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Volume 14 Number 7

JULY

a healthier lexington

COMMUNITY

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Who’s Who:

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Pathway to Success:

37 47 48 55 80 82

Sharon Price Community Action Council United Voices Five Ways to Give in July How COVID is Changing the Face of Central KY Healthcare Meet Local Doctors and Healthcare Professionals Breaking the Bronze Ceiling

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TOPS Digital Playbook

LIFESTYLE 86

Fashion:

88

Outfit of the Month:

91

DowntownLEX Together:

92

Wow Wedding:

98 100

Swimming In It Cruel Summer Shop and Win Katie & Rob Small. Intimate. Special. Weddings Unveiled:

What’s your Bouquet Style?

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STAY CONNECTED

Keep up with the Who’s Who, What’s New and What to Do by following us on social media, subscribing to our email newsletter and visiting our website!

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TOPS in Lexington | July 2020


JULY

a healthier lexington

AT HOME 104 124 128 130

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Tour of Homes:

Greystone Manor TOP People to Know in Real Estate Show us your Grill At Home DIY:

Dino Garden Pets:

Looking for Love

EATS & ENTERTAINMENT 136

140 142 145

East End Tap & Table TOP 5 Dining:

Margaritas Summer Dining Guide Recipes:

Skinny Buffalo Burgers and Skinny Grilled Chicken & Fruit Salad

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Equine:

151

BBN:

136 STAY CONNECTED

Keep up with the Who’s Who, What’s New and What to Do by following us on social media, subscribing to our email newsletter and visiting our website!

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Dining:

TOPS in Lexington | July 2020

The Show Must Go On Going Places


JULY

a healthier lexington

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PHOTOS 152 154 156

158 160

Quality Time Enjoying the Outdoors UK Football team attends Black Lives Matter Protests Pet Parade Celebrations!

on our COVER Sharon Price Photo by Keni Parks

Next Month what makes lexington great

AUGUST

Read the July issue as well as archive issues of TOPS Lexington for free at topsinlex.com or on issuu.com. Event photo captions are typically provided to TOPS by the event organizers. We do our best to check names and spelling… but we are all human and make mistakes. Please contact info@topsmarketing.com with any corrections and we will make note of it in the next issue.

STAY CONNECTED Keep up with the Who’s Who, What’s New and What to Do by following us on social media, subscribing to our email newsletter and visiting our website! 18

TOPS in Lexington | July 2020


Exciting TOPS News Jayme Jackson Promoted Jayme Jackson is now Executive Vice-President and will be primarily responsible for client acquisition, retention, and managing our talented team of marketing professionals. Jayme has been a rising star at TOPS. It is no surprise given her 20+ years of business, financial and development experience. Her excitement is genuinely contagious, and she channels that into helping businesses and nonfor-profits increase profitability and brand awareness. “When you spend digital and print advertising dollars, it is my goal to make sure you see the results, I build relationships not databases,” Jayme says. She brings energy, enthusiasm and just a hint of gracious Southern sass, balanced with some of the funniest one-liners you’ve ever heard.

Fran Elsen to join TOPS Fran Elsen has been named our new Editor-inChief. Fran has made Lexington home for over 40 years. She developed a highly successful career at the Lexington Herald-Leader and Kentucky.com where she rose through the ranks during her 34-year tenure. She is an experienced professional in various areas, including sales management on both the local and regional level, strategic print/digital sales and marketing, targeted section coordination, and new product implementation. All this in addition to her many boards and volunteer work in the community. Fran has so much experience in the worlds of print and digital marketing, and we can’t wait for her to start with us on September 7th. She will bring a whole new dimension of ideas and relationships to our growing operation.

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TOPS in Lexington | July 2020


TOPS TOPS 465 East High Street, Suite 201 Lexington, KY 40507 859.543.8677 100 Executive Park, Suite 101 Louisville, KY 40207 502.780.7825

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TJ OLMSTED Account Executive tj@topsmarketing.com

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CREATIVE STAFF

CONTRIBUTORS

Amanda Harper, Vice President of Production amandah@topsmarketing.com

Writers:

Jen Brown, Senior Content Director jen@topsmarketing.com Haley Norris, Senior Designer haley@topsmarketing.com

DIANA GEVEDON Business Manager billing@topsmarketing.com

Jesse Brooks, Amanda Harper, Kate Horning, Barbara Meyer, Haley Norris, Kristen Oakley, Lauren Parsons, Le’Shae Robinson, Jen Roytz, Jessi Turner and Larry Vaught Photographers:

Keni Parks, Shaun Ring and Conrhod Zonio

The views and comments expressed by the authors are not always that of our editors or publishers. While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information in this publication, TOP Marketing Group accepts no responsibility or liability for any errors, omissions or resultant consequences, including any loss or damage arising from the reliance on information in this publication. All images contained in TOPS in Lexington Magazine are subject to copyright of the artist or photographer as named, but not limited thereto. Reproduction of any part of this magazine without prior written permission is prohibited.

TOPS in Lexington | July 2020

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LETTER FROM THE PUBLISHER

KEITH YARBER Dear Reader, A Healthier Lexington is our theme this month. Our goal this month is to spotlight not only the many amazing doctors and healthcare professionals who have been heroically serving their patients and communities, but also to feature important diverse voices in our community. We all witnessed the tragic death of George Floyd, which ignited a national debate on police procedures, equality and racial issues. Closer to home, Breonna Taylor of Louisville, was an innocent victim shot in her own home. Our nation has seen too many Black lives taken and it’s important for us to be part of our city’s conversations on race and equality. We can all be proud of recent citizen involvement. The majority of Lexington’s protestors were peaceful and lawful, respecting the rights of others while making their voices heard loud and clear. TOPS asked writer, Le’Shae Robinson, to interview Sharon Price, Executive Director of the Community Action Council, for our monthly “Who’s Who” and “Non-Profit” features. Sharon graces the cover of our magazine in front of an eye-catching mural on Church Street. Additionally, TOPS profiles prominent Kentucky African Americans to learn about their experiences and viewpoints so that we can all better understand and respect one another. COVID-19 continues to dominate our lives. As of press time, Kentucky is doing better than most states in flattening the curve. As we have seen around the nation, that can change rapidly. Certainly, we are all facing a “Cruel Summer” of wearing masks, practicing social distancing and washing and sanitizing hands. We are waiting to see how events, sports, schools and other important activities plan to open and under what guidelines. Businesses such as those you see advertised in our magazine are going above and beyond to keep you as safe as possible. These responsible business owners are following guidelines and investing their own money for safety supplies needed to make your visits safe and enjoyable. Thank you for being a loyal reader. Thank you for helping to flatten the curve. Thank you for your support of social justice and equality for all. Until next month…

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Keith Yarb 24

TOPS in Lexington | July 2020


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COMMUNITY

32 37 47

Who’s Who:

Sharon Price Pathway to Success:

Community Action Council

48 55

United Voices

80

Five Ways to Give in July

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How COVID is Changing the Face of Central KY Healthcare Meet Local Doctors and Healthcare Professionals Breaking the Bronze Ceiling TOPS Digital Playbook


Who’s Who

COMMUNITY

SHARON PRICE Lagniappe, or “a Little Bonus Gift” by Le’Shae Robinson | photos by Conrhod Zonio In the midst of a global coronavirus pandemic and the demand for racial equality and structural change, one local nonprofit organization, Community Action Council, is working on the front lines to help our neighbors and bring about change. I recently met and interviewed Sharon Price, the new executive director of Community Action Council, the designated Community Action Agency for the counties of LexingtonFayette, Bourbon, Harrison and Nicholas. Price has the charge of leading a team of nearly 420 staff, while managing an annual budget of more than $42 million dollars. During my interview at her office, I learned that Price has been in the role for just eight months. Before moving into her new position, Price served as Community Action Council’s Head Start Director for five years and was responsible for ensuring that, annually, more than 2,000 children and families received high-quality early childhood education and comprehensive support services. As I learned more about Community Action Council, I learned that apart from her work, Price is also a wife, a mom of four, and the youngest of 12 siblings. The pride she has for her children is evident as she tells me that her oldest daughter is a Chief Resident Psychiatrist at the University of Louisville, her two middle children are studying at the University of

Kentucky, and her youngest child attends Frederick Douglass High School. Education has always been important; Price graduated from Southern University with a Bachelor of Art in History and, later on, earned a Master of Science degree in Early Childhood Studies from Walden University. Initially, Price wanted to be a high school history teacher, but that plan changed when she moved to Lexington 28 years ago from a small Creole town in Louisiana. Born and raised on Cane River, Price noted that, “Everything that I am today started in that little community.” Price smiles as she describes her mother, “She has three priorities: God first, family second, community third. In that order. No exceptions ever.” As an adult, Price came to understand that she grew up in poverty, but as a child, all she knew was that she and her siblings were healthy and happy and they didn’t want for anything. Price grew up on a small farm where her family raised chicken, cattle, and pigs, and they got by using lagniappe (pronounced lan yap), a Creole word that means “a little bonus gift.” Price and her family often used the familiar term to describe the exchange of hand-me-down clothes that occurred regularly among the siblings, cousins, and neighbors. This friendly bartering system showed her at a very young age the value of community and what it means to take care of your neighbors.

Price grew up on a small farm where her family raised chicken, cattle, and pigs, and they got by using lagniappe (pronounced lan yap), a Creole word that means “a little bonus gift.” July 2020 | TOPSinLex.com

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Who’s Who

COMMUNITY

“We have to be intentional about the role models that influence our children.” In addition to education, Price believes that another strong predictor of success is having strong role models, especially for young children. Price said, “we have to be intentional about the role models that influence our children. I wanted my children to see and interact with people of color in professional positions, such as healthcare providers, so I made sure that they had that exposure.” When asked about her own personal role models, she points to her six sisters. As the youngest sibling, Price said, “They’re not afraid of telling me the truth, even if it’s something I don’t want to hear. They’re strong in their conviction and what it means to make people feel like they belong. Respecting the dignity and value of all people was always reinforced.” And today, Price is standing on these principles as she works to help families recover from the impact of the coronavirus pandemic amid a local and national outcry for racial justice. As executive director, Price actively works for equality most often by working to eliminate barriers for individuals and families living in poverty. When she first became the executive director eight months ago, she could not have predicted the road just ahead. As she continues to navigate these rough waters, Price plans to implement more efficient and innovative initiatives that help strengthen the community for everyone. Said Price, “We will double-down on effective programs that are working and, as demonstrated recently, turn toward grassroots efforts that ensure that the voice of people with low income are heard as we work to address infrastructural policy changes that are costly or damaging to the working poor. Community Action will be more visible in our community addressing the complexities of poverty in whatever form they present themselves.” Whether it’s connecting people to resources or simply just sharing what you have, perhaps we can all embody the spirit of lagniappe and be a little bonus gift to someone else. •

July 2020 | TOPSinLex.com

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Pathway to Success COMMUNITY ACTION COUNCIL by Le’Shae Robinson | photos courtesy Sharon Price

On March 25th of this year, Community Action Council for Lexington-Fayette, Bourbon, Harrison and Nicholas Counties, Inc.—known in the community simply as Community Action Council—celebrated its 55th year of service. In any other year the agency’s staff may have commemorated this milestone with a big celebration, but this year, amid the threat of COVID-19, Community Action Council’s staff silently marked the passing of their anniversary by honoring their mission: preventing, reducing, and eliminating poverty among individuals, families, and communities through direct services and advocacy. Instead of a large crowd of well-wishers, Community Action Council’s staff returned to their roots, working safely in small groups in 15 counties to make a difference.

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Community Action Council is one of 23 community action agencies in Kentucky formed shortly after President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964. When Community Action Council first opened its doors the very first program it offered was Project Head Start. Now simply known as Head Start, the program has evolved into a federally-funded group of programs for families with low income with children birth to age five that provide comprehensive early childhood education, health, nutrition, and family engagement services. Today Community Action Council educates more than 2,000 children in over 18 counties across the state, including its statewide operations of the Migrant and Seasonal Head Start program. Head Start is just one of 40 programs Community Action Council offers to help individuals and families achieve economic security and thrive.

TOPS in Lexington | July 2020


July 2020 | TOPSinLex.com

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COMMUNITY

Nonprofit

As the designated community action agency for four counties of Lexington-Fayette, Bourbon, Harrison and Nicholas, the agency is well-versed in assessing the needs of families and communities and adapting to new challenges—and the challenges presented by the COVID-19 pandemic were no exception. In mid-March, the agency quickly pivoted from its ongoing, inperson support to using telecommunication to provide urgent resources to all families, especially those suffering an immediate financial loss or reduction in employment. With funding from the Coronavirus Response Fund, a partnership between the Blue Grass Community Foundation, the United Way of the Bluegrass and the city of Lexington, the Council’s staff began distributing personal and baby care items to thousands of families—much needed items for families hit hardest by the impact of COVID-19. Agency staff also worked quickly to expand its partnership with God’s Pantry Food Bank, rapidly transitioning from a weekly support of 100 households accessing food to as many as 575 households. Staff also began working with FoodChain, a

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local nonprofit who generously provided prepared hot meals to be delivered to seniors and others at greater risk of exposure. Community Action Council has eight neighborhood centers— four in Lexington and one each in Bourbon, Harrison and Nicholas counties—that are accessible to anyone to meet a variety of needs from emergency support, such as food access or utility assistance, to resources that to help increase educational attainment, locate housing, improve employment opportunities, support youth transitioning out of foster care, and many others. Community Action Council is well-positioned to help people recover from the global pandemic. As a recipient of just over $950,000 in Community Services Block Grant funding through the CARES ACT, Community Action Council will soon begin enhanced services to help with house stabilization, food access, employment, small business creations, job skills, and certification programs. Executive Director Sharon Price explains, “We know that in order for a community to be stable, the family has to be stabilized. We want to make sure that we have our system in place to try and help all of these families move forward.”

TOPS in Lexington | July 2020


Nonprofit

COMMUNITY

“Community Action Council changes people’s lives, embodies the spirit of hope, improves communities and makes America a better place to live...” In addition to these new services, more change is in store for Community Action Council. Beginning in August, the agency will be expanding its Head Start program by adding a new location off Arbor Drive in Lexington. Families with children between the ages of 6 weeks and 5 years old can apply online at commaction.org or by calling 859-233-4600. The agency will also be adding a new center in Richmond, where construction is already underway. Price believes the value Community Action Council has in its communities is made stronger through partnership. As an example, Community Action Council has a long-standing collaboration with the Urban League of Lexington-Fayette (Urban League). Nearly 10 years ago, Community Action Council worked with Urban League to revitalize the vacant Russell Elementary School. Now called Russell School Community Ser-

vices Center, today the building is jointly operated by the two agencies and is home to an early childhood development center, apartments for seniors, and robust neighborhood services. The chief values of the anti-poverty movement have always been to serve the best interests of people with low income and to improve the quality of life throughout communities by promoting economic development and expanding opportunity. If you are interested in learning more about Community Action Council or donating to help advance their services, visit their website, commaction.org, or find them on social media at “Community Action Council.” Whether you need help or want to be a part of the solution, the Promise of Community Action is one that we all need to get behind: “Community Action Council changes people’s lives, embodies the spirit of hope, improves communities, and makes America a better place to live…” •

July 2020 | TOPSinLex.com

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TOPS in Lexington | July 2020


Conversations are happening across the nation. We wanted to share some of the conversations that we’ve been having and listening to in the past several weeks. Writer Le’Shae Robinson spoke with four members of our community about their visions for a more just future and where Lexington fits into the national conversation. Matt Jones used his platform to speak to several members of the Lexington community about race and equality in our city.

Le’Shae Robinson

Matt Jones

July 2020 | TOPSinLex.com

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Lawrence Weathers,

Angela Evans,

Lexington Chief of Police

Councilmember, Council District 6

As the Black Lives Matter movement continues to gain traction across the country, Chief of Police Lawrence Weathers, is confident in how Lexington is handling the recent city unrest. “I think as a city we understand why this is happening, why people feel like they need a voice.” Effective communication is key. His own belief for change is rooted in the opportunity for dialogue. “Anytime there is open communication, there’s hope for improvements.” Improvements have already been made with the downtown removal of Confederate era statues, John Hunt Morgan and John C. Breckinridge. The statues caused conflict as they stood on the same plot of land that slaves were sold from before the Civil War. It is these types of actions that give Chief Lawrence Weathers hope to see Lexington improve it’s racial relations. He moved to the North side of town as a child and it is there where he began to hear people use the n-word in addressing Black people to show blatant racism. Weathers succeeded nonetheless by focusing on a goal that would allow him to honor his family morals while impacting his community in a positive light. He has served as the Chief of Police with Lexington since 2018. photo courtesy LFUCG

Mentorship and diversity is how Councilmember Angela Evans believes Lexington can begin to improve it’s race relations. As a Black woman she has experienced being called the n-word, unjustified traffic stops, had her presence ignored, and even had her ideas ignored but accepted when presented by White peers. It was intentional mentorship, continued support and encouragement from adults in her life of all races that kept her focused on pursuing her goals and not be deterred by negative racial experiences. “Both of my parents have advanced degrees, and many of my mentors were public school teachers who expected me to excel in school and life.” She makes this same plea for Lexington businesses, “Businesses must establish strategic plans to recruit and retain professionals of color, including meaningful mentor and leadership programs.” Diversity is the next step. Observing the crowds of protestors, it’s encouraging to see a variety of ethnicities, ages, genders, and socioeconomic backgrounds represented. She hopes this momentum for diversity continues within the business sphere. “Business leaders must learn to actually value diversity itself and believe it will positively contribute to their work environments.” photo courtesy Angela Evans

TOPS in Lexington | July 2020


United Voices

COMMUNITY

Diedra Dennie,

Colene Elridge,

Vice President of Diversity and Inclusion, Transylvania University

Motivational Leadership Expert If you haven’t read a Monday Morning Pep Talk email from Coach Colene, how are you even getting your week started? This motivational leadership expert advises everyone to “get comfortable being uncomfortable.” After working over a decade in the EEO and Diversity office for the state, Coach Colene knows that it will take conversations that make us feel uncomfortable to actually move us to the solutions we want to see. Elridge encourages people to “listen, ask questions, and be willing to take imperfect action.” As a Transylvania graduate she has seen first hand what it looks like when people move on their values. She graduated in 2005 as one of three Black women. Today Colene sits on the Board of Regents and has seen a significant increase in the number of students who identify as people of color. This is just the beginning of how Lexington can see change through diversity. One look at protestors and it is clear that this isn’t just a Black issue as people from all walks of life continue to march downtown. She firmly believes that “once you become aware, you become responsible” and that this is how our world, community, and organizations can be a better place. photo courtesy Colene Elridge

Diedra Dennie trusts that strategy and action are the key to seeing real change when it comes to racial inequalities. Starting July 13th, she will move into her new role as the Vice President of Diversity and Inclusion at Transylvania University. Dennie is relocating to Lexington from Maryland where she served as the Chief Diversity Officer at Anne Arundel Community College. She looks forward to being invited to collaborate with different organizations so she can get a clear picture of what the current issues are on the Transylvania campus and Lexington city as a whole. She believes this will help her better understand what outcomes people would like to see. “Race has been an issue since the beginning of time, it is part of the social construct and fabric of America. Real change is going to require a willingness by those who have agency to do the work and to write a new social contract for equity.” She looks forward to learning more about Transylvania’s strategic reality and how it pairs with Lexington. Dennie will then explore processes and politics as she begins to navigate her new role and new city. photo courtesy Diedra Dennie

July 2020 | TOPSinLex.com

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Dr. Ricky Jones, Professor and Chair of the University of Louisville’s Department of Pan-African Studies

“There are a number of positives happening … These white kids are doing something that a lot of their forefathers and foremothers have not done. They are standing up with and they’re standing for Black brothers and sisters. They are partners. So race is looking a whole lot different to that generation. “When these things happen, I think there quite often is too much attention paid to the response and not enough attention paid to the underpinning, underlying reality that prompted the situation in the first place, that opened the door for the response. So it’s very easy for any of us to condemn the destruction of property, people engaging in “violent or unruly behavior”, causing a state of mayhem. That’s easy to make a condonation. It’s much harder to look at structural situations that brought it about in the first place. “Anybody who paid attention to what’s going on in this country for a very long time would not be surprised by what’s going on right now. It wasn’t a question of if, it was a question of when. “People have called me all week. They wanna turn me into Harry Potter or something, man. Like I have some magic wand that I can wave and everything goes away, and I’m telling them, look, I’m not saying anything that I haven’t been saying for the last 20 years. You all just didn’t want to listen because you were behaving in a very arrogant way and you felt like the structures in place were just fine and anytime someone said something

about it, you wanted to beat those arguments back. And now, you’re dealing with the consequences of that. So I can’t just make things go away, I wish I had that type of power. “The first thing that we have to do, is to figure out a way to carve out space where we can have some seriously honest conversations about what we’re dealing with. And we’re dealing with a very very long legacy of racial strife in this country that runs beyond Kentucky. Racial strife and supremacy where one group of people in the country has quite often [deciding] they are the only group that has the ability to think, to know, and decide. And they haven’t always used that power with a level of responsibility that makes other people comfortable or even feel humane. We’ve got to acknowledge that first. The first step to healing is acknowledging that you’ve done something wrong, taking responsibility for that and saying hey now we gotta move on and build something different. But it can’t be done in such a way that people are really just delivering platitudes and cliches and you know, trying to get past this moment and the basic structures stay intact. That’s the first thing that we have to do, then build out from that. “Let’s not engage in reductionism. And let me explain that. What reductionism is, is because something isn’t your reality or something has not happened to you, that it doesn’t exist at all. I haven’t been beaten by police, but it doesn’t mean that physical police brutality doesn’t happen.” photo courtesy Dr. Ricky Jones

This and the following conversations were trasncribed from the June 2, 2020 episode of the KSR podcast with Matt Jones. To hear the full discussions, find KSR on iHeartRadio.

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TOPS in Lexington | July 2020


July 2020 | TOPSinLex.com

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COMMUNITY

United Voices

Vince Marrow, University of Kentucky Associate Head Coach Tight Ends / Recruiting Coordinator / NFL Liaison

“People ask me how we get recruits and all of these kids. I used to tell parents, ‘just go downtown and just walk around.’ The people in this community do not know we were recruiting their kid, they were just people walking around. Whether they were white parents, or Black parents, they walked around and they came back and said, ‘Man, this is just a nice place. The hospitality here, people are just nice.’ “And I do have to take my hat off to our police force, they were very, very good in these protests the last couple of days. I really just talking to everybody – I mean, if you are going to protest, protest, but don’t do no looting. Don’t do none of that stuff. “If you are also a [student or athlete] of the University of Kentucky, we ask you to conduct yourself... in a very respectful way. I believe that you can do it in this limelight of being a student athlete. So if you want to get your message across get your across by performing and when people are on you and the media talks to you, you can say how you feel and say it in a positive manner. “I’m gonna tell you what I was encouraged about first, from what I’ve seen. Some of our players were very upset and a lot of them was reaching out to me. I just told them, I said, ‘Look, turn on the TV and just look and see who’s walking with people that look like you.’ And one of the players, I’m not gonna say his name, but he called me back and he was like, ‘Coach, man, there’s a whole bunch of white dudes out there and white people.’ And I was like, ‘Yeah. And there’s a lot of Asian people. And there’s a lot of brown people.’ … What I see now is it is like a true racial coalition. Like you see all types of people out there. And they protest and they’re tired. It’s a human thing now. I mean as a Black man, it’s always been a Black thing, but I think white people, Asian people are very just upset on what they’ve seen. I appreciate the people that’s protesting, but we, you know, Black people are tired. “In our time now, we have so much diversity on our staff and diversity in the athletic department. And I think that’s the biggest thing I commend Mark Stoops on. Mark Stoops has one of the most diverse staffs in college football. … Our players know that our white players stand with them. … Don’t get me wrong, I am pissed on what I’ve seen you know with George

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Floyd, but I am also encouraged on what I see amongst this generation of young men and women. That’s why you see them marching out there right now “The only thing I was intimidated by with police is was what could happen, they see me driving nice cars and you know where I live, ever since I got drafted in the NFL, I live in predominantly white communities. You just wonder, I have to say sometimes if I see a police car and I’m driving, and I’m being honest, am I nervous? No. But I’m like, ‘who’s in that car that maybe is an idiot that don’t care who I am, he’s just looking at the color of my skin and I’m driving a nice car.’ And I think a lot of my colleagues, like my family members and friends, feel that way, where you are driving and you get pulled over for driving Black. “I had an incident when I was recruiting in Ohio and I was on the highway. This guy, a highway patrolman in Ohio pulled me over, and I’m actually kind of pissed. So I get off the highway and go to a gas station and he follows me. He didn’t pull me over, but he follows me to the gas station. I get out of my car and said .‘what’s the problem?’ and he must of ran a check to see who I was, cause you know, they can do that. He was like, ‘Hey I pulled you over because there’s something wrong with your light.’ Now, I’m driving a brand new Infiniti, and I’m sitting there saying ‘there’s something wrong with my light.’ That old ‘your taillight is out.’ I thought that was the biggest BS I’ve ever seen. I just gave him a look like, ‘dude are you serious?’ And he just said ‘sorry sir.’ So you know, it was one of them things. “So yes, I think being African American, a lot of people feel that way. It don’t matter if you’ve got millions of dollars or ten dollars in your pocket.” photo courtesy UK Athletics

TOPS in Lexington | July 2020


Charles Booker,

Daniel Cameron,

Kentucky State Representative/Candidate for U.S. Senate

Kentucky Attorney General

“Our local leadership has to be accountable to people. And, you know, I’m trying to make it clear as I talk across the Commonwealth that as much as you are seeing this locally, we have to understand that this is something that we deal with across the Commonwealth. In terms of lack of leadership on the ground, some folks feel abandoned and unheard and unaccounted for in their communities. “This is at the heart of my conviction for our Commonwealth, because we got to break these barriers down so that we can know our common bonds, so that we can actually end poverty. And we can have a better future for all Kentuckians. “Rioters are lashing out out of a sense of hopelessness, which it’s not right. We have to address it, but we also have to understand it so that we can heal. And we make sure no one ever feels like their life is so irrelevant, they’re so invisible that the only way they can be heard is by breaking glass. We wanna make sure glass isn’t broken, but we also wanna make sure lives aren’t broken too. “It’s really a culmination of generations of abandonment, of frustration, of feeling invisible, of feeling like the laws ignore our humanity... We can be treated as a deadly weapon before being treated as a human being. And it really is a broader message that connects and resonates with a lot of Kentuckians that know what it feels like to be invisible and to be unheard, which is why people are yelling out. Yelling out for justice and for change.” photo courtesy Kentucky Legislative Research Commission

“You look over the landscape, across the nation and in particular across the Commonwealth... You know there are obviously folks within our communities who are hurting. Black folks, in particular, that are hurting. What I try to say and convey is that protests are something that is consistent with our country’s history and seeing, whether it be the ‘60s or other periods of times: protests are integral to our country. “I don’t have anything against folks who protest. I think they have a God-given right to be able to protest, whatever community is hurting and has concerns they want to address or raise. On the flip side of that, I think there are folks who have tried to hijack a peaceful protest and tried to take advantage of the situation by stealing and destroying and vandalizing property... “Everyone – in my judgement – wants the truth. And when I say everyone, I think all officials and leadership that are involved in the process here as it relates to Miss Breonna Taylor or Mr. McAtee, people want the truth to come out. So that is a part of my responsibility as the prosecuting authority in Miss Taylor’s case and there will be others... there’s a lot of issues in this country and the leaders have to step up and figure out a way to move forward in a constructive way... “I think that we owe it to all of our communities of color, all of our communities, frankly, to do better, to engage Black and brown communities and let them know that we are here to protect and serve them just as much as we are any other community.” • photo courtesy Commonwealth of Kentucky

July 2020 | TOPSinLex.com

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H

TOPS louisville | diversity is beautiful

ere are some of our favorite recent covers in both Louisville and Lexington.


TOPS lexington | diversity is beautiful

TOPS

MARCH 2017 • PRICELESS

W h o ’s W h o

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W h a t ’s N e w

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W h a t To D o

March 2017

TOWNHOME TOUR • LAFAYETTE ACADEMY • BOURBON TRAIL

vol. 11 no. 3

HO M E & GA R D E N


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Giving

COMMUNITY

5 Ways to Give in July As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to impact central Kentucky, our local nonprofits are experiencing increased demand for services, and they need your help now more than ever. Here are some easy ways to give back this month:

the people who are helping prepare and distribute meals and follow @FoodChainLex on Facebook and Instagram to stay connected to its work and help spread awareness of its mission. Contact morgan@foodchainlex.org.

The Hope Center provides food, shelter and essential services to individuals experiencing homelessness or suffering from addiction and mental health issues. During the pandemic, they are serving dinner every evening to anyone in need at their Jacobs Hope Cafeteria. You can help by donating food for the to-go meals: lunch meat, cheese, bread, granola bars, fruit and snacks, or by donating toiletries and new men’s underwear. For more information, visit hopectr.org.

GreenHouse17 nurtures lives harmed by intimate partner abuse, and its crisis hotline, emergency shelter and services in 17 Kentucky counties have continued to operate during the pandemic. You can support job training for adults healing from abuse by purchasing “Handmade by Survivors” products or by donating supplies from GreenHouse17’s wish list, such as twin bedding and pillows, towels, wash cloths and women’s underwear. For more information, visit GreenHouse17.org.

Bluegrass Care Navigators needs volunteers to provide hospice patients with “Compassion from a Distance.” You can make phone calls to provide companionship, deliver care packages to a patient’s doorstep, assemble mailings at your home, mow a yard or visit through a nursing facility window. To find an opportunity to fit your talents and schedule, contact jcurtis@bgcarenav.org.

Lexington Leadership Foundation needs volunteers for the multiple programs under its umbrella that serve and raise up leaders in our community. Volunteer opportunities include summer meal delivery drivers, food donations for its Woodhill Feeding Program, mentors for children and teens impacted by parental incarceration and male facilitators for its Fatherhood Initiative parenting classes. For more information, visit lexlf.org.

FoodChain has distributed 50,000+ meals to children, families and individuals in need since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. To support FoodChain, you can donate masks for

To learn more about these local nonprofits and hundreds of others, or to learn more about the work of Blue Grass Community Foundation, Lauren would love to hear from you! You can reach her at 859.225.3343 or lauren@bgcf.org. *The coronavirus pandemic is a rapidly evolving situation. Before you donate, please contact these agencies to see if their needs have changed.

July 2020 | TOPSinLex.com

Lauren Parsons,

Director of Strategic Initiatives & Communications

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COMMUNITY

COVID & Health Care

How COVID is changing the face of central Kentucky

HEALTH

CARE From check-ins to social distancing standards, learn what you can expect at your next health care visit. by Barbara Meyer

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COVID & Health Care

As

Kentucky is opening up, people are returning to activities halted by COVID-19, including medical care. The coronavirus is an evolving public health situation, and health care facilities are continuously assessing their procedures and making changes as needed to respond to government and CDC COVID-19 guidelines. While the Commonwealth seeks to flatten the coronavirus curve, the Central Kentucky health care community is adjusting their services to help assure the highest standards of safety for patients, visitors, medical teams and staff. New steps have been put in place to actively implement social distancing and minimize the spread of the virus. These precautions could require additional preparation, cause visits to take a little longer or increase the wait time before an appointment is available. Be assured they are there for everyone’s protection and that your providers will assist you to lessen any inconvenience. Reach out to your health care provider with any questions or concerns. You can support health care workers by learning about and complying with visitor guidelines. You can also show you appreciate them by leaving encouraging messages on your health care provider’s social media sites and making donations to their foundations. Before your appointment, it’s wise to visit your facility’s website to get the latest procedure requirements for patients, staff and visitors so you’ll know what to expect and what’s needed.

COMMUNITY

Lexington Clinic Lexington Clinic strives to provide the highest quality of health care for patients and is taking active new measures to ensure the safety of their patients and staff. All patients and staff wear face masks within their facilities at all times. Patients are asked to call upon arrival and are instructed to wait in their car or outside until they can be brought in safely. Some locations may use other nontraditional waiting arrangements. All individuals entering any of their facilities undergo a temperature check as well as a screening for COVID-19 symptoms, with social distancing norms in place. Visitors are not permitted at this time. However, patients requiring personal assistance may have one individual accompany them to appointments. Telehealth appointments are available and encouraged for all specialty and primary care services within Lexington Clinic to minimize chances of exposure to COVID-19. Lexington Clinic has COVID-19 testing available and offers drive-up testing at an off-site tent location. They offer driveup clinical laboratory testing as well. If you suspect you have COVID-19, please get in touch with your primary care provider and they can assess if you should be tested. For more information, visit Lexington Clinic’s website (lexingtonclinic.com) or call 859-258-4000.

“We understand the vital role we play in our community and the value of our dedicated physicians and employees who staff and operate our healthcare services. We also understand that our patients want to know that we are taking the necessary precautions to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. We earn your trust one visit at a time and want to assure you that we will remain vigilant and at your service as always.” – Dr. Andrew Henderson, CEO of Lexington Clinic

July 2020 | TOPSinLex.com

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COVID & Health Care

COMMUNITY

Baptist Health Lexington At Baptist Health Lexington, patient safety is always their priority. Look for the Leapfrog Hospital Safety A grade banner on their building - it’s an honor they’ve earned five times in a row. All staff and all visitors are wearing masks inside the facility: masks are provided for those who don’t bring them. Visitors are limited and screened at the entrances. They request that patients go into physician offices by themselves unless there is a special reason they need someone to accompany them. Their COVID-19 workgroup has been meeting since early March and is made up of doctors, nurses, administrators and other staff. The group has made plans for the hospital to be ready to deal with patients affected by the pandemic, as they care for all patients who seek their help. They are under the leadership of President Bill Sisson and COO/CNO Karen S. Hill, both of

whom have been with Baptist Health for over 35 years. Their hospital epidemiologist has been on their team for 30 years and their local board members are all part of this community and give them valued advice. The system team helps support their efforts through the supply chain and other avenues. They continually plan and prepare for whatever patients may need next, testing their pre-op patients as they are once again open for elective surgeries and procedures. Baptist Health Lexington is grateful for their local community, who understand that their mission is demonstrating the love of Christ by providing and coordinating care and improving health in our area. From meals to PPE, they have opened their hearts to Baptist Health staff and continue to support them. To learn more about Batpist Health’s COVID-19 response, visit: baptisthealth.com/covid-19

CHI Saint Joseph Health CHI Saint Joseph Health continues to stress the steps necessary to keep staff, patients, visitors and their community safe, and offer support and care for their health care providers. All patients who enter the clinics and hospitals will be screened for fever and COVID-19 symptoms. Everyone will be required to wear a mask while they are in the buildings; cloth masks are acceptable for patients in the physician offices and clinics. Traffic in waiting rooms is limited. Patients may be asked to stay in their vehicles until the time of their appointments. Only patients will be allowed in the physician offices, with a few exceptions, such as a pediatric patient or a patient with mobility

issues. Many CHI Saint Joseph physicians will continue to offer care virtually. Patients undergoing certain procedures at CHI Saint Joseph Health, including Saint Joseph Hospital and Saint Joseph East, will be required to have a COVID-19 test before the procedure. This requirement applies to both inpatient and outpatient procedures. CHI Saint Joseph Medical Group is facilitating the COVID-19 testing for those procedures and for patients who come into their offices in need of COVID-19 testing. A doctor’s order is required for the testing. Learn more: chisaintjosephhealth.org/novel-coronavirus

Courtesy CHI Saint Joseph Health

“While the past few months have brought uncertainty into our physician offices and clinics, we are happy to once again be able to serve our communities. The safety of our patients and staff comes first, and we are taking significant steps to make sure it is safe to be treated at our offices and in our hospitals. Serving our communities is our calling, and we look forward to doing what our mission calls us to do each day – provide the care that our patients and our communities depend on.” – Viren Bavishi, DO, President, CHI Saint Joseph Medical Group

July 2020 | TOPSinLex.com

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COMMUNITY

COVID & Health Care

Photos by Mark Cornelison | UKphoto

UK HealthCare Leaders at UK HealthCare are continuing to phase-in their Smart Restart reopening plan to increase the number of patients and procedures performed. In addition, they continue to monitor volumes, inpatient capacity and PPE days-on-hand to ensure that they are within state guidelines. All providers, staff, patients and visitors are required to wear a mask when in UK HealthCare facilities. A mask covering the nose, mouth and chin must always be worn – including inside a patient’s hospital or clinic room. In addition, each visitor will be given a colored wrist band to indicate a cleared screening and those entering the hospital or clinic will be given an Infection Prevention Tip Sheet to reinforce the importance of hand hygiene before and after touching a patient and before and after leaving the patient’s room and the health care facility. UK HealthCare hospitals and clinics have designated entry points staffed by health care personnel to screen individuals entering the facility. They will evaluate both patients and any person accompanying them for symptoms of COVID-19.

Anyone who screens positive for symptoms will not be allowed to enter and will be directed to the proper resources for follow up. In addition, several measures have been taken to reduce the number of people in waiting areas, including some ambulatory clinics which have implemented a Text Upon Arrival system for patients to use when they come to the parking lot. When their exam room is ready, they are notified and go straight there to avoid sitting in the waiting room. When appropriate, UK TeleCare visits are encouraged. Using telehealth technology, patients can set up a visit in more than 100 UK HealthCare clinics for appointments with advanced practice providers or physicians with Zoom, which is compliant with HIPAA regulations. UK HealthCare is not currently offering drive-thru testing for the general public. However, providers can recommend patients with symptoms be tested. All patients are tested upon admission to the hospital and prior to undergoing procedures. Learn more: ukhealthcare.uky.edu/covid-19 •

“As the state’s largest health care provider for advanced sub-specialty and critical care, it is crucial we are prepared for any scenario to ensure that we can meet the needs of our community and the Commonwealth during this pandemic crisis and we are confident we have the people, the expertise and the resources to meet any challenges ahead.” – Dr. Mark Newman, UK Executive Vice President for Health Affairs

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July 2020 | TOPSinLex.com

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2nd Chance Clinic Colleen Ryan, MD • Marvin A. Bishop, MD, MBA • Tuyen T. Tran, MD, MBA Thomas Howard, MD • Kenneth Brodsky, DO The 2nd Chance team provides a wide array of opioid addiction treatment services to meet each individual’s needs. This can include meeting with a physician, individual or group therapy and targeted case management services. 2nd Chance was founded in 2012 by Dr. Bishop and Dr. Tran to help those struggling with addiction. The founding physicians are members of the American Society of Addiction Medicine. Dr. Tuyen Tran is a co-owner and the Chief Executive Officer of 2nd Chance Clinic. He has been practicing medicine for over 20 years. While treating patients as a hospitalist and in emergency rooms, Dr. Tran recognized a growing need to help those struggling with addiction. This led him to become board certified in Addictionology and Emergency Medicine, in addition to Internal Medicine. Dr. Tran has used his platform as a member of the American Society of Addiction Medicine, the Kentucky Medical Association, and the Lexington Medical Society to champion the fight against addiction. Dr. Marvin Bishop is a co-owner and the Chief Financial Officer of 2nd Chance and is board certified in Endocrinology. He has over eight years of experience treating and managing addiction. As Dr. Bishop explained, “Addiction hit close to home for me when I discovered someone whom I have known for years was struggling with this disease, so I felt like I had to try and make a difference.” Dr. Thomas Howard is board certified in Addictionology and Rheumatology, and serves as Medical Director, working closely with physicians, as well as case managers and counselors. Dr. Howard is a member of the American Society of Addiction Medicine and has been working in the addiction field for seven years. Dr. Kenneth Brodsky is board certified in Family Medicine. He owned and operated a Family Medicine practice before transitioning to addiction medicine in 2017. He has been working in the addiction field for three years and has over 24 years of experience in the medical field. Dr. Colleen Ryan is board certified in Psychiatry. She is the newest member of the 2nd Chance Clinic team. Dr. Ryan has extensive experience in the field of psychiatry and is board certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology as well as the American Board of Preventive Medicine. Many patients seeking treatment for addiction also require treatment for psychiatric disorders, including mood and anxiety disorders, trauma and stress-related disorders, schizophrenia, and more. “2nd Chance is one of the few clinics that provides a full treatment regimen for patients who are affected by addiction in an outpatient setting. We provide the full spectrum of physician-led treatment, counseling, and case management. We treat the patient as a whole person,” Dr. Bishop says.

1420 N. Broadway • 859.368.8820 • 2ndchanceclinics.com

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Bluegrass Orthopaedics - Spine Harry Lockstadt, MD • Travis A. Hunt, MD • Jim Farris, PA-C • Christopher Oser, MS, PA-C Spinal injuries can happen to athletes of all ages, and may affect the entire body. Bluegrass Orthopaedics' fellowship-trained orthopedic spine specialists help patients get back to an active lifestyle by preventing spinal disorders from worsening by reversing or stabilizing the condition. Their spinal surgery specialists perform complex reconstructions and revision spine surgeries for a variety of spinal disorders. The orthopedic spine specialist team frequently uses less invasive surgeries to treat spinal injuries and disorders. Patients tend to experience faster recovery and less postoperative pain with minimally invasive spinal surgery. Dr. Lockstadt is one of the founding partners of the practice and stands as one of the premier spine physicians in the region, with a special focus on the diagnosis and treatment of back pain. Orthopaedic surgeon Dr. Hunt completed his residency at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine. Jim Farris has been with Bluegrass Orthopaedics since 1993 and is a graduate of the UK Physician Assistant program. Christopher Oser graduated from the UK Physician Assistant program, where he earned his master’s degree.

888.422.3170 • bluegrassortho.com

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Health Care

COMMUNITY

Bluegrass Orthopaedics Shoulder & Elbow Ryan Donegan, MD, MS Cheslee Bloyd, PA-C At Bluegrass Orthopaedics, fellowship-trained specialists treat shoulder and elbow conditions in athletes of all ages. The highly skilled team customizes a treatment plan for each patient that may include modification of activities, physical therapy, injections, anti-inflammatory drugs and surgery. Dr. Donegan has been with Bluegrass Orthopaedics since 2013, holding a shoulder and elbow orthopaedic fellowship from Washington University. His interests include arthroscopic surgery as well as complex shoulder and elbow reconstruction and reverse total shoulder surgery. Cheslee Boyd has been with the practice since 2007, and he covers a wide range of orthopedic specialties including sports medicine and upper extremity/hand.

888.422.3170 bluegrassortho.com

Bluegrass Orthopaedics Sports Medicine Owen McGonigle, MD Wallace L. Huff, Jr. MD While sports medicine physicians care for professional athletes, they also specialize in active seniors and the wellness of athletes of all ages. Dr. McGonigle and Dr. Huff offer a variety of services for all areas of sports medicine, total joint care, industrial medicine and foot, ankle and hand care. Fellowship-trained sports medicine specialist Dr. McGonigle has trained with some of the foremost leaders in his field at the American Sports Medical Institute. Dr. Huff serves as a team physician for several local high schools and colleges. He is board certified by the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery with added qualifications in Sports Medicine.

888.422.3170 bluegrassortho.com Sponsored Content | TOPSinLex.com

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Bluegrass Orthopaedics - Total Joint Kevin M. Denhey, MD • Veronia A. Vasicek, MD • Wallace L. Huff, Jr., MD Christian P. Christensen, MD • Gregory D’Angelo, MD • John Balthrop, MD When other methods of treating pain and loss of motion have been exhausted, joint replacement may be the best hope for longterm improvement for many patients. The Bluegrass Orthopaedics Total Joint team has mastered common hip and knee joint replacements and continues to gain experience with many other joint replacement procedures. Dr. Denehy is an expert in minimally invasive hip and knee replacement surgery and direct anterior hip replacements. He also had extensive training in complex hip and knee revision surgery, including infection, instability, and early loosening. Dr. Vasicek is a senior partner at Bluegrass Orthopaedics. Providing specialized patient care in general orthopaedics, she has a special interest in knee and shoulder replacement and arthroscopy surgery. Dr. Huff is board certified by the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery. Dr. Christensen is an expert in minimally invasive hip and knee replacement surgery including direct anterior hip replacement and partial knee replacement. He also specializes in complex revision hip and knee replacement. Dr. D'Angelo is a senior partner in Bluegrass Orthopaedics with specialty training in adult joint reconstruction of knees and hips. Dr. Balthrop is a senior partner at Bluegrass Orthopaedics and has a special interest in joint replacement, knee arthroscopy surgery and treatment of shoulder injuries.

888.422.3170 • bluegrassortho.com

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Health Care

COMMUNITY

Bluegrass Orthopaedics Hand Specialists William L. O’Neill, MD J. Martin Favetto, MD Bluegrass Orthopaedics has two incredible hand surgeons on staff. These physicians have the knowledge and experience to treat complex upper extremity problems that have not responded to non-surgical remedies. The Bluegrass Orthopaedics team prides themselves in treating athletes of all ages – from the adolescent athlete to the weekend warrior; the industrial athlete to the senior athlete. “Our patient's positive stories and outcomes mean the world to us,” they said. Dr. Favetto and Dr. O'Neill were two of the chief surgeons on the transplant team that performed the first two of three human hand transplants in the United States.

888.422.3170 bluegrassortho.com

Bluegrass Orthopaedics Foot & Ankle Jason S. Harrod, DPM Dr. Harrod employs state-of-the-art technology and innovative surgical and non-operative treatments when treating a full spectrum of issues, ranging from arthritis management to reconstructive surgery. He offers patients the highest level of treatment and service in orthopaedic foot and ankle care. As a fellowship-trained orthopedic foot and ankle specialist, he knows that patients take comfort in the fact that Bluegrass Orthopaedics has been a trusted name in the field for over 25 years. Dr. Harrod feels that one of the most rewarding aspects of his work is caring for patients and seeing their incredible outcomes on the other side of an injury.

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Bluegrass Veterinary Specialists + Animal Emergency Nina Waldron, DVM

The Bluegrass Veterinary Specialists emergency team focuses on emergency and critical care for small animals including dogs, cats and some pocket pets. As a dog mom to two Jack Russell Terriers, Paisley and Colby, Dr. Waldron knows how harrowing those moments can be. “We meet patients and their families during what is often a time of great need. We have an opportunity to make a big difference in their comfort, health and outcome,” she explained. “I studied animal behavior, which has been invaluable in my career. The ability to interpret animals’ nonverbal cues is key to understanding our patients.” The BVS+AE team is proud to offer true specialty care for their patients. From services like endoscopies, digital radiology and ultrasound, to more unique therapies many other practices don't offer such as chemotherapy, CT scan and hyperbaric oxygen therapy, Dr. Waldron and her team have the training and tools to provide exceptional care." She explained, “Whether a patient is not responding to a treatment as expected or you’re trying to narrow down a difficult diagnosis, having a skilled specialist on your pet’s care team can make a world of difference.” “Everyone who works at our hospital is there because they love animals,” Dr. Waldron said. “We are all pet parents, too, and we want to help your companions live their best lives!”

1591 Winchester Rd. Ste. 106 859.268.7604 bgvets.com

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Kirn Plastic Surgery Center David S. Kirn, MD, FACS

Since its opening in 1998, the foundation of Dr. Kirn’s practice has been cosmetic surgery of the face, breast and body completed with precision and care. However, they also offer a full range of non-surgical treatments such as VeraPulse laser. Both Dr. Kirn and two highly-skilled nurses, Carey Sanders, RN and Shirley Ramsey, APRN, perform injections. The affiliated Aesthetic Skin Care Center LLC is located within the same office. Dr. Kirn believes that new technology and techniques are an important piece of his practice, and he has been a frequent early adopter of scientifically proven services. Dr. Kirn is something of an innovator himself, and he holds multiple US and international patents for medical equipment design! Dr. Kirn is deeply committed to patient safety, comfort and satisfaction. “Balancing warmth and professionalism is always our goal. Every patient is unique and deserving of individualized care,” Dr. Kirn explained. One hallmark of their care is carefully documenting patient progress. “When the patient looks at the before and after pictures side by side, it brings the process full circle,” he said. “Seeing the smiles on happy patients is the best part of my practice.”

2376 Alexandria Dr. 859.296.3195 kirnplasticsurgery.com

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Lexington Women's Health Allison Cook, MD Allison Cook, MD graduated from Georgetown College and the University of Kentucky College of Medicine. “I have a passion for providing respectful women’s health care,” she said. “I value the importance of establishing a trusting relationship with my patients.” Dr. Cook practices a full spectrum of OB/GYN care, from annual wellwoman visits to the management of gynecological disorders. That, of course, includes pregnancy care and childbirth, and she loves developing relationships with her prenatal patients and their families. She has a special interest in minimally invasive gynecologic surgery. Outside of the office you may find her spending time with her husband Adam and sweet baby Lucie Quinn and their two miniature dachshunds. She enjoys baking, fitness, traveling and of course, cheering for the CATS! Lexington Women's Health was founded in 2007. The staff is comprised of Obstetrician- Gynecologists, Certified Nurse Midwives, and Advanced Practice Registered Nurses, supported by an an experienced and well-trained team of medical professionals. They have convenient locations (Nicholasville Road, Alysheba Way and a new location in Brannon Crossing) and a range of services to best serve their patients’ needs. From Obstetrics and gynecology, modern midwifery to weight loss, PCOS care to pelvic floor therapy, they have the experience and expertise to help.

859.264.8811 lexingtonwomens.com

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Susan E. Neil, MD Aesthetic Medicine & Wellness Dr. Susan Neil believes in offering personalized aesthetic medicine and wellness care in a private office setting. Each patient receives oneon-one attention from Dr. Neil. “The best part of working in health care is direct interaction with my patients,” she said. “I love being able to see how we are helping improve their quality of life, whether it’s relieving migraines, helping them look better or working through depression.” She also views her team as family. Office manager Lisa Stiff has been working alongside Dr. Neil for over 15 years. Kathy Sims serves as the nurse and laser technician, and has been on staff over 20 years. Staying ahead of the curve is important to Dr. Neil. She was an early adopter of cosmetic fillers and laser, as well as many non-invasive procedures. She proudly offers SculpSure® and Sculptra®, and is the only practice in the area offering Thermage®. In addition to being an avid golfer, Dr. Neil is a CSW, certified specialist of wine and a member of the Society of Wine Educators and the Wine Scholars Guild, and is studying for a Bordeaux Masters-level certification with Jane Anson of Decanter magazine.

2101 Nicholasville Rd. 859.278.6345 susanneilmd.com

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Commonwealth Plastic Surgery Jared Nimtz, MD Dr. Jared Nimtz specializes in cosmetic plastic surgery of the face and body. His most requested procedures include the mommy makeover, breast augmentation, and facial rejuvenation. Procedures are tailored to the individual patient, often finding solutions that can combine procedures to maximize recovery time or creating solutions that offer quality results in an office-based setting. Commonwealth Plastic Surgery is family-owned and operated, with the understanding that our patients are treated as we would like to be. The team is attentive to delivering exceptional care in a comfortable environment while addressing patients' aesthetic goals. It's not uncommon to find Dr. Nimtz and his team caring for patients on off hours, responding to emails and texts addressing concerns, or finding new solutions for a patient's specific surgical objectives. Dr. Nimtz and his staff take time to offer personal care to each person who walks through the door. He is known for his signature Lunch Hour Lift procedure, which tightens the face and neck without the downtime of a traditional facelift. Commonwealth Plastic Surgery offers the latest technology from laser to liposuction, including Renuvion, a one-and-done skin tightening treatment. At every consultation, they offer computer imaging to take the guesswork out of the potential results.

715 Shaker Dr. Ste. 100 859.340.8544 commonwealthplastics.com

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Central Kentucky Endodontics Anna Smothers Dressman, DMD, MS Dr. Anna Smothers Dressman is a Lexington native who graduated at the top of her class from the UK College of Dentistry. She chose to specialize in endodontics, a specialized field of dentistry that cares for teeth from the inside out. Endodontists are root canal experts, and can perform root surgery to correct tooth pain. After spending several years practicing out of the state, she decided to return to her hometown and open her own practice. “I am very appreciative to be serving my community, the patients that come see us and the dentists that put their trust in us,” she said. “We want to instill in our patients the same level of trust with us as the dentist who referred them to our office,” Dr. Dressman said. “Efficiency, quality and clear communication with our patients are paramount to ensure a smooth treatment.” Dr. Dressman and her staff build their schedules with emergencies in mind. “We know tooth pain is impatient, so we get our emergent patients in quickly,” she explained. “Our staff and doctors are committed to a positive patient experience. We understand dental anxiety.”

1001 Monarch St. #210 859.368.7337 ckyendo.com

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Lexington OB-GYN Associates For women, “one size fits all” does not apply to clothing, lifestyles or healthcare. Lexington OB-GYN Associates understand that each woman’s wellness needs are as unique as the woman herself. According to their physicians, “At Lexington OB-GYN Associates, we create personal treatment plans that consider individual needs and goals while building long standing relationships with our patients and their families. From well women exams, to pre conceptual counseling and pregnancy care, to coping with infertility, to managing menopause, our comprehensive services cover women at all stages of their life.” The doctors and nurses at Lexington OB-GYN appreciate being a part of a very personal relationship with their patients. From educating teens, helping patients that struggle with fertility, safely delivering amazing babies, as well as medically and surgically managing gynecology problems, they treat every patient as an individual person, not a number. Since 1986, Lexington OB-GYN Associates’ focus has been on “prevention and healthy lifestyle.” Of course, the practice also monitors for adverse health issues, and provides the latest and safest treatment for these diseases and conditions. Together with gynecologic and obstetric care, they offer in-office ultrasounds, bone density scans, blood work, vaccinations and MonoLisa treatments.

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With 200 years of combined experience, their dedicated and highly-trained staff of nine physicians, all board-certified by The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, four nurse practitioners, six registered nurses, certified lactation consultant, childbirth educator and support staff supply a surplus of top-notch care and quick, reliable information. They recognize that “Registered Nurses are an integral part of our health care team and provide advice and emotional support to our patients and their family members.” Of course, the most rewarding part of a day’s (and sometimes night’s) work is bringing a brand new Kentuckian into the world. The staff shares “the enjoyment of delivering babies and seeing them grow up and become leaders in our community.” In the past 34 years, 30,000 babies have been delivered directly by a member of the Lexington OB-GYN practice. The physicians admit, “The rewards of bringing new life into the world are well worth the long hours. We love going out and being able to run into our patients and watching the babies we have delivered grow up.” Lexington OB-GYN Associates have two convenient locations in Lexington and Georgetown. And, thanks to technology, patients can now receive care via telemedicine, in addition to face-to-face.

1700 Nicholasville Rd. Ste. 701 & 206 Bevins Ln. • lexingtonobgyn.com

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CoolBluLex at Waldman Schantz Turner Plastic Surgery Center Stephen A. Schantz, MD • Amanda Harms, CNA, MA A lot of aesthetic providers know the basics of treatment, but the definition of an expert is someone who knows what not to do. That's one of the reasons why CoolBluLex is the largest CoolSculpting, body contouring provider in Kentucky. With thousands of both surgical and non-surgical procedures performed over the years, board-certified plastic surgeon Dr. Stephen Schantz and Master Sculptor Amanda Harms know what does and does not work. That's the difference of nearly 20 years of experience and quality results! As the Chief Operating Officer, Harms has immersed herself in the science of cryolipolysis, also known as fat freezing, as well as electromagnetic muscle stimulation to give patients non-invasive options for fat reduction, skin tightening, and muscle toning. With her sharp eye for body contouring aesthetics, master level placement of CoolSculpting and CoolTone technology, and experience-acquired body assessment techniques, it's no wonder Harms has performed the most CoolSculpting treatments in the Commonwealth, with exceptional results. Not only has Harms reached the level of Master Sculptor from CoolSculpting and CoolTone manufacturer Allergan, her Master's in Medical Sciences from the University of Kentucky and hands-on experience in health care has given her a research-based confidence in the science behind the technology. While eliminating stubborn fat is an important step for many patients seeking a sleek, sculpted look, building muscle is another important aspect. Equipped with the latest models of CoolSculpting machinery, along with newly launched CoolTone technology, Harms is now able to "complete the look" of comparable surgical procedures through a combination of non-invasive CoolSculpting and CoolTone treatments. For example, a patient may be interested in a Tummy Tuck which surgically removes fat and excess skin, and tightens abdominal muscles. However, with CoolBluLex being housed within the Waldman Schantz Turner Plastic Surgery Center, Dr. Schantz and Harms are able to pick a surgical or non-surgical treatment plan based exclusively on a patient's needs, in a way that other locations can't. Harms is also excited to use CoolSculpting and CoolTone technology to open new doors for patients who have had physical restrictions or limitations to muscle building or surgical candidacy. "I can't wait to help provide core strengthening and booty lifting options for our patients, especially those who may have an injury that prevents them from doing those types of exercises in the gym," Harms explained. "We are excited to be using both technologies to help our patients get back on track after quarantine!" During a consultation, CoolBluLex takes into account a patient's overall skin quality, type of fat tissue, goals, budget, and time frame to come up with the best possible treatment plan. "We find it humbling to know we've built a reputation among Allergan and other CoolSculpting providers for offering honest recommendations that provide realistic expectations," said Harms. Dr. Schantz and Harms are able to fuse the best of both worlds, to ensure that everyone they treat is a good candidate for their surgical or non-invasive treatment. "This is important because every patient should receive the best medical care for their body concerns. We want to help ensure that all CoolSculpting patients achieve exceptional results and experience top quality patient care."

3288 Eagle View Ln. Ste. 300 • 859-254-5665 • coolblulex.com

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TOPS in Lexington | Sponsored Content


Sponsored Content | TOPSinLex.com

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Family Practice Associates of Lexington, PSC Theresa Hobson, PT • James Rossi, MD • Raleigh Kincaid, LMFT Rajeana Conway, MD • Layota Lee, DNP, APRN Family Practice Associates has 24 providers at two locations. They offer comprehensive primary care, allowing patients to work collaboratively with their provider to develop a plan to keep them healthier for longer. Dr. Conway is Board Certified in Internal Medicine and is open to seeing new patients over the age of 18 at the Brannon Crossing office. Dr. Rossi will be joining the practice in August and will see patients at the Hamburg and Brannon Crossing offices. He sees patients of all ages for primary care. Dr. Lee is a Family Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner at the Brannon Crossing office. She provides medication management and counseling for most mental health conditions, such as anxiety, depression and ADHD. Theresa Hobson has been a Physical Therapist in Lexington for several years and sees patients for many kinds of acute and chronic issues. She opened FPA’s PT department at the Brannon Crossing office in February. Raleigh Kincaid provides individual and group therapy for patients and families at the Brannon Crossing office. FPA has been serving the Lexington area for over 35 years. For the FPA team, the most rewarding part of their work has been caring for multiple generations of patients and their families.

859.495.1521 • familypracticelexingtonky.com

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Health Care

COMMUNITY

Medical Vision Institute Jitander Dudee, MD Dr. Jitander Dudee has been in private practice since 1994. In that time, he has performed several thousands of ocular surgeries, receiving numerous awards and professional distinctions in his industry. Dr. Dudee explained, “The best part of working in eye care is helping patients and giving them a sense of security.” To achieve that, Dr. Dudee and his team are committed to providing the best possible care for each patient’s eyes. He believes that meticulous attention to detail is of the utmost importance, so they always go the extra step. They take pride in their stellar reviews from patients!

181 Prosperous Pl. 859.278.9486 medicalvision.com

Sustaining Health Acupuncture Talia Foster, LAc Jacqui Kinzig, DAc Jordan Burk, LAc Sustaining Health is one of the largest acupuncture providers for the VA Health Care System in Kentucky. In addition to acupuncture, they offer wellness care that includes herbal therapy for patients of all ages. “We strive to treat each individual with clarity and compassion,” said Dr. Kinzig, founder. “We love having the opportunity to help people reclaim their lives and passions.” Jordan Burk enjoys getting to know patients to discover how to best assist them with their individual health goals. Talia Foster appreciates how their practice treats the patient as a whole, rather than just the symptoms.

2985 Liberty Rd. #14104 859.475.6841 sustaininghealthacupuncture.com Sponsored Content | TOPSinLex.com

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Frontier Nursing University Susan E. Stone, DNSc, CNM, FACNM, FAAN • Joan Slager, CNM, DNP, FACNM For 80 years, Frontier Nursing University has been educating nurse-midwives and nurse practitioners to deliver crucial care within their communities. The university prepares nurse-midwives and nurse practitioners to provide equitable healthcare in Kentucky and across the country. President Dr. Susan Stone and Dean of Nursing Dr. Joan Slager are proud to take part in educating many of Kentucky's future health care professionals. With top-ranked, accredited programs, FNU is one of the largest not-for-profit universities in the United States for advanced nursing and midwifery education. Their programs are available through online courses, followed by a clinical experience in the student’s community. Highlighting the university's values, Dr. Stone says, "For many years people of color have been plagued with disproportionate healthcare outcomes due to health inequities and the social determinants of health. We recognize the disparities in access to quality education and healthcare available to rural, diverse, and underserved populations. We are committed to building a culture that is inclusive and caring for all." FNU offers both a Master of Science in Nursing and a Doctor of Nursing Practice degree option with the specialties of NurseMidwifery, Family Nurse Practitioner, Women's Health Care Nurse Practitioner, and Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner.

859.251.4700 • frontier.edu

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TOPS in Lexington | Sponsored Content


Health Care

COMMUNITY

The Woodhouse Day Spa In this lightning-paced world, we all deserve to slow down and steal some “me” time. No place offers a more tranquil and transformational environment than The Woodhouse Day Spa. Owners Jeff Chapman and Cheryl Rose explain, “With over seventy treatments designed to purify and nourish your body and mind, our Woodhouse Signature Treatments set us apart by delivering therapeutic results while enveloping our guests in an environment designed for their renewal.” Their highly-trained professional staff is taking special precautions during COVID-19. They are thrilled to be back open and serving customers with a few extra measure to ensure everyone is healthy, relaxed and safe!

161 Lexington Green Cir. 859. 800.5397 lexington.woodhousespas.com

2nd Chance Clinic Lydia Ratliff, BSW Toni Webb, LCSW Sidney Sebastian, CSW Toni, Lydia, and Sidney hold degrees in social work and are part of the behavioral health team at 2nd Chance. They are dedicated to helping patients along their journey against substance use disorder by bridging the gap between physicians and patients. The team at 2nd Chance understands that the cycle of addiction goes beyond physical dependence. Case managers help patients by navigating resources and social services and working one-on-one with patients to remove as many barriers to recovery as possible. Knowing that patients cannot fully engage in recovery until their fundamental needs are met, case managers identify the social barriers such as domestic violence, lack of transportation, food, shelter, and legal threats which are obstacles on the journey to recovery.

1420 N. Broadway 859.368.8820 2ndchanceclinics.com Sponsored Content | TOPSinLex.com

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COMMUNITY

Breaking the Bronze Ceiling

National Endowment for the Arts grant awarded to Breaking the Bronze Ceiling initiative in Lexington! Breaking the Bronze Ceiling is the recipient of a $20,000 Art Works Grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. Breaking the Bronze Ceiling is a public art initiative dedicated to recognizing the many historic contributions of Lexington women in their efforts to advance women’s rights, including the right to vote. Chaired by Lexington-Fayette Urban County Council Members, Jennifer Mossotti and Kathy Plomin, Breaking the Bronze Ceiling is a collaborative project of the Breaking the Bronze Ceiling Steering Committee, the Lexington-Fayette Urban Co. Government, and Blue Grass Community Foundation.

courtesy Barbara Grygutis

“When Councilmember Jennifer Mossotti, who chairs the Committee, and Councilmember Kathy Plomin approached me about this project last year, I saw their passion, I recognized immediately the importance of this project for our community, and I knew I wanted to help. The vision, dedication and hard work of the Committee to build a monument in downtown Lexington to celebrate the history of women in Fayette County is inspiring,” said Congressman Andy Barr. Congressman Barr wrote two letters of support to the NEA for the Breaking the Bronze Ceiling Project, including a joint letter with Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney (D-NY), in support of the monument. “Community support for this initiative has been tremendous and has made the realization of this monument possible as we seek to deepen people’s understanding of Central Kentucky women’s contributions to history. It is a remarkable collective history of extraordinary achievements,” said Lexington Councilmember Jennifer Mossotti, Chair of Breaking the Bronze Ceiling. “Women’s representation in public art has been virtually non-existent,” Mossotti continued. “This work helps change that dynamic while honoring noteworthy local women and hopefully inspiring future generations. We are grateful for Congressman Barr’s ongoing support.” Barbara Grygutis, internationally recognized sculptor, has been selected to create the site-specific monument. The sculpture will be installed in August 2020, at the corner of Mill and Vine Streets, as part of the national celebration of the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which granted women the right to vote.

Support Breaking the Bronze Ceiling in erecting a statue in downtown Lexington to celebrate the 100th anniversary of women’s right to vote. Visit breakingthebronzeceiling.com to donate and be a part of this important movement!

Blue Grass Community Foundation is the programmatic partner for the Breaking the Bronze Ceiling project. “We are so pleased to serve in this capacity,” said Blue Grass Community Foundation President/CEO Lisa Adkins. “Creating a more vibrant and engaged city is central to our mission, and that’s what these projects add to our community.” Courtesy Breaking the Bronze Ceiling, Blue Grass Community Foundation and Congressman Andy Barr

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COMMUNITY

Digital Playbook

SOCIAL MEDIA. MANAGED. People crave connection on social media, and the companies that create authentic connections with their customers will thrive — but it’s becoming harder than ever.

Brands Need an Authentic Voice: Social media interactions between brands and consumers used to primarily consist of short scripted replies to public comments, but times have changed. To effectively connect with audiences on social, brands must find an authentic and approachable voice that encourages consumers to start organic conversations. Responses must be timely, personal, and consistent with the company’s voice to ensure customers don’t feel like they’re getting replies from a script.

Social Is a Participatory Newsroom: Audiences are passionate about being a part of the stories of their time, so brands need to have a newsroom mentality to stay on top of trends. Consumers generally welcome brands that get involved from the start by offering timely, relevant content. By contrast, brands that push out content later are more likely to be ignored or even mocked.

Involve Your Audience: 95% of in-house marketing teams said they find creating engaging content to be one of their biggest challenges. At TOPS Digital we can reduce your workload and increase credibility by allowing us to create and develop content or by inviting consumers to submit user-generated content (UGC) in the form of photos or videos. UGC improves performance on every digital marketing channel and increases time spent on websites, email click-throughs, and online purchase conversions. Also, you can consider letting TOPS digital host a social contest tied to a brand campaign or product launch to boost your digital customer engagement.

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WHY USE SOCIAL MEDIA: • Building brand awareness and gathering insights • Driving engagement and participation • Generating social conversions and sales leads • Deliver superior customer service

SET MEASURABLE GOALS • Metric: Audience Size- Fans/Followers • Why it Matters: Shows how many people are willing to engage with your brand • Sample Goal: Increase your following and engagement by [insert number here] Once you have established a following of consumers that are engaging with your brand, it’s then important to create content that they want to see, otherwise they will unfollow you. When developing content make sure you are speaking in your companies tone and voice to make sure they know they are getting this content from a real person and that you care about their interest. We’ve been working with Kitchen Concepts for the past 3 months, managing their social media and paid social. Here is what our client is saying about our partnership efforts: “Over the past 3 months we’ve had the pleasure of partnering with Chad & Lindsey at TOPS Digital. We’ve been able to contribute 30 leads back to their organic and paid social efforts. That is 10 qualified a month for new kitchen or bath designs! They are about to launch our new website and additional digital tactics, and we can’t wait to see our continued success.”

TOPS in Lexington | July 2020


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LIFESTYLE

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Fashion:

Swimming In It Outfit of the Month:

Cruel Summer DowntownLEX Together:

Shop and Win

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Wow Wedding:

Katie & Rob Small. Intimate. Special. Weddings Unveiled:

What’s your Bouquet Style?


LIFESTYLE Summer Swimsuits

Colorblock tipped nicole tank bikini top ($84) and bottom ($88) by Madewell x Solid & StripedÂŽ | Madewell at The Summit

Women’s Hana tankini swim top by Carve Designs ($27.20) | Water & Oak at The Summit

Off-the-shoulder ruffle one-piece in slate blue by La Blanca Island Goddess ($124) | Dillards

Summer

is in full swing which means vacations, pool days and soaking in as many (healthy) rays as possible. Here are some of our top picks to have you feeling stylish even in the summer heat.

Bandeau bikini top ($59.50) and high-waisted bikini bottom ($49.50) in honolulu hibiscus by Madewell x Warm | Madewell at The Summit

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Summer Swimsuits LIFESTYLE

Printed Tenny underwire demi bikini top ($52) and printed Heidi high-cut bikini bottom ($42) by Out From Under | Urban Outfitters Juliet bikini top ($76) and high-waisted pernille bikini bottoms ($88) in tropical peach | Free People at The Summit

Jetsetter reversible one-piece swimsuit by Becca by Rebecca Virtue ($138) | Dillards

Here’s a list of local shops to get you started:

Dillards Fayette Mall Madewell at The Summit Free People at The Summit Urban Outfitters Water + Oak at The Summit

Thick strap retro bra swim top ($58) and high-waisted tie bikini bottom ($46) in miami stripe by Jessica Simpson | Dillards

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LIFESTYLE Outfit of the Month

This summer is already one like no other. Just

because we are more Covid conscience doesn’t mean we can’t enjoy the fun summer has to offer. Laying by the water is a form of relaxation we can get behind, and we figure why not dress up for the occasion?

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This Johanna Ortiz ruffled swimsuit with matching wrap skirt and straw hat are one way to stay glam while soaking up some rays. It’s feminine in all the right ways with its waist belt, playful print and delicate trim. The accompanying pieces are sunning essentials, not to mention a chic way to accessorize. Like these woven Andrew Geller sandals and rattan Madewell tote beach bag.

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To leave skin soft and glowing after a little responsible tanning, we love a splash of Anthropologie’s Mermaid oil. No matter where you spend your sunny days, in a look like this you will definitely be making the best of a ‘Cruel Summer’.

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get the look:

1 | Johanna Ortiz Time Traveler Ruffled One-Piece Swimsuit 2 | Johanna Ortiz Wrap In The Salt Printed Jersey Wrap Skirt 3 | Johanna Ortiz Paint In The Town Straw Hat 4 | Madewell Bembien ‘Lola” Rattan Tote Bag (Available at The Summit) 5 | Anthropologie Mermaid Body Oil (Available at The Summit) 6 | Andrew Geller Capture Sandal in olive green

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Downtown LEX Together LIFESTYLE

Shop Local for the win! The Downtown Lexington Partnership came up with a fun and free program to help get downtown businesses back on their feet amid the easing of pandemic restrictions. The program, called DowntownLEX Together, runs from June 15 to July 31 and will promote the different ways to shop, dine and support local all around downtown. Spending at participating businesses will be rewarded with the opportunity to win prizes. There is no minimum purchase for customers to participate, every receipt qualifies.

HOW TO PARTICIPATE: 1. Make a purchase at any participating downtown business 2. Text “DOWNTOWN” to 474747 to Register 3. Text a copy of your receipt to 474747

Prizes, you say? Two $50 gift cards will be awarded weekly. Plus, a $500 cash grand prize will be awarded at the end of the campaign. For a list of participating downtown businesses and their hours of operation, visit downtownlex.com.

4. WIN PRIZES!

REGISTER TODAY! Simply text “downtown” to 474747

July 2019 | TOPSinLex.com

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LIFESTYLE WOW Wedding

05 11 19 story by amanda harper photos by jessica lynn hatton photography

Katie Rob A N D

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WOW Wedding LIFESTYLE

Katie and Rob wanted their wedding to reflect their personalities: easy-going and full of humor. Their vision for a comfortable, fun wedding helped steer so many of their decisions. In the end, they created a day that was as relaxing as it was romantic. Katie studied abroad in Italy, where her love of wine was born. Having their wedding at a Kentucky winery helped their out of town guests get to know the couple, their home and the heart of horse country in one beautiful weekend. One thing that helped the couple enjoy their big day was having their planner and friend, Kaitlin Glass, serve as the day-of coordinator. As Katie put it, “If something went wrong that weekend, we didn’t have a clue about it because she took on all of that stress for us!” The couple shared a first look moment, which they highly recommend to other couples. “Doing the first look allowed us to have some time together before everything began, and it calmed a lot of our natural nerves,” Katie explained. “We were able to take pictures and just enjoy the last few moments we had together before getting married.” Since they had a little time between their first look, bridal party photos and the ceremony, the couple relaxed with their wedding party. The groomsmen started up a huge game of cards. July 2020 | TOPSinLex.com

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WOW Wedding LIFESTYLE

The ceremony was held outside, offering guests sweeping views of the countryside. Simple tied floral arrangements and scattered rose petals brought a kiss of pale pink to the aisle. The pastor kicked off the nuptials with a joke that the wedding was sponsored by Tinder – a nod to the fact that the couple met online. Guests were in stitches! As a sentimental touch, the bride wore her late grandmother’s wedding band. “My grandmother, Adina, was larger than life,” Katie reflected. “My family felt her presence at the wedding, and we knew she was there in spirit.” The reception was held inside the Cabernet Barn. Floral arrangements and photos of Katie and Rob were sprinkled throughout the space. Empty wine bottles covered in twinkle lights bore the table numbers. Slabs of wood added a rustic touch to each table. Each guest was given a monogrammed mason jar, which served as their drink glass at dinner.

July 2019 | TOPSinLex.com

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LIFESTYLE WOW Wedding The best man secretly asked the wedding band to have the couple on stage to do karaoke. They sang “Sweet Caroline” – a favorite of the bride’s Boston family. The band and guests joined in, creating a fun singalong moment. After dancing and laughing beneath the barn’s romantic fairy lights, the wedding party hopped aboard a chartered limo bus. They headed to the Downtown Hilton, where many of their guests were staying and celebrating through the evening.

the vendor team PHOTOGRAPHER Jessica Hatton VENUE Talon Winery and Vineyard CATERING City Barbeque SWEETS Martine’s Pastries FLOWERS Kaitlin Glass

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PLANNER/DECOR Kaitlin Glass BRIDAL GOWN Lace Bridal Couture BRIDAL PARTY Azazie GROOM/GROOMSMEN Alfani BRIDE HAIR/MAKEUP Becca Hooker

BRIDAL PARTY HAIR/MAKEUP Blush Salon,

Sasha Whitt & Heather Raleigh STATIONERY Minted CEREMONY MUSIC Devin Hale BAND Superfecta

TOPS in Lexington | July 2020


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LIFESTYLE WOW Wedding

small. intimate. special. How local brides are embracing their forced and small at-home weddings due to COVID. TORI + BRIAN STRAUB Married May 16, 2020

Photos by Mimi Lee Photograhy

Why did you decide to keep your original wedding date, rather than postpone to a future date?

Brian and I decided not to wait because we did not want a virus to determine our love and future together. It was our date, our time, our memories and we did not want to wait. What was special about your small/at home ceremony?

In December, my mom and stepdad built a house that was on a 5 acre lot. At that point in time, we did not know the significance of this land. We ended up putting together a backyard wedding in 2 months, and it was the most beautiful wedding I could have ever experienced. The intimacy of it being at my parents’ home was beyond what I could have imagined. It was so special and something I will treasure forever. Due to my grandpa living out-of-state, Brian and I ended up driving to Florida after the wedding and meeting him at the beach. I brought my wedding dress to make sure that he and I got a picture together. It was so special and I know it meant the world to him.

What is one tip you would give a future bride who is faced with a possible postponement?

Do what makes your heart happy. Don’t listen to what the world, media, or anyone else thinks. You and your fiancé agree on what makes you happy and what is going to matter in 10 years.

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At-Home Weddings LIFESTYLE

JAYRA HOWARD + CAITLIN GIBBS

Married February 29, 2020 Photos by Two Arrows Photography

What was special about your small/at home ceremony?

It was special because it encompassed everything that was important to us, not only as a couple, but as individuals. Honestly, I think we were able to put our own personal touches into it, more than we would have been able to do on a larger scale. Are you still hosting a large celebration as planned, but at a later date?

We certainly still plan to host a large celebration at a later date. We are hoping to be able to plan it for late summer/early fall. However, the health and safety of our friends and loved ones are a top priority. Nevertheless, whenever the celebration happens, it will be just as wonderful and exciting as it would have been on the actual day. What is one tip you would give a future bride who is faced with a possible postponement?

My advice would be to sit down with your soon to be husband or wife and ultimately decide what is best for the two of you. If postponing is in your best interest, do it. If scaling down and having a small and intimate gathering is in your best interest, do it. Your wedding day is your day, just make sure you make it a day you’ll never forget.

AMBER NEWCOMB + JOSH OWENS Plan to marry on October 24, 2020

Photo by Madisen Hinkle

Why did you decide to keep your original wedding date, rather than postpone to a future date?

We are so in love!!! We are so ready to be husband and wife!!!! What do you think will be special about your small/at home ceremony?

Even though it will be on a smaller scale, we will have our most precious family and friends there! That’s all that matters! What is one tip you would give a future bride who is faced with a possible postponement?

Get married regardless!!!!

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LIFESTYLE Weddings Unveiled

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nosegay Are you looking for something simple and traditional? Then a nosegay bouquet is for you. These little cuties feature a cluster of flowers all cut to the same length and wrapped tight creating that symmetrical round shape. The perfect compliment to any classic wedding vision.

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posy

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Find yourself liking the idea of a nosegay, but wanting to add a little flair? Posy bouquets are the best of both worlds. They have the same small structure, but have unique touches that break a little outside that frame. Think round, but not perfect round.

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organ ic

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For the whimsy at heart, an organic bouquet embraces the assymetrical and loose aesthetic, which can be very beautiful and unique. If you’re hosting your wedding outdoors or at a more non-traditional locatoin, this might be the style for you.

cascade

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If you’re looking for something with a little drama, then a cascade bouquet might be your choice. Imagine a waterfall-like “spill” of blooms draping down the front of your dress.

oversi zed These are not for the shy brides. If you’re a fan of an abundance of lush florals and making a statement, then go more oversized with your bouquet. As long as your designer is aware of your size and body shape, they will be able to create something not only grand, but proportional to your frame.

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Outfit of the Month LIFESTYLE

11 photo credits 1 | Elizabeth Anne Designs 2 | Kevin Glaser Photography 3 | Joseph Rogero Photography 4 | Laura Caraway Photography 5 | Sophie Epton Photography 6 | Erin Wilson Photography 7 | Jonathan Wherrett Photography 8 | Landon Jacob Photography 9 | Brancoprata Photography 10 | Alison Conklin Photography 11 | Sophie Epton Photography

by haley norris Owner of Haley Michelle Designs

www.haleymichelledesigns.com

July 2020 | TOPSinLex.com

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AT HOME

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Tour of Homes:

Greystone Manor TOP People to Know in Real Estate Show us your Grill

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At Home DIY:

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Pets:

Dino Garden Looking for Love


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Tour of Homes

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S T O RY B Y K R I S T E N O A K L E Y • P H OT O S B Y S H AU N R I N G

When Kelly and Judy Buckley envisioned their dream home, they saw a large home positioned on an expansive piece of property, where they could spend time with their children and grandchildren. Both homeowners grew up on a farm. In fact, Judy’s grandparents’ farm was located where Edythe J. Hayes Middle School sits today, and the 200-year-old home is still located on the property! The couple stumbled upon the home by accident and immediately fell in love with its peaceful surrounding. Originally built in 2006, Greystone Manor won the Parade of Homes that same year. The Buckleys knew they needed help transitioning the original interior to reflect their own style and personality. So, they called upon Dwayne Anderson of House by JSD Designs. Judy works at House and has always loved Dwayne’s clean, classic and comfortable style. According to Dwayne, “The Buckleys are not fancy people. Their style is traditional, but not overly done. Since the original color palette throughout the home was red, black and lots of gilded gold, the goal was to pull it down.” Rather than change everything, Dwayne worked with the Buckleys to keep certain distinctive pieces like the elegant doorknobs, gold hardware and elaborate chandeliers. By toning down the color of the walls and adding layers of neutral textures and patterns, everything began to work together.

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AT HOME

Tour of Homes

Upon entering the grand foyer, one’s eyes are immediately greeted with the home’s original checkered marble floor, a detail the homeowners kept because of its unique interest. Dwayne recommended painting the banister in black lacquer to tie in with the flooring and to naturally carry one’s gaze up the winding stairs to the beautifully designed dome ceiling with intricate Jeffersonian inspired architecture and gorgeous gold chandelier. The table was a piece that Judy purchased from an estate sale for her previous home. The style was perfect for the new home, but with a dated red mahogany finish. Dwayne enlisted the help of Vince and Casey Murray, master painters, who helped the couple transform several pieces and rooms throughout the home. The Murray’s painted the table a shiny black lacquer and finished the top with a textured crocodile pattern, all with an intricate gold ribbon border. The ottoman below is also from their previous home but reupholstered in a neutral print fabric that mirrors the tabletop’s crocodile texture. Dwayne accessorized the table with florals, table lamps and a mirror, all from his store on Industry Road.

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Tour of Homes

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TOPS in Lexington | July 2020


Tour of Homes

AT HOME

The home office, located to the right of the foyer, was Dwayne’s opportunity to convince Judy of welcoming a masculine black room into the home. Coffered ceilings, built in bookshelves, a chair rail, and cherry ooring give the room a sense of warmth. The walls are covered in a black cork wallpaper, giving the room even more texture and dimension. The painting is from Interior Yardage.

July 2020 | TOPSinLex.com

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AT HOME

Tour of Homes

The

master bedroom is surrounded by ďŹ ve large windows, allowing plenty of natural light to pour into the room. Painted in a light buttercream, the walls have delicate gold speckles that glisten with the sunlight. Dwayne had custom draperies made from material found at the Rag Peddler. The homeowners did not want blinds, so Dwayne had a second lighter layer of drapery made that can be pulled shut for privacy. A domed ceiling, similar to the one in the foyer, gives the room the grand traditional style the homeowners have come to love. A cozy sitting area is deďŹ ned by a beautiful mini chandelier and two armchairs, perfect for a morning coffee, or a nighttime book. The carpeting is from Mathis Carpets.

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Tour of Homes

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Tour of Homes

The

dining room’s ceiling was painted a deep black to beautifully offset the white molding and crystal chandelier. The Buckleys friendly cat, Oasis, can be found meandering around the home and welcoming guests upon arrival.

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AT HOME

Tour of Homes

The molding and woodwork are the focal

point of the two-story living room. Dwayne explained that this room is the perfect example of using restraint and allowing the room to breathe. Rather than incorporating drapery, they opted to expose every inch of the windows, and add elements of texture elsewhere in the room with fabric, accent pieces and artwork. A view of the pond and fountain are visible through the French doors.

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AT HOME

Tour of Homes

Most of the Buckley’s time is spent in the kitchen, which is open to the breakfast and family rooms. The space offers a panoramic view of the pond and barn out back! This section of the home is where family and guests gather for holidays and celebrations. During Christmas, the couple hosts 30 family members, sometimes wearing matching pajamas. Like the rest of the home, the walls were originally painted red. Once repainted in Benjamin Moore’s Revere Pewter, the entire space felt calmer, and more welcoming. The bar stools and dining chairs were left with the home. Originally finished in glossy black, Dwayne reimagined them and reached out to Ray Gilker to refinish them in soft gray/black, before Dwayne had them reupholstered in faux leather and cream-colored tweed performance fabric, respectively. A sectional couch offers plenty of seating for a cozy night by the fire or a movie night with the grandchildren. The accent chair is upholstered in a cheetah fabric. 116

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The breakfast area is surrounded by two sets of French doors, allowing easy access to the covered patio. The dining table was from the Buckley’s previous home, but the side table was a bargain buy that Judy made without consulting with Dwayne first! When he initially saw it, he could not fathom using it in the home. But the size was perfect for the space, so he called Vince Murray and asked for help. “You would never know it’s the same piece,” said Dwayne. “It was originally farm country, finished in a distressed white. Vince dressed it up by replacing the glass panes with mirrored glass. He painted the top and the trim in mixed metal metallic, and the rest of the piece in a lighter textured grey.” The piece is perfect against the Thibaut textured wall covering.

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AT HOME

Tour of Homes

Judy and Kelly welcome their two

granddaughters to the house often. It was important to Judy that her granddaughters feel at home, so she turned two of the three upstairs bedrooms into their own. Charlee Mae (6) has her very own pink tent, where she and her sister play and read books. Connected by a Jack and Jill bathroom, Piper’s (2) room is decorated in soft teal and green. A crib and changing table sit on one side, and a big girl bed on the other, ready for her as she gets older.

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AT HOME

Tour of Homes

The

finished walk-out basement had a small stage built in one of the rooms. It gave Judy the idea of turning the entire room into a playroom for Charlee Mae and Piper. Vince Murray took the original red curtain painting on the wall and extended it to span the entire width of the room. He added a sign with the girls’ names on it and voilá, instant fun for years to come. On the opposite side of the room, a fancy playhouse is decked out with windows, a pink front door, and matching bunkbeds inside for endless hours of playtime and imagination.

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AT HOME

The home offers two stories of

outdoor living. The basement’s exterior doors lead to a large firepit just steps away from the pond. On pleasant evenings, the Buckley’s love roasting marshmallows with their granddaughters or sharing stories with friends. Just above, the covered patio off the kitchen and breakfast room offer a shaded reprieve for morning coffee, casual dinner, or a relaxing evening of peace and quiet. The view never gets old.

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AT HOME TOP People to Know in Real Estate

TOP PEOPLE

TO KNOW in Real Estate

Maximize your realty marketing the simple way Reach our

64,500+ Readers

TOPS TOPS

Reserve your ad space for July in TOP People to Know in Real Estate today!

advertising@topsinlex.com 124

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AT HOME TOP People to Know in Real Estate

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AT HOME

Grills

Bull Angus 30-inch 4-burner propane gas grill and cart ($2758) | Lowe’s

WHO doesn’t

love a good home cooked meal on a grill? There’s just something about sitting out back, smoke rolling from the grill and delicious smells filling the afternoon air. We’ve pulled together some TOP picks for grills your back patio needs this summer!

Photos courtesy of business’ websites.

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AT HOME

Eno La Plancha griddle | Housewarmings Weber Genesis® II E-310 Gas Grill ($749) | Lowe’s

Primo Oval Jr. 200 ceramic grill and cart ($1178) | Barnhill Chimney

Saffire large 19” blue platinum grill with cart ($1499) | Aurora Pools & Spas

Big Green Egg grills, sizes mini-2XL | Housewarmings July 2020 | TOPSinLex.com

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DIY with Kids

Dino Garden Dinosaurs and dirt are some of my boys’ favorite things. Plus, they love being outside and so does their mama! I was running out of sensory bin ideas and materials and searching for things to do outside. I stumbled on an idea for real-life play with toy dinosaurs. I’d always thought the little fairy gardens were so neat, but... boys. Enter our “Dino Garden”. I had an old fire pit that had a rusted out bottom and was on the verge of tossing it. I laid some landscapers fabric down and the boys and I headed to Walmart! Our goal was to keep it cheap, and use the resources we already had if we could. We picked up some soil and some plants on clearance. (I had no clue what we were buying, we were looking for things that looked “dino-y”.) While the boys napped, I got to have some fun putting it together! I took a water bottle and hot glued some bark to it for a little tunnel, painted a terra-cotta dish for a little body of water, and added some pebbles to the soil and plants! I had two happy little boys when they woke up, all for a total of $8. It was a win for me, too! The Dino Garden was actually very visually appealing...much better than the random rusted fire pit! Now, our mystery plant is blooming, our herbs are shooting up and are looking like real trees and the boys play in it all the time! The best thing about it is it can be done in any type of container, using lots of things you already have! And if you’re a boy momma, I know you’ve got plenty of toy dinosaurs laying around.

Get creative with the plants and herbs you include. The more unique, the better!

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JESSI TURNER Fruitful Phases Blog @fruitfulphases

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Pets

Looking for

Looking for a perfect match? Look no further than local shelter animals!

Kelly Hi, my name is Kelly! I am a sweet eight-year-old girl looking for my forever home. I love cat toys, string and head scratches! I dislike dogs and other cats, so I must be the QUEEN of the castle! Will you share your palace with me?

e

Hey there, I’m Dallas! Since hurricanes hit my hometown of Dallas, TX, I’ve been looking for my forever home. I am very gentle, well-mannered and have a loving soul! Even though I am a big Boxer mix, I am not afraid to do my best lap dog impression. I am looking for a single person in need of a companion. I love having all the attention on me, so I would prefer to be your only pet. I would love a fenced-in yard to play fetch with you in! Do you think we’d make a good match?

Hey there, my name is Merlin! Some people even call me Merlin the Magician! I am a huge goofball who loves to be center stage! Some of my tricks include sit, down, wait and my world-famous “disappearing food act.” I have supersonic hearing that can hear a food wrapper being opened from the opposite end of the house. I am great on a leash and I get along with everyone as long as they love cheese, bacon and peanut butter. Did I mention my obsession with peanut butter? I need to be the center of your universe, so it’s best there are no other pets in the house. I can be trusted in a crate so you don’t have to worry about me whenever you go buy new toys and treats! I am also neutered, housebroken and up-to-date on all my vaccinations!

If you’re looking for a buddy who’ll weather life’s storms with you, please fill out an application at paws4thecause.com.

Want me to add some magic to your life? Go to KY Great Dane Rescue at shelterluv.com.

Check me out at lexingtonhumanesociety.org.

Dallas

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EATS &

ENTERTAINMENT

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Dining:

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TOP 5 Dining:

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East End Tap & Table Margaritas Summer Dining Guide

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Recipes:

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Equine:

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Skinny Buffalo Burgers + Skinny Grilled Chicken & Fruit Salad The Show Must Go On BBN:

Going Places


EATS & ENTERTAINMENT

Dining

Photos By Keni Parks

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Dining EATS & ENTERTAINMENT

East End TAP AND TABLE

A local husband and wife team delivers internationally influenced cuisine in an urban gastropub setting.

H

Story By Kate Horning H EALTHY L IVING C HEF katehorning.com

East End Tap and Table 333 E Main St, Lexington (859) 785-2511 eastendtapandtable.com

usband and wife duo Matt and Betsy Borland are no strangers to the restaurant scene. With over 20 years of experience in the hospitality industry, Matt knew a restaurant was always part of the plan. Still, travel for work and raising kids put their dream on the back burner until they decided to move from Miami, Florida to Lexington, Kentucky. "We had family here in Lexington and absolutely fell in love with the people and community in this town. We knew it was home," shares Betsy. And after making the move to Lexington, the couple spent over four years searching for the perfect place to open their dream restaurant. When 333 East Main Street, formerly the home of Dunkin' Donuts, came available, the Borlands jumped on the opportunity to turn what once was a basic chain restaurant into their vision of a comfortable, modern gastropub. "We have such great neighbors here at Main and Rose. We wanted to create something comfortable and casual for them to come to enjoy lunches and dinners, but also excellent food that's unique here in Lexington," shares Matt, "and the fact that we have parking just sweetens the deal." Open just three months, when the pandemic hit the Borlands have been adapting to everything that has been thrown their way as new restaurant owners. "We were fortunate that business didn't slow down a lot during the pandemic, and we're looking forward to getting back to more normal hours and service in the summer months. From happy hour offerings to late-night drinks, there's so much more we want to do and share with our customers," reveals Betsy. While the Borlands are passionate about hospitality at their core, they're also remarkably enthusiastic about excellent food. Betsy, who grew up in the kitchen cooking with her Thai mother, spent her early twenties exploring the culture and cuisines of Bangkok city. "I fell in love with the street vendors and the food of Bangkok, which sparked a passion for travel and exploring international food and avors," shares Betsy. "Most of our menu comes from inspiration we've gathered from our travels."

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Dining

The spicy carrot margarita, a customer favorite, was inspired by a trip to Cabo, where Betsy tasted the margarita for the first time and decided she had to have it in her life. The Borlands wanted the menu to be unique yet also offer comfortable favorites for anyone who might come through the doors. The gastropub itself has a hip, urban feel and a vast amount of natural light from the large interior windows. A concrete bar furnished with local artwork and a garage-style window and exposed brick wall make you feel completely transported to some big city. When it comes to the menu, it's unlike anything you'll find here in Lexington. "When we sat down to create the menu with our head chef, Aaron Sheets, we pulled flavors and dishes from all of our travels," shares Matt. "You'll find everything from family recipes such as Betsy's mom's spring rolls and dumplings, our favorite Peruvian green sauce, and Cuban empanadas as well as a good old fashioned burger."

A few of the dishes not to be missed are the Crispy Rice with Spicy Tuna appetizer. "I have always loved crispy rice and wondered why no one here in town does it this way," shared Betsy. "We take fluffy sushi rice and sear it off to create a nice crispy and nutty exterior and then top it off with spicy tuna and sesame seeds. It's simple but quite addictive, and the textures and flavors are just amazing together." Moving into mains, the Siam-Wich is another dish, unlike anything you'll find around Lexington. The bread is brought in from a Vietnamese bakery in Louisville and topped with flavor-packed satay chicken or tofu. It is then dressed with classic Bahn Mi garnishes such as pickled carrots, watermelon radish, cilantro, jalapeno and garlic aioli for an out-of-this-world combination. The Siam-Wich is best when paired with a Watermelon Margarita from the Summer Frozen Libations Menu.

COCKTAIL RECIPE:

Hot Blooded 2oz rye bourbon 1/2 oz Ancho Reyes 1/2 oz lime juice 1/2 oz blood orange juice 1/2 oz simple syrup 4 dashes Hellfire Bitters Shake all ingredients with ice, strain and serve in a coup-style glass

And then there's the NY Strip that's dressed with melty miso butter and served with sazon potato and garlic green beans for a flavorful, international twist on steak and potatoes. Wash it all down with the Blood Peach Sangria, another customer favorite that's fresh and flavorful, perfect for summertime. As you enter East End Tap and Table, you'll be greeted by the warmest and most hospitable couple. The Borlands can't wait for you to taste some of their family's favorite dishes, savor a couple of housemade cocktails and enjoy a relaxed dining experience.

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Dining EATS & ENTERTAINMENT

QA +

with

Matt & Betsy Borland

What made you fall in love with food?

Matt: I grew up as one of six children, and my mom was very creative with her cooking. She always made delicious food. She’s the one who taught us how to make all of the salad dressings on our menu. Betsy: I grew up with a Thai mom who showed her love by feeding people, and now that’s me. I love seeing people enjoy our food.

Favorite veggie?

Matt: Bok choy steamed with oyster sauce. It's Betsy's mom's recipe. Betsy: Brussels sprouts. More specifically, our Brussels sprouts. We flash-fry them and toss with fish sauce.

How do you stay inspired?

Matt: We travel, try every new restaurant that opens here in Lexington and read a lot of cookbooks. Betsy: I love to eat, haha! Also, the Food Network and travel keep me inspired. Whenever we travel, we always come back with new ideas for dishes.

Favorite cocktail?

Matt: IPA—Homestyle Bearded Iris out of Nashville or our Dirty Ol' Fashioned. Betsy: Our Carrot Margarita.

Favorite dish from your childhood?

Matt: Presidents Chicken. My mom makes this dish, and it's a casserole that's a combination of cream of chicken soup, lemon, rice, curry powder, broccoli, chicken and topped off with cheddar cheese. It's so good. I love it and our kids love it.

When you're not working, are you cooking or grabbing carryout?

Betsy: Kuay Teow Kua Gai. It's a lot like pho. It's a dark beefbased broth and noodle soup, and it's so incredibly flavorful and tasty. We hope to add one to our menu soon.

Betsy: I like to eat, so it depends on how much energy I have! If my mom is here, we cook and my mom always says, "I can make that for cheaper."

Matt: We do both. We love to cook, but we also like to try every new restaurant that opens up.

What's the last thing you ate or drank?

What do you love most about Lexington?

Matt: I have family here, but I just love Kentucky. The people, the food, the horses. It's such a beautiful place and so centrally located. Betsy: We've lived all over Florida, and most recently in Miami and the people there are nowhere near as friendly as they are here in Lexington. Everyone talks to me, and they're so personable here. We already had involvement here, so we did not doubt that this would be home.

Matt and Betsy: Mai Thais

Can you give us a piece of advice for someone who dreams of pursuing a career in food?

Matt and Betsy: Have a plan. It's fantastic, but it's a lot of work. The most important part of a restaurant is the staff. You can have great food, but if the hospitality isn't there, then there's no point. We were lucky to have a lot of experience before opening East End Tap and Table, so we knew what to expect.

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5

M

Story By Amanda Harper

El Rancho Tapatio

144 Burt Rd. | (859) 373-909 elranchotapatio.com This family-owned and operated authentic Mexican restaurant has some fun drinks on their menu. Their beloved House Margarita comes in mango, peach, strawberry, Blue Hawaiian, red raspberry and watermelon. Looking for something extra special? Get the Margarita Tamarindo… perfect for enjoying on the patio!

West Main Cra�ting Co. 135 W. Main St. | (859) 618-6318 westmain.com This bar specializes in authentic historically-inspired drinks with seasonal variations. So it’s no surprise that their Fire Pit Margarita is unusual and cool: it features mezcal, blanco tequila, spicy chipotle-pineapple syrup, lime, curaçao and orange bitters, garnished with a smoking thyme sprig.

Blue Sushi Sake Grill 105 Summit at Fritz Farm Ste. 130 | (859) 554-4452 bluesushisakegrill.com What could be more perfect for a summer lunch than an ice-cold margarita served with sushi? The Cucumber Jalapeño Margarita features Casa Noble Crystal tequila, Cointreau, lime, jalapeño and cucumber, offering a little heat alongside a refreshing sip. Add an Ilegal Mezcal float for a little somethin’ extra.

Campestre Mexican Bar & Grill 910 Beaumont Centre Pkwy. | (859) 368-7779 campestre.com Love a fancy twist on a traditional margarita? Get to Campestre! The Green Lagoon is made with Avión Silver tequila, Grand Marnier and Midori Melon liqueur for a tropical take on the classic. Love to customize? Pick A Style! You can choose your size, flavor, tequila and style.

Drake’s Hamburg, Lansdowne and Brannon Crossing drakescomeplay.com The Strawberry Mango Margarita is a fun take on an old standby, featuring El Jimador Blanco Tequila, sweetened lime juice, triple sec, strawberry and mango purees with citrus sour. It’s an easy sip for hanging with friends and sharing some appetizers!

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Summer Dining Guide

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Summer Dining Guide EATS & ENTERTAINMENT

Patio Picks! OBC KITCHEN

Lansdowne Shoppes 3373 Tates Creek Road (859) 977-2600 obckitchen.com

Tell us about your patio space.

OBC Kitchen offers a perfect setting to escape the indoors and enjoy the open air while enjoying mouth-watering bites and beverages.

What makes OBC Kitchen special?

OBC Kitchen is a local, chef-driven restaurant that houses an extremely rare bourbon collection, eclectic craft beer selection, extensive wine list and hand-crafted cocktails. OBC Kitchen is perfect for dinner, weekend brunch and Friday happy hour.

What menu items would you recommend for patio season?

Short rib tacos are a delicious start to any visit. The seared halibut is a light option, perfectly suited for a summer evening. Pair any dish with your favorite bourbon, wine or hand-crafted cocktail.

Do you have any summer specials?

Cheers to $5 featured bourbon, wine and hand-crafted cocktails during Friday happy hour from 4-6pm.

HARRY’S

AMERICAN BAR & GRILLE What makes your patio a great place to hang out?

It’s a year-round experience—glass encased for cooler months and an open-air atmosphere for the rest of the year. Harry’s is perfect for anyone: ladies that lunch, coworkers to convene and families to gather. The patio is bursting with energy at lunch, dinner and happy hour!

Tell us a little bit about your restaurant's cuisine, drinks and overall "vibe".

Harry’s is known for American favorites, mini sandwiches galore, fresh sushi and an extensive bar. We are also known for our unmatched service and exceptional value.

What is the most popular dish on the menu for patio season? What drink would you pair with it? Palomar Center || 3735 Palomar Centre Drive - (859) 977-2620 Hamburg Pavillion || 1920 Pleasant Ridge Drive - (859) 264-8023 bluegrasshospitality.com

The trifecta, three mini sandwiches served with fries, is a crowd favorite! We suggest pairing this with an ice-cold local beer. Looking for something a little lighter? The tuna stack and Pixi Stix martini are delicious.

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Recipes EATS & ENTERTAINMENT

Skinny

e C eese t

e

BUFFALO BURGERS

Prep Time:5 minutes | Cook Time: 8-10 minutes

Ingredients: 1 pound lean ground beef ¼ teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon black pepper 1 teaspoon garlic powder 1 teaspoon onion powder 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce ¼ cup hot sauce 6 tablespoons reduced-fat bleu cheese crumbles (1½ tablespoons for each burger) 4 whole wheat buns

Preparation: Using clean hands, combine the beef, salt, black pepper, garlic powder, onion powder, Worcestershire and hot sauce together in a large bowl. Divide the meat into four equal-sized patties, and form a very flat hamburger by pressing with your palms. Put 1 tablespoon of bleu cheese into each hamburger, and fold it over onto itself to seal the cheese in the center. Reshape the beef into equal-size hamburgers, and make a slight thumb indentation in the center of each. That keeps them flat while grilling. Lightly oil the grill grates with vegetable oil or nonstick cooking spray. Grill the hamburgers until they reach desired doneness, or about 4 minutes on each side. Serve with the remaining ½ tablespoon of bleu cheese for each hamburger, and optional toppings as desired. Nutrition Facts:

Yield: 4 servings | Serving Size: 1 burger with bun Calories 345 | Fat 13g | Carbohydrates 30g | Cholesterol 67mg Sodium 1209mg | Fiber 4g | Sugar 3g | Protein 29g

Recipes Courtesy of

Popculture.com is the nation’s go-to source for all things pop culture and speaks to fans that eat, sleep and play amidst today’s prevailing trends and provides an authentic, one-of-a-kind view of the contemporary landscape.

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EATS & ENTERTAINMENT Recipes

Skinny

GRILLED CHICKEN &FRUIT SALAD

Prep Time: 30 minutes | Cook Time: 10-12 minutes

Ingredients: 1 pound boneless, skinless chicken breasts salt, to taste black pepper, to taste 1 orange (segments only) 8 cups baby spring mix ½ cup fresh blueberries 6 strawberries, sliced ¼ cup reduced-fat feta cheese crumbles ¼ cup unsalted raw walnuts, chopped Creamy Poppy Seed Dressing: ¼ cup light mayonnaise ¼ cup plain, nonfat Greek yogurt 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar 2 teaspoons organic honey ½ teaspoon poppy seeds salt, to taste

Recipes Courtesy of

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Popculture.com is the nation’s go-to source for all things pop culture and speaks to fans that eat, sleep and play amidst today’s prevailing trends and provides an authentic, one-of-a-kind view of the contemporary landscape.

TOPS in Lexington | July 2020


Recipes EATS & ENTERTAINMENT

Preparation: Cook the chicken by heating a grill pan over medium heat. Pound the chicken out to an even thickness, and season both sides with salt and pepper. Coat the grill pan (or the chicken pieces) with nonstick cooking spray and grill the chicken for 4-6 minutes on each side. Remove from the heat and let rest for 10 minutes. Once rested, slice or dice the chicken and set aside until ready to assemble the salad. To make the dressing: Whisk together the dressing ingredients in a small bowl until combined. Segment the oranges by slicing off the two ends, so it sits flat. Use your knife to slice off the peel all the way around the orange, being careful not to slice too far into the orange flesh. Over the mixing bowl, pick up the “naked” orange, and with a paring knife very carefully slice along the membrane, slicing towards the center of the orange. Slice on each side of the membrane to loosen each segment, and remove it. In a large bowl, or on individual salad plates, layer ¼ of the spring mix, chicken, blueberries, strawberries, orange segments, feta, and walnuts. Evenly drizzle two tablespoons of the dressing on each salad. Nutrition Facts: Yield: 4 servings | Serving Size: 1⁄4 of recipe Calories 232 | Fat 9g | Carbohydrates 14g | Cholesterol 69mg Sodium 324mg | Fiber 3g | Sugar 8g | Protein 27g

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EATS & ENTERTAINMENT Equine Update

The Show Must Go On

Story by Jen Roytz

Split Rock Jumping Tour Kicked Off the Global Return to International Equestrian Competition

The Lexington International, the highlight of which was the $75,000 FEI Grand Prix, attracted a full field of international competitors. Typically, these equestrian superstars would be cheered on by an audience of spectators. This year was a much different scene, as protocols restricted spectators, media and all non-essential personnel from attending.

The spring season definitely wasn’t what anyone expected, and for equestrians, that meant no horse shows and, in many cases, less riding in general.

“We amped up our live stream to have a huge presence both there and on social media and are the only show airing on FEI TV (the premier television platform for international equestrian sports),” said Braun. “Our Split Rock Jumping Tour App is, in my opinion, one of the best and most user-friendly apps of its kind, so we hope people follow us there as well. All of the resources we’ve invested in technology-wise over the years allow us to give people a great experience.”

All of the staggered and carefully crafted re-openings of equestrian competitions, which started to come back in June, just like other industries, were held to a high level of scrutiny and strict protocols. One of the first competitions to open their arenas was the Split Rock Jumping Tour’s Lexington International. Rescheduled from May due to the COVID-19 closures, the event was held June 17-21 at the Kentucky Horse Park. This five-day international equestrian competition was one of the first real tests of how the pandemic protocols and mandates would be implemented and enforced at horse shows around the country and the world. “I decided to make the protocols as strict as possible because we were among the first equestrian events to come back worldwide. We were tasked with setting a precedent,” said Derek Braun, founder, and president of the Split Rock Jumping Tour. “Everyone has to wear a mask unless you’re on horseback, we’re sanitizing jumps and everyone who makes adjustments to jumps (placement and height) has to wear gloves. There are rules about congregating, especially in places like wash racks and barns, which are typically high-traffic areas, and there is no hospitality. People had to give up some of the social aspects of horse showing to get back in the ring.”

The Split Rock Jumping Tour, which is an internationally competitive high-end show jumping series held at locations throughout the country, has six more shows slated for 2020. Braun says the success, support and take-aways from the Lexington International will influence the execution of the other shows. Now in its fifth year, the Split Rock Jumping Tour has grown from its inaugural spring and summer shows to adding shows in Columbus, Ohio, Santa Fe, New Mexico, Sonoma, California and more. Braun’s vision was always to create an elite, European-style national show series to elevate show jumping and bring it to the masses. Horse showing, especially at the upper levels, is just as much a business as it is a sport. “My goal was to add one or two shows every year, so I’m pleased that it’s grown the way I envisioned it,” he said. “We’re hoping to add a few new venues in 2021 and hopefully keep expanding, as long as we can continue to provide the same caliber and quality events.”

Photos by Winslow courtesy of Split Rock Jumping. Left: Equestrians were eager to get back into the show ring and had to wear masks at all times, except when riding. Right: Derek Braun (left) stands with Jonathon Millar aboard Alter Ego after the pair won the opening class of the 2020 SRJT Lexington International. 148

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BBN EATS & ENTERTAINMENT

Jared Burton's

BBN

GOING PLACES Story By Larry Vaught

Pictured left: Teresa, Jager and Jeff Burton | Photo provided by the Burton Family

“The coaches have been bored just like players because there was nothing to do,” Burton said. “They (coaches) would just blow up my phone wanting to set up (virtual) meetings.” His parents, Teresa and Jeff Burton had to encourage him to set limits for when he would take phone calls from coaches.

T

he new normal for Jager Burton is to get asked daily about where he’s going to play college football.

“If I go out in Lexington, people will ask me questions,” said Burton, an offensive lineman at Frederick Douglas High School in Lexington and the state’s top-rated player in the 2021 recruiting class. “If I am with family or friends, that’s usually the first question I get. It’s just kind of normal now.” The 6-4, 275-pound Burton has had a final five of Kentucky, Ohio State, Oregon, Alabama and Clemson. He originally planned to make his college decision on August 24, his 18th birthday. He said a few weeks ago the date could change but only if he had “no idea” where he wants to go. Because of COVID-19, Burton has not been able to take any official visits—something he definitely wanted to do before making his college choice, even though he had made several unofficial visits.

“For us, it has been mostly trying to be an encourager without being an influencer of what we might like to happen,” Teresa Burton said. “He’s 17 years old, and sometimes decision making is not the best at that age, but from the start, he’s had a list of things he wants in a college. We are just along for the journey and hoping he can take his official visits, and that will give him more clarity.” Jager Burton continued to work out daily despite the COVID-19 restrictions. Often he joined former Frederick Douglas teammate Walker Parks, a 2020 Clemson signee, and did the same workout Clemson coaches had sent him. He’s even worked out some with UK senior center Drake Jackson.

I have stayed as productive as possible and done stuff to stay focused on football that also takes my mind off reccruiting some.”

However, in late June, he decided he would wait a bit longer to make his college choice. “I will be pushing my commitment back from August 24. I want to weigh all my options and take all five of my official visits to make the best possible decision for my family and me,” Burton, a top 150 player nationally, said. “I would have gotten all my officials done in June, so it was definitely frustrating that I couldn’t do that. Not being able to take visits has led to some hectic times. He’s happy fans follow his recruitment and care enough to ask about it. However, he’s also had a hard time finding “private” time, and when he does, he might get a call from a college coach. Frederick Douglas coach Nathan McPeek said his star lineman was “bombarded” by calls at times from coaches and media.

- Jared Burton

“I have stayed as productive as possible and done stuff to stay focused on football that also takes my mind off recruiting some,” Burton said, he has accepted an invitation to play in the prestigious All-American Bowl January 9 in San Antonio. What he hasn’t done is give anyone any indication where he might be leaning college-wise. That likely won’t happen before his commitment date, either, whenever that now turns out to be. “My parents are kind of like me. They don’t say much about it. We keep our conversations about recruiting private,” Burton said. “We are not going to be very vocal about what I am thinking. I don’t want anyone except me to know where I am going until I announce it.”

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PHOTOS

Quality Time

LOCAL STYLE-MAKER AND BUBBLE ENTHUSIAST | PHOTO BY GWYN EVERLY

JULIA TONCRAY MAKING PIZZA PHOTO BY JACQUELINE TONCRAY

SCOTTY FLORO AND MAMA FLO

THE RAWLS AND THE WILLIAMSONS ENJOY SOCIAL TIME IN THE SUNSHINE

KEN AND ALEX FRANKE

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PHOTOS

THE DOWNEY FAMILY

EMMA KATE NORRIS WITH PUP JASMINE

CRISTY JACKSON SHARP

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PHOTOS

Enjoying the Outdoors

RUSSELL CAMPBELL AT THE PINNACLES PHOTO BY MEGAN MARTIN

CHRISTINA SIMMONS AND TOMMY ADAMS AT PILOT KNOB STATE NATURE PRESERVE

RILEY JO AND RAEGAN HOENIG

JAIME DAY AT PINE ISLAND DOUBLE FALLS PHOTO BY ROBERT BORDERS

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PHOTOS

JOSIE ENJOYS A LAZY POOL DAY | PHOTO BY JENN BLAUVELT-CARTER

ZION PARRISH | PHOTO BY TERRY BENTLY

ENJOYING LAKE CUMBERLAND | PHOTO BY DAVID SMYTH

July 2020 | TOPSinLex.com

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PHOTOS

UK Football team attends Black Lives Matter Protests Downtown Lexington | June 5 | ukathletics.com Photos courtesy of UK

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PHOTOS

Pet Parade

BLUE IVY | PHOTO BY KIMBERLY BRASHEAR LESLIE

DIAMOND AND PEACE ARE UP FOR ADOPTION AT CAMP JEAN

ZELDA | PHOTO BY BETH HELLEBUSCH

CALLIE MEETS MOLLIE | PHOTO BY LAURA MCCOMAS ALLEN

SHELDON | PHOTO BY CLAIRE ARTHUR JENNINGS

SYDNEY | PHOTO BY STEPHEN BISHOP

PARIS | PHOTO BY COURTNEY BARNETT

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PHOTOS

CHARLI SUE | PHOTO BY JAMIE RIDDLE

JOHNNY | PHOTO BY DAVID FLYNN

GRACIE | PHOTO BY TERRY BENTLEY

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PHOTOS

Celebrations!

THE ALLNUTT FAMILY CELEBRATES FATHER’S DAY

JOE AND BAILEY CHRISTINE RICE CELEBRATE HER GRADUATION FROM UK

ZOE, BRETT AND NOAH TINCH CELEBRATE FATHER’S DAY

HOMEMADE SURPRISE CAKE PHOTO FROM DIANA KEATING

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TOPS in Lexington | July 2020


PHOTOS

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Profile for TOPS Magazine

TOPS Lexington - July 2020  

Who's Who, What's New and What To Do in Lexington, Kentucky

TOPS Lexington - July 2020  

Who's Who, What's New and What To Do in Lexington, Kentucky

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