{' '} {' '}
Limited time offer
SAVE % on your upgrade.

Page 1

ISSN 2218-0885

International Arab Journal of Dentistry ‫المجلة العربية الدولية لطب االسنان‬

Revue arabe internationale de dentisterie

Vol. 5 – Issue 1


ISSN 2218-0885

International Arab Journal of Dentistry ‫اﻟﻤﺠﻠﺔ اﻟﻌﺮﺑﻴﺔ اﻟﺪوﻟﻴﺔ ﻟﻄﺐ اﻻﺳﻨﺎن‬

Revue arabe internationale de dentisterie

Vol. 5 – Issue 1

The International Arab Journal of Dentistry (IAJD) is a specialized, and refereed journal that is published quarterly in French and English. IAJD is the official journal of the Society of Arab Dental Faculties (SARDF) and is published by the Faculty of Dental Medicine - Saint-Joseph University of Beirut.

Université Saint-Joseph 2014 - International Arab Journal of Dentistry - www.iajd.org Society of Arab dental Faculties - www.sardf.org Published by Facuty of Dental Medicine, USJ All rights reserved For any information concerning the IAJD, please contact us by e-mail :

info@iajd.org or fmd@usj.edu.lb


AUTHOR GUIDELINES Submission Manuscripts should be submitted by one of the authors of the manuscript through the online Submission System. Regardless of the source of the word-processing tool, only electronic PDF (.pdf) or Word (.doc, .docx, .rtf) files can be submitted through the MTS with priority for PDF file. There is no page limit. The attached file should not exceed 12Mb for low speed connection, and 32 Mb for high speed connection. Only online submissions are accepted to facilitate rapid publication and minimize administrative costs. Submissions by anyone other than one of the authors will not be accepted. The submitting author takes responsibility for the paper during submission and peer review. If for some technical reason submission through the MTS is not possible, the author can contact info@iajd.org for support.The attached file should be scanned with an antivirus software before submitting. Terms of Submission Papers must be submitted on the understanding that they have not been published elsewhere (except in the form of an abstract or as part of a published lecture, review, or thesis) and are not currently under consideration by another journal published by Hindawi or any other publisher. The submitting author is responsible for ensuring that the article’s publication has been approved by all the other coauthors. It is also the authors’ responsibility to ensure that the articles emanating from a particular institution are submitted with the approval of the necessary institution. Only an acknowledgment from the editorial office officially establishes the date of receipt. Further correspondence and proofs will be sent to the author(s) before publication unless otherwise indicated. It is a condition of submission of a paper that the authors permit editing of the paper for readability. All enquiries concerning the publication of accepted papers should be addressed to info@iajd.org. Peer Review All manuscripts are subject to peer review and are expected to meet standards of academic excellence. Submissions will be considered by an editor and—if not rejected right away—by peer-reviewers, whose identities will remain anonymous to the authors. Units of Measurement Units of measurement should be presented simply and concisely using System International (SI) units. Title and Authorship Information The following information should be included: t 1BQFSUJUMF t 'VMMBVUIPSOBNFTonly in the submission form and not in the manuscript

www.iajd.org t 'VMMJOTUJUVUJPOBMNBJMJOHBEESFTTFT t&NBJMBEESFTTFT Abstract The manuscript should contain an abstract. The abstract should be self-contained and citation-free and should not exceed 150 words. Introduction This section should be succinct, with no subheadings. Acknowledgments All acknowledgments (if any) should be included at the very end of the paper before the references and may include supporting grants, presentations, and so forth. References Authors are responsible for ensuring that the information in each reference is complete and accurate. All references must be numbered consecutively and citations of references in text should be identified using numbers in square brackets (e.g., “as discussed by Smith [9]”; “as discussed elsewhere [9, 10]”). All references should be cited within the text; otherwise, these references will be automatically removed. Proofs Corrected proofs must be returned to the publisher within 2-3 days of receipt. The publisher will do everything possible to ensure prompt publication. It will therefore be appreciated if the manuscripts and figures conform from the outset to the style of the journal. Copyright Open access authors retain the copyrights of their papers, and all open access articles are distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution license, which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided that the original work is properly cited. The use of general descriptive names, trade names, trademarks, and so forth in this publication, even if not specifically identified, does not imply that these names are not protected by the relevant laws and regulations. While the advice and information in this journal are believed to be true and accurate on the date of its going to press, neither the authors, the editors, nor the publisher can accept any legal responsibility for any errors or omissions that may be made. The publisher makes no warranty, express or implied, with respect to the material contained herein.

Statements and opinions expressed in the articles and communications herein are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the editor or the publisher. Professional qualifications stated in each article are provided by authors. The editor and the publisher disclaim any responsibility or liability for such material and do not guarantee, warrant or endorse any product or service advertised in this publication nor do they guarantee any claim made by the manufacturer on such product or services.


COMITÉ DE RÉDACTION - EDITORIAL BOARD Rédacteur en chef – Editor-in-Chief Prof. Edgard NEHMÉ Faculty of Dental Medicine, Saint-Joseph University, Lebanon

Comité exécutif de l’association des facultés dentaires arabes - Officers Society of Arab Dental Faculties

Rédacteur en chef adjoint - Associate Editor

Prof. Nada BOU-ABBOUD NAAMAN, General Secretary, Dean Faculty of Dental Medicine, Saint-Joseph University, Lebanon

Dr. Hiam WEHBÉ Faculty of Dental Medicine, Saint-Joseph University, Lebanon

Prof. Ihab ABDEL MOHAMMAD HAMMAD, Dean Faculty of Dental Medicine, University of Alexandria, Egypt

Comité de Direction – Editorial Advisory Board

Prof. Elham ABU ALHAIJA, Dean Faculty of Dentistry, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Jordan

Ass. Prof. Roula ABIAD Prof. Nabih BADAWI Ass. Prof. Antoine BERBERI Dr. Pascale HABRE HALLAGE Ass. Prof. Jeanine HOYEK GEBEILY Ass. Prof. Alfred NAAMAN Ass. Prof. Balsam NOUEIRY Dr. Ziad NOUJEIM Prof. Issam OSMAN Prof. Khaldoun RIFAI Prof. Fayez SALEH Prof. Lucette SEGAAN

Prof. Jawad BEHBEHANI, Dean Faculty of Dental Medicine, Kuwait University, Kuwait Prof. Amal AL-WAZZANI, Dean Faculty of Dental Medicine, Hassan 2 University, Morocco Prof. Razan KHATTAB, Dean Faculty of Dental Medicine, University of Damascus, Syria Prof. Antoine KHOURY, telltale & treasurer, Saint-Joseph University, Lebanon

COMITÉ DE LECTURE – SCIENTIFIC BOARD Dr. Nadim Mokbel, Lebanon Ass. Prof. Alfred Naaman, Lebanon Prof. Nada Naaman, Lebanon Prof. Balsam Noueiry, Lebanon Dr. Ziad Noujeim, Lebanon Prof. Issam Osman, Lebanon Prof. Lamia Oualha, Tunisia Prof. Herve Reychler, Belgium Dr. Faouzi Riachi, Lebanon Prof. Sana Rida, Morocco Prof. Khaldoun Rifai, Lebanon Prof. Nouhad Rizk, Lebanon Prof. Joseph Sader, Lebanon Prof. Fayez Saleh, Lebanon Prof. Elizabeth Sarkis, Syria Prof. Lucette Segaan, Lebanon Dr. Bassel Tarkaji, Syria Prof. Georges Tawil, Lebanon Prof. Abed Yakan, Syria Prof. Nadia Ahmad Yehia, Sudan Dr. Ronald Younes, Lebanon Prof. Mohamed Youssef, Syria Ass. Prof. Carina Zogheib, Lebanon

Ass. Prof. Khansa Ababneh, Jordan Prof. Nabil Abdel Fattah, Iraq Prof. Maha Abdel Salam, Egypt Ass. Prof. Roula Abiad, Lebanon Prof. Elham Abu Alhaija, Jordan Prof. Salem Abu Fanas, UAE Prof. Hani Amin, Egypt Ass. Prof. Ola Al- Batayneh, Jordan Prof. Fouad Al-Belassi, Egypt Prof. Fahed Al-Harbi, KSA Prof. Abadi Al-Kadi, Egypt Dr. Qasem Al- Omari, Kuwait Prof. Abdallah Al-Shammari, KSA Prof. Khaled Al-Wazzan, KSA Prof. Amal Al-Wazzani, Maroc Prof. Athanasios Athanasiou, Greece Prof. Fouad Ayoub, Lebanon Prof. Nabih Badawi, Lebanon Prof. Zaid Baqaeen, Jordan Ass. Prof. Nayla Bassil- Nassif, Lebanon Prof. Jawad Behbehani, Kuwait Prof. Joseph Bou Serhal, Lebanon Ass. Prof. Antoine Berberi, Lebanon Ass. Prof. Paul Boulos, Lebanon Dr. Diego Capri, Italy

Dr. Robert Cavezian, France Prof. Nada Chedid, Lebanon Dr. Maroun Dagher, Lebanon Dr. Maha Daou, Lebanon Prof. Azmi Darwazeh, Jordan Prof. Mounir Doumit, Lebanon Miss Lea El Korh, Lebanon Prof. Kifah El-Jemaani, Jordan Prof. Rabab El-Sabbagh, Syria Dr. Amine El Zoghbi, Lebanon Dr. Pascale Habre- Hallage, Lebanon Prof. Ahmad Hamdan, Jordan Prof. Ihab Abdel Mohammad Hammad, Egypt Dr. Louis Hardan, Lebanon Prof. Raed Moheiddine Helmi, Iraq Ass. Prof. Jeanine Hoyek Gebeily, Lebanon Prof. Mohammad Mazen Kabbani, Syria Prof. Imad Keaid, Syria Prof. Carlos Khairallah, Lebanon Prof. Razan Khattab, Syria Dr. Roland Kmeid, Lebanon Prof. Ammar Laika, Syria Ass. Prof. Nada Mchayleh, Lebanon Prof. Ahmed Medra, Egypt Prof. Raad Mehieddine Helmi, Iraq

Secrétaire de rédaction – Editing Secretary

Conception et mise en page – Design and Layout

Impression et diffusion – Printing and Promotion

Miss Mireille Abdallah Faculty of Dental Medicine, Saint-Joseph University, Lebanon

Bassam Kahwagi, Beirut, Lebanon

Dental News group, Beirut, Lebanon

mireille.abdallah@usj.edu.lb


EDITORIAL « Vers l’Orient compliqué, je m’en allais avec quelques idées simples ». Charles De Gaulle

Pr. Edgard Nehmé Editeur

QUESTIONS D’ORIENT, REFLEXIONS D’ORIENT

La « tempête du désert » qui a touché l’Irak en 1990 s’est révélée être la préfiguration, la genèse d’un cycle interminable de violences impitoyables frappant depuis la totalité ou presque des pays de la région. Les dragons -vous m’excuserez du peu- des temps modernes, aussi appelés superpuissances, G5, G5 +1… G25 n’ont rien à envier à cet animal fantastique aux griffes de lion, aux ailes d’oiseau et à la queue de serpent. Sans oublier au passage que l’histoire a hissé le dragon au rang de guerrier en attribuant son nom à un cavalier militaire qui peut également combattre à pied. Bien triste et sanglante est la destinée de l’humanité quand elle est guidée par l’obscurantisme, le fanatisme aveugle et les seuls intérêts suprêmes des nations. Aucun acte intentionnellement violent, et qui plus est froidement prémédité, commis contre un individu, une collectivité ou tout un peuple n’est justifiable au regard de la morale. N’est-ce pas qu’à cette fin la charte des droits de l’Homme a été rédigée puis approuvée par le concert des nations ? L’histoire de l’humanité nous ramène constamment à des périodes peu glorieuses de guerres et de sang, faussement menées au nom des religions. Ne s’agirait-il pas plutôt d’interprétations fourbes et sectaires mises au service de plans diaboliques situés aux antipodes de toute vérité et de toute religion, en tout cas, à des années-lumière de l’évolution scientifique, intellectuelle et sociale vers quoi tend l’homme d’aujourd’hui. Sommes-nous en droit de désespérer? La violence finit un jour par perdre haleine, par s’essouffler. Elle n’est nullement l’œuvre de Dieu et de ses vrais et fidèles serviteurs. De l’espoir surgira la vérité, et son éclat éblouira ceux qui y ont cru. Cette vérité que tout homme ordinaire, plus encore, tout homme de science quête incessamment sur le chemin de la vie et à travers ses œuvres.


Louis-Ferdinand Destouches, plus connu sous le nom de Céline, médecin et romancier, a participé à la Première Guerre mondiale en 1914 qui lui a révélé l’absurdité du monde. Il la qualifiera d’« abattoir international en folie ». La seule façon raisonnable de résister à une telle folie : la lâcheté, dira-t-il, en affichant son hostilité à toute forme d’héroïsme, celui-là même qui va de pair avec la guerre. Sa vie, il la consacra à l’exercice de la médecine après des séjours sanitaires en Afrique et à Detroit aux États-Unis au profit de la « Société des Nations ». Je ne peux mieux conclure que sur cette citation de Louis-Ferdinand Céline : « Les grandes œuvres sont celles qui réveillent notre génie. Les grands hommes sont ceux qui lui donnent forme ». De la cité phénico-punique, Carthage, fondée par Élyssa, à l’antique Mésopotamie assyrienne et babylonienne ; de Petra, « halte naturelle au croisement de plusieurs routes caravanières qui reliaient l’Égypte à la Syrie et l’Arabie du Sud à la Méditerranée, chargées principalement de produits de luxe (épices et soie en provenance d’Inde, ivoire en provenance d’Afrique, perles de la Mer Rouge et encens du sud de l’Arabie)», à l’Egypte Pharaonienne et ses merveilles, jusqu’à la Phénicie-rouge pourpre-, berceaux de brillantes civilisations, des états modernes ont émergé au fil des siècles, des frontières entre les hommes aussi. Des peuples vaillants et créatifs, puissants négociants, bâtisseurs d’œuvres colossales, inventeurs et exportateurs de l’alphabet ont marqué l’histoire antique et contemporaine et façonné le monde. Ces riverains du Nil, du Tigre, de l’Euphrate, de la mer Morte et de l’Oronte ne peuvent trahir leur propre histoire. Et par-dessus les tempêtes, l’odeur de la poudre et du sang, par la seule volonté de ses citoyens renaitra un jour, fidèle à son passé, un Orient libre, moderne et rayonnant. Sans toutefois oublier que c’est de l’Orient que le jour se lève invariablement.


EDITORIAL “Towards the complicated Orient, I went with a few simple ideas.” Charles De Gaulle

Pr. Edgard Nehmé Editor-in-chief

QUESTIONS OF EAST, THOUGHTS OF EAST “Desert Storm” that hit Iraq in 1990 proved to be the prefiguration, the genesis of an endless cycle of ruthless violence striking since all or almost all countries of the region. The dragons (I apologize for the lack) of modern times, also called superpowers, G5, G5 +1, ... G25 have nothing to envy this fantastic animal with lion claws, bird wings and snake tail. Without forgetting that history has hoisted the dragon to the rank of warrior by giving its name to a military rider who can also fight on foot. Sad and bloody is the destiny of humanity when it is guided by the obscurantism, blind fanaticism and the only ones supreme interests of nations. No intentionally and violent act and moreover coldly premeditated, committed against an individual, a community or a people can be morally justified. Is it not to this end that the Declaration of Human Rights was drafted and approved by the community of nations? Humankind history leads us constantly to some inglorious periods of war and blood, falsely conducted in the name of religion. Aren’t these rather deceitful and sectarian interpretations placed at the service of devilish planes at the antipodes of truth or religion, in any case, in light years away from the scientific, intellectual and social evolution to which tends the man of today. Do we have the right to despair? One day violence ends per running out of steam. It is not a work of God and his true faithful servants. Hoping truth will emerge, and its brightness dazzles those who believed in it. That truth witch any ordinary man and every man of science constantly quest on the path of life and through his works. Louis-Ferdinand Destouches, better known under the name of Celine, doctor and novelist, had participated in the First World War in 1914 that revealed to him the absurdity of the world. He compared a “slaughterhouse international madness.” The only reasonable way of resisting such madness: cowardice, he says, displaying his hostility to any form of heroism, the very same that


goes with war. All his life, he devoted himself to the medical practice after sanitary stays in Africa and Detroit in the United States for the benefit of the “League of Nations”. I cannot conclude better than by quoting him: “Great works are those that awaken our genius. Great men are those who shape it”. From the Phoenician-Punic Carthage, founded by Elyssa to the antique Assyrian and Babylonian Mesopotamia; from Petra the “natural stop at the crossroads of several caravan routes that linked Egypt, Syria and South Arabia to the Mediterranean, loaded mainly of luxury goods (spices and silk from India, ivory from Africa, pearls of the Red Sea and incense from southern Arabia)» to the Pharaonic Egypt till the purplered Phoenicia, cradles of brilliant civilizations, modern states have emerged over the centuries, boundaries between men too. Valiant and creative people, powerful traders, builders of colossal works, inventors and exporters of the alphabet marked the ancient and contemporary history and shaped the world. These riparian of the Nile, Tigris, Euphrates, Dead Sea and Orontes cannot betray their own history. And above the storms, the smell of gunpowder and blood, by the will of its citizens will be reborn one day, true to its past, a free, modern and radiant Orient. While not forgetting that it is from the Orient that the sun rises consistently.


SOMMAIRE | TABLE OF CONTENTS 9

ARTICLE SCIENTIFIQUE / SCIENTIFIC ARTICLE

9

Orthodontie / Orthondontics Facial proportions in different mandibular rotations in class I individuals Shaghaf Bahrou / Abed Alkarim Hasan / Fadi Khalil

19 19

REVUE DE LA LITTÉRATURE / LITERATURE REVIEW Médecine Légale / Legal Medicine Détermination de l’âge dentaire en odontologie médico-légale Nada El Osta / Lana El Osta

26

Médecine Orale /Oral Medicine Dental management of diabetic patients: A clinical review Malik Sunita

31 31

A PROPOS D’UN CAS / CASE REPORT Prothèses Fixées / Fixed Prostheses Réhabilitation esthétique et fonctionnelle globale par la prothèse fixée d’un cas de bruxisme Narjes Hassen / Ramy Oualha / Lamia Oualha / Samir Boukottaya / Nabiha Douki


ARTICLE SCIENTIFIQUE | SCIENTIFIC ARTICLE

Orthodontie / Orthondontics

FACIAL PROPORTIONS IN DIFFERENT MANDIBULAR ROTATIONS IN CLASS I INDIVIDUALS Shaghaf Bahrou * | Abed Alkarim Hasan ** | Fadi Khalil *** Abstract The aims of this study were to evaluate facial proportions in different types of mandibular rotation using various parameters, to explore gender dimorphism within each type and to evaluate the correlation between the mandibular rotation measurements and the facial proportions. Lateral cephalograms of a total of 62 class I subjects (30 males and 32 female), aged between 18-25 years, were studied. The sample was divided into forward, normal, and backward rotation subgroups. Nine soft tissue facial proportions and five skeletal proportions were measured on lateral cephalometric radiographs. The facial proportions data were analyzed using independent sample Student t-test and Pearson correlation analysis. The backward rotation subjects showed the lowest value for the proportion of total posterior facial height (TPFH) and total anterior facial height (TAFH) and proportion of lower posterior facial height (LPFH) and TPFH and the highest value for the proportion of Sn-Pn¥/Stms-Sn¦, while forward rotation subjects exhibited the lowest value for proportion of upper posterior facial height (UPFH) and TPFH. Gender dimorphism was recorded; males showed higher value for the proportion of TPFH and TAFH, as well as for the proportion of Sn-Me'/G-Me' and Me'-Stmi/Me'-Sn in the backward rotation group. All the skeletal facial proportions were found correlated with mandibular rotation measurements (NS-GoMe, B, FH-GoMe, Bjork) while only the soft tissue proportion for G-Sn/Sn-Me', Sn-Me'/G-Me' and G-Sn/G-Me' were correlated with mandibular rotation measurements. The soft tissue drape particularly facial vertical dimensions are influenced by the underlying skeletal vertical pattern.

Résumé Les objectifs de cette étude étaient d’évaluer les proportions du visage dans différents types de rotation mandibulaire en utilisant différents paramètres, d’explorer le dimorphisme sexuel dans chaque type et d’évaluer la corrélation entre les mesures de la rotation de la mandibule et les proportions du visage. Des céphalogrammes de profil d’un total de 62 sujets de classe I (30 hommes et 32 femmes), âgés de 18-25 ans, ont été étudiés. L’échantillon a été divisé en 3 groupes suivant le type de rotation mandibulaire. Les données sur les proportions du visage ont été statistiquement évaluées à l’aide du test de Student et de l’analyse de corrélation de Pearson. Les sujets présentant une rotation mandibulaire postérieure ont montré la valeur la plus faible pour la proportion « TPFH » et « TAFH » et la proportion de « LPFH » et « TPFH » , la valeur la plus élevée pour la proportion de « Sn - Pn¥/ STM - Sn¦ », alors que pour les sujets présentant une rotation antérieure, la valeur de la proportion de « UPFH » et « TPFH » était la plus faible. Le dimorphisme sexuel a été enregistré; les hommes présentant une rotation mandibulaire postérieure ont montré des valeurs plus élevées du rapport « TPFH » et « TAFH », ainsi que du rapport de Sn–Me'/G-Me' et Me'-Stmi /Me'–Sn. Le drapé des tissus mous, en particulier les dimensions verticales du visage, est influencé par le modèle vertical squelettique sous-jacent. Mots-clés: rotation mandibulaire – proportions faciales.

Keywords: Mandibular rotation - backward rotation forward rotation - facial proportions.

* MSc Student Dpt of Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Tishreen University, Lattakia, Syria. sharaffrance@hotmail.com

** Ass. Prof. Dpt of Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Tishreen University, Lattakia, Syria.

*** Ass. Prof. Dpt of Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Tishreen University, Lattakia, Syria.


10

IAJD Vol. 5 – Issue 1

$UWLFOH6FLHQWLÀTXH_6FLHQWLÀF$UWLFOH

Introduction

Subjects Sex

Both soft tissue outline and skeleton determine facial harmony and balance. Facial esthetics is one of the main goals of orthodontic treatment and increased emphasis has been placed on it in recent years by both patients and orthodontists [1, 2]. The soft tissue profile has been studied extensively in orthodontics, primarily from lateral cephalometric radiographs, under the assumption that the form of the soft tissue outline largely determines the esthetics of the whole face [3]. Several investigators have noted that soft tissue behaves independently from the underlying skeleton [4, 5] whereas other researches have displayed that soft tissues are a major factor in determining a patient’s final facial profile [6-9]. Facial proportion was defined as the comparative relation of facial elements in profile [10]. Most of researchers have long focused on antero-posterior balance, probably spurred by the widespread use of Angle’s classification. Over the years, however, research and clinical experience have revealed the close interdependence of facial proportions in the three space dimensions [11]. In 1942, Thompson and Brodie [12], after performing measurements on radiographs of 50 adults and 300 dry skulls, concluded that nasal height (nasion-anterior nasal spine) accounts for 43% of the total facial height (nasion-gnathion). Moreover, Wylie and Johnson [13] in 1952 studied 171 patients and found that in harmonious individuals, total facial height (TFH) is divided into 45% of nasal height (anterior nasal spine) and 55% of dental height (anterior nasal spine-chin), i.e., upper facial height (UFH) and lower facial height (LFH), respectively. Later, in 1964, Schudy [14] examined cephalometric radiographs of 270 subjects, including both retrognathic and prognathic individuals with normal growth pattern. The results indica-

Forward rotation

Normal rotation

Backward rotation

Total

Male

13

9

8

30

Female

9

11

12

32

Total

22

20

20

62

Table 1: Subjects distribution according to sex and mandibular rotation.

ted that UFH varied very little between the three facial types, even though it was 2 mm higher in the prognathic group. LFH accounted for 56% of TFH (nasion-chin) in the group with normal growth pattern, 59.5% in the retrognathic group and 54.1% in the prognathic group. Before the advent of cephalometric radiography, anthropometric measures were frequently employed to help establish facial proportions [15]. However, this method has limitations since soft tissue compressibility can lead to errors during measurement [16]. When the aluminum filter was introduced in cephalometric radiographs [17], soft tissue measuring became part and parcel of cephalometric analysis. This allowed the study of the dentoskeletal profile since it was believed that certain hard tissue abnormalities could be masked or even heightened by the soft tissues. Soft tissue profile does not always follow skeletal profile as it differs from the latter in some areas [18]. This is due to a wide variability in soft tissue thickness [18] which renders inadequate the exclusive use of hard tissue analysis [6, 8]. Thus, evaluation of facial proportions and aesthetics should be conducted during clinical examination and the findings should be compared with cephalometric radiographs and photographs [15]. According to Margolis [19] one should focus on the proportions of the face. In light of the fact that many authors have proposed different methods to assess the facial proportions [20], this study aimed to: 1) Investigate the variation in facial proportions in different mandibular

rotation groups in a sample of adults with Class I normal occlusion; 2) To explore the gender dimorphism within each group of facial type; 3) To evaluate the correlation between the mandibular rotation and facial proportions in males and females.

Materials and Methods The sample of this study consisted of 62 adults (30 males and 32 females) aged 18–25 with class I normal occlusion. The selection criteria of the sample were as follows: 1. Full set of permanent teeth in both jaws excluding the third molars. 2. Angle’s class I molar relationship. 3. Class I according to ANB (0-4). 4. No significant medical history and no history of facial trauma. 5. No history of orthodontic treatment or maxillofacial surgery or excessive restorative dentistry. A lateral cephalogram was taken for each subject under rigidly standardized conditions with the mandible in centric occlusion. The 62 subjects were divided into three groups according to mandibular rotation (forward, normal and backward) based on an evaluation of the following skeletal parameters [21]: 1. The inclination of the mandibular plane relative to the Frankfort horizontal plane. 2. The inclination of the mandibular plane relative to the anterior cranial base. The first parameter is based on anatomical landmark, while the second parameter involves a plane of orienta-


11 Orthodontie / Orthondontics

Fig. 1: Soft tissue landmarks determined on cephalograms [2223-].

Fig-2: Skeletal landmarks determined on cephalograms [24].

tion. This approach insures that neither anatomic variation nor inaccurate orientation would influence ranking of the cases. For each of these parameters, all subjects were rank ordered and divided into 3 groups as described in table 1. Specific soft tissue landmarks (Fig. 1) and cephalometric points (Fig. 2) were identified on each cephalogram. Based on these landmarks, 18 facial proportions (5 skeletal and 9 soft tissues) were constructed. The following skeletal vertical linear measurements were recorded according to Schudy’s analysis [14] (Fig. 3): -Total anterior facial height (TAFH): Linear distance between nasion (N) and menton (Me).

-Upper anterior facial height (UAFH): Linear distance between N and ANS (perpendicular projection of anterior nasal spine in line N-Me). -Lower anterior facial height (LAFH): Linear distance between ANS and Me. -Total posterior facial height (TPFH): Linear distance between sella (S) and gonion (Go). -Upper posterior facial height (UPFH): Linear distance between S and Ar (perpendicular projection of articular (Ar) in line S-Go). -Lower posterior facial height (LPFH): Linear distance between Ar and Go.

1-UAFH/TAFH (N-ANS/N-Me): Proportion of UAFH and TAFH. 2-LAFH/TAFH (ANS-Me/N-Me): Proportion of LAFH and TAFH. 3-UPFH/TPFH (S-Ar/S-Go): Proportion of UPFH and TPFH. 4-LPFH/TPFH (Ar-Go/S-Go): Proportion of LPFH and TPFH. 5-TPFH/TAFH (S-Go/N-Me): Proportion of TPFH and TAFH. The following soft tissue vertical linear measurements were recorded (Fig. 4): -Vertical height ratio G-Sn/Sn-Me’. -Vertical lip-chin ratio Sn-Stms/ Stmi-Me’. -Lower vertical height-depth ratio Sn-Gn’/C-Gn’ according to Legan and Burstone analysis [5].


12

IAJD Vol. 5 – Issue 1

$UWLFOH6FLHQWLÀTXH_6FLHQWLÀF$UWLFOH -Lower facial height ratio: Sn-Me’/G-Me’. - Upper facial height ratio: G-Sn/G-Me’. -Upper lip height to lower facial height ratio: Sn-Stms/Sn-Me’. -Lower lip height to lower facial height ratio: Me’-Stmi/Me’-Sn. -Nasal projection to Nasal length ratio: G-Pn¥/G-Sn¦. -Nasal projection to upper lip height ratio: Sn-Pn¥/Stms-Sn¦.

Fig. 3: Measurements from various analyses: Wylie and Johnson [13]: 1- TAFH; 2- UAFH; 3- LAFH. Siriwat and Jarabak [25]: 4- TPFH; 83)+/3)+*HEHFNDQG0HUULÀHOG>27-].

The following mandibular rotation angles were recorded [28-29]: -FH-GoMe: The relationship between the Frankfort plane and the lower border of the mandible. -Maxillary-mandibular plane (B) angle: The angle of inclination of the mandible, formed by the mandibular and the palatal planes (ANS-PNS). -NS-GoMe: The inclination of the mandibular plane relative to the anterior cranial base.

Statistical analysis

Fig. 4: Soft tissue facial proportions: Horizontal reference plane (HP), constructed by drawing a line through nasion (N) 7° up from S-N line. 1) lower vertical height-depth ratio( Sn-Gn’/C-Gn’); 2) vertical height ratio (G-Sn / Sn-Me’) 3) vertical lip-chin ratio ( Sn-Stms/Stmi-Me’) [30].

Fifteen cephalograms were randomly selected, retraced, and measurements were obtained after 2 weeks to evaluate the reliability and the reproducibility of landmarks and measurements. Minimal error indicated that the reliability rate of all measurements was fair. All statistical analyses were performed using a software program (SPSS for Windows version 18). The mean and standard deviation for each variable in the different vertical growth patterns were calculated. Gender dimorphism was explored for each variable using independent samples t–test at p<0.05 significance level. Analysis of variance and post-hoc analysis test were used to examine difference among the groups at p<0.05. Pearson’s correlation coefficients between mandibular rotation angles and facial proportions variables were determined for males and females separately. The ‘’r’’ value was described as significant at p<0.05 and highly significant at p<0.01.


13 Orthodontie / Orthondontics Facial proportions

Forward rotation

Normal rotation

Backward rotation

Male

Female

Male

Female

Male

Female

S-Go /N-Me

0.72 ± 0.038

0.72 ± 0.034

0.65 ± 0.029

0.66 ± 0.015

0.64 ± 0.026*

0.60 ± 0.034*

Me-Ans/N-Me

0.57 ± 0.021

0.56 ± 0.017

0.57 ± 0.019

0.57 ± 0.020

0.59 ± 0.023

0.57 ± 0.022

N-Ans /N-Me

0.43 ± 0.021

0.44 ± 0.017

0.43 ± 0.014

0.42 ± 0.018

0.41 ± 0.023

0.43 ± 0.023

S-Ar/S-Go

0.39 ± 0.025

0.38 ± 0.035

0.42 ± 0.032

0.41 ± 0.038

0.43 ± 0.021

0.44 ± 0.056

Ar-Go /S-Go

0.61 ± 0.025

0.62 ± 0.035

0.60 ± 0.053

0.59 ± 0.039

0.57 ± 0.021

0.56 ± 0.056

* p<0.0 5. Table 2: Statistical comparison of the skeletal facial proportions in the different mandibular rotation groups between males and females (mean and standard deviation).

Facial proportions

Forward rotation

Normal rotation

Backward rotation

Male

Female

Male

Female

Male

Female

G’-Sn/Sn-Me’

0.96 ± 0.094*

1.03 ± 0.078*

0.93 ± 0.086

0.99 ± 0.064

0.93 ± 0.093*

1.09 ± 0.095*

Sn-Gn’/C-Gn’

1.17 ± 18.17

6.42 ± 3.626

1.72 ± 25.15

10.31 ± 5.392

2.97 ± 22.22

4.08 ± 25.79

Sn-Stms/Stmi-Me’

0.44 ± 0.036

0.45 ± 0.075

0.47 ± 0.040

0.47 ± 0.031

0.46 ±.039

0.47 ± 0.049

Sn-Me’/ G’-Me’

0.51 ± 0.014

0.49 ± 0.019

0.52 ± 0.022

0.50 ± 0.016

0.52 ± 0.024*

0.48 ± 0.022*

G’-Sn/G’-Me’

0.49 ± 0.014

0.51 ± 0.019

0.48 ± 0.022

0.50 ± 0.016

0.48 ±0.024*

0.52 ± 0.021*

Sn-Stms/Sn-Me’

0.31 ± 0.021

0.31 ± 0.027

0.29 ± .034*

0.31 ± 0.020*

0.32 ± 0.038

0.30 ± 0.031

Me’-Stmi/Me’-Sn

0.69 ± 0.029

0.66 ± 0.043

0.69 ± 0.033

0.68 ± 0.031

0.69 ± 0.025*

0.66 ± 0.030*

G’-Pn¥/G’-Sn¦

0.36 ± 0.133

0.31 ± 0.071

0.30 ± 0.069

0.30 ± 0.060

0.36 ± 0.049

0.31 ± 0.077

Sn-Pn¥/Stms-Sn¦

0.79 ± 0.114

0.82 ± 0.220

0.68 ± 0.107

0.74 ± 0.096

0.76 ± 0.091

0.89 ± 0.217

* p<0.0 5. Table 3: Statistical comparison of the soft tissue facial proportions in the different mandibular rotation groups between males and females (mean and standard deviation).

Results Descriptive statistics and comparison between males and females of the skeletal and soft tissue facial proportions for males and females in the different mandibular rotation groups are presented in tables 2 and 3. Results for comparing variables among the 3 groups of mandibular rotation are presented in table 4 for skeletal facial proportions and in table 5 for soft tissue facial proportions. The correlation coefficients of the mandibular rotation angles with skeletal and soft tissue facial proportions for males and females were described in tables 6 and 7. Only the skeletal proportion of total posterior facial height and total anterior facial height in backward

rotation group showed significant difference between the sexes (p<0.05) where males showed higher value than females. However, the soft tissue proportion of G-Sn/Sn-Me’ showed significant difference between the sexes in forward and backward rotation groups where females showed higher value than males. The soft tissue proportion of Sn-Stms/Sn-Me’ showed significant difference between the sexes in normal rotation group where females showed higher value than males. The soft tissue proportions of Sn-Me’/G-Me’, G-Sn/G-Me’ and Me’-Stmi/Me’-Sn showed significant difference between the sexes in backward rotation group where males showed higher value than females in Sn-Me’/G-Me’ and Me’-Stmi/Me’-Sn, and females showed

higher value than males in G-Sn/G-Me’ as shown in (Tables 2 and 3). No statistical differences between the mandibular rotation groups with regard to Me-Ans/N-Me and N-Ans /N-Me (Table 4). However, the groups were considered different from each other in terms of proportion of TPFH and TAFH (S-Go /N-Me). Forward rotation exhibited significantly higher means, followed by normal rotation and backward rotation, who displayed lower means. Regarding S-Ar/S-Go, there were no significant differences between backward rotation and normal rotation. However, the forward rotation group exhibited significantly lower means compared with the other groups. Regarding Ar-Go /S-Go, statistical differences were detected in the analy-


14

IAJD Vol. 5 – Issue 1

$UWLFOHVFLHQWLÀTXH_6FLHQWLÀF$UWLFOH

Variables

Rotation type

N

Mean

ANOVA test

Post-hoc tests Mean difference

S-Go /N-Me

Me-Ans/N-Me

N-Ans /N-Me

S-Ar/S-Go

Ar-Go /S-Go

Forward

22

0.72 ± 0.036

F–N

0.064*

Normal

20

0.66 ± 0.022

F–B

0.105*

Backward

20

0.61 ± 0.035

B–N

4.050

Forward

22

0.56 ± 0.020

F–N

-0.010-

Normal

20

0.57 ± 0.019

F–B

-0.011-

Backward

20

0.57 ± 0.024

B–N

0.001

Forward

22

0.44 ± 0.020

F–N

0.012

Normal

20

0.43 ± 0.016

F–B

0.011

Backward

20

0.43 ± 0.024

B–N

0.002

Forward

22

0.39 ± 0.029

F–N

-0.029-*

Normal

20

0.42 ± 0.035

F–B

-0.049-*

Backward

20

0.44 ± 0.045

B–N

0.019

Forward

22

0.61 ± 0.029

F–N

0.017

Normal

20

0.60 ± 0.045

F–B

0.049*

Backward

20

0.56 ± 0.045

B–N

-0.032-*

0.0001*

0.170

0.109

0.0001*

0.001*

* p<0.0 5 Table 4: Comparison of variables among the three mandibular rotation groups for skeletal facial proportions.

sis including all groups. In paired analysis, there were no statistically significant differences between forward rotation and normal rotation. However, this difference reach a statistically significant level between forward rotation and backward rotation groups, and between backward rotation and normal rotation groups with the higher means in forward rotation group. The groups were considered different from each other only in terms of the proportion of the nasal tip projection and the length of the nose (Sn-P¥/ Stms-Sn¦) (Table 5). In paired analysis, however, this difference did not reach a statistically significant level although it was more significant when backward rotation and normal rotation groups were confronted with each other. In this comparison, backward rotation had higher means than other rotation groups. A significant correlation was found between skeletal proportions and man-

dibular rotation angles (NS-GoMe, B, Bjork, FH-GoMe) in males and females. In males and females, as shown in table 5, S-Go /N-Me was negatively correlated with NS-GoMe, B, Bjork, and FH-GoMe. Me-Ans/N-Me was positively correlated with B angle. Ar-Go/S-Go was negatively correlated with NS-GoMe, B, Bjork and FH-GoMe. S-Ar/S-Go was positively correlated with NS-GoMe, B, Bjork and FH-GoMe. N-Ans /N-Me was negatively correlated with B angle in males and negatively correlated with NS-GoMe, B and Bjork in females. Different correlation levels among the variables were detected (Table 7). In males, G-Sn/Sn-Me’ and G-Sn/G-Me’ were negatively correlated with B and FH-GoMe. Sn-Me/G-Me’ was positively correlated with B and FH-GoMe. In females, G-Sn/Sn-Me’ was positively correlated with NS-GoMe and Bjork. Sn-Me’/G-Me’ was negatively correlated with NS-GoMe and Bjork.

Finally, G-Sn/G-Me’ was positively correlated with NS-GoMe and Bjork.

Discussion Subjects falling within 18–25 years age range were selected since most of the growth would have been completed by that time and the skeletal pattern is established and becomes constant [32]. In addition, Bishara [21] in his longitudinal study concluded that the differences among facial types were more pronounced at adulthood. Studies have shown that the growth changes of the facial tissues, although not completed, occurred predominantly before the age of 18 years [31, 32]. Differences between skeletal and soft tissue facial proportions for the various mandibular rotations and correlation between facial propor-


15 Orthodontie / Orthondontics

Variables

Rotation type

N

Mean

ANOVA test

Post-hoc tests Mean difference

G’-Sn/Sn-Me’

Sn-Gn’/C-Gn’

Sn-Stms/Stmi-Me’

Sn-Me’/G’-Me’

G’-Sn/ G’-Me’

Sn-Stms/Sn-Me’

Me’-Stmi/Me’-Sn

G’-Pn¥/G’-Sn¦

Sn-Pn¥/Stms-Sn¦

Forward

22

0.99 ± 0.094

F–N

0.023

Normal

20

0.96 ± 0.080

F–B

-0.039-

Backward

20

1.03 ± 0.122

B-N

0.063

Forward

22

3.32 ± 17.874

F–N

-1.583-

Normal

20

4.90 ± 23.901

F–B

2.775

Backward

20

0.54 ± 18.702

B-N

-4.358-

Forward

22

0.44 ± 0.054

F–N

-0.025-

Normal

20

0.47 ± 0.034

F–B

-0.023-

Backward

20

0.47 ± 0.044

B-N

-0.002-

Forward

22

0.50 ± 0.017

F–N

-0.009-

Normal

20

0.51 ± 0.021

F–B

0.005

Backward

20

0.50 ± 0.030

B-N

-0.015-

Forward

22

0.50 ± 0.017

F–N

0.009

Normal

20

0.49 ± 0.021

F–B

-0.006-

Backward

20

0.50 ± 0.030

B-N

0.015*

Forward

22

0.31 ± 0.023

F–N

0.007

Normal

20

0.30 ± 0.029

F–B

-0.003-

Backward

20

0.31 ± 0.034

B-N

0.010

Forward

22

0.68 ± 0.036

F–N

-0.008-

Normal

20

0.68 ± 0.031

F–B

0.0001

Backward

20

0.68 ± 0.031

B-N

-0.008-

Forward

22

0.34 ± 0.112

F–N

0.039

Normal

20

0.30 ± 0.063

F–B

0.010

Backward

20

0.33 ± 0.071

B-N

0.029

Forward

22

0.80 ± 0.161

F–N

0.087

Normal

20

0.71 ± 0.103

F–B

-0.039-

Backward

20

0.84 ± 0.188

B-N

0.125*

* p<0.05. Table 5: Comparison of variables among the three mandibular rotation groups for soft tissue facial proportions.

0.146

0.763

0.141

0.138

0.122

0.557

0.367

0.321

0.039*


16

IAJD Vol. 5 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Issue 1

$UWLFOHVFLHQWLĂ&#x20AC;TXH_6FLHQWLĂ&#x20AC;F$UWLFOH

Facial proportions

Male

Female

NS-GoMe

B

Bjork

FH-GoMe

NS-GoMe

B

Bjork

FH-GoMe

S-Go /N-Me

0.748-**

0.699-**

0.685-**

0.657-**

0.951-**

0.809-**

0.956-**

0.834-**

Me-Ans/N-Me

0.328

0.550**

0.346

0.3

0.054

0.497**

0.061

0.083

N-Ans /N-Me

0.365-*

0.588-**

0.379-*

0.342-

0.048-

0.493-**

0.055-

0.088-

S-Ar/S-Go

0.489**

0.473**

0.461*

0.579**

0.511**

0.545**

0.531**

0.601**

Ar-Go /S-Go

0.354-

0.370-*

0.466-**

0.448-*

0.506-**

0.531-**

0.529-**

0.612-**

* p<0.05; **p<0.01. :HDNFRUUHODWLRQOHYHO Â&#x201C;Â&#x201D;UÂ&#x201C;  0RGHUDWHFRUUHODWLRQOHYHO Â&#x201C;Â&#x201D;UÂ&#x201C;  6WURQJFRUUHODWLRQOHYHO Â&#x201C;Â&#x201D;UÂ&#x201C; >@ Table 6: Correlation of the mandibular rotation angles with skeletal facial proportions for males and females.

tions and mandibular rotation have rarely been described in the literature. In our study, a significant difference was observed between males and females for the ratio of TPFH to TAFH with males exhibiting higher values than females in backward rotation group; i.e., a well-developed posterior facial height especially in backward rotation. This is in agreement with Kharbanda study [33] who found a significant difference between males and females for the ratio of TAFH to TPFH in a sample of adult subjects with excellent occlusion and good facial harmony. However, Utomi [34] found that in Hausa-Fulani children, TPFH/TAFH was 61.5% for males and 63% for females. The findings of the present study showed no significant differences between males and females in the ratio of UAFH to TAFH, LAFH to TAFH, UPFH to TPFH and LPFH to TPFH in different mandibular rotation groups. This is in agreement with Utomi study [34], in which UAFH/TAFH was 44.2% for males and 44.1% for females. LPFH/TPFH was constant (58.4%) for both sexes. The rotation groups were considered different from each other in terms of proportion of TPFH and TAFH

(S-Go /N-Me) and LPFH to TPFH (ArGo /S-Go). Forward rotation group exhibited significantly higher means, followed by normal rotation and backward rotation groups, who displayed the lower means. Regarding the soft tissue facial proportions, vertical height ratio (Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;-Sn/ Sn-Meâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;) was found greater in females, significantly in forward and backward rotation groups indicating tendency of males to have longer lower facial height than females. Similar results were obtained by AlBarakati study [35] who reported that vertical height ratio was greater in adult Saudi females (1.02Âą0.10) than in males (1.00Âą0.09) even though the difference was not significant. Lower vertical height-depth ratio (Sn-Gnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; /C-Gnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;) was also greater in females than males but the difference wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t significant; this might be reflected by the prevalence of shorter neck among females. Upper facial height ratio (G-Sn/ G-Meâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;) is also significantly greater in females in backward rotation group, indicating increased anterior facial height in males than females. This in agreement with the results of Sayagh et al. [36] who found that males

showed significantly longer upper and lower facial height than females in all facial types. Lower lip height to lower facial height ratio (Meâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;-Stmi/Meâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;-Sn) was greater in males than females significantly in backward rotation, indicating increased lower lip height (Meâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Stmi) in males than females. These findings were in agreement with those of Sayagh et al., [36] who reported that males showed significantly longer chin height than females. Also, we found that nasal projection to nasal length ratio (G-PnÂĽ/G-SnÂŚ) was greater in males than females in all rotation groups but the difference wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t significant. The same result was obtained by Nahidh [37] and other studies [38-41] who reported that males showed more prominent and longer nose than females in adult class I subjects. The proportion of nasal projection to upper lip height (Sn-PnÂĽ/ Stms-SnÂŚ) was different in the three rotation groups. Backward rotation exhibited significantly higher means than forward rotation. These results indicated that the nasal projection tend to increase with the backward rotation. Nahidh [37] found that the


17 Orthodontie / Orthondontics Males

Females

Facial proportions NS-GoMe

B

Bjork

FH-GoMe

NS-GoMe

B

Bjork

FH-GoMe

Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;-Sn/Sn-Meâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

0.215-

0.359-

0.228-

0.363-*

0.368*

0.051

0.377*

0.301

Sn-Gnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;/C-Gnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

0.100-

0.051

0.074-

0.078-

0.326-

0.388-*

0.334-

0.357-*

Sn-Stms/Stmi-Meâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

0.334

0.269

0.323

0.298

0.002-

0.032

0.011

0.017

Sn-Meâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;/Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;-Meâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

0.331

0.551**

0.345

0.415*

0.355-*

0.043-

0.362-*

0.296-

Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;-Sn/ Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;-Meâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

0.331-

0.551-**

0.345-

0.415-*

0.366*

0.061

0.375*

0.302

Sn-Stms/Sn-Meâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

0.072

0.01

0.126

0.099

0.072-

0.114-

0.087-

0.163-

Meâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;-Stmi/Meâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;-Sn

0.088

0.006

0.053

0.06

0.105-

0.05

0.056-

0.066

Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;-PnÂĽ/Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;-SnÂŚ

0.215-

0.359-

0.228-

0.363-*

0.368*

0.051

0.377*

0.301

Sn-PnÂĽ/Stms-SnÂŚ

0.055-

0.124-

0.020-

0.112-

0.108-

0.024-

0.076-

0.128-

* p<0.05; **p<0.01. :HDNFRUUHODWLRQOHYHO Â&#x201C;Â&#x201D;UÂ&#x201C;  0RGHUDWHFRUUHODWLRQOHYHO Â&#x201C;Â&#x201D;UÂ&#x201C;  6WURQJFRUUHODWLRQOHYHO Â&#x201C;Â&#x201D;UÂ&#x201C; >@ Table 7: Correlation of the mandibular rotation angles with soft tissue facial proportions for males and females.

nasal length and projection tend to increase with the increments of the facial heights which increase with mandibular rotation. In males, a significant positive correlation was found between lower facial height ratio (Sn-Meâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;/G-Meâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;) and (B and Bjork), and a significant negative correlation between upper facial height ratio (G-Sn/G-Meâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;) and (B and Bjork); any increase in these rotation angles was associated with an increase in Sn-Meâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;. While in females, the correlation was significantly negative between lower facial height ratio (Sn-Meâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;/ G-Meâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;) and (NS-GoMe and FH-GoMe), and significantly positive between upper facial height ratio (G-Sn/G-Meâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;) and (NS-GoMe and FH-GoMe); the increase in these rotation angles was associated with an increase in G-Meâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;. These findings reflect dimorphism between sexes.

Conclusion Within the limitations of the present study, we can conclude that: -The soft tissue profile tended to follow the contour of the underlying skeletal profile, although in some cases this was not the case, probably due to variations in the soft tissue thickness. -Sexual dimorphism was detected especially in soft tissue facial proportions. -Skeletal facial proportions were more correlated with mandibular rotation than soft tissue facial proportions.


18

IAJD Vol. 5 – Issue 1

$UWLFOHVFLHQWLÀTXH_6FLHQWLÀF$UWLFOH

References 1. Bowman SJ. More than lip service: Facial esthetics in orthodontics. J Am Dent Ass 1999;130:1173-81.

23. $WKDQDVLRV $I 2UWKRGRQWLF FHSKDORPHWU\ 7KDVVDORQLN  -DQXDU\0RVE\:ROI/RQGRQ

2. Lemley B. Isn’t she lovely? Discover 2000;21:42-9.

24. 0DQJOD 5 6LQJK 1 'XD 'XD 9 3DGPDQDEKDQ 9 .KDQQD 0 (YDOXDWLRQ RI PDQGLEXODU PRUSKRORJ\ LQ GLIIHUHQW IDFLDO W\SHV &RQWHPS&OLQ'HQW-XO6HS  ²

3. 6S\URSRXORV 01 +DOD]RQHWLV '- 6LJQLÀFDQFH RI VRIW WLVVXH SURÀOH RQ IDFLDO HVWKHWLFV $P - 2UWKRG 'HQWRIDFLDO 2UWKRS 2001; 119(5): 464–471. 4. 5LFNHWWV50(VWKHWLFVHQYLURQPHQWDQGWKHODZRIOLSUHODWLRQ Am J Orthod 1968;54: 272-28. 5. /HJDQ+/%XUVWRQH&-6RIWWLVVXHFHSKDORPHWULFDQDO\VLVIRU RUWKRJQDWKLFVXUJHU\-2UDO6XUJ 6. +ROGDZD\5$$VRIWWLVVXHFHSKDORPHWULFDQDO\VLVDQGLWVXVH LQRUWKRGRQWLFWUHDWPHQWSODQQLQJ3DUW,$P-2UWKRG 28. 7. 0HUULÀHOG // 7KH SURÀOH OLQH DV DQ DLG LQ FULWLFDOO\ HYDOXDWLQJ IDFLDOHVWKHWLFV$P-2UWKRG 8. +ROGDZD\ 5$ $ VRIW WLVVXH FHSKDORPHWULF DQDO\VLV DQG LWV XVH LQ RUWKRGRQWLF WUHDWPHQW SODQQLQJ 3DUW ,, $P - 2UWKRG 1984;85:279-283. 9. 3DUN<&%XUVWRQH&-6RIWWLVVXHSURÀOHIDOODFLHVRIKDUGWLVVXH VWDQGDUGV LQ WUHDWPHQW SODQQLQJ $P - 2UWKRG 'HQWRIDFLDO 2UWKRS-XO   10. 3HFN + 3HFN 6 $ FRQFHSW RI IDFLDO HVWKHWLFV $QJOH 2UWKRG 1970;40(4): 284-318. 11. 6DVVRXQL91DQGD6$QDO\VLVRIGHQWRIDFLDOYHUWLFDOSURSRUWLRQV Am J Orthod. 1964 Nov;50(11):801-23. 12. 7KRPSVRQ -5 %URGLH $* )DFWRUV LQ WKH SRVLWLRQ RI WKH PDQGLEOH-$P'HQW$VVRF-XQ   13. :\OLH:/-RKQVRQ (/ 5DSLG HYDOXDWLRQ RI IDFLDO G\VSODVLD LQ WKHYHUWLFDOSODQH$QJOH2UWKRG   14. 6FKXG\ )) 9HUWLFDO JURZWK YHUVXV DQWHURSRVWHULRU JURZWK DV UHODWHG WR IXQFWLRQ DQG WUHDWPHQW $QJOH 2UWKRG  Apr;34(2):75-93. 15. 3URIÀW:52UWRGRQWLDFRQWHPSRUkQHDHG5LRGH-DQHLUR *XDQDEDUD.RRJDQ 16. %LVKDUD 6( -RUJHQVHQ *- -DNREVHQ -5 &KDQJHV LQ IDFLDO GLPHQVLRQV DVVHVVHG IURP ODWHUDO DQG IURQWDO SKRWRJUDSKV 3DUW , 0HWKRGRORJ\ $P - 2UWKRG 'HQWRIDFLDO 2UWKRS  Oct;108(4):389-93. 17. %M|UN$&HSKDORPHWULF;UD\LQYHVWLJDWLRQVLQGHQWLVWU\,QW'HQW J. 1954 Sep;4(5):718-44. 18. 6XEWHOQ\-'$ORQJLWXGLQDOVWXG\RIVRIWWLVVXHIDFLDOVWUXFWXUHV DQGWKHLUSURÀOHFKDUDFWHULVWLFVGHÀQHGLQUHODWLRQWRXQGHUO\LQJ VNHOHWDOVWUXFWXUHV$P-2UWKRG  

25. 6LULZDW 33 -DUDEDN -5 0DORFFOXVLRQ DQG IDFLDO PRUSKRORJ\ LVWKHUHDUHODWLRQVKLS"$QHSLGHPLRORJLFVWXG\$QJOH2UWKRG 1985;55:127-38. 26. 0HUULÀHOG//$QDO\VLVFRQFHSWVDQGYDOXHV3DUW,,-&KDUOHV+ 7ZHHG,QW)RXQG 27. *HEHFN750HUULÀHOG//$QDO\VLV³FRQFHSWVDQGYDOXHV3DUW ,-&KDUOHV+7ZHHG,QW)RXQG 28. 5DNRVL 7 $Q DWODV DQG PDQXDO RI FHSKDORPHWULF UDGLRJUDSK\ QG HG :ROIH 0HGLFDO 3XEOLFDWLRQV /WG /RQGRQ S  29. -DFREVRQ $  5LFKDUG / 5DGLRJUDSKLF FHSKDORPHWU\ IURP EDVLFVWR'LPDJLQJ(XU-2UWKRG   30. 6DQWRV&(VWDWtVWLFDGHVFULWLYDPDQXDOGHDXWRDSUHQGL]DJHP /LVERD(GLo}HV6tODER 31. &UHHNPRUH7',QKLELWLRQDQGVWLPXODWLRQRIWKHYHUWLFDOJURZWK RI WKH IDFLDO FRPSOH[ LWV VLJQLÀFDQFH WR WUHDWPHQW $QJOH Orthod. 1967;37:285–97. 32. )RUPE\ :$ 1DQGD 56 &XUULHU *) /RQJLWXGLQDO FKDQJHV LQ WKH DGXOW IDFLDO SURÀOH $P - 2UWKRG 'HQWRIDFLDO 2UWKRS 1994;105:464–76. 33. .KDUEDQGD 23 6LGKX 66 6XQGDUDP .5 9HUWLFDO SURSRUWLRQV RI IDFH D FHSKDORPHWULF VWXG\ ,QWHUQDWLRQDO -RXUQDO RI 2UWKRGRQWLFV   34. 8WRPL,/9HUWLFDOIDFLDOKHLJKWDQGSURSRUWLRQVRIIDFHLQ+DXVD )XODQLFKLOGUHQLQ1RUWKHUQ1LJHULD7KH1LJHULDQ3RVWJUDGXDWH 0HGLFDO-RXUQDO   35. $O%DUDNDWL 6 6RIW WLVVXH IDFLDO SURÀOH RI DGXOW 6DXGLV ODWHUDO FHSKDORPHWULFDQDO\VLV6DXGL0HG- 36. 6D\DJK 10 6DOHHP 15 $EGXO²4DGLU 0< $QDO\VLV RI VRIW WLVVXH IDFLDO SURÀOH LQ GLIIHUHQW YHUWLFDO JURZWK SDWWHUQV $O² 5DÀGDLQ'HQW-   37. 1DKLGK01RVHDQGVNHOHWDOSDWWHUQVLVWKHUHDUHODWLRQVKLS" -%DJK&ROOHJH'HQWLVWU\ 38. $O7D·DQL 00$ 6RIW WLVVXH IDFLDO SURÀOH DQDO\VLV D FHSKDORPHWULFVWXG\RIVRPH,UDTLDGXOWVZLWKQRUPDORFFOXVLRQ $PDVWHUWKHVLV'HSDUWPHQWRI3HGRGRQWLFV2UWKRGRQWLFVDQG 3UHYHQWLYH'HQWLVWU\8QLYHUVLW\RI%DJKGDG

19. 0DUJROLV0-(VWKHWLFFRQVLGHUDWLRQVLQRUWKRGRQWLFWUHDWPHQW RI DGXOWV $GXOW RUWKRGRQWLFV ,, 'HQW &OLQLF 1RUWK $P 1997;41(1):29-48.

39. <RXVHI0$66RIWWLVVXHIDFLDOSURÀOHDQDO\VLV$FRPSDUDWLYH VWXG\ RI WKH GHQWDO DQG VNHOHWDO FODVV , DQG FODVV ,, IRU ,UDTL DGXOW VDPSOH D ODWHUDO FHSKDORPHWULF VWXG\  $ PDVWHU WKHVLV 'HSDUWPHQW RI 3HGRGRQWLFV 2UWKRGRQWLFV DQG 3UHYHQWLYH 'HQWLVWU\8QLYHUVLW\RI%DJKGDG

20. &RVWD 0& %DUERVD 0& %LWWHQFRXUW 0$ (YDOXDWLRQ RI IDFLDO SURSRUWLRQVLQWKHYHUWLFDOSODQHWRLQYHVWLJDWHWKHUHODWLRQVKLS EHWZHHQ VNHOHWDO DQG VRIW WLVVXH GLPHQVLRQV 'HQWDO 3UHVV - Orthod. 2011 Jan-Feb;16(1):99-106.

40. *XOVHQ$2ND\&$VODQ%,8WHU2<DYX]HU57KHUHODWLRQVKLS EHWZHHQ FUDQLRIDFLDO VWUXFWXUHV DQG WKH QRVH LQ $QDWROLDQ 7XUNLVK DGXOWV $ FHSKDORPHWULF HYDOXDWLRQ $P - 2UWKRG 'HQWRIDF2UWKRS  HH

21. %LVKDUD6(-DNREVHQ-5/RQJLWXGLQDOFKDQJHVLQWKUHHQRUPDO IDFLDOW\SHV$P-2UWKRG'HQWRIDFLDO2UWKRS   502.

41. (QORZ'++DQV0*(VVHQWLDOVRIIDFLDOJURZWK3KLODGHOSKLD: %6DXQGHUV

22. 3DUN<&%XUVWRQH&-6RIWWLVVXHSURÀOH)DOODFLHVRIKDUGWLVVXH VWDQGDUGV LQ WUHDWPHQW SODQQLQJ $P - 2UWKRG 'HQWRIDFLDO Orthop. 1986; 90(1):52-62.


19

REVUE DE LA LITTÉRATURE / LITERATURE REVIEW

0pGHFLQH/pJDOH/HJDO0HGLFLQH

DÉTERMINATION DE L’ÂGE DENTAIRE EN ODONTOLOGIE MÉDICO-LÉGALE Nada El Osta * |Lana El Osta ** Résumé L’étude de la dentition est un des éléments les plus classiques pour la détermination de l’âge surtout en médecine légale. Dans cet article, on abordera les méthodes recommandées actuellement pour estimer l’âge dentaire des personnes décédées inconnues et des personnes vivantes. Chez les enfants, les techniques histologiques ainsi que les méthodes basées sur l’évaluation du temps d’éruption et de calcification dentaires sont appropriées pour évaluer l’âge dentaire en post-mortem. Après 15 ans, l’estimation de l’âge devient plus difficile puisque les phénomènes liés à la formation et à l’éruption dentaire sont achevés. Le taux de racémisation et la méthode de Lamendin sont les plus adaptées. Finalement, dans le cas de jeunes vivants, la minéralisation de la dent de sagesse constitue un critère pour évaluer l’âge dentaire. L’ajustement des méthodes globales d’estimation de l’âge dentaire et leur application sur la population libanaise permettra de déterminer avec plus de certitude l’âge dentaire. Mots-clés: odontologie médico-légale - méthode de Lamendin – racémisation –méthode de Demirjian.

* DDS, DESP, MSBM, DU Med Légale, PhD Chargée d'enseignement, Dpt de Prothèse Amovible, Dpt de Santé Publique Université Saint-Joseph, Liban pronada99@hotmail.com

Abstract The study of the dentition is a common method for age determination. In this article, we will discuss the pertinent methods to estimate the dental age of unknown dead or alive young people. In children, histological techniques as well as the determination of the level of tooth eruption or calcification are appropriate to assess dental age in postmortem. After the age of 15, it becomes difficult to estimate the age, since the phenomena related to the tooth eruption or calcification is completed. Therefore, the rate of racemization and Lamendin method are applicable to determine the age of adults in postmortem. Finally, in young alive subjects, the mineralization of the wisdom tooth is a fundamental criterion for evaluating dental age. Age determination depends on physiologic, environmental, genetic and pathologic factor. Thus, the age estimation in Lebanese population might be appraised using the methods universally adopted after adjustment, to obtain an accurate evaluation. Keywords: Postmortem age determination - forensic odontology - Lamendin method - Demerjian method.

** MD, MSBM, DU Med Légale Dpt de santé publique Université Saint-Joseph, Liban


20

IAJD Vol. 5 – Issue 1

5HYXHGHOD/LWWpUDWXUH_Litrature Review

Introduction L’odontologie médico-légale est une branche de la médecine légale qui s’intéresse à l’étude des dents et des maxillaires. Elle est l’une des méthodes de référence pour l’identification des victimes inconnues non identifiées par les proches ou par les empreintes digitales [1]. En effet, l’émail, le tissu le plus dur de l’organisme, rend la dent résistante à la carbonisation, l’immersion et la putréfaction. Les dents qui ont échappé à la destruction sont comparées au statut dentaire et aux radiographies ante mortem des personnes disparues. L’identification comparative est ainsi possible pour des victimes brûlées complètement méconnaissables; les dents et les matériaux d’obturation peuvent résister à des températures très élevées [1-5]. Chez les victimes inconnues et en l’absence du dossier dentaire ante mortem, les méthodes d’identification reconstructives devront être utilisées. Ces méthodes consistent à déterminer les caractéristiques de la victime de point de vue race, sexe et âge [6]. La détermination de l’âge est une étape capitale dans les enquêtes visant à identifier des victimes inconnues. L’identité potentielle sera par la suite infirmée ou confirmée par l’odontologie médico-légale [7]. L’âge dentaire est relativement aisément déterminé chez les sujets de moins de 15 ans par l’analyse de la maturation dentaire. Cependant, une fois l’âge adulte atteint, sa détermination devient plus difficile et imprécise. On se base alors sur des indicateurs qui résultent des changements morphologiques induits par des processus de maturation variables et moins distincts. A un âge plus avancé, s’installent des signes de détérioration en rapport avec la sénescence [6, 7]. Dans cet article, on abordera les techniques actuelles les plus utilisées par les odontologistes légistes pour estimer l’âge dentaire des personnes décédées non identifiées ou vivantes ainsi que leurs limitations notamment au Liban.

Estimation de l’âge dentaire en post mortem chez l’enfant L’étude de la dentition est l’un des éléments les plus classiques pour la détermination de l’âge dentaire (Fig. 1) [8,9]. Chez les enfants, l’estimation de l’âge dentaire en post mortem peut être réalisée selon les méthodes histologique, d’éruption et de calcification dentaire [6]. Etude histologique L’étude histologique des tissus dentaires permet d’apporter des indices discriminants et d’estimer l’âge dentaire. A partir de l’examen de nombreuses coupes histologiques, le degré de calcification, le stade de développement et la situation de chaque dent de la naissance à l’âge de 15 ans sont établis. Après section longitudinale d’une dent, il est possible d’observer au microscope une ligne de croissance individualisée, la ligne néo-natale d’Orban dans l’émail et la dentine. La mesure de l’épaisseur des tissus, du côté pulpaire de cette ligne, permet une estimation de l’âge chez le très jeune enfant. Toutefois, les méthodes histologiques d’estimation de l’âge dentaire sont laborieuses et onéreuses ce qui limite leur utilisation surtout en cas de catastrophe de masse. D’autres méthodes pertinentes et plus rapides peuvent être alors utilisées [6,9]. Etude de l’éruption dentaire L’éruption dentaire est un processus de développement au cours duquel la dent se déplace verticalement de sa position initiale dans la crypte alvéolaire vers sa position fonctionnelle dans le plan occlusal [7]. La détermination de l’âge dentaire sera réalisée par l’étude de la succession entre dentitions temporaire et permanente. Ainsi, du 5ème mois à 2 ans et demi, l’âge peut être estimé par l’étude de l’éruption des dents temporaires avec une marge d’erreur de 2 à 6 mois [8, 9]. La période située entre 3 ans et 6 ans correspond à la période de stabilité, sans éruption ni chute dentaire. De 6 ans à 12 ans, l’âge peut être estimé

par la chute des dents temporaires et l’éruption des dents permanentes. A 12 ans, toutes les dents permanentes sont présentes sur l’arcade sauf les dents de sagesse. De nombreuses tables sur la chronologie d’éruption dentaire des deux types de dentures ont été établies pour l’estimation de l’âge dentaire des enfants en post mortem (Tables 1 et 2) [9, 10]. Toutefois, de nombreux auteurs ont proposé une évaluation de la maturation dentaire puisque la calcification d’une dent pourrait mieux estimer l’âge dentaire que son émergence clinique. Etude de la maturation dentaire La maturation dentaire interprétée sur des clichés radiographiques usuels en odontologie permet d’apprécier certains stades chronologiques informateurs de l’âge [11]. Le dentiste peut, à l’aide du cliché panoramique ou d’une rétroalvéolaire, déterminer approximativement l’âge dentaire de l’individu. Chaque dent sera confrontée au stade correspondant de son édification en fonction du sexe de l’enfant [9]. Plusieurs tables ont été élaborées au cours des dernières années en se basant sur des données radiographiques. Ces tables indiquent les stades de maturation chronologique des dents temporaires et permanentes: début de la minéralisation, éruption, formation complète de la couronne et formation complète de la racine (Tables 2 et 3) [9,12]. L’âge de 6 à 12 ans pourra être estimé par l’étude de la résorption des racines des dents temporaires et la croissance des racines des dents définitives [7, 13, 14]. A noter que la maturation dentaire est soumise aux influences du milieu extérieur; également, des variations physiologiques importantes peuvent exister selon la race, l’hérédité, le sexe et la puberté. Les tables de maturation dentaires ont été développées sur des enfants européens, américains et africains; leur utilisation chez les enfants libanais peut par conséquent sur- ou sousestimer l’âge dentaire et engendrer des biais de mesure vu l’influence des


21 0pGHFLQH/pJDOH/HJDO0HGLFLQH DĂŠcĂŠdĂŠs

Vivants

(QIDQWV

18 ans

5HFKHUFKHG XQH SDWKRORJLHGH croissance 0HVXUHVDQWKURSRPpWULTXHV

$GXOWHV

(WXGH KLVWRORJLTXH

(PHUJHQFH dentaire

0DWXUDWLRQ dentaire

MĂŠthodes de Lamendin

7DX[GH racĂŠmisation

3UpFLVLRQ 3UDWLTXH²²²

3UpFLVLRQ 3UDWLTXH

3UpFLVLRQ 3UDWLTXH

3UpFLVLRQ 3UDWLTXH

3UpFLVLRQ 3UDWLTXH²²²

8VXUH Apposition de dentine secondaire Apposition de ciment

([DPHQGHQWDLUH 3DQRUDPLTXH

RĂŠsorption de la racine

5DGLRJUDSKLHGX SRLJQHWJDXFKH

7HLQWH 5DGLRJUDSKLH RX&76FDQGH O DUWLFXODWLRQ VWHUQRFODYLFXODLUH

3UpFLVLRQ²²² 3UDWLTXH

+++ Fig. 1 : dĂŠtermination de lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;âge dentaire en odontologie mĂŠdico-lĂŠgale.

Dents Centrale

Achèvement de la couronne

Eruption

Edification complète des racines

RĂŠsorption

Remplacement

3 Ă 4 mois

3 Ă 6 mois

2 ans

4 ans

7 ans

LatĂŠrale

4 Ă 5 mois

6 Ă 12 mois

2 ans ½

5 ans

8 ans

Canine

9 Ă 12 mois

18 Ă 24 mois

3 ans

8 ans

11 ans

1ère molaire

6 Ă 9 mois

12 Ă 18 mois

3 ans

6 ans

10 ans

2ème molaire

12 mois

24 Ă 30 mois

4 ans

7 ans

11 ans

Table 2 : ĂŠvolution des dents temporaires (Fortier [12]).

Dents

Mise en place du germe

DĂŠbut de minĂŠralisation

Achèvement de la couronne

Eruption

Edification complète

Centrale

5ème mois I.U.

3 mois

4 Ă 5 ans

6 Ă 7 ans

10 ans

LatĂŠrale

5ème mois I.U.

6 mois

5 ans

7 Ă 8 ans

10 ans

Canine

5ème mois I.U.

6 Ă 9 mois

6 ans

11 Ă 12 ans

13 Ă 15 ans

Naissance

2 ans

6 Ă 7 ans

10 Ă 12 ans

13 ans

1ère prÊmolaire

9 Ă 12 mois

3 ans

6 Ă 8 ans

11 Ă 12 ans

14 ans

1ère molaire

2ème prÊmolaire

4ème mois I.U.

Naissance

3 Ă 4 ans

6 ans

9 Ă 10 ans

2ème molaire

9 Ă 12 mois

30 mois

8 ans

12 Ă 13 ans

15 ans

3ème molaire

5 Ă 6 ans

7 Ă 10 ans

13 Ă 15 ans

17 ans Ă +

Après 18 ans

Table 3 : ĂŠvolution des dents permanentes (Fortier [12]).


22

IAJD Vol. 5 – Issue 1

5HYXHGHOD/LWWpUDWXUH_Litrature Review

P=

Hauteur de la parodontolyse au niveau du collet de la dent Hauteur de la racine

* 100

T=

Hauteur de la dentine transparente à la base de la racine Hauteur de la racine

* 100

Fig. 2 : mesure de la parodontolyse et de la translucidité (Lamendin [21]).

facteurs environnementaux, physiologiques et génétiques [9]. Demirjian a proposé une autre méthode considérée actuellement la méthode de référence pour estimer l’âge dentaire des enfants en post mortem [13-18]. Elle se base sur les données radiographiques des étapes de maturation dentaire de 7 dents mandibulaires gauches [13]. Huit stades de maturation dentaire dont 4 stades pour la couronne et 4 pour la racine sont définis pour chaque type de dents (incisives, canine, prémolaires et molaires) allant de la minéralisation initiale jusqu’à la maturation complète de l’apex. Lorsque l’ensemble des 7 dents mandibulaires gauches est codé, l’étape suivante consiste à convertir les stades dentaires en scores numériques. Les 7 scores sont ensuite additionnés afin d’obtenir, pour l’individu concerné, un indice de la maturité dentaire dont la valeur est comprise entre 0 et 100. Par la suite, cet indice est converti en âge dentaire par l’intermédiaire d’un abaque qui dépend de la population considérée [13]. L’abaque utilisé dans cette méthode a été établi chez les enfants français-canadiens [13]. Des tables et graphes ont été par la suite établis en Europe, en Australie et récemment en

Arabie Saoudite pour l’application de la méthode de Demirjian dans ces pays [14-18]. Au Liban, il faut établir des scores de maturation dentaire propres à la population des enfants libanais pour pouvoir utiliser cette méthode d’identification reconstructrice de l’âge dentaire en minimisant les erreurs. La détermination de l’âge dentaire de l’enfant pourrait être influencée par de nombreux facteurs notamment le niveau de vie; de plus, la malnutrition. Des situations pathologiques pourraient également aboutir à une sousévaluation de l’âge [9, 19]. Pour plus de fiabilité, la détermination de l’âge dentaire chez l’enfant en post mortem doit être confrontée au point de vue du radiologue (os du poignet, ossification des épiphyses, présence de stries d’arrêt de croissance) et à celui de l’anthropologue (longueur des os longs, ossification des fontanelles et des sutures des os du crâne) [9]. Estimation de l’âge dentaire en post mortem chez l’adulte Après 15 ans, il devient difficile d’estimer l’âge d’un sujet car tous les phénomènes liés à la formation et à l’éruption dentaire sont terminés. Il est alors nécessaire de disposer de méthodes fondées sur des modifi-

cations complémentaires des dents. Des examens anatomiques, radiographiques et microscopiques sont effectués sur des dents in situ sur les arcades, extraites ou sur des dents retrouvées isolément. De nombreuses méthodes ont été décrites dans la littérature telle l’estimation de l’usure des surfaces occlusales, de l’apposition de dentine secondaire, de l’apposition de cément sur la racine et de la résorption radiculaire [9, 20-22]. Toutefois ces critères de modification qui sont en rapport avec l’âge, peuvent être influencés par des causes pathologiques, les rendant non fiables. Des études ont rapporté que la méthode de Lamendin et le taux de racémisation sont actuellement considérés les plus appropriés pour déterminer l’âge d’individus adultes en post mortem (Table 1) [9, 21-28]. Méthode de Lamendin La méthode de Lamendin fondée sur un modèle statistique de régression linéaire, relie l’âge au moment du décès à deux indicateurs dentaires : la parodontolyse (P) correspondant à la perte d’attache gingivale et la translucidité radiculaire (T) qui est due à l’oblitération des tubuli secondaires et à la décalcification de la racine, modi-


23 0pGHFLQH/pJDOH/HJDO0HGLFLQH

Fig. 3 : corrélation entre l’âge et le taux de racémisation de l’acide aspartique [27].

fiant ainsi la réfraction de la lumière. Pour pouvoir appliquer cette technique, la dent doit être monoradiculée et intacte; une source lumineuse type négatoscope 16 watts, une règle millimétrée et un compas sont utilisés [21]. L’âge sera estimé en appliquant la formule: âge = 0.18 P + 0.42 T + 25.5. La parodontolyse est mesurée au compas à pointes sèches de la jonction amélo-dentinaire à la limite coronaire de l’attache gingivale ou à la limite apicale des dépôts. La translucidité radiculaire est mesurée au compas à pointes sèches de l’apex de la dent à la limite coronaire de la translucidité (Fig. 2). La constante 25.53 indique que l’âge estimé ne peut être inférieur à cette limite [9, 21, 22]. Cette méthode est rapide, simple, fiable et permet la préservation de la pièce examinée. Cette technique, actuellement adoptée par les communautés internationales dans les enquêtes médicolégales, peut être appliquée dans le cas de dents provenant de sujets âgés de 26 à 89 ans, avec une plus grande efficacité de la méthode pour les tranches d’âge allant de 50 à 69 ans [22]. Cette méthode est peu sensible au sexe du sujet, aux variations interou intra-observateurs, à la localisation

de la dent monoradiculée étudiée et à l’origine ethnique. L’utilisation de nouvelles formules établies pour des sousgroupes prenant en compte le sexe et la race permettra toutefois d’améliorer l’erreur moyenne [23]. Cette méthode s’est révélée être parfaitement complémentaire de la technique osseuse de Suchey Brook et l’examen des sutures crâniennes [23]. Toutefois, Foti et coll. [24] ont constaté que le niveau d’attache épithéliale utilisé comme critère dans la méthode de Lamendin n’est pas précis pour estimer l’âge des adultes ayant un problème parodontal. Par contre, la translucidité radiculaire qui apparait en moyenne après 25 ans constitue un critère très pertinent [25]. De ce fait, il faut mener des études supplémentaires pour démontrer si le critère translucidité radiculaire utilisé seul sera un meilleur estimateur de l’âge dentaire de l’adulte comparé à la méthode de Lamendin. Racémisation des acides aminés L’estimation de l’âge au moment du décès par la mesure du taux de racémisation de l’acide aspartique a été proposée par plusieurs auteurs [9]. Les acides aminés existent sous deux formes énantiomériques: la forme D

(Dextrogyre) dévie le plan de polarisation de la lumière vers la droite et la forme L (Lévogyre) la dévie vers la gauche. La racémisation est une conversion stéréo-isomérique de la forme L des acides aminés vers leur forme D. La forme L de ces molécules est principalement synthétisée chez les organismes vivants. A la température du corps humain qui est de 37$C à peu près, les résidus d’acides aminés contenus dans les protéines de certains tissus subissent une racémisation in situ, donc un enrichissement en acide aminés de type D et ce durant la vie même de l’individu. Ces résidus s’accumulent avec l’âge dans une protéine métaboliquement stable, c’est-àdire qui ne subit plus de transformation ; le rapport D/L des énantiomères peut ainsi être mesuré [26, 27]. Pour réussir la datation de l’âge, il faut étudier une protéine synthétisée très tôt dans la vie et qui reste à température constante non altérée durant son existence. La détection de la racémisation a été envisagée sur l’émail et la dentine, deux tissus durs dont les protéines répondent aux conditions de stabilité métabolique exigée. A la température du corps humain, les protéines constituant l’émail subissent un


24

IAJD Vol. 5 – Issue 1

5HYXHGHOD/LWWpUDWXUH_Litrature Review enrichissement en acide aspartique D de 0.1% par an à peu près [9, 28]. Ce tissu, fortement minéralisé, présente tous les critères requis pour déduire l’âge de n’importe quelle protéine stable d’un mammifère à vie longue. Dans les protéines métaboliquement inertes, comme celles contenues dans l’émail et la dentine, la quantité d’acide aspartique croît avec l’âge (Fig. 3) [27]. La dentine constitue un matériel de qualité supérieure pour des analyses de racémisation plus sûres [29]. La dentine est plus riche en protéines que l’émail et son volume tissulaire dans l’organe dentaire est plus important. La proportion de protéines dentinaires est 100 fois plus importante. La dentine est protégée par la couche amélaire de l’action des agents extérieurs, réduisant ainsi les possibilités de tomber sur du matériel préalablement contaminé [30]. Chez les sujets atteints d’une forte attrition, la racine seule est susceptible d’être analysée [9, 10]. Actuellement, l’estimation de l’âge par la détermination du taux de racémisation pourrait compléter d’autres techniques comme la méthode de Lamendin. Toutefois, les difficultés pratiques de sa réalisation en limitent son utilisation et entravent sa comparaison à des méthodes plus simples [23]. Estimation de l’âge dentaire chez les vivants La détermination de l’âge chez le vivant présente des intérêts médicolégaux telles la détermination de l’âge à titre civil dans les cas d’adoption et l’identification des mineurs de moins de 18 ans [31]. L’estimation de l’âge des personnes vivantes qui ne peuvent ou ne veulent pas le déclarer, notamment dans les cas de procédures d’asile, constitue un champ récent d’application de l’odontologie légale, en raison des flux migratoires croissants. Dès leur arrivée dans un pays étranger, des ressortissants étrangers font souvent des déclarations incorrectes ou peu exactes au sujet de leur

âge ou ne disposent pas de pièces d’identité valables émanant de leur pays d’origine [31]. L’âge de criminalité dans la majorité des pays s’étend entre 16 et 22 ans ; la prise en charge des requérants d’asiles majeurs et mineurs en situation illégale est différente: une responsabilité pénale pour les sujets âgés de plus de 18 ans et une atténuation de la peine chez les mineurs (absence de peine d’interdiction du territoire chez les mineurs, détention provisoire ou garde à vue) [31]. Dans ce cas de figure, un groupe interdisciplinaire de spécialistes dans l’évaluation médico-légale de l’âge interroge et examine le requérant d’asile, prend ses mensurations et recherche les signes de maturité sexuelle et, en se basant sur le développement du système dentaire et sur l’étude de l’apparition des noyaux d’ossification, détermine son âge le plus précisément possible. Toutefois, l’origine géographique, le statut socioéconomique, l’ethnie et la présence de maladie doivent être pris en considération. Les médecins légistes, les dentistes et les radiologues font partie du groupe interdisciplinaire [31-33]. La minéralisation de la dent de sagesse constitue un critère fondamental pour déterminer l’âge dentaire des sujets jeunes vivants [34, 35]. Il s’agit d’une méthode radiographique de référence pour estimer l’âge jusqu’à 20 ans environ car elle est reproductible et donne les meilleurs résultats [34, 36-38]. Elle est basée sur les stades de développement depuis la formation du germe, le développement et l’éruption de la dent de sagesse [38]. Des tables de maturation de la dent de sagesse ont été établies dans plusieurs pays du monde (Canada, Brésil, Turquie, Chine, Belgique et Arabie Saoudite); au Liban, il faut établir des tables de développement de la dent sagesse qui soient représentatives de la population étudiée. La détermination de l’âge pendant la période de croissance se fera en conséquence, selon les recommandations internationales, en confrontant

les données de l’examen dentaire (dent de sagesse) et de la panoramique dentaire aux données de l’examen clinique en recherchant une pathologie de croissance qui sous-estime ou surestime l’âge, aux mesures anthropométriques, aux données de la radiographie du poignet gauche et de l’articulation sterno-claviculaire [31].

Conclusion et perspectives L’âge est le critère le plus difficile à déterminer; il ne peut être pas estimé qu’approximativement, vu la variabilité interhumaine, l’influence des facteurs physiologiques, environnementaux, génétiques et pathologiques. De ce fait, l’enjeu actuel des chercheurs est de mettre au point des méthodes de datation simples, rapides, peu onéreuses, précises et fiables. Une approche multidisciplinaire associant médecins légistes, dentistes, anthropologues, radiologues, histologistes et biologistes est souvent nécessaire pour réussir cette tâche. Le domaine de l’identification médico-légale a connu un grand développement dans le monde au cours des dernières années. Cependant, au Liban, de principales difficultés empêchent l’élaboration des méthodes d’identification, notamment des difficultés d’ordre technique et l’insuffisance d’un personnel expérimenté. Des études sur des échantillons représentatifs devront être menées au Liban en respectant les normes éthiques afin d’établir des tables et des abaques ainsi que des modèles statistiques de régression linéaire qui permettront la détermination de l’âge dentaire avec suffisamment de précision.


25 0pGHFLQH/pJDOH/HJDO0HGLFLQH

Références 1. $GDQN ) 0pGHFLQH GHQWDLUH OpJDOH  /HV GHQWV UHQVHLJQHQW &RPPXQLTXp GH SUHVVH  6RFLpWp 6XLVVH G·RGRQWRVWRPDWRORJLHZZZVVRFK 2. 'RULRQ5&RXORPEH6)RUHVW3/·RGRQWRORJLHPpGLFROpJDOH 3RXUUpVRXGUHXQFULPH«&RORPERRXOHGHQWLVWH8QLYHUVLWpGH /DYDO)DFXOWpGH0pGHFLQH'HQWDLUH 3. $PRsGR 2VFDU /·DUW GHQWDLUH HQ PpGHFLQH OpJDOH 0DVVRQ pGLWHXU3DULV 4. *HRUJHW&/DE\W/HUR\$6/H'RFWHXU2VFDU$PRsGR<9DOGHV   XQ SUDWLFLHQ pFOHFWLTXH ZZZELXPXQLYSDULVIU VIKDGYRODUWLFOHKWP

FRUSVHV7KHWZRFULWHULDGHQWDOPHWKRG-)RUHQVLF6FL 37:1373-9. 22. /DPHQGLQ + 'pWHUPLQDWLRQ GH O·kJH DYHF OD PpWKRGH GH *XVWDIVRQ´VLPSOLÀpHµ&KLU'HQW)U 23. %DFFLQR ( ,GHQWLÀFDWLRQ GHV FDGDYUHV ,QWpUrW GH O·XWLOLVDWLRQ FRPELQpH GH PpWKRGHV DQWKURSRORJLTXHV HW RGRQWRORJLTXHV %XOO$FDG1DWOH&KLU'HQW 24. )RWL%$GDOLDQ36LJQROL0$UGDJQD<'XWRXU2/HRQHWWL* /LPLWVRIWKH/DPHQGLQPHWKRGLQDJHGHWHUPLQDWLRQ)RUHQVLF Sci Int 2001;122:101-6.

5. 5RGULJXH] ([SRVLWR &pVDU ©'U 2VFDU $PRsGR \ 9DOGHV XQD ÀJXUDGHODRGRQWRORJLDXQLYHUVDOª&XDGHUQRVGH+LVWRULDGHOD 6DOXG3XEOLFD/D+DEDQD&XED

25. *LEHOOL ' 'H $QJHOLV ' 5RVVHWWL ) &DSSHOOD $ )UXVWDFL 0 0DJOL ) HW DO 7KHUPDO PRGLÀFDWLRQV RI URRW WUDQVSDUHQF\ DQG LPSOLFDWLRQVIRUDJLQJ$3LORW6WXG\-)RUHQVLF6FL$XJ 23. doi: 10.1111/1556-4029.12263.

6. %HFDUW $ /H GRPDLQH G·DFWLYLWp GH O·RGRQWRORJLVWH PpGLFR OpJDOH ,QVWLWXW GH 0pGHFLQH /pJDOH GH /LOOH  ZZZVPOF DVVRIU

26. 2JLQR 7 2JLQR + 1DJL % $SSOLFDWLRQ RI DVSDUWLF DFLG UDFHPL]DWLRQWRIRUHQVLFRGRQWRORJ\SRVWPRUWHPGHVLJQDWLRQ RIDJHDWGHDWK)RUHQVLF6FL,QW

7. +HX]p < &KURQRORJLH HW pWLRORJLH GH OD PDWXUDWLRQ PDFURVWUXFWXUDOH GHV GHQWV GpÀQLWLYHV 7KqVH SUpVHQWpH j O·8QLYHUVLWp %RUGHDX[  (FROH 'RFWRUDOH 6FLHQFHV GX 9LYDQW *pRVFLHQFHV HW 6FLHQFHV GH O·(QYLURQQHPHQW SRXU REWHQLU OH JUDGHGH'RFWHXUHQ$QWKURSRORJLH%LRORJLTXH

27. 2KWDQL 6 <DPDPRWR 7 6WUDWHJ\ IRU WKH HVWLPDWLRQ RI FKURQRORJLFDODJHXVLQJWKHDVSDUWLFDFLGUDFHPL]DWLRQPHWKRG ZLWKVSHFLDOUHIHUHQFHWRFRHIÀFLHQWRIFRUUHODWLRQEHWZHHQ'/ UDWLRVDQGDJHV-)RUHQVLF6FL

8. 'R\RQ'%RQQHYLOOH-)0DUWLQ'0RQQLHU-33LQHW$+HUEHDX 'HWDO&DKLHUVGHUDGLRORJLH,PDJHULHGHQWRPD[LOODLUH(OVHYLHU 0DVVRQpGLWHXU3DULV 9. 1RVVLQWFKRXN500DQXHOG·RGRQWRORJLHPpGLFROpJDOH(GLWLRQ 0DVVRQ3DULV 10. 1RYRWQ\ 9 ,VoDQ 0< /RWK 6 0RUSKRORJLF DQG RVWHRPHWULF DVVVHVPHQW RI DJH VH[ DQG UDFH IURP WKH VNXOO ,Q ,VoDQ 0<  +HOPHU 53 (GV  )RUHQVLF DQDO\VLV RI WKH VNXOO :LOH\/LVV  11. /LPGLZDOD 3* 6KDK -6 $JH HVWLPDWLRQ E\ XVLQJ GHQWDO UDGLRJUDSKV-)RUHQVLF'HQW6FL 12. )RUWLHU -3 'HPDUV)UHPDXOW & $EUpJp GH SpGRGRQWLH 3DULV 0DVVRQpGLW 13. 'HPLUMLDQ*ROGVWHLQ 7DQQHW 7+ $ QHZ V\VWHP RI GHQWDO DJH DVVHVVPHQW+XP%LRO 14. /LYHUVLGJH + &KDLOOHW 1 0RUQVWDG + 1\VWURP 0 5RZOLQJV . 7D\ORU - :LOOHPV * 7LPLQJ RI 'HPLUMLDQ·V WRRWK IRUPDWLRQ VWDJHV$QQDOVRI+XPDQ%LRORJ\ 15. /LYHUVLGJH+07KHDVVHVVPHQWDQGLQWHUSUHWDWLRQRI'HPLUMLDQ *ROGVWHLQ DQG 7DQQHU·V GHQWDO PDWXULW\ $QQ +XP %LRO 2012;39:412-31. 16. :LOOHPV * 9DQ 2OPHQ $ 6SLHVVHQV % &DUHOV & 'HQWDO DJH HVWLPDWLRQLQ%HOJLDQ&KLOGUHQ'HPLUMLDQ·VWHFKQLTXHUHYLVLWHG J Forensic Sci 2001;46:893-5. 17. )ORRG6-)UDQNOLQ'7XUODFK%$0F*HDFKLH-$FRPSDULVRQRI 'HPLUMLDQ·VIRXUGHQWDOGHYHORSPHQWPHWKRGVIRUIRUHQVLFDJH HVWLPDWLRQLQ6RXWK$XVWUDOLDQVXEDGXOWV-)RUHQVLF/HJ0HG 2013;20:875-83. 18. %DJKGDGL =' 'HQWDO PDWXULW\ LQ 6DXGL FKLOGUHQ XVLQJ WKH 'HPLUMLDQ PHWKRG $ FRPSDUDWLYH VWXG\ DQG QHZ SUHGLFWLRQ models. ISRN Dent 2013;2013:390-314. 19. 'XVVDUSV/&RQWULEXWLRQjODGpWHUPLQDWLRQGHO·kJHGHPRPLHV G·HQIDQWVJUkFHDX[GHQWVZZZDOSKDQHFURSROLVFRP 20. -RXVVHW 1 )UDQFR $ *DUG & 3HQQHDX 0 5RXJp0DLOODUW &O 'pWHUPLQDWLRQGHO·kJHGHVDGXOWHVHQSRVWPRUWHPLQWpUrWGH O·XWLOLVDWLRQGHVFULWqUHVGH*XVWDIVRQ$QWURSR 21. /DPHQGLQ+%DFFLQR(+XPEHUW-)7DYHUQLHU-&1RVVLQWFKRXN 50 =HULOOL $ $ VLPSOH WHFKQLTXH IRU DJH HVWLPDWLRQ LQ DGXOW

28. *RXOHW - &LULPHOH 9 .LQW] 3 7UDFTXL $ +XWW -0 .DHPSI & /XGHV%(VWLPDWLRQGHO·kJHDXGpFqVSDUODUDFpPLVDWLRQGH O·DFLGHDVSDUWLTXHFRQWHQXGDQVOHVGHQWV,QVWLWXWGH0pGHFLQH /pJDOHGH6WUDVERXUJZZZVPOFBDVVRBIU 29. *ULIÀQ 5& 3HQNPDQ .( 0RRG\ + &ROOLQV 0- 7KH LPSDFW RI UDQGRP QDWXUDO YDULDELOLW\ RQ DVSDUWLF DFLG UDFHPL]DWLRQ UDWLRV LQHQDPHOIURPGLIIHUHQWW\SHVRIKXPDQWHHWK)RUHQVLF6FL,QW 2010;200:148-52. 30. 6DNXPD$2KWDQL66DLWRK+,ZDVH+&RPSDUDWLYHDQDO\VLV RIDVSDUWLFDFLGUDFHPL]DWLRQPHWKRGVXVLQJZKROHWRRWKDQG dentin samples. Forensic Sci Int 2012;223:198-201. 31. 6FKPHOLQJ$5HLVLQJHU:*HVHULFN*2O]H$$JHHVWLPDWLRQ RI XQDFFRPSDQLHG PLQRUV 3DUW , *HQHUDO FRQVLGHUDWLRQV Forensic Sci Int 2006;159S:S61-S64. 32. 2O]H $ 3\QQ %5 .UDXO 9 6FKXO] 5 +HLQHFNH $ 3IHLIIHU + 6FKPHOLQJ $ 6WXGLHV RQ WKH FKURQRORJ\ RI WKLUG PRODU PLQHUDOL]DWLRQ LQ )LUVW 1DWLRQV SHRSOH RI &DQDGD ,QW - /HJDO Med 2010;124:433-7. 33. 'H 2OLYHLUD )7 &DSHOR]]D $/ /DXULV -5 GH %XOOHQ ,5 0LQHUDOL]DWLRQ RI PDQGLEXODU WKLUG PRODUV FDQ HVWLPDWH FKURQRORJLFDO DJH%UD]LOLDQ LQGLFHV )RUHQVLF 6FL ,QW 2012;219:147-50. 34. 'KDQMDO .6 %KDUGZDM 0. /LYHUVLGJH +0 5HSURGXFLELOLW\ RI UDGLRJUDSKLFVWDJHDVVHVVPHQWRIWKLUGPRODUV)RUHQVLF6FL,QW 2006;159S:S74-S77. 35. 0DNNDG 56 %DODQL $ &KDWXUYHGL 66 7DQZDQL 7 $JUDZDO $ +DPGDQL65HOLDELOLW\RISDQRUDPLFUDGLRJUDSK\LQFKURQRORJLFDO DJHHVWLPDWLRQ-)RUHQVLF'HQW6FL 36. .DUDGD\L%.D\D$.ROXVD\×Q02.DUDGD\L6$IVLQ+2]DVODQ$ 5DGLRORJLFDODJHHVWLPDWLRQEDVHGRQWKLUGPRODUPLQHUDOL]DWLRQ DQG HUXSWLRQ LQ 7XUNLVK FKLOGUHQ DQG \RXQJ DGXOWV ,QW-/HJDO Med 2012;126:933-42. 37. /L*5HQ-=KDR6/LX</L1:X:<XDQ6:DQJ+'HQWDO DJH HVWLPDWLRQ IURP WKH GHYHORSPHQWDO VWDJH RI WKH WKLUG PRODUV LQ ZHVWHUQ &KLQHVH SRSXODWLRQ )RUHQVLF 6FL ,QW  219:158-64. 38. $MPDO 0 $VVLUL ., $O$PHHU .< $VVLUL $0 /XTPDQ 0 $JH HVWLPDWLRQXVLQJWKLUGPRODUWHHWK$VWXG\RQVRXWKHUQ6DXGL SRSXODWLRQ-)RUHQVLF'HQW6FL


REVUE DE LA LITTÉRATURE / LITERATURE REVIEW

Médecine Orale / 2UDO0HGLFLQH

DENTAL MANAGEMENT OF DIABETIC PATIENTS: A CLINICAL REVIEW Sunita Malik * Abstract Diabetes describes a group of metabolic diseases resulting from impaired insulin secretion, varying degrees of insulin resistance, or both. Management of the diabetic dental patients must take into consideration the impact of dental disease and dental treatment on the management of diabetes as well as an appreciation for the comorbidities that accompany long-standing diabetes. Those comorbidities include obesity, hypertension and dyslipidemia. Management of the diabetic dental patient should focus on periodontal health and the delivery of comprehensive dental care with minimal disruption of metabolic homeostasis and recognition of diabetic comorbidities.

Résumé Le diabète est une maladie chronique du métabolisme qui apparaît lorsque le pancréas ne produit pas suffisamment d’insuline ou que l’organisme n’utilise pas correctement l’insuline qu’il produit. La prise en charge des patients diabétiques au cabinet dentaire doit prendre en considération l’impact des maladies dentaires et des soins dentaires sur le contrôle du diabète, ainsi qu’une appréciation des comorbidités qui accompagnent le diabète. Ces comorbidités sont l’obésité, l’hypertension et la dyslipidémie. La prise en charge du patient diabétique devrait donc se concentrer sur la santé parodontale et la prestation des soins dentaires complets sans perturber l’homéostasie métabolique.

Keywords: Diabetes mellitus - chronic hyperglycemia - retinopathy - macrovascular disease.

Mots-clés: diabéte – hyperglycémie – rétinopathie – maladie macrovasculaire.

* Ass. Prof. M.D.S, Dpt of Maxillofacial Surgery, Vardhman Mahavir Medical College, India drsunitamalikmds@yahoo.in


27 MĂŠdecine Orale / 2UDO0HGLFLQH

Introduction Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by hyperglycemia resulting from defects in insulin secretion, insulin action or both. The chronic hyperglycemia of diabetes is associated with long-term damage, dysfunction and failure of various organs, especially the eyes, kidneys, nerves, heart and blood vessels [1]. DM results when one of the following conditions occurs: insulin released from the pancreas is impaired or insulin action at peripheral tissues is impaired [2]. A deficiency in insulin or a problem with its metabolic activity can result in an increased blood glucose level (ie, hyperglycemia). Hyperglycemia leads to an increase in the urinary volume of glucose and fluid loss, which then produces dehydration and electrolyte imbalance [3]. This latter problem, if severe, may result in coma. The stress of the disease also results in an increase in cortisol secretion. It is the inability of the diabetic patient to metabolize and use glucose, the subsequent metabolism of body fat, and the fluid loss and electrolyte imbalance that causes metabolic acidosis. It is the hyperglycemia and ketoacidosis coupled with vascular wall disease (microangiopathy and atherosclerosis) that alters the bodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to manage infection and heal [3]. Based on the pathogenic processes, four types of diabetes are identified [4]: t5ZQFEJBCFUFTPGEJBCFUJDT t5ZQFEJBCFUFTPGEJBCFUJDT t(FTUBUJPOBMEJBCFUFT t0UIFSDBVTFECZWBSJPVTNFUBCPlic disorders, drugs or surgery. The onset of symptoms is rapid in type 1 diabetes, and includes the classic triad of polyphagia, polydipsia and polyuria, as well as weight loss, irritability, drowsiness and fatigue [4]. Symptoms of type 2 diabetes develop more slowly, and frequently without the classic triad; rather, these patients may be obese and may have pruritus,

peripheral neuropathy and blurred vision. Opportunistic infections, including oral and vaginal candidiasis, can be present. Adults with long-standing diabetes, especially those with poorly controlled hyperglycemia, may develop microvascular and macrovascular conditions that can produce irreversible damage to the eyes (retinopathy, cataracts), kidneys (nephropathy), nervous system (neuropathy and paresthesias), and heart (accelerated atherosclerosis), as well as recurrent infections and impaired wound healing. Gestational DM is defined as any degree of glucose intolerance with onset or first recognition during pregnancy [5]. In the majority of cases, glucose regulation will return to normal after delivery. Diabetes and the oral manifestations Several soft tissue abnormalities have been reported to be associated with diabetes mellitus in the oral cavity. Xerostomia and dry mouth Dry mouth is a common complaint among diabetic patients. This can be due to hyperglycemia, which leads to polyuria and can result in a lowering of fluids like saliva [6]. Xerostomia may also be a side effect of other medications such as antihistamines. Xerostomia disrupts the normal saliva balance in the mouth, which leads to a number of oral and dental disorders such changes in taste, speech, and the ability to eat in addition to increasing the risk of cavities and infections [7]. Xerostomia also causes mouth tissues to become inflamed and sore, which in turn can make chewing, tasting and swallowing difficult and possibly lead to difficulties in controlling diabetes because of a reduced interest in eating and thus, an inability to properly maintain stable blood sugar levels. Caries Due to the low sugar diets followed by most DMs, many do not have a lot

of carious lesions, restorations, or enamel decalcification [8]. Exceptions are the cervical caries noted in type 2 DM with high sugar diets, those that drink soft drinks, and those with xerostomia. If the patient also has oral fungal infections, the topical antifungal medications have high sugar content and can promote caries. Candidiasis Another manifestation of diabetes and an oral sign of systemic immunosuppression is the presence of opportunistic infections, such as oral candidiasis. Fungal infections of oral mucosal surfaces and removable prostheses are more commonly found in adults with diabetes. Candida Pseudohyphae, a cardinal sign of oral Candida infection, have been associated significantly with cigarette smoking, use of dentures and poor glycemic control in adults with diabetes [9]. Salivary hypofunction also may increase the oral candidal carriage state in adults with diabetes [10]. Periodontal disease Large number of investigations have provided the evidence that type 1 and type 2 diabetes increase the risk and severity of periodontitis [11, 12], and vice versa periodontitis has been shown to have impact on diabetic status by using rodent studies although the underlying mechanism has not been discussed [13]. The association between diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease is therefore considered to be bidirectional: diabetes as a risk factor for periodontitis and periodontitis as a possible severity for diabetes. In fact, aggressive periodontitis is recognized as the sixth serious complication of diabetes [14]. Treatment of periodontal disease in DMs is similar to treatment in non-DMs. One major difference is the strong collaboration required by the dental professional with the patientâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s medical caregivers. Studies showed that there can be a temporary increase in the control of DM when periodontal disease is controlled. Proper oral


28

IAJD Vol. 5 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Issue 1

5HYXHGHOD/LWWpUDWXUH_Litrature Review hygiene care may arrest periodontal disease if treatment is aimed at daily plaque removal and timely calculus removal [15]. Taste disturbances Taste is a critical component of oral health that is affected adversely in patients with diabetes [16]. One study reported that more than one-third of adults with diabetes had hypogeusia or diminished taste perception, which could result in hyperphagia and obesity [17]. This sensory dysfunction can inhibit the ability to maintain a proper diet and can lead to poor glycemic regulation. Other oral manifestations include oral lichen planus, trigeminal neuralgia, traumatic ulcers and irritation fibromas. Dental management considerations Diabetes mellitus is not a curable disease. Any patient who has cardinal symptoms of diabetes (polydypsia, polyuria, polyphagia, weight loss, weakness) but has not been diagnosed, should be referred to a physician for diagnosis and treatment. To minimize the risk of intraoperative emergency, clinicians need to consider a number of issues before initiating the dental treatment [Lalla]. Medical history Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important for clinicians to take a good medical history at the first appointment. They should ask patients about recent blood glucose levels and frequency of hypoglycemic episodes, as well as the antidiabetic medications, their dosage and their times of administration [5]. Blood glucose monitoring Depending on the patientâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s medical history, medication regimen and procedure to be performed, dentists may need to measure the blood glucose level before beginning any procedure, especially to prevent the risk of a hypoglycemic event [5].

For glycemic control, it is recommended that the HbA1c level (monitored every three months) be maintained at less than 7 percent. If daily blood glucose monitoring is performed, fasting blood plasma levels should be less than 120 mg/dl and blood glucose levels two hours postprandial should be less than 150 mg/ dl. For every 1 percent HbA1c level, there is an associated increase in complication rates for both microvascular and macrovascular diseases. Also, elective procedures should be postponed if the fasting glucose is either less than 70 mg/dl. It has been emphasized that when blood glucose level is less than 70 mg/dl, there is risk of hypoglycemia [18]. Antibiotic coverage Patients with poorly controlled diabetes are at risk of developing oral complications because of their susceptibility to infection and sequelae, and likely will require supplemental antibiotic therapy [19]. Anticipation of dentoalveolar surgery (involving mucosa and bone) with antibiotic coverage may help prevent impaired and delayed wound healing. Orofacial infections require close monitoring. Cultures should be performed for acute oral infections, antibiotic therapy initiated and surgical therapies contemplated if appropriate (for example, incision and drainage, extraction, pulpectomy). In cases of poor response to the first antibiotic administered, dentists can select a more effective antibiotic based on the patientâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sensitivity test results. Diet Dental treatment can result in postoperative discomfort. This may necessitate changes in the diet, especially in cases of extensive dental therapy [5]. Because diet is a major component of diabetes management, diet alterations that are made because of dental treatment may have a major impact on the patient. The clinician may need to consult the patientâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s physician prior to therapy, to discuss diet modifications

and required changes in medication regimens. Another diet change occurs when patients are placed on orders to take nothing by mouth (NPO) before dental treatment, a common recommendation before conscious sedation. Consultation with the patientâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s physician may be needed to adjust the dose of insulin or oral agents in this situation [5]. Physicians often recommend reducing the insulin dose that immediately precedes lengthy or extensive dental procedures. Scheduling considerations for diabetic dental patients Morning appointments are recommended, preferably 11/2 hours after breakfast and morning meds to avoid the peak action time for those who take insulin injections and since the endogenous cortisol levels are generally higher at this time. Do not schedule appointments during lunch breaks or as the last appointment of the day before dinner since blood sugar levels can be low and oral health care procedures can interfere with eating. In the case of type 1, ask the patient to bring their own monitoring device to the appointment to monitor their glucose if there is any question as to their control. For patients who take insulin, the greatest risk of hypoglycemia will thus occur about 30 to 90 minutes after injecting lispro insulin, 2 to 3 hours after regular insulin, and 4 to 10 hours after NPH or Lente insulin. For those who are taking oral sulfonylureas, peak insulin activity depends on the individual drug taken. Metformin and the thiazolidinediones rarely cause hypoglycemia. For the above mentioned reasons, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;s advised to avoid dental appointments when the patient: t)BTOPUIBENFETPSFBUFO t)BTDPME PSGMV PSUJSFEOFTT t)BT OPU SFDFOUMZ TFFO UIFJS physician t)BTMFWFMTNHEMPSNH dl t)BTIBEBSFDFOUFNFSHFODZ


29 MĂŠdecine Orale / 2UDO0HGLFLQH Management of potential complications Certain patients may need a medical consult before elective dental treatment [20]. Many of them may have complications such as cardiovascular disease, renal disease, blindness, or side effects from related medications. It is vital for the dental professional to always be prepared for emergency situations and immediately control any serious oral infections. Hypoglycaemia The most common complication of diabetic mellitus that can occur in the dental office is a hypoglycemic episode [21]. If insulin or oral antidiabetic drug levels exceed physiological needs, the patient may experience a severe decline in his or her blood sugar level. The maximal risk of developing hypoglycemia generally occurs during peak insulin activity. Initial signs and symptoms include mood changes, decreased spontaneity, hunger and weakness. These may be followed by sweating, incoherence and tachycardia. If untreated, possible consequences include unconsciousness, hypotension, hypothermia, seizures, coma and death. Preventing such complication requires: t5IPSPVHI NFEJDBM IJTUPSZ BOE consultation with physician to assess glycemic control, disease severity and medications with hypoglycemic potential. t.POJUPSJOH PG UIF CMPPE HMVDPTF level and the dietary intake before treatment. t"WPJEBODFPGQFBLBDUJWJUZQFSJPET of insulin or oral antidiabetic medications. t3FDPHOJUJPO PG TJHOT BOE TZNQtoms of low blood glucose level and timely administration of carbohydrate source (oral, intramuscular, intravenous) Salivary gland dysfunction and oral burning Salivary gland dysfunction might play a role in the onset of the syn-

drome of burning mouth syndrome (BMS). Radiation therapy, some systemic diseases, and a variety of pharmacologic agents [22], known to be capable of inducing a decrease in salivary flow rate [23] have reportedly been associated with increased incidence of BMS [24]. BMS may represent a complex of multiple diseases with overlapping symptoms [25]. Consequently, dealing with a syndrome which is poorly defined by symptom(s) without regard to etiology actually causes more problems relative to diagnosis and management. However, maintaining an adequate oral hydration (saliva substitutes, sugarless gums, water, ice chips) and the restriction of caffeine and alcohol intake can help reduce the symptoms [26]. Infection and delayed wound healing Wound infection is a major complication in diabetic patients [27]. Factors such as age, obesity, malnutrition, and macrovascular and microvascular diseases may contribute to wound infection and delayed wound healing especially in the type II diabetic patient. In addition, hyperglycemia caused by decreased insulin availability and increased resistance to insulin can affect the cellular response to tissue injury. At the cellular level, an increase in the number of acute inflammatory cells, absence of cellular growth, and migration of the epidermis have been observed [28]. Patients with diabetes have impaired leukocyte function, and the metabolic abnormalities of diabetes lead to inadequate migration of neutrophils and macrophages to the wound, along with reduced chemotaxis [29, 30]. Such cellular changes would predispose individuals to an increased risk of wound infection. In order to prevent such complication, frequent dental visits may help to control plaque formation and to identify risk factors for periodontal disease, caries and oral candidiasis.

Conclusion Managing the care of patients with DM in the dental office should not pose a significant challenge. Hypoglycemia is the major issue that usually confronts dental practitioners when they are treating patients with DM, especially if patients are asked to fast before undergoing a procedure. Finally, having well-controlled blood glucose levels is important for infection prevention and proper healing. At the same time, patients are needed to be made aware of regular periodontal maintenance schedule and oral hygiene.


30

IAJD Vol. 5 – Issue 1

5HYXHGHOD/LWWpUDWXUH_Litrature Review

References 1. $PHULFDQ'LDEHWHV$VVRFLDWLRQ'LDJQRVLVDQGFODVVLÀFDWLRQRI GLDEHWHVPHOOLWXV'LDEHWHV&DUH 6XSSO 66

21. &U\HU 3( 'DYLV 61 6KDPRRQ + +\SRJO\FHPLD LQ GLDEHWHV 'LDEHWHV&DUH-XQ  

2. *ROOD.(SVWHLQ-%5DGD5(6DQDL50HVVLHKD=&DED\5- 'LDEHWHVPHOOLWXVDQXSGDWHGRYHUYLHZRIPHGLFDOPDQDJHPHQW DQGGHQWDOLPSOLFDWLRQV*HQHUDO'HQWLVWU\  

22. 1LHGHUPHLHU : +XEHU 0 )LVFKHU ' %HLHU . 0XOOHU 1 6FKXOHU5HWDO6LJQLÀFDQFHRIVDOLYDIRUWKHGHQWXUHZHDULQJ SRSXODWLRQ*HURGRQWRORJ\²

3. *XWKULH5$*XWKULH':3DWKRSK\VLRORJ\RIGLDEHWHVPHOOLWXV &ULW&DUH1XUV4$SU-XQ  

23. $VWRU )& +DQIW ./ &LRFRQ -2 ;HURVWRPLD D SUHYDOHQW FRQGLWLRQLQWKHHOGHUO\(DU1RVH7KURDW-²

4. *UD\ + 5DKLOO\ 62 7RZDUGV LPSURYHG JO\FHPLF FRQWURO LQ GLDEHWHV :KDW·V RQ WKH KRUL]RQ" $UFK ,QWHUQ 0HG 1994;155:1137.

24. -HQVHQ -/ %DUNYROO 3 &OLQLFDO LPSOLFDWLRQV RI WKH GU\ PRXWK 2UDOPXFRVDOGLVHDVHV$QQ1<$FDG6FL²

5. /DOOD 5 '·$PEURVLR - 'HQWDO PDQDJHPHQW FRQVLGHUDWLRQV IRU WKH SDWLHQW ZLWK GLDEHWHV PHOOLWXV - $P 'HQW $VV 2001;132:1425-1432. 6. 6UHHEQ\/0<X$*UHHQ$9DOGLQL$;HURVWRPLDLQGLDEHWHV PHOOLWXV'LDEHWHV&DUH-XO   7. 0RRUH3$*XJJHQKHLPHU-(W]HO.5:H\DQW5-2UFKDUG7 7\SH  GLDEHWHV PHOOLWXV [HURVWRPLD DQG VDOLYDU\ ÁRZ UDWHV 2UDO 6XUJ 2UDO 0HG 2UDO 3DWKRO 2UDO 5DGLRO (QGRG  Sep;92(3):281-91. 8. /LQ%37D\ORU*:$OOHQ'-6KLS-$'HQWDOFDULHVLQROGHUDGXOWV ZLWKGLDEHWHVPHOOLWXV6SHFLDOFDUH'HQWLVWU\   9. *XJJHQKHLPHU-0RRUH3$5RVVLH.HWDO,QVXOLQGHSHQGHQW GLDEHWHV PHOOLWXV DQG RUDO VRIW WLVVXH SDWKRORJLHV SDUW ,, SUHYDOHQFHDQGFKDUDFWHULVWLFVRI&DQGLGDDQGFDQGLGDOOHVLRQV 2UDO6XUJ2UDO0HG2UDO3DWKRO2UDO5DGLRO(QGRG² 6. 10. .DGLU 7 3LVLULFLOHU 5 $N\X] 6 <DUDW $ (PHNOL 1 ,SEXNHU $ 0\FRORJLFDO DQG F\WRORJLFDO H[DPLQDWLRQ RI RUDO FDQGLGDO FDUULDJHLQGLDEHWLFSDWLHQWVDQGQRQGLDEHWLFFRQWUROVXEMHFWV WKRURXJK DQDO\VLV RI ORFDO DHWLRORJLF DQG V\VWHPLF IDFWRUV - Oral Rehabil 2002;29:452–7. 11. 7VDL&+D\HV&7D\ORU*:*O\FHPLFFRQWURORIW\SHGLDEHWHV DQG VHYHUH SHULRGRQWDO GLVHDVH LQ WKH 86 DGXOW SRSXODWLRQ &RPPXQLW\'HQWDODQG2UDO(LGHPLRORJ\   12. &DPSXV * HW DO 'LDEHWHV DQG SHULRGRQWDO GLVHDVH D FDVH FRQWUROVWXG\-3HULRGRQWRO   13. 3RQWHV $QGHUVHQ && )O\YEMHUJ $ %XVFKDUG . +ROPVWUXS 3 5HODWLRQVKLSEHWZHHQSHULRGRQWLWLVDQGGLDEHWHV/HVVRQVIURP URGHQWVWXGLHV-3HULRGRQWRO² 14. /RH+3HULRGRQWDOGLVHDVH7KHVL[WKFRPSOLFDWLRQRIGLDEHWHV PHOOLWXV'LDEHWHV&DUH² 15. 6WHJHPDQ &$ 2UDO PDQLIHVWDWLRQV RI GLDEHWHV +RPH +HDOWKFDUH1XUVH   16. 6HWWOH5*7KHFKHPLFDOVHQVHVLQGLDEHWHVPHOOLWXV,Q*HWFKHOO 79HG6PHOODQGWDVWHLQKHDOWKDQGGLVHDVH1HZ<RUN5DYHQ 3UHVV² 17. 6WROERYD.+DKQ$%HQHV%$QGHO07UHVORYD/*XVWRPHWU\ RIGLDEHWHVPHOOLWXVSDWLHQWVDQGREHVHSDWLHQWV,QW7LQQLWXV- 1999;5(2):135–40. 18. .QRZOHU:&6FUHHQLQJIRU1,''02SSRUWXQLWLHVIRUGHWHFWLRQ treatment and prevention. Diabetes 1994;17:445-450. 19. /LWWOH-:)DODFH'$0LOOHU&65KRGXV1/'LDEHWHV,Q/LWWOH -: HG 'HQWDO PDQDJHPHQW RI WKH PHGLFDOO\ FRPSURPLVHG SDWLHQWWKHG6W/RXLV0RVE\² 20. 7D\ORU *: 0DQ] 0& %RUJQDNNH :6 'LDEHWHV SHULRGRQWDO GLVHDVHVGHQWDOFDULHVDQGWRRWKORVVDUHYLHZRIWKHOLWHUDWXUH &RPSHQGLXP&RQWLQXLQJ(GXFDWLRQLQ'HQWLVWU\   

25. 5KRGXV 1/ 0\HUV 6 %RZOHV : 6FKZDUW] % 3DUVRQV + %XUQLQJPRXWKV\QGURPHGLDJQRVLVDQGWUHDWPHQW1RUWKZHVW Dent 2000;79:21–28. 26. =DNU]HZVND-0*OHQQ\$0)RUVVHOO+  ,QWHUYHQWLRQVIRU WKH WUHDWPHQW RI EXUQLQJ PRXWK V\QGURPH &RFKUDQH UHYLHZ  &RFKUDQH'DWDEDVH6\VW5HY9RO'DWDEDVHQR&' 27. )HUULQJHU70LOOHU)UG&XWDQHRXVPDQLIHVWDWLRQVRIGLDEHWHV PHOOLWXV'HUPDWRO&OLQ² 28. )HUJXVRQ0:+HUULFN6(6SHQFHU0-6KDZ-(%RXOWRQ$- 6ORDQ 3 7KH KLVWRORJ\ RI GLDEHWLF IRRW XOFHUV 'LDEHW 0HG 6XSSO6² 29. 'HODPDLUH00DXJHQGUH'0RUHQR0/H*RII0&$OODQQLF +*HQHWHW%,PSDLUHGOHXFRF\WHIXQFWLRQVLQGLDEHWLFSDWLHQWV Diabet Med. 1997;14:29–34. 30. :\VRFNL - :LHUXV]:\VRFND % :\NUHWRZLF] $ :\VRFNL + 7KH LQÁXHQFH RI WK\PXV H[WUDFWV RQ WKH FKHPRWD[LV RI SRO\PRUSKRQXFOHDU QHXWURSKLOV 301  IURP SDWLHQWV ZLWK LQVXOLQGHSHQGHQWGLDEHWHVPHOOLWXV ,'' 7K\PXV² 67.


31

A PROPOS D’UN CAS / CASE REPORT

3URWKqVHV)L[pHVFixed Prosthodontics

RÉHABILITATION ESTHÉTIQUE ET FONCTIONNELLE GLOBALE PAR LA PROTHÈSE FIXÉE D’UN CAS DE BRUXISME Narjes Hassen * | Ramy Oualha ** | Lamia Oualha *** Samir Boukottaya **** | Nabiha Douki *****

Résumé Le bruxisme est un comportement inconscient caractérisé par des contractions des muscles masticateurs en dehors des fonctions physiologiques. L’odontologiste est amené à prendre en charge les conséquences buccales du bruxisme, dont les plus visibles sont les usures dentaires. Lorsque le degré d’atteinte dentaire devient important, un traitement prothétique fixé global doit être conçu. La réhabilitation prothétique cherche à rétablir l’ensemble des fonctions occlusales (calage, centrage, guidage), pour permettre à l’ensemble de l’appareil manducateur de fonctionner avec le minimum de contraintes. Elle doit redéfinir les critères esthétiques, rétablir une bonne stabilité occluso-fonctionnelle et optimiser les fonctions de l’appareil manducateur. Ces données fondamentales seront illustrées par la présentation d’un cas clinique de patient souffrant de bruxisme.

Abstract Bruxism is an unconscious behavior characterized by contractions of the masticatory muscles outside the physiological functions. The dentist is required to manage the oral consequences of bruxism; the most remarkable one is dental wear. When the dental degree of damage becomes important, a total fixed prosthetic treatment must be conceived. The prosthetic rehabilitation aims at restoring all the occlusal functions (centering, guidance), to allow the entire masticatory system to operate with minimal constraints. It must redefine esthetic criteria, reestablish a good functional occlusal stability and optimize the functions of the masticatory system. These basic concepts are illustrated by the presentation of a clinical case of a patient suffering from bruxism. keywords: Bruxism - prosthetic dental rehabilitation occlusal vertical dimension - occlusal stability.

Mots-clés: bruxisme - réhabilitation prothétique - dimension verticale d'occlusion - stabilité occlusale.

* Prof. Dpt de prothèse amovible Service de Médecine dentaire Hôpital Sahloul de Sousse, Tunisie h.narjes@live.fr

** Résident, Dpt de prothèse partielle amovible, Faculté de Médecine Dentaire de Monastir, Tunisie

**** Prof. Faculté de Médecine Dentaire de Monastir, Tunisie

***** Prof. en odontologie conservatrice Chef de service de Médecine Dentaire, Hôpital Sahloul de Sousse, Tunisie

*** Prof. en Médecine et Chirurgie Buccale Service de Médecine dentaire, Hôpital Sahloul de Sousse, Tunisie


32

IAJD Vol. 5 – Issue 1

$3URSRVG XQ&DV_Case Report

Introduction Le bruxisme est une activité musculaire répétitive caractérisée par un serrement ou un grincement des dents et / ou par une crispation et une poussée de la mandibule. Le bruxisme a deux manifestations distinctes circadiennes: il peut se produire pendant le sommeil (le bruxisme du sommeil) ou pendant l’éveil (bruxisme de l’éveil) [1]. L’étiologie du bruxisme n’est pas encore déterminée; il peut s’agir d’un problème multifactoriel [2]. La plupart des études réalisées sur le bruxisme du sommeil indiquent que le bruxisme semble être régulé principalement par le système nerveux central, pas par le périphérique [3]. Des facteurs tels que la génétique, la structure du sommeil (micro-éveils), l’environnement, le stress, l’anxiété et d’autres facteurs psychologiques, pareil pour la balance catécholaminergique du système nerveux central et autonome, ainsi que certaines drogues (l’extasie, l’alcool, la caféine, le tabac) et les médicaments (les inhibiteurs sélectifs du recaptage de la sérotonine, les benzodiazépines, les dopaminergiques) sont en relation avec l’étiopathogénie de ce bruxisme [4]. Le pourcentage le plus élevé de bruxomanes est situé dans un groupe d’âge de 20 à 50 ans, il diminue nettement à partir de 50 ans. Il n’existe pas de différence entre les pourcentages d’hommes et de femmes [5]. L’ususre ou l’abrasion dentaire est un élément caractéristique du bruxisme quand elle est trop marquée [6, 7]. Elle s’observe essentiellement sur les incisives et les canines maxillaires car l’activité parafonctionnelle la plus courante est celle de la latéro-propulsion. En pratique dentaire, le praticien hésite souvent à entreprendre une reconstruction prothétique. Trois situations sont à distinguer: la première intéresse les patients bruxomanes présentant une usure dentaire modérée; le cas peut être géré sans recours à des reconstructions prothétiques. Comme il n’existe pas d’indices

très précis d’abrasion occlusale aux différents stades de la maladie, le problème est souvent éludé‚ pour n’être traité‚ hélas, qu’à un stade avancé de l’abrasion Dans le second cas, l’usure est toujours modérée, mais une couronne ou un bridge de petite étendue doit être réalisé. La reconstruction prothétique va s’intégrer dans le schéma occlusal avec des cuspides peu marquées, des guidances «a minima» [4] Enfin, dans la troisième situation, l’usure coronaire est très prononcée et le patient souhaite une réhabilitation esthétique; il faut envisager une réalisation prothétique de longue étendue, mais il faut aussi en assurer la pérennité [8].

Présentation du cas clinique Le patient, âgé de 50 ans avait pour plainte principale la restauration des dents abrasées. L’anamnèse et l’histoire clinique ont mis en évidence des antécédents de dépression et des habitudes parafonctionnelles de bruxisme et de crispation. Les examens cliniques et radiographiques ont révélé une attrition et une abfraction sévères, touchant en particulier les dents antérieures, ainsi qu’une perturbation du plan occlusal (Figs. 1-3). Par ailleurs, l'hygiène buccale était bonne, sans problèmes parodontaux L'examen extra-oral a révélé la diminution du rapport de l’étage inférieur du visage. Les muscles masséters et temporaux présentaient une hypertonie musculaire. Un claquement lors de l'ouverture et de fermeture de la bouche était perceptible au niveau de l’articulation temporo-mandibulaire, associé à un déplacement asymétrique des deux condyles; la trajectoire étant en baïonnette lors de ces deux mouvements [9]. Des empreintes préliminaires ont été réalisées; les moulages de diagnostic ont été montés sur un articulateur semi-adaptable (Fig. 4) et affrontés en relations centrée et excentrée

en respectant la dimension verticale de l’occlusion [10].

Démarche prothétique Puisque l’occlusion d’intercupidation maximale (OIM) et la DVO du patient sont perturbées, la décision de modifier ces positions a impliqué une reconstruction prothétique étendue, avec modification des critères de l’occlusion (ORC et DVO). La prise en charge s’est déroulée en plusieurs étapes : - Réalisation de cires de diagnostic et de travail (Figs. 5a et 5b). - Réalisation de prothèses provisoires préfigurant le résultat final, avec contrôle pendant plusieurs semaines (Figs. 6a et 6b). - Montage sur un articulateur semiadaptable des moulages issus des empreintes sur lesquelles on a réalisé les prothèses provisoires pour une analyse et éventuellement pour réaliser une gouttière occlusale de décontraction musculaire. Ce montage sur articulateur permet également de réaliser des prothèses finales similaires par recopie et par l’utilisation d’une table incisive personnalisée. En effet Lorsque le guidage antérieur est parfaitement restauré en bouche à l’aide des prothèses provisoires on procède de la manière suivante: . La tige incisive est vaselinée et relevée de 1mm. . La table incisive est horizontale et elle est garnie de résine autopolymérisable (Fig. 7). L’articulateur est manipulé en propulsion et en latéralités droite et gauche jusqu’à la polymérisation complète de cette résine. . L’extrémité de la tige incisive sculpte donc la cinématique dento-dentaire antérieure, matérialisant ainsi le guidage des déterminants antérieurs, C’est cette table incisive fonctionnelle fabriquée à partir de prothèses provisoires qui va servir à l’élaboration


33 3URWKqVHV)L[pHVFixed Prosthodontics

Fig. 1: photos initiales préopératoire du patient.

Fig. 2 : vue occlusale des deux arcades montrant le degré d’abrasion.

Fig. 3 : radiographie panoramique initiale.

Fig. 4 : montage des moulages d’étude sur articulateur en DVO.


34

IAJD Vol. 5 – Issue 1

$3URSRVG XQ&DV_Case Report

Figs. 5a et 5b: photos montrant la cire de diagnostic réalisée sur les moulages d’étude montés sur articulateur.

Fig. 6: a) prothèses provisoires réalisées en occlusion centrée; b) prothèses provisoires restaurant le guide antérieur.

Fig. 7: réalisation de la table incisive.

de la prothèse définitive. Elle sera utilisée tout le temps dans la confection et dans l’équilibration de la prothèse à réaliser [11]. - Réalisation de prothèses définitives copiant les prothèses provisoires validées et vérifiées au cours du temps. Il est souvent possible de réaliser les prothèses en fractionnant la réhabilitation et en travaillant par secteur, ce qui permet de copier plus facilement les éléments provisoires testés [12]. L’occlusion des préparations des dents piliers est enregistrée à l’aide d’un check-bite (Figs. 8a et 8b) sans

enlever les autres provisoires; ceci va nous permettre d’avoir des références occlusales stables lors de la réalisation de la prothèse fixée sur les dents restantes. On a choisi pour ce cas de réaliser des couronnes céramo-métalliques sur les dents 47, 37, 27 et un bridge céramométallique remplaçant la 16 en fonction de la PIM et la DVO des prothèses provisoires (Fig. 9). Dans une deuxième étape, les couronnes restantes ont été réalisées et scellées en bouche. Les figures 10 et 11 montrent le montage de la céramique en se réfé-

rant à la table incisive et l’intégration esthétique et fonctionnelle des prothèses en bouche. Une gouttière de protection a été réalisée en fin de traitement après le scellement en bouche des couronnes (Fig. 12).

Discussion Le bruxisme peut se définir, d’abord du point de vue phénoménologique, comme des mouvements masticateurs et des grincements (ou/et serrement) des dents répétitifs et involontaires sans but fonctionnel (dit aussi parafonctionnel), fréquemment incons-


35 3URWKqVHV)L[pHVFixed Prosthodontics

)LJVDHWEHQUHJLVWUHPHQWGHO¡RFFOXVLRQjO¡DLGHG¡XQFKHFNELWH des prÊparations sur les dents 15, 17, 27, 37et 47.

Fig. 9 : rÊalisation des couronnes cÊramomÊtalliques au niveau des dents 37, 47, 27 et du bridge cÊramo-mÊtallique remplaçant la 16.

Fig. 10 : montage de la cĂŠramique en se UpIpUDQWjODWDEOHLQFLVLYH

cients, associĂŠs Ă lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;usure anormale des dents et Ă  lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;inconfort des muscles de la mâchoire. Le bruxisme peut ĂŞtre suspectĂŠ en cas de prĂŠsence de facettes dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;usure qui ne peuvent pas ĂŞtre attribuĂŠes Ă  la fonction masticatoire. Lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;usure dentaire peut aboutir Ă  une relation occlusale très instable; en effet, lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;usure occlusale sâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;accompagne dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;une modification de la topographie des courbes dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;occlusion sagittale (courbe de Spee) et frontale (courbe de Wilson). Les critères occlusaux essentiels doivent ĂŞtre apprĂŠciĂŠs au cours de lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;examen clinique et Ă  lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;aide des examens complĂŠmentaires afin dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ĂŠtablir

un plan de traitement [13] : la dimension verticale, lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;occlusion dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;intercuspidie maximale, la hauteur coronaire prothĂŠtique et les relations interocclusales [14]. La perte de la dimension verticale est frĂŠquente dans les cas de bruxisme. Dans ces situations, lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;augmentation de la dimension verticale est nĂŠcessaire: -pour rĂŠtablir lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ĂŠquilibre neuro-musculaire; -recrĂŠer un espace interocclusal correct pour mĂŠnager lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ĂŠpaisseur suffisante Ă la reconstruction prothĂŠtique (rĂŠsistance mĂŠcanique et esthĂŠtique); -pour retrouver lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;esthĂŠtique [15].

-Un guide antĂŠrieur devrait ĂŠgalement ĂŞtre rĂŠtabli en harmonie avec les mouvements fonctionnels normaux et dĂŠsocclusion des dents postĂŠrieures immĂŠdiatement lors de tout mouvement excentrique de la mandibule [16]. La position de rĂŠfĂŠrence est la relation mandibulaire horizontale. Lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;occlusion dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;intercuspidie maximale (OIM) peut ĂŞtre modifiĂŠe avec le temps. Dans ce cas, une nouvelle OIM devra ĂŞtre dĂŠfinie Ă partir dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;une position de rĂŠfĂŠrence diffĂŠrente (relation articulaire).


36

IAJD Vol. 5 – Issue 1

$3URSRVG XQ&DV_Case Report

Fig. 11: intégration esthétique et fonctionnelle des prothèses en bouche.

Fig. 12 : mise en place de la gouttière de protection.

L’usure des dents par frottements ou serrements entraîne une diminution de la hauteur coronaire qui peut nuire à la rétention et à l’esthétique de la future reconstruction. Dans certains cas, il est nécessaire d’augmenter cette hauteur coronaire par une modification de la dimension verticale d’occlusion ou une chirurgie parodontale d’élongation coronaire, ou encore par les deux procédés. Les prothèses provisoires, en plus des rôles classiques, jouent un rôle fondamental chez les patients bruxomanes : elles permettent de matérialiser le projet prothétique, de tester les choix thérapeutiques et de guider la conception de la prothèse future. Une protection dans le temps assurée par le port d’une gouttière de libération occlusale en fin de traitement est de règle. Elle va protéger les reconstitutions prothétiques de l'effet destructeur des frottements et des ser-

rements du bruxisme, en particulier pendant le sommeil. C’est une gouttière occlusale complète, lisse et plate, en résine dure transparente, maxillaire ou mandibulaire [17].

Conclusion Cliniquement, le bruxisme est de toute évidence une parafonction très néfaste aux organes dentaires. Lorsqu’une solution prothétique complexe est indispensable, certains paramètres devront impérativement être pris en compte avant la réalisation prothétique définitive, notamment la dimension verticale d’occlusion Pour réussir ce traitement prothétique, il faut respecter les directives suivantes : - une adhésion totale du patient au plan de traitement.

- un traitement occlusal symptomatique rigoureux. - une protection dans le temps par le port d’une gouttière de libération occlusale en fin de traitement et une prise en charge comportementale.


R├йf├йrences 1. /REH]]RR ) $KOEHUJ - *ODURV $* .DWR 7 .R\DQR . /DYLJQH *-%UX[LVPGH├АQHGDQGJUDGHGDQLQWHUQDWLRQDOFRQVHQVXV- Oral Rehab 2013;40:2-4. 2. /REEH]]RR)1DHLMH0%UX[LVPLVPDLQO\UHJXODWHGFHQWUDOO\ QRWSHULSKHUDOO\-2UDO5HKDELO 3. &DPSDULV &0 )RUPLJRQL * 7HL[HLUD 0- %LWWHQFRXUW /5 6OHHSEUX[LVPDQGWHPSRURPDQGLEXODUGLVRUGHU&OLQLFDODQG SRO\VRPQRJUDSKLF HYDOXDWLRQ $UFKLYHV RI 2UDO %LRORJ\  51:721-728. 4. &KDSRWDW % %DLOO\ ) %UX[LVPH HW UHVWDXUDWLRQV SURWKpWLTXHV ,QIRUPDWLRQ'HQWDLUH 5. /DYLJQH*-.KRXU\6$EH6<DPDJXFKL75DSKDHO.%UX[LVP SK\VLRORJ\ DQG SDWKRORJ\ DQ RYHUYLHZ IRU FOLQLFLDQV - 2UDO 5HKDELO-XO   6. :RGD $ *RXUGRQ $0 )DUDM 0 2FFOXVDO FRQWDFWV DQG WRRWK ZHDU-3URVWKHW'HQW-DQ   7. 3ODQDV3(TXLOLEULXPDQGQHXURRFFOXVDOUHKDELOLWDWLRQ2UWKRG )U3W 8. +R]$L]SXUXD -/ 'tD]$ORQVR ( /D7RXFKH$UEL]X 5 0HVD -LPpQH]-6OHHSEUX[LVP&RQFHSWXDOUHYLHZDQGXSGDWH0HG 2UDO3DWRO2UDO&LU%XFDO0DU  H 9. 0HUFX├о96FULHFLX03RSHVFX60&UmL├оRLX0([WHQGHGFDVH UHSRUW %UX[LVP ZLWK D KLVWRU\ RI HDUO\ RQVHW LQ D \HDUROG PDOH2+'0

The 2nd International Scientific Conference of the Faculty of Dentistry Jordan University of Science and Technology 7-8 May, 2014

TOWARDS ADVANCEMENT AND EXCELLENCE IN DENTISTRY

10. $PHU $ DQG $EXHOURRV ( 3URVWKHWLF UHKDELOLWDWLRQ RI SDUWLDOO\ HGHQWXORXVEUX[LQJSDWLHQWVXVLQJGHQWDOLPSODQWV&DLUR'HQWDO -RXUQDO 11. 9DOHQWLQ&<DNKRX25HFRQVWLWXWLRQGXJXLGHDQWpULHXUSDUGHV DUWL├АFHVGHSURWKqVHFRQMRLQWH5pDOLWpV&OLQLTXHV 176. 12. %URFDUG'/DOXTXH-)%UX[LVPHHWSURWKqVHFRQMRLQWHTXHOOHV DWWLWXGHVDYRLU"&DK3URWK 13. 2UWKOLHE -' %H]]LQD 6 3UHFNHO (%  /H SODQ GH WUDLWHPHQW HW OHV  FULWqUHV RFFOXVDX[ GH UHFRQVWUXFWLRQ 2&7$  6\QHUJLH SURWKpWLTXH   14. /DXUHQW0/DERUGH*2UWKOLHE-'&KRL[HWHQUHJLVWUHPHQWGH ODSRVLWLRQGHUpIpUHQFH,Q2UWKOLHE-'%URFDUG'6FKLWWO\- 0DQLqUH $ HG 2FFOXVRGRQWLH SUDWLTXH 3DULV  &G3  84. 15. .QHOOHVHQ & %UX[LVPH HW SURWKqVH FKDQJHU  O┬╖RFFOXVLRQ " 5LVTXHHWEpQp├АFHWKpUDSHXWLTXH7RXORXVH&ROOqJH1DWLRQDO G┬╖2FFOXVRGRQWRORJLH

тАл╪зя│Мя║Ж┘Е╪кя║о ╪зя╗Яя╗Мя╗ая╗дя╗▓ ╪зя╗Яя║к┘Ия▒Д ╪зя╗Яя║Ья║О┘К┘ЖтАм тАля╗Яя╗Ья╗ая╗┤я║Ф я╗Гя║Р ╪зя╗╖я║│я╗ия║О┘ЖтАм тАля║Яя║Оя╗гя╗Мя║Ф ╪зя╗Яя╗Мя╗ая╗о┘Е ┘И╪зя╗Яя║Шя╗Ья╗ия╗оя╗Яя╗оя║Яя╗┤я║О ╪зя╗╖╪▒╪пя╗зя╗┤я║ФтАм ┘в┘а┘б┘д тАл ╪гя╗│┘А┘А┘А┘А┘А┘А┘Ая║О╪▒тАм┘и-┘з

тАля╗зя║дя╗о ╪зя╗Яя║оя╗Чя╗▓ ┘И╪зя╗Яя║Шя╗д ┘Ся╗┤я║░ я░▓ я╗Гя║Р ╪зя╗╖я║│я╗ия║О┘ЖтАм

16. 0DKERXE ) )DUG (0 *HUDPLSDQDK ) +DMLPLUDJKD + 3URVWKRGRQWLF UHKDELOLWDWLRQ RI D EUX[HU SDWLHQW ZLWK VHYHUHO\ ZRUQGHQWLWLRQ$FOLQLFDOFDVHUHSRUW-2''' 17. 8QJHU ) /HV JRXWWLqUHV RFFOXVDOHV HW DXWUHV GLVSRVLWLIV LQWHURFFOXVDX[3DULV&G3

for more information: please contact Dr. Ziad Al Dwairi at: ziadd@just.edu Abstract Submission and Registration are available on the conference website: www.just.edu.jo/jidc


Planmeca ProMax 3D ®

Create your virtual patient.

CBCT

+ 3D model scan

+ 3D face photo

$ZRUOGȴUVW One imaging unit, three types of 3D data. All in one software. Find more info and your local dealer www.planmeca.com 3ODQPHFD2\ɄAsentajankatu 6, 00880 Helsinki, Finland. Tel. +358 20 7795 500, fax +358 20 7795 555, sales@planmeca.com


HU-FRIEDY. HOW THE BEST PERFORM. AFTER

Hu-Friedy was founded in Chicago, USA in 1908. Hu-Friedy creates innovative dental products that improve the work of WHITE clinicians and quality of life for patients. We support general parctitioners, specialists, dental hygienists, dental assistants, hospitals and Universities and students world wide. With more than 10,000 products in a wide range of specialities that include periodontal, surgical, orthodontics, pedodontics,restoratives and more, we lead the industry in innovation and technology development. There are three branches located in The Netherlands, Germany, Italy. In addition, many partners are spread all over the Middle East and North Africa. HU-FRIEDY. HOW THE BEST PERFORM. To perform at your best here some of the newest Hu-Friedy products:

IMPLACARE™ II:

BLACK LINE:

New Solution for Gentler Implant Scaling AFTER

DESIGNED FOR PERFORMANCE AFTER

Implacare II - a new solution for scaling that is gentle on implants but tough on plaque. WHITE

POINTS OF PERFORMANCE

WHITE

The Hu-Friedy Black Line is engineered to optimize clinical outcomes by delivering efficiency throughout the entire perio and surgical procedure and to reduce light reflection. POINTS OF PERFORMANCE

Made of PLASTEEL™: A high grade, unfilled resin that causes the least amount of alteration to implant abutment surfaces

Performance engineered coating for a harder, smoother surface for optimal edge retention and enhanced lubricity

20% thinner tip design: Allows for improved access to implant abutment surfaces and allows for more effective maintenance and care of implants

Distinct black finish for enriched contrast and visual acuity at the surgical site and underlying tissue

Two NEW universal curette designs: The Barnhart 5/6 and Langer 1/2 join the Columbia 4R/4L, 204S, and H6/H7 to provide a well-rounded set of options so you can select the instrument best suited for each patient’s needs

Reduced light reflection afforded by a matte finished handle and black working ends

Unique, smooth, large diameter lightweight handle for maximum comfort, reduced hand fatigue and increased control

Handcrafted with Immunity Steel® for optimal strength and corrosion resistance

Visit us at www.hu-friedy.eu to learn more or contact us by e-mail to reach the dealer of your region: info@hu-friedy.eu CHICAGO

MILAN

ROTTERDAM

TOKYO

©2014 Hu-Friedy Mfg. Co., LLC. All rights reserved.

TUTTLINGEN

How the best perform


Profile for Dental News

IAJD March 2014  

International Arab Journal of Dentistry. The Dental Academic publication of the Arab Dental Schools.

IAJD March 2014  

International Arab Journal of Dentistry. The Dental Academic publication of the Arab Dental Schools.

Profile for tonydib