert Limited

Scaw South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Electronic products ...............................................(+27 11) 517 9000

Steel ......................................................................... (+27 11) 621 1555

Rex Trueform Clothing Company Limited

Sea Harvest Corporation (Pty) Ltd

Retail – soft goods ................................................(+27 21) 460 9400

Fishing ....................................................................(+27 21) 417 7900

Ricoh South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Sechaba Medical Solutions (Pty) Ltd

O Oceana Group Limited Fishing ................................................................... (+27 21) 410 1400

Ogilvy & Mather South Africa (Pty) Ltd Advertising ............................................................ (+27 11) 709 6600

Office automation .................................................(+27 11) 723 5000

Old Mutual

Rockwell Diamonds Incorporated

Life insurance ........................................................(+27 86) 094 7366

Diamond mining ...................................................(+27 11) 484 4722

Old Mutual Investment Group South Africa

Royal Bafokeng Holdings (Pty) Ltd

Asset management .............................................. (+27 21) 509 5022

Investment holding companies......................... (+27 11) 530 8000

Omnia Holdings (Pty) Ltd

Royal Bafokeng Platinum Limited

Specialty chemicals ............................................(+27 11) 709 8888

Platinum ................................................................ (+27 10) 590 4510

Omnicom Media Group (Pty) Ltd

Royalmnandi (Pty) Ltd

Media agencies.......................................................(+27) 11 303 2000

Food services ..........................................................(+27 12) 001 7160

Optimum Coal Holdings Limited

Reutech Radar Systems

Coal..........................................................................(+27 11) 447 3858

Aerospace and defence .........................................(+27 21) 880 1150

P Pretoria Portland Cement Ltd (PPC)

Revlon South Africa (Pty) Ltd Beauty products ....................................................(+27 11) 971 0812

Medical aid administrators .................................(+27 11) 353 0000

Securitas Specialised Services (Pty) Ltd Private security ......................................................(+27 86) 191 1652

Sedibeng Brewery (Pty) Ltd Beverages – Breweries ............................................(+27 10) 216 1115

Sedibeng Water Water .......................................................................(+27 56) 515 0200

Sekunjalo Investments Group (Pty) Ltd Investment holding companies......................... (+27 21) 427 1400

Sentula Mining Limited Mining services ...................................................... (+27 11) 656 1303

Senwes Limited Agriculture.............................................................(+27 18) 464 7800

PricewaterhouseCoopers South Africa

S Saab Grintek Defence (Pty) Ltd

Accounting and consulting .................................(+27 11) 797 4000

Aerospace and defence ........................................(+27 12) 672 8000

Shoprite Holdings Limited

Primedia Limited

Saab Grintek Technologies (Pty) Ltd

Diversified retailers/ food retailers ...................(+27 21) 980 4000

Broadcasting contractors/ media groups.......... (+27 11) 506 3000

Electronic products ..............................................(+27 12) 672 8000

Sibanye Gold Limited

Primedia Outdoor

SA Airlink (Pty) Ltd

Gold ........................................................................ (+27 11) 278 9600

Airlines....................................................................(+27 11) 451 7300

Siemens (Pty) Ltd

Saatchi & Saatchi South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Electronic products ............................................. (+ 27 21) 935 8260

Advertising ............................................................ (+27 11) 548 6000

Sizwe Ntsaluba Gobodo Inc.

Safmarine (Pty) Ltd

Accounting and consulting .................................(+27 11) 231 0600

Shipping ................................................................ (+27 21) 408 6588

Skynet Worldwide Express & Logistic Solutions

SA French

Courier services .................................................... (+27 11) 586 1000

Heavy machinery ...................................................(+27 11) 822 8782

SMEC SA (Pty) Ltd

Sage South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Consulting engineers .......................................... (+27 11) 369 0600

Business software solutions................................(+27 11) 304 1000

Software AG

Sahara Computers (Pty) Ltd

Business software solutions................................(+27 11) 317 2900

IT components.......................................................(+27 21) 551 5595

Sony South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Samsung

Consumer electronics ...........................................(+27 11) 690 3555

Office automation ................................................(+27 86) 072 6786

South African Airways (Pty) Ltd

Samsung Electronics SA

Airlines.................................................................... (+27 11) 978 5313

Consumer electronics ...........................................(+27 11) 549 1500

South African Breweries (Pty) Ltd

Sandton City Shopping Centre

Beverages – Breweries ........................................... (+27 11) 881 8111

Shopping centres ..................................................(+27 11) 217 6000

South African Broadcasting Corporation Limited

Sandton Convention Centre

Broadcasting contractors ......................................(+27 11) 714 9111

Exhibition and conference facilities .................. (+27 11) 779 0000

South African Express Airways (Pty) Ltd

Cement .................................................................. (+27 11) 386 9000

Outdoor advertising.............................................. (+27 11) 475 1419

Primeserv Group Limited Recruitment group............................................... (+27 11) 691 8000

Private Health Administrators Medical aid administrators ................................. (+27 86) 742 2273

Procter & Gamble (Pty) Ltd Personal products ................................................ (+27 86) 011 2188

Protea Hospitality Group (Pty) Ltd Hotels ..................................................................... (+27 21) 430 5000

Prudential Portfolio Managers South Africa (Pty) Ltd Asset management ...............................................(+27 21) 670 5100

PSG Group Limited Asset management ...............................................(+27 80) 055 1552

Puma Sports Distributors (Pty) Ltd Sports apparel ....................................................... (+27 21) 683 5706

Q Quality Beverages 2000 (Pty) Ltd Beverages ............................................................... (+27 21) 534 8070

R Rainbow Chicken Limited

Shefa Group (Pty) Ltd Industrial products and equipment ....................(+27 12) 342 1111

Sanlam Limited

Airlines...........................................................................0861 729 227

Life insurance ........................................................(+27 86) 072 6526

South African Post Office SOC Ltd

Farming.................................................................. (+27 31) 242 8500

Sanofi-Aventis South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Service delivery .....................................................(+27 12) 649 7000

Ram Hand-to-Hand Couriers

Pharmaceuticals ....................................................(+27 11) 256 3700

South African Travel Centre

Courier services .................................................... (+27 86) 172 6726

Santam Limited

Travel and tourism ................................................(+27 11) 616 7956

Rand Water

Short term insurance ............................................(+27 21) 915 7000

South Ocean Holdings Limited

Water .......................................................................(+27 11) 682 0911

Sappi Southern Africa (Pty) Ltd

Electrical equipment ............................................ (+27 11) 864 1606

Real People Investments Holdings (Pty) Ltd

Forestry ................................................................... (+27 11) 407 8111

Sovereign Food Investments Limited

Micro finance.........................................................(+27 10) 245 8000

SAP South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Farming.................................................................. (+27 41) 995 1700

Rectron (Pty) Ltd

Business software solutions................................(+27 11) 235 6000

SRK Consulting (South Africa) (Pty) Ltd

IT components.......................................................(+27 11) 203 1000

SAS Institute (Pty) Ltd

Consulting engineers ..................................................021 659 3060

Redefine Properties Limited

Business software solutions................................(+27 11) 713 3400

Stallion Security (Pty) Ltd

Real estate holdings and development ............. (+27 11) 283 0000

Sasol Gas Limited

Security services ....................................................(+27 11) 533 8888

Reebok South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Gas ............................................................................(+27 11) 441 3111

Standard Bank of South Africa Limited

Sports apparel ....................................................... (+27 31) 459 8800

Sasol Limited

Banks...................................................................... (+27 86) 120 1000

Regent Insurance Company Limited

Specialty chemicals ................................................(+27 11) 441 3111

STANLIB Asset Management Limited

Short term insurance ...........................................(+27 86) 073 4368

Sasol Mining (Pty) Ltd

Asset management ............................................. (+27 11) 448 6000

Remgro Limited

Coal...........................................................................(+27 11) 441 3111

Stefanutti Stocks (Pty) Limited

Investment holding companies.........................(+27 21) 888 3000

Construction groups.............................................(+27 11) 571 4300 T O P 5 0 0 / 6 th E D I T I O N

159


Stellenbosch University

TNS Research Surveys (Pty) Ltd

Vox Telecommunications (Pty) Ltd

Universities ............................................................(+27 21) 808 9111

Research companies .............................................(+27 11) 778 7500

Telecoms solutions ..............................................(+27 87) 805 0000

Stellenbosch Vineyards (Pty) Ltd

TNT Express Worldwide SA (Pty) Ltd

Distillers and vintners ......................................... (+27 21) 881 3870

Courier services .................................................... (+27 860) 122 441

Strauss & Co

Trans Hex Group Limited

Auction houses......................................................(+27 11) 728 8246

Diamond mining .....................................................+27 21 937 2000

Sumo Coal (Pty) Ltd

Transnet SOC Ltd

Coal......................................................................... (+27 11) 684 2764

Service delivery ......................................................(+27 11) 583-0312

Sun International Limited

Travel with Flair

Gaming and leisure ...............................................(+27 11) 780 7810

Travel and tourism ................................................(+27 21) 419 1350

Super Group Limited

Trencon Construction (Pty) Ltd

Road freight........................................................... (+27 11) 523 4000

Construction groups.............................................(+27 11) 451 8000

Sure Travel (Pty) Ltd

Trollope Mining Services 2000 (Pty) Ltd

Travel and tourism ...............................................(+27 86) 147 4849

Mining services ..................................................... (+27 11) 281 6000

Syntell (Pty) Ltd

Truworths International Limited

Business process outsourcing ............................(+27 21) 710 2081

Retail â&#x20AC;&#x201C; soft goods .................................................(+27 21) 460 7911

T Tarsus Technologies (Pty) Ltd Food Processors ........................................................(011) 840 4000

TATA Automobile Corporation SA (Pty) Ltd Commercial vehicles ............................................ (+27 11) 255 9600

TBWA Hunt Lascaris JHB (Pty) Ltd

TSB Sugar RSA Limited Sugar .......................................................................(+27 13) 791 1000

Tsogo Sun Holdings Limited Gaming and leisure ...............................................(+27 11) 780 7810

T-Systems SA (Pty) Ltd Information technology groups .........................(+27 11) 254 7400

TeleMasters Holdings Limited

U UD Trucks Southern Africa (Pty) Ltd

Telecoms solutions ..............................................(+27 87) 945 0000

Commercial vehicles ............................................ (+27 12) 564 9500

Telkom SA SOC Ltd

Umgeni Water

Advertising .............................................................(+27 11) 322 3100

Telecoms..................................................................(+27 12) 311 3911

Tellumat (Pty) Ltd Telecoms equipment/ telecoms solutions ........ (+27 21) 710 2911

Tenova Mining & Minerals SA (Pty) Ltd Consulting engineers .......................................... (+27 11) 899 9111

Thales South Africa Systems Aerospace and defence ........................................(+27 11) 313 9000

The Brand Union (Pty) Ltd Branding and design agencies............................ (+27 11) 895 9300

The Coca Cola Dome Exhibition and conference facilities .................. (+27 11) 794 5800

The Courier & Freight Group SA (Pty) Ltd Courier services .................................................... (+27 11) 961 3000

The Petroleum, Oil, and Gas Corporation of South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Water ........................................................................(+27 33) 341 1111

Unilever SA (Pty) Ltd Personal products ................................................ (+27 31) 570 3000

Unitrans Holdings (Pty) Ltd Road freight........................................................... (+27 11) 445 5000

University of Cape Town Universities ............................................................ (+27 21) 650 9111

University of KwaZulu-Natal Universities .............................................................(+27 31) 260 1111

University of Limpopo Universities ............................................................(+27 12) 521 4058

UCT Graduate School of Business University of South Africa Universities ............................................................ (+27 12) 429 3111

University of Stellenbosch Business School

The Platinum Group (Pty) Ltd

Business schools ................................................... (+27 21) 918 4111

Retail â&#x20AC;&#x201C; soft goods .................................................(+27 21) 461 1207

University of Witwatersrand

The Spar Group Limited

Universities ............................................................... (+27 11) 717 1030

The Switch Group (Pty) Ltd Branding and design agencies.............................(+27 11) 474 2666

The Waste Group (Pty) Ltd Waste management .....................................................0861 292 783

Thebe Tourism Group (Pty) Ltd Travel and tourism ...............................................(+27 11) 447 7800

Thirtyfour Degrees South Marketing (Pty) Ltd Branding and design agencies............................(+27 21) 480 3400

Thompson Corporate Travel Travel and tourism ................................................(+27 11) 770 7700

Three Cities Management Limited

V Value Logistics Limited Road freight........................................................... (+27 11) 929 6700

Vektronix (Pty) Ltd Electronic products .............................................. (+27 43) 707 1000

Victoria & Alfred Waterfront (Pty) Ltd Shopping centres ................................................. (+27 21) 408 7500

VKB Landbou Beperk Agriculture..............................................................(+27 58) 863 8111

Vodacom Group Limited Telecoms (wireless)...............................................(+27 11) 653 5000

Hotels ..................................................................... (+27 86) 131 0000

Volkswagen of SA (Pty) Ltd

Tiger Brands Limited

Automobiles ......................................................... (+27 86) 043 4737

Food processors .................................................... (+27 11) 840 4000

Voltex (Pty) Ltd

Times Media Group Limited

Electrical equipment .............................................(+27 21) 853 8551

Media groups ........................................................ (+27 11) 280 3000

Vox DataPro Internet service providers ...................................(+27 87) 805 0000

160

T O P 5 0 0 / 6 th E D I T I O N

Construction groups.............................................(+27 11) 321 7200

Webber Wentzel Legal services ........................................................ (+27 21) 431 7000

Werksmans Incorporated Legal services ........................................................ (+27 21) 431 7000

Wescoal Holdings Limited Coal..........................................................................(+27 11) 570 5800

Westcon SA (Pty) Ltd Telecoms solutions ............................................... (+27 11) 233 3333

Whirlpool South Africa (Pty) Ltd Household appliances ........................................(+27 86) 088 4401

Wideopen Platform (Pty) Ltd Outdoor advertising.............................................(+27 86) 020 0300

Wilson Bayly Holmes-Ovcon Construction (Pty) Ltd Construction Groups ...........................................(+27 21) 321 7200

Winhold Limited Industrial products and equipment .................. (+27 11) 345 9800

WITS Business School Business schools ................................................... (+27 11) 717 3544

Woolworths Holdings Limited Diversified retailers/ food retailers .....................(+27 21) 407 6137

Woolworths Holdings Limited - Food Division Food Retailers ........................................................ (+27 21) 407 9111

Workforce Holdings Limited Recruitment group............................................... (+27 11) 532 0000

WSP Group Africa (Pty) Ltd Engineering groups............................................... (+27 11) 361 1300

X Xstrata Coal Coal......................................................................... (+27 11) 250 0000

Y York Timber Holdings Limited Forestry .................................................................. (+27 13) 764 9200

Business schools ............................................... (+27 21) 406 1338/9

Gas ..........................................................................(+27 21) 929 3000

Food retailers .........................................................(+27 21) 550 7300

W

WBHO Construction (Pty) Ltd

Z Zurich Insurance Company South Africa Limited Short term insurance .............................................(+27 11) 370 9111


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Top500 6th Edition  

Top 500: South Africa’s Best Managed Companies was conceptualized to recognize the crème de la crème of business in South Africa. Top 500 em...

Top500 6th Edition  

Top 500: South Africa’s Best Managed Companies was conceptualized to recognize the crème de la crème of business in South Africa. Top 500 em...