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SKETCH

2012 Master of Architecture Graduation Year Project Never Stand Still

Faculty of Built Environment


22224

Supporters


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Reid Nakou Mohammad Nasiry Kristi Maree Neou Jin Soon Ng Tran Thien Toan Ngo Patricija Novosel Lewis Pang Laura Parengkuan Camilla Persson Lachlan Pierce Reihaneh Pourhamedani Muhamad Hanafi Rahmat Deepika Ratnaraj Madeleine Rowe Minoo Samadi Sahar Shirazi Winnie Wing Ning Sheung Daniel Shin Lauren Sideris Vinayagamoorthy Sivasubramaniam Kah Mun Tham Nicola Thorogood Ryan Townsend Andy Yat Hang Tsui Shasha Wang Alexandra Whitty Daniel Wight-Wick Julia Wilson Kai Ming Wong Siok-Hong Yap Jacqueline Yip Varian Yonathan Kenneth Young Herry Yuen Qiujing Ellen Zhu

LUMINOCITY 15th November 2012 Pier 2/3 Walsh Bay, Hickson Road, Sydney

Mohammed Salem Alquahtine Joycey Aoukar Victor Au Jemma Basso Amy Beech-Allen Sophie Bock Nicholas Brennan Chiu Yin Wilson Chan Ying Ying Chang Andrew Chua Clement Yu Hong Cheng Carolyn Cheung Kevin Cheung Shari Cheung Dean Chivas Thomas Chomer YeeLing (Elaine) Chow Daina Cunningham Nicole Cusack Emanuel Franklin Hossein Gholami Yammie Hoi Yan Ho Jian Jiang Melodie Kaplan Shahab Karimi Anthony Kerr Mansoor Khan Nicola Kwong Manus Leung Yau Wai Leung Ling Wei Liang Jed Long Flora Ma Christopher Paul Malouf David McCallum Milica Mitrovic Vanesa Molitorova

Message Sketch from the CEO

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Contents

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Message from the Dean

Message from Lend Lease

Message from the Course Convener

Master of Architecture 2012 Graduation Projects

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Acknowledgements

Supporters

Message from the Program Director

Studio Guests

Alumni Profile


3 This year has been busy at UNSW BE. We have continued the review and development of our curriculum including the introduction of two new interdisciplinary streams for first and third year bachelor degree programs and are introducing a new post professional degree program in urban policy and strategy. We have also added Design Research to our four funded research clusters (Emergent Digital Technologies, People and Places, Sustainable Design and Development and Urban Typologies). Finally, the CRC Low Carbon Living international research project led by our faculty commenced its work this year in collaboration with partners in industry and other universities. I wish every graduate a successful and satisfying career. In many respects, our relationship is just beginning. As you travel the world through your work you will meet many alumni and make special bonds of lasting value. We look forward to your ongoing participation in the life of our university and the mutual benefits this brings.

Professor Alec Tzannes Dean UNSW Built Environment

Message from the Dean

I congratulate all the students who have completed their degree program and now become our alumni. This catalogue conveys through selected study themes and projects from our final year studios something about the unique student experience offered at UNSW Built Environment along with the outstanding skills of our students and academic staff. UNSW Built Environment has a developing reputation as a knowledge leader in the design, delivery and management of the C21st city and its elements. Our research is directly relevant to the development of knowledge within built environment professions and underpins a process of continuous improvement to curriculum material. Embedded in the curriculum are core values centered on the thinking and practices required to deliver sustainable urban environments of deep cultural value. Design education in all of its many forms, including understanding evidence-based design processes is at the centre of all UNSW BE degree programs. This is complemented by the development of discipline knowledge with interdisciplinary design and research orientated projects aligned with advanced contemporary practices in industry.


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Supporters

Built Environment and its 2012 graduating students thank LuminoCITY’s supporters for their generous contributions.

Lead Supporter

Major Supporters

Supporters Built Environment Alumni

Event Partners

Master of Architecture Platinum Supporter

Master of Architecture Silver Supporters

BATE MART TM

Master of Architecture Supporters

Donors Master of Architecture Community Fundraising Donors Tonkin Zulaikha Greer


5 Throughout this event and graduating student exhibition, I encourage the thought leadership and vigorous debate that is required to deliver on the vision that LuminoCITY seeks to achieve. Knowledge knows no boundaries and it is our universities and their students that provide a mechanism to allow communities to grow and prosper through improved solutions, products and services. Continued knowledge investment in our universities is vital to equip society to creatively respond to challenges that are impacting all our lives at an ever increasing rate. Anticipating the thought provoking research and exhibitions of all the contributors, but in particular that of the graduating class, I would like to congratulate all participants who will undoubtedly assist in shaping the cities of tomorrow. Lend Lease looks forward to the continued relationship with UNSW Built Environment and LuminoCITY to create new ideas that deliver our vision in delivering the best places.

Murray Coleman OAM Managing Director, Australia Project Management and Construction Lend Lease

Message from Lend Lease

Lend Lease is proud to continue its longtime relationship with UNSW Faculty of Built Environment through the sponsorship of LuminoCITY. In creating an event like this, the Faculty delivers a forum to challenge the boundaries of the modern landscape and allows our leaders of the future to showcase how 21st century communities can live sustainably and meet the demands of the modern world. Lend Lease’s aspiration to be a sustainable organisation and an industry leader means we constantly search for ideas that will help us to deliver the improved social, environmental and economic performance of our businesses and of our industry more broadly. In sponsoring LuminoCITY, we are supporting the Faculty of the Built Environment to achieve their vision to create a forum to imagine, test and debate ideas about the 21st century city.


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Message from the Program Director

The LUMINOCITY | SKETCH Exhibition and this accompanying catalogue celebrate the distinctive graduation projects of the 2012 students of the Master of Architecture degree program. Course Convener Dr Dijana Alic and a dedicated team of studio project leaders guided students’ engagement in a yearlong graduation studio experience that demonstrates the vital relationship between disciplinary contemplation and architectural project realisations. Dr Alic’s energetic revitalisation of the graduation year experience brought focus to this critical relationship as one of contribution to public debate and discourse about Architecture’s role in advancing peoples’ urban and suburban well being in metropolitan Sydney.

Architecture’s synergy with the themes of Art, Culture, Technology and Agency was explored in eight distinctive studios informed by the research and practice interests and intersections of academics and practising architects who worked together as a team during 2012 to guide the inquiry, development and resolution of student’s distinctive architectural projects. This endeavour necessitates an extraordinary level of commitment to the graduation year experience. We are indebted to Adjunct Professor Diane Jones of PTW; Ivan Ip of Architectus; Robert Brown of Casey Brown Architecture; Dr Paola Favaro, Dr Dijana Alic, Dr M. Hank Haeusler, Andrew Macklin and Ann Quinlan. Together, the studio project leaders, their associated practices, our colleagues as well as invited guests brought their professional expertise to the studio experience and guided our students architectural design education with their stance, insight, experience, passion and patience. This interactive approach demonstrates how UNSW architectural student design projects, in attending to questions, issues of concern and debate, can contribute as research based ‘incubators’ for advancing understanding of architecture’s relational contribution to beneficially imagining, realising and sustaining our Built Environment.

Ann Quinlan Program Director


7 With a student community of over 80 students of diverse educational and cultural backgrounds we acknowledge the student studio representatives who play an important governance role in this year-long experience and in their contributions to the planning of their exhibition SKETCH. The Master of Architecture degree with its penultimate Bachelor of Architectural Studies degree as well as the Bachelor of Architectural Computing degree program forms the UNSW Architecture Program community. The graduation projects presented in this catalogue affirms our distinctive Built Environment studio approach. This approach celebrates the mutuality of student’s creative vitality and technical capability, in concert with demonstrating the qualities of academic excellence, commitment and community identified with UNSW graduating students of Architecture.

Congratulations to the 2012 Master of Architecture Graduand Students on their achievements and best wishes for a rewarding and successful career as an Architect of contribution to the thoughtful making of our Built Environment.

“STUDENTS ENGAGED IN A YEARLONG GRADUATION STUDIO EXPERIENCE THAT DEMONSTRATES THE VITAL RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN DISCIPLINARY CONTEMPLATION AND ARCHITECTURAL PROJECT REALISATIONS.”


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Introduction from the Course Convener

The aim of the 2012 Graduation studio was to provide a constructive context for the culmination of the students’ academic studies and the transition to architectural practice. In this yearlong course, students engaged in research and design based investigations of the contemporary city and pursued their independent interests in their design propositions. Throughout the year the studio community benefited from the supportive and creative inputs of practicing and academic architects, prominent guests, community activists and other interested parties. The diversity of involvements and responses from multiple disciplines allowed the students to develop individual propositions that responded to the layered realities and experiences of urban life. The studio themes, broadly framed by the staffs’ knowledge and research interests, examined the ideas, relations and debates between Architecture and Art, Culture, Technology or Agency. The studio projects deliberated and negotiated the specific topographic and geographic conditions and the broader social, cultural and political contexts of sites almost exclusively located within the greater Sydney Basin.

The tension between the architectural form and human and daily experience provided the foundations for design explorations and expressions that built upon a wide range of design practices. The students considered and deliberated upon complex social issues that included the work space needs of the sex workers of the Sydney’s Kings Cross area, the community needs of immigrants and minority groups, the needs of the indigenous population of La Perouse and the multifaceted requirements of children and young adults engaged in the justice system. The design project proposals that emerged within the studios demonstrate the capacity of architecture to act as an agent of change. The emerging possibilities span across the various urban scales and include the speculative and ambiguous aspects of architecture. With the locations varying from pristine and beautiful to marginal and peripheral the students’ proposal offered visions for the cultural transformation of the World Heritage Site of Cockatoo Island; the changing needs of the UNSW Kensington precinct; the adaptation and urban integration of the Old King’s School in the City of Parramatta; the needs of ethnic communities across the city; emerging models of therapeutic justice in the children’s court house in Newcastle; the speculative explorations of High Density Urban Prototypes; and the digital domains of the ubiquitous city. The 2012 Graduation studio propositions demonstrate the positive potential embedded in combining academic studies with professional practice. They mark the foundation of the students’ future creative endeavours.

Dr. Dijana Alic Course Convener


9 Professor Alec Tzannes Professor Jon Lang Professor James Weirick Professor Richard Johnson Professor Kevin Dunn Professor Jill Hunter Professor David Tait Associate Professor Simon Pinnegar Associate Professor Harry Margalit Dr Paul Hogben Dr Christine Steinmartz Dr Paul Osmond Dr Emma Rowden Dr. Anuradha Chatterjee Alan Crocker Anne Warren Berlin Ng Brian Ladd Buccah Goitseone Sebitla Carol Peterson Chris Ingrey Craig Brown David Earp David Logan David R Goodwin John Carrick John Dimopoulos, John Gamble John Jeremy Katalin Erdelyi Katarina Vrdoljak Kathryn Bunn Katie Hepworth Katrina Simon Ken Morkaya Kerry Marshall Kim Crestani Kristen Saul

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Laurice Elhaj Marian Macken Mark Gilder Martin Linnartz Martin Tomitsch Michael Harrison Michelle Tabet Miriam Green Mladen Prnjatovic Nicholas Simpson, Nici Long Nick Seeman Nicolas Simpson Nicole Gardner Peter Chivers Peter John Cantrill Peter Tonkin Philip Thalis Ray Brown Richard Frances Jones Robert Ousey Ron Timbery Rosanna Rubero Ryan Van den Nouwelant Sandra Loschke Sarah Benton Simon Fleet Stefan Meissner Stephen Gibblett Sumati Ahuja Lindsay Webb Wendy Yeung

Studio Guests

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Master of Architecture Message from the Dean 2012 Graduation Projects

This year has seen UNSW Built Environment continue to develop as a leading source of knowledge focused on the design, management and construction of the 21st century city. The aspiration of the faculty is to contribute, at the highest level of academic achievement, to the making of valued and sustainable built environments. New research initiatives undertaken in the last twelve months build on the faculty’s strengths concentrating on themes that include sustainable design and development, urban typologies and emergent digital technologies. Each degree program integrates research outcomes to ensure our students are equipped with knowledge of relevance and intellectual skills to enable successful future careers in a global context. Design, including understanding evidence based design processes, is at the core of many degree programs at UNSW BE. Design is studied at every scale and in the context of achieving in the future, lower carbon industrial products, buildings and cities. Design of enduring cultural value also matters and underpins the intellectual rigor of the curriculum. Student experiences involve interdisciplinary projects to enhance contemporary relevance and utilize the breadth of discipline knowledge available at UNSW BE. This catalogue presents selected projects from our final year students. It reflects the hard work and talents of all involved. On behalf of the faculty I congratulate all the students who have completed their degree program and now become our alumni. We wish you every success in your chosen field of endeavor. In many respects, our relationship is just beginning as we look forward to your ongoing participation in the life of our university through the many events and activities that we undertake to support research and the future generations of built environment graduates.

We wish you every success in your chosen field of endeavor. In many respects, our relationship is just beginning as we look forward to your ongoing participation in the life of our university through the many events and activities that we undertake to support research and the future generations of built environment graduates. We wish you every success in your chosen field of endeavor. In many respects, our relationship is just beginning as we look forward to your ongoing participation in the life of our university through the many events and activities that we undertake to support research and the future generations of built environment graduates. We wish you every success in your chosen field of endeavor. Professor Alec Tzannes Dean UNSW Built Environment


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The Architecture of EthniCity

Dr Dijana Alic Student Refletion

Metropolitan Sydney is home to a diverse range of immigrants who, over time, have built their clubs, religious buildings and other structures in order to facilitate community gathering, interaction and celebration. Considering such cultural buildings as important mediators between immigrant groups, and their cultures of origin, and the identities of their new country the studio projects engaged in the complex debates on the role of architecture in identity building. Sydney’s extensive suburban sprawl provided the context for the explorations of the complex relationships between diverse community groups and architectural expression. The students explored the existing and past community buildings that facilitated the establishment of ethnic and religious groups such as Jewish, Greek, Lebanese and Chinese migrants and those of the Czech Sokol gymnastic movement. These in-depth analyses of precedents, such as Hakoah or Marconi Clubs, allowed the students to draw upon knowledge and experiences of the past and relate their findings to the changing needs of the modern city.

The freedom to explore and construct their own briefs led to a wide range of design proposals. The projects present new ways of thinking about both the community and the architecture that houses the community. The projects spread across the Sydney metropolitan area and include: a Jewish youth centre in Surry Hills; the redevelopment of a well-known Community Centre in Marrickville; a new Sokol based sporting facility in the northern beaches; a Christian community centre in Strathfield; the Mestizo Centre for the Hispanic community in Fairfield, facilities for the Indonesian community in Kingsford and Maroubra; an African communities development centre in Parramatta and a gallery of contemporary Chinese history located in Darling Harbour. There is also a proposal for a Rocinha community centre in Rio de Janeiro. The proposed designs demonstrate the depth of the students’ engagement in the contemporary urban debates on multiculturalism and their implications on architectural production.

Immigrant groups in Sydney account for almost a third of the population, propelling the city into international status, and contributing to the rich culture of the city. Many communities have dedicated buildings wherein their culture and lifestyle may continue to exist within their new home of Sydney. The aim of our studio was to identify a need in a specific community and provide a solution through Architecture, one which would showcase the identity of such communities within the context of a contemporary city. Our starting point was to study the existing infrastructures built by a range of communities, including social clubs and religious buildings. It was through these studies that we learned of the history of certain cultural groups, and deduced an

appropriate direction for the future. The balance between representing cultural heritage and designing for current needs was an important one for all projects. As a result of the wide range of ethnic and religious groups that make up Sydney’s population, students have derived proposals of a varying nature, representing cultural groups such as Indonesian and Latin communities, religious groups such as Jewish and Christian communities, and sporting cultures such as the Sokol gymnastic association. The projects bring varying forms of these cultures to the fore, including performing arts, food markets, history, and celebration. At the heart of each project was the aim to mix cultural and ethnic lifestyle with that of the locals, and reinforce the word ‘community’.

Joycey Aoukar Andrew Chua Emanuel Franklin Melodie Kaplan

David McCallum Reid Nakou Laura Parengkuan Deepika Ratnaraj

Cecilia Salazar Sahar Sharifzadeh Shirazi Varian Yonathan Kenneth Young


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Mestizo Centre

Joycey Aoukar

Hispanic cultures are often described as lively, warm and joyful. The aim for the Mestizo Centre is to evoke memories for the older generation as well as creating a new one for the younger ones through the movement of the dance and the waves of the water; the water that connects all countries into one. Conveying a sense of freedom and peace while connecting with nature.

Email Joycey.aoukar@gmail.com

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*Mestizo is a term traditionally used in Latin America and Spain for people of mixed heritage of descent. In some countries it has come to mean a mixture of European and American, while in others, like Venezuela, mestizo still retains the original meaning of being mixed without specifying which admixture.


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Function hall interior Function hall interior Ground plan Dancing with the sun


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Unite - Christian Community Centre

Andrew Chua

The ideal community is connected, integrated and unified, but that ideal is not present in many communities around Sydney. Typical community buildings provide opportunities but they are hampered by location and availability leading to a disconnection from everyday lives of people. The Unite Christian Community Centre addresses the disconnection in the community by embodying the principles of compassion, generosity and hope prominent in the Christian faith. Operated by the Christian community, the building unites people of all backgrounds through community-based activities and services, a public expression of those principles. Located at Strathfield Town Centre the site was chosen because of existing urban disconnections and the lack of a central community building. It is also in close

Email achua747@gmail.com URL www.andrewchua.net

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proximity to transport, Christian churches, retail centres and residents allowing people to easily access and interact with the centre. Surrounding roads were adjusted unifying the existing square. The building addresses the square and permeates the lives of people, situated at the heart of the suburb. It connects directly with the transport interchange and provides connection to the station enhancing views over the suburb. Transparent and relational spaces are key elements that open the centre to the public and build a visual connection to the community activities within. The project promotes unity through the solving of urban conflicts, through the integration and connection to people and through the expression of the embodied principles of the Christian faith in built form.


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Site plan View from the station overpass Main event hall and public space Layout sketch


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Returning – Marrickville Arts and Design Innovation Centre

Emanuel Robert Franklin

Located in Marrickville in Sydney’s InnerWest the Addison Road Centre (ARC) holds the title of Australia’s largest community centre. ARC was founded in 1976 on the grounds of a decommissioned army barracks through the united action of the Marrickville community. The large site (roughly 6 football fields) was saved from developers allowing for a diversity of groups, bodies and organisations to establish and serve the community. In 2003 the ARC governing body signed a 50 year lease with the NSW government ensuring the site remains in the community’s hands well into the future. This significant milestone has meant the governing body has begun to explore planning options for

Email eman.rfh@live.com Phone 0406 979 344 URL http://emanfrank.tumblr.com

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the site to address programmatic issues, increase capacity and enhance its use as a communal focal point. The project brief was to design a master plan for a mixed-use multicultural community centre that returns the existing program back to its founding values through architectural interventions based in principles of good urban design. A masterplan was developed for the site with the intention of accommodating the current programs in a way which reconfigures them to focus on a unified goal and identity through the arts and design innovation. The two most significant community buildings of the masterplan (main theatre and library) were chosen to detail in the second part of the project.


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Site model with focus buildings highlighted black Visualisation of focus buildings (library & theatre) in context Section cut through library building Sketch of theatre interior looking towards the stage

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Surry Hills Cultural Hub for Jewish Youth

Melodie Kaplan

Providing a central communal space for the Sydney Jewish community became a clear focus after studying the now demolished Hakoah Club in Bondi. This left the community without a central space to bring culture, celebration, and socialisation together outside of Synagogue. The Sydney Jewish population is less than 1%, and it relies on the education and instillation of cultural values of its youth to continue population growth within the community. A brief was derived to provide spaces which focus on the cultural nature of Judaism, rather than the religious, such as a tapas bar, Israeli & Jewish delicatessen store, resource centre & library, and multipurpose classrooms and terraces that aim to further the education of the varying cultures of Judaism. A 6 x 6 metre grid was applied to the site and the façade was pushed and pulled along this grid, creating various forms of ‘boxes’. This design not only draws on the compactness and tightness of Surry Hills, but it also takes inspiration from the

Email melodiekaplan@hotmail.com

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multi-cultural nature of the Sydney Jewish community, to create a ‘multi-faceted’ façade. A ‘connection atrium’ has been placed between the two wings of the building, connecting all floors as a void spanning 24 metres high. It draws on the concept of centrality: the building is named a ‘Hub’, intended to be a central place in the community, and the atrium provides reinforcement of this concept. Open spaces including courtyards, gardens and terraces allow the building to be used freely by the Jewish and Surry Hills communities alike.


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Circulation bridges in the connection atrium Ground floor plan Main elevation; library; longitudinal section ‘Push/Pull’ concept sketch


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Rocinha Football for Life Centre

David McCallum

The Football For Life Community Centre at the foot of Rocinha – Rio de Janeiro’s largest ‘favela’ or urbanised slum – follows in the footsteps of previous football-centric community centres built within communities experiencing specific social issues, discord, or need of community education in countries across the world. With the impending 2014 FIFA World Cup and the 2016 Summer Olympics being held in Brazil and Rio de Janeiro respectively, global attention is being brought to bear on Brazilian society and the social issues encountered by favela dwellers across the country. The project develops a site at the foot of the hillside on which Rocinha has grown. It echoes favela typology with its modulescale, its tectonics and its contained design. The football pitch becomes the central

Email david.john.mccallum@gmail.com Phone 0435 046 438 A

conceptual and social focal point of the site, sunken into a surrounding podium of community spaces and residential blocks. The ‘walled-in’ nature of the pitch brings to mind the ancient Meso-American ball game, drawing contemporary parallels with football as religious, communal and social ritual. The programmatically quartered nature of the site reveals a holistic understanding of organic community; the program as a pixelation of the site, the site as pixelation of the favela, the favela as pixelation of the city. Each quarter surrounds the central courtyard-esque pitch, and each quarter is itself centred by a courtyard space. Ultimately the project focuses on security for the site and its users via visibility and communal interaction across the site and between each programmatic.


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Concept of centralised football field within favela Apartments faรงade and section through inner court Ground plan of community centre Massing of scheme in context with favela


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Augmenting Landscapes

Reid Nakou

Architecture and landscape mandate a harmonious fusion of distinctive concepts and ideas which share a collective underpinning ideology; a focus on creating active, exciting and vibrant spaces, motivated by a single unifying element, ‘community’. Therefore, architecture’s fundamental objective is one which embodies, exemplifies and encompasses the artistic sensibilities of a ‘place’ through the poetic expression of architecture. In considering the cultural circumstance of Sydney, ‘sport’ espouses a dynamic concept in this instance, both in terms of resonating with the sporting stereotype so stringently

Email reidnakou@gmail.com Phone 0458 888 101

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endorsed within the greater Australian community and introducing a powerful tool inspiring social cohesion. Such an idea is manifested in the multifaceted mediums of this design proposition, whereby the pivotal geographic location of the site, lively topography, sport and architecture fuse to demonstrate a congruent example of ‘community based architectural design’. Scale, structure, materiality, movement and landscape embrace principal responsibilities in achieving such a concept, whereby its success delves deeper than independent realizations, thriving on the harmonious expression and synergy of the whole.


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Rendered Perspective Aquatic Centre Facing North East Rendered Perspective Facing North Rendered Perspective Facing West Landscape Figure Ground Master Plan


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Indonesian Student and Education Centre

Laura Parengkuan

Globally, there are very few neighbouring countries with such strong cultural differences between them as Australia and Indonesia. Nevertheless, as a major player in the international student market, Australia attracts a large number of students from Indonesia. The Indonesian Student and Education Centre of Sydney will be a facility catering for Indonesian international students and the local Indonesian community. The centre will act as a ‘home away from home’ where Indonesian students and children can meet with others of the same background. Amenities such as short term accommodation, learning spaces, a multifaith prayer room and places for social gathering and events will support student interactions and help combat the common challenges students face in a new country. The centre will also include facilities for the

Email laura.parengkuan@gmail.com Phone 0418 456 909 A

general public such as a restaurant, library, hall, childcare centre, community garden, shops and Sunday markets. By combining public and student facilities the centre aims to integrate the Indonesian student community with the local community. The centre will be located in Kingsford, a suburb with a large Indonesian community close to the University of New South Wales and the Indonesian consulate. The project will involve a redevelopment of the site at 1-21 Rainbow Street, Kingsford, to replace the current deteriorating facilities and to accommodate a variety of new and existing community uses. The proposed buildings are constructed of modern engineered timber, such as glulam and cross laminated timber, and are reminiscent of traditional Indonesian pavilion architecture.


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A. Anzac Parade street front B. Student accommodation and prayer space face central courtyard C. Multi-faith prayer space D. Site plan sketch


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MultipliCity

Deepika Ratnaraj

The Addison Rd Centre (ARC) located in the heart of Marrickville, is Sydney’s largest community centre, established in 1976. Considering its rich social history and varied urban fabric, the design proposition intends to plug into this existing social infrastructure by redeveloping its current program through a structured amalgamation and reorganisation of its key facilities accompanied by the addition of new spaces to cater for existing and future demographics. The 8 acre site is nestled within a residential skin reflected by it limited access and exposure thus minimising the potential for urban connections and thoroughfare prospect. Predominantly characterised by its industrial nature, portal warehouse and demountable ‘huts’ make up the skyline of this site.

Email deepikaratnaraj@ymail.com Phone 0415 804 390 A

New forms on site aim to imitate and exaggerate the genius loci of the site, which sees materials used and forms generated in a referential manner to the site’s surrounds. The proposed conceptual strategy understands the site as a container of collective memory that turns the site into a living museum; a collection of the old and new. Certain buildings of historical significance to the site will be maintained and reused while new spaces will be added to create a dynamic overlay of architectural typologies. Planning and arrangement of buildings on site imitates the idea of a city in which the old and the new are connected through subtle junctures.


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ARC Existing Site Plan Model exploration of pitched roof form Artist Impression of Design Proposition Sketch Elevation of Design Proposition


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Cultural Intersection

Sahar Shirazi

My design proposal for Addison Road is to design a multicultural centre for the technologies, education and design. This will be an educational centre where people from all cultures and backgrounds of all ages are welcome to come and teach each other, learn from each other and participate in positive discussions towards a better future. To be able to have such an organisation at Addison Road would be a first for combating the harsh and unreal interpretations the media places on everyday topics. It will become a haven where people can give first hand accounts of events and educate others on the realities of the situation. A place

Email sahar.shirazi@hotmail.com Phone 0413 304 102 URL https://www.linkedin.com/in/sshirazi

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where social and racial stereotypes are broken down and pushed aside. Where people gain from a common thirst for knowledge and spread the word of their newfound wisdom to others and a ripple effect will take place in the community. The ideas that are shared in this place can then become a reality as the support of the community is behind each and every idea. Giving people with hopes and dreams a chance, a shot at making them come true and providing a venue where these ideas can flourish and be nurtured.


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Exploded axonometric of lecture theatre space View from top of site looking down the stream Theatre view from bridge Construction section perspective through lecture theatre

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Indonesian Art and Performing Centre.

Varian Yonathan

Indonesia is strongly represented with their rich culture, such as the art culture as well as the food and the music and performances. Indonesian Performing and Art Centre is a communal centre that provides space to Indonesian in particular and local community in general, in matters of batik art activities, events, shadow puppets theatre and traditional music performance by offering outdoor space activities, main theatre, and exhibition /

Email vrian.yonathan@hotmail.com Phone 0450 493 365

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gallery spaces; in order to provide public communal space that can be used for the community by day and turn into night theatre performances by night. The aim of the project is to create an art precinct within the suitable site and introduce Indonesian culture as a technique to turn the site into fields of social, cultural, and national identity production.


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Structural Model Section Section Light and shadow


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Chinese Culture House

Kenneth Young

The project explores the contemporary issue of Chinese identities, the identity as an immigrant, the inner conflict of tradition and modernity, and developing a site specific response in Darling Harbour. The site selected is to the south of the Chinese Garden of Friendship, and west of Sydney Chinatown; there is the opportunity to create a connection between these two culture elements. Through the investigation of Chinese culture centres, the history of the Chinese settlement in Sydney, research on Chinatowns and Chinese Gardens, the project proposes three main elements to the building, the Contemporary Chinese Gallery and Museum, the contemporary Chinese roof garden, and Chinese designer shops and restaurants, brought together through courtyards and landscapes, a public haven that allows one to escape the city.

Email yken43@hotmail.com Phone 0406 768 203 A

The Contemporary Chinese Gallery and Museum enables visitors to reflect on the contested memories of the Chinese in Sydney as well as contemporary expressions through art. The contemporary Chinese roof garden, on the other hand, delivers a different experience of a space of both self-contemplation and relaxation. As the threshold between the Chinese Garden and Chinatown, the project searched for a contemporary Chinese architectural language. Instead of mimicking traditional Chinese architecture, the project reinterprets elements of Chinese gardens and houses; the framing and sequencing of spaces, somewhat similar to a Chinese scroll that are never spread out and viewed in their entirety, by analogy, the unrolling of a scroll is experiencing the sequence of scenes of a spatial narration.


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Contemporary Chinese Roof Garden Gallery Courtyards Ground plan perspective Bird’s eye view


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Cockatoo Island: The cultural transformation of a World Heritage Site through Architecture

Rob Brown

Cockatoo Island Sydney harbour’s largest Island, a World Heritage Site was once Sydney’s equivalent to Port Arthur a virtual inescapable convict prison for repeat offenders is now a maritime industry wasteland of docks enormous sheds and convict barracks. The Island is in the very early stages of being transformed into an arts and cultural precinct of Sydney. The rich history of the place ,its unique state of preservation and its enormous cultural potential was the basis for the studio’s research, experiments/interventions to transform the post industrial Island into a cultural haven of the future. The studio through critical research analyzed both the historic evolution of the island and the contemporary culture of an arts district in the making. Students selected a specific use identified from their

research to form the programmatic basis of their design proposal. This research generated architecturally rich concepts for the future function and vitality of the island. Encouraged to be unswayed by predominant fashion and grounded in a deep understanding of ‘place’, The students explored the breadth of possibilities from intervening lightly in a fragile environment to the more robust architectural propositions. Consideration of the implications of being a World Heritage Site tested the students understanding of conservation theory and working within an existing historic fabric. The culmination of the creative process sought to produce a body of student work which presents both pragmatically and poetically at a high level of architectural understanding.


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Victor Au Jemma Basso Sophie Bock Clement Cheng Anthony Kerr Manus Leung Milica Mitrovic Mohammad Nasiry Lewis Pang Dragan Pasatovic Camilla Persson Jacqueline Yip

The island’s inclusion on the World Heritage Site list posed a delicate issue of conservation for us as architects. Rob Brown as studio leader and mentor taught us the integral balance between understanding ‘place’ and being sympathetic to it, whilst still injecting something new, robust and exciting. Each student has developed an energised scheme anchored in site research and conceptual analysis, and all projects, although varying in scale, program and purpose, uncover a very successful range of solutions for a site packed with potential. Ultimately a diverse collection of highly developed projects share one vision – to imbue Cockatoo Island with a clear sense of purpose, drawing people into its gritty, raw and mysterious clutches and see it become one of the most attractive and unique destinations within Sydney.

Student Refletion

Cockatoo Island’s rich fabric is woven together by hundreds of years of unique history. From its conception as a place of punishment and isolation for immigrant convicts, to its centrality as a major shipbuilding and repair facility in both WWI and WWII, Cockatoo displays a strength of identity in its past, but an uncertainty for its future. Left abandoned and in a penultimate state of decay after the 1990’s, it is this characteristic that makes the island such a rare sequence of spaces filled with a rich contrast of materials and robust industrial remains. Developing a masterplan for this vibrant but largely disused space has proven to be one of the most challenging studios faced by its students. A tightknit class allowed for a collaboration of rigorous research of the site, history, the local environment and the predominantly emerging arts culture developing on the island. As such, students gathered a significant understanding of the potential transformations for Cockatoo as it moves forward as a burgeoning centre within Sydney.


38

Cockatoo Collective: The Craftsman’s District

Victor Au

This proposal seeks to unify the isolated island through the interpretation of heritage, culture and sympathy for a derelict landscape. The underlying concept is rebirth; to be executed through the introduction of a craftsman’s district on the island, with a series of metal workshops beside the plateau and slipways. These workshops will serve as the heart through which life emanates; they will be the protagonist for bringing life and activity back to the dead spaces. These intimate scale working pieces of corten sculpture urge human interaction between the natural landscape and the crafted sculptural roofs. Through bringing in recyclable materials, as well as recycling retired vessels themselves, the conventional view of ‘garbage’ is challenged as they return to the earth to be reborn into art;

Email vicsticks@gmail.com A

an antithesis of Cockatoo, which was once used to release and craft ships, parts and vessels, now the reclamation. The buildings have a minimal footprint in order to allow for basic workshop functions, with a myriad of kinetic and mechanical devices that allow for permeability, urging artists to immerse in the island atmosphere and be consumed by it. They seek to return and mimic the character and dialogue that the island once had between the docks, the working life and crafting – all to an often overlooked locale. The proposal deals with adaptive reuse of existing buildings, repairing existing infrastructure and mechanics in order to compliment the new ‘layer’ of Cockatoo Island, a new canvas for the process of making.


B

C

A. Resin concept model B. Artistic render of ateliers C. Preliminary sketch


40

Working Maritime Dockyard

Jemma Basso

Responding to a deep understanding of place, this proposal for Cockatoo Island has been inspired by its physical character, history, architectural quality, and its growing cultural needs. Cockatoo Island was once a bustling naval dockyard during the World Wars, cluttered with workshops, boats, workers, cranes and loose materials. This proposal seeks to revive this maritime setting by relocating the activities of the Sydney Heritage Fleet (SHF) to the southern precinct of the island. The SHF is a not for profit organisation made up of volunteers who come together to restore and maintain a number of Australia’s old historic boats. Described as a “Living Museum,” it allows traditional boat building techniques to be preserved and passed down to younger generations.

Email jemma_basso@hotmail.com Phone 0431 929 979 A

This proposal aims to activate what is currently the most under-utilised and derelict part of the island. It will improve access to the water’s edge and ultimately create a significant cultural destination to be visited by thousands of people each year. Over time, Cockatoo Island has been transformed, cut into and added to. The southern dockyard is entirely reclaimed land and is separated from the main part of the island by two large cut dry docks. In a process termed ‘reductive planning,’ this proposal seeks to ‘reclaim back’ by creating a number of ‘incisions’ into the reclaimed land. This not only adds to the physical character of the island, but will also create areas of still water necessary for undertaking work on the boats.


B

C

D

A. B. C. D.

Proposed outline of the southern dockyard Cross-section through the main workshop 3D view of the main workshop Sketch of one of the working wharves


42

Cockatoo Island Campus Library

Sophie Bock

Research into the history and built fabric of Cockatoo Island lead to my aim of creating an architecture which interprets the narrative of Cockatoo for a new university campus on the island. At the heart of the campus, the library became my main focus. The library breathes new life into Cockatoo Island, while telling the story of the continuous construction and demolition which have occurred there in response to changing functions. This architecture is therefore of an aesthetic and form which reference Cockatoo’s rich history through adaptive reuse of an existing building, and launch

Email s.bock@student.unsw.edu.au Phone 0417 370 089

A

it into a culturally rich future. The library’s purpose of bridging across past and future is paralleled by the building’s function as the traditional library typology retains its civic significance and simultaneously moves forward into the digital era. The aim is for an enduring architecture, at once modern and classical and, most importantly, specific to Cockatoo Island.


B

C

A. B. C. D.

Ground Floor Plan, Sketch of interior, Library western facade, 1:200 Model

D


44

Green Technologies Research & Education Facility, Cockatoo Island, Sydney

Clement Yu Hong Cheng

The project is in reaction to recent positive changes in attitude towards sustainability and green living. As Sydney improves to become a sustainable city, so will the local green industry boom and the need for a hub to research and manufacture sustainable technologies becomes invaluable. Situated in the derelict industrial precinct of Cockatoo Island in Sydney’s Harbour, the project proposes a place for the translation of concepts and ideas into real life implementation of sustainability as culture. It will become a place to foster an outstanding resource specializing in green energy and to develop new creative technologies focusing on sectors related to the sustainable industry. The research facility consists of interactive laboratories, workshops, exhibition halls, research library, computer labs, administrative

Email clementcg@gmail.com Phone 0425 851 711 URL http://issuu.com/clementcg/docs/clementcg_portfolio

A

office, lecture halls, an internal plaza and a central courtyard. Within the industrial halls, laboratory and circulation structures will stand detached from the historic fabric and maintaining the link to the Turbine Hall which is kept untouched for cultural use. For education, the centre provides live research experience, educational and lecturing facilities to inform the public and the industry concerning the research and development of green technologies. The Green Technologies Research & Education Facility will be a place of synthesizing sustainability research and technological development along together with public education and a host for the booming green industry. It is to be a place of ideas, a forum for dialogue and a beacon for a sustainable future.


B

C

A. The idea of a building within a building. B. Office and administrative interior space. C. Interactive research laboratories within the old convict workshop building. D. Research library within the old industrial hall turned internal plaza.

D


46

Ocean Exploration Reserach Station

Antony Kerr

Cockatoo Island has an extensive layered history that has evolved from being a prison during early settlement to an industrial site for naval ships during the war. The site today has been abandoned and sits in complete isolation in the middle of Sydney Harbour. The opportunity exists for a new layer to be inserted that is well suited to site and location. The need for a maritime and marine research station is not only inspired by

Email anthonykerr@hotmail.com Phone 0414 068 186 URL anthonykerr.blogspot.com.au

A

the lack of local educational courses in marine research and maritime training but is also the desperate attempts to preserve and maintain fish stocks and sea life for future generations. By consolidating marine science and maritime institutions into an interdisciplinary hub, a holistic approach to problem solving will be achieved. To have all related industries on an island will build relationships between disciplines and further encourage a collaborative work environment.


B

C

E

D


48

Platform-870; Alternative Theatre in Sutherland Dock

Manus Leung

In a published book edited by Joanne Jakovich, past organizer of the Urban Islands Project on Cockatoo Island, entitled ‘Cuttings – Urban Island Vol 1’, Jakovich question the island’s potential to self-sustain programmatically. While in the short term the island may be able to host temporary cultural inhabitations – bars, music events, art installations, workshops, heritage tours – there remain the challenge to secure long term viability. The site calls for the introduction of a programmatic ecology – a living, adaptive approach to injecting and sustaining activity. The design questions the possibility of introducing an alternative performance theatre as a sustaining activity to reactivate the collective atmosphere the island once

Email manusleung@hotmail.com URL www.manusleung.tumblr.com A

had. The theatre challenges a new system of spatial design, with co-exists to heritage forms, to provide a performance space in Sutherland Dock. It is only through people gathering together – which is what theatres do – that you can actually feel the humanity again. On another level, specific attention is given to water as a key medium in which performers and props emerge and disappear unexpectedly. The project aims to not treat architecture as an object or icon, but rather as an urban catalyst, promoting uses and facilities for the surrounding buildings that are now empty and neglected. The theatre attempts to highlight and emphasizes the characteristic of the island with a strong identity of ‘place.’


B

C

A. Front of House B. Performance Space in Sutherland Dock C. Concept Sketch


50

Cockatoo Island Gateway Markets

Milica Mitrovic

The proposal is for an entry building and artist’s market pavilion to be located on the North East corner of Cockatoo Island. This building proposal is envisioned as part of larger concept which focuses on the transformation of Cockatoo Island into an International Art District for Sydney. This concept seeks to redevelop the Island’s Eastern Apron as the district’s heart. Its empty plaza and large unoccupied industrial workshops provide inspiring spaces for exhibitions, cultural events and all forms of experimental art. At present the Eastern Apron does not accommodate public visitation and requires development to engage people and encourage artistic talent to thrive alongside. The project incorporates administrative/ education and public/art use. These functions are separated by the entry canopy and succeeding forecourt

Email mitrovic.milica88@gmail.com Phone 0402 723 625 A

which form the gateway to the Island. Public spaces such as the boardwalk, restaurant and markets are orientated to receive maximum natural sunlight and iconic views to the Harbor Bridge. The artist’s market pavilion is designed for local and international artists to showcase their work. It consists of 20 individual lock up spaces for lease over 3 to 6 month periods. The philosophy of the markets is to encourage creativity and the exchange of ideas. It provides artists with a blank canvas and imposes minimal restrictions on how these spaces are used. The entry building and accompanying artist’s market pavilion are envisioned as a sculptural gateway to an artistic, post-industrial landscape. For this reason their forms, structure and materiality are sculptural interpretations of the sites intriguing architectural qualities.


B

C

A. Entry Building B. Artist’s Market Pavilion C. Concept Sketch


52

Embracing Change

Mohammad Nasiry

As a conceptual exploration into accommodation on Cockatoo Island, this proposal takes the imaginative leap forward into providing better alternatives to camping and normalised heritage apartments. It is a conflicting contrast of experimentation through form, structure, and materiality to represent characteristics and element from each phase of the islands rich heritage and history whilst serving the need for better accommodation and amenity on the island for its emerging creative cultural phase. The proposal comprises of a 15 room, 5 star sustainable cliff edge hotel rooms, a lobby within the existing dogleg tunnel and a restaurant, pool and bar embedded within the top edge of the cliff to reduce any impact it may have on the existing heritage listed buildings.

Email nasirymm@gmail.com Phone 0422 340 444

A


B

C

D


54

Void

Lewis Pang

Cockatoo Island is an amalgam of history and driven by its varying political, social and economic. Different times bring different circumstances, ideologies, and priorities make the island with little regard for the existing condition or for the inhabitants that occupy these space. The site is currently a lost space of unoccupied, arbitrary aligned buildings and a lack of definition or hierarchy. It is big, vast and vague. The Design Intention is to activate and create the vitality of the precinct through the art culture as a generator. The concept

Email cheungpang@hotmail.com Phone 0414 633 128

A

of the accommodation was inspired by the caves where the location is unnoticeable on the island for past several decades. The accommodation is contradistinction to the surrounding extensive environment, where is the place of contemplation allow the artist or students find their thoughts from silent. The light source only introduced form above, it used for the spiritual concentration. The material of In-Situ concrete perceive the sense of simplicity and primitive to work together with the existing characteristic of the Islands.


B

C

D

E

A. B. C. D. E.

Concept sketch of Cave Proposed location at Northern Apron Interior of Dormitory Corridor of Dormitory Enclosed Courtyard


56

Buried Gallery of Contemporary Art – ‘BGCA Cockatoo’

Camilla Persson

The future of Cockatoo Island lies in its pursuit of contemporary culture and the arts. The proposed masterplan acknowledges the extraordinary potential intrinsic in Cockatoo to become a major cultural and artistic centre in Australia, and on an international scale. Stepping onto the island, visitors are propelled into a whimsy of imagination and discovery. Inherent to the site are themes of cutting and carving, void and solid, building as canvas and honesty in architecture. The ‘Buried Gallery of Contemporary Art’ is a physical manifestation of these values. The Gallery embeds itself within the sandstone plateau below the islands surface. It’s composition as a series of voids within the rock is a distinct contrast to the lightweight sheds that occupy the island above, and draw inspiration from the awe-inspiring silos cut out of the rock by its former convict inhabitants for grain storage. Yet the success of the Gallery’s internal labyrinth of spaces, is in the

Email camillampersson@hotmail.com Phone 0408 255 887 A

subtlety of its external impact. The building embraces its gritty, industrial context and by concealing the Gallery, it does not attempt to distract from the character of the island, nor does it mimic the buildings that already stand. By embedding a new physical form within the island’s rock, a new metaphorical layer is also entrenched, that speaks of the island’s history, but directs it firmly towards the future.¬ The evocative materiality of the cut sandstone walls creates a rare dialogue with the subversive nature of the art exhibited within. T¬he considered drama of light and shadow mentally prepares the visitor for what lies ahead, detaching them from the reality of the everyday as they focus on encountering the art that awaits them in the theatrical journey of spaces. “The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the source of all true art and all science.” - Albert Einstein


B

C

A. Sections through Island - Embedded Gallery B. Gallery Entrance C. Interior Perspective - Cut Rock and Art Installation


58

The Fringe @ Cockatoo Island

Jacqueline Yip

Cockatoo Island presents an opportunity to cater for the non-conventional forms of the performing arts which pushes beyond the boundaries of the conventional theatre. Its bizarre setting can easily be the backdrop for any alternative form of theatre. Furthermore, its location is on the periphery of the existing network of theatres which could be interpreted as being on the ‘fringe’ of conventional theatres. Therefore, Cockatoo Island will become the ‘fringe’ for the performing arts in Sydney. Secluded on the ‘fringe’ of the CBD, the island will become a place for the discussion and experimentation of the performing arts, showcasing its ideas through microfes¬tivals.

Email oiyee.jackie@gmail.com A

In order to create such an arts precinct, existing warehouses will be adapted into studios, workshops and classrooms. Performers and artists would also be encouraged to stay and live on the island, especially during these microfestivals. As such, new accommodation has been inserted into the upper levels of the existing convict building in the Industrial Precinct.


B

C

A. Plan of the accommodation level B. Overlooking the south-eastern corner of the island C. Earlier concept sketch of the convict building


60

Agency + Institution + City

Ann Quinlan Student Refletion

With an emphasis on self-reflexive questioning and speculative curiosity about built environments as they are and what they could be (Cairns 2009) this Studio positions the architectural project as a potent setting for student exploration of agency as a transformative design practice that engages with the interaction of policies, systems and structures to effect change through design actions to meet identified social needs. Attention to exploring the current light rail proposal connecting the UNSW Kensington precinct to the City exposed a layered legacy of public transport and campus issues. This led Cory, Vicki, Ryan, Herry, Daniel and Mohammed to examine the role of a university as a social institution, its representation in the institution’s mission policy and realisation in the campus plan. Students researched activities and experiences that they perceived were under-represented on campus to frame and represent a ‘matter of concern’ for their investigation and realisation as a project.

The robust nightlife of Kings Cross brought focus to the contemporary demands placed upon support services in attending to the outcomes of the social milieu experiences of urban lifestyles. Investigation of people’s needs, activities and attraction to this distinctive City locality, Sydney City policies, NSW government statutory frameworks and international best practice led Madeleine, Alex, Joseph and Neil to identify and represent differing matters of concern for investigation and project speculation. With attention to a reflexive design process students explored the depth and potential of their inquiry concern to guide the design of vital spatial experiences in their projects that respond to people’s needs. In this approach they were supported by the camaraderie of the studio and our regular student peer reviews with the Agency Courthouse Studio.

The Agency + Institution + City studio centres on the concept of the architect as an agent of change and the potential transformative qualities inherent within architecture that can be explored to address social needs and inadequacies within a society. The University of New South Wales and the Kings Cross area were identified as two distinct geographical precincts where the concept the architect as an agent of change could be investigated. The self-governed approach to the studio enabled students to pursue architectural solutions unique to their research agenda whilst still focussing on the overarching ideology of the architect as an agent of change responding to an identified social need. The studio strategy resulted in a diversity of architectural

projects, ranging from a performance theatre to a multi-purpose sports facility as well as from a religious precinct to a safe sex house. The melange of projects within the studio provided a rich architectural learning experience, with frequent informal discussions and presentations providing a collaborative community atmosphere to the design process. The studio group would like to acknowledge and sincerely thank our studio leader Ann Quinlan for her ongoing support and committment to the studio group, the collegial and instructive dialogue she created within a studio setting, and for the creative freedom given to individual students which facilitated the exploration of unique interests and ideas.

Mohammed Alqahtine Joseph Burraston Lingwei V (Vicky) Liang Min Xing (Coby) Liu

Cairns, Stephen, “Agency” Architectural Research Quarterly 13 (2009): 105-108.

Madeleine Rowe Ryan Townsend Neil Warner-O’Connell Alexandra Whitty

Daniel Wight-Wick Herry Tsz Hin Yuen


62

West Mall Village UNSW

Mohammed Salem Alqahtine

UNSW is planning to achieve many of its aims by 2020. One of which is serving the surrounding community by establishing suitable buildings. in The future UNSW plan , in 2020, the west mall will be the area containing buildings that serve the target community. These buildings, which will be in the Anzac Parade, are a community centre, mosque and station and in the opposite side will be buses and metro stations. The number of Muslims in the university - staff or students -is about 600. Every Friday, they need to pray to gather but there is no a suitable place. Indeed, they have to pray five times daily.

Email Dark_leader84@hotmail.com Phone 0424 922 224 A

Despite the fact that Sydney is one of the mega-cities across the globe, it does not have any kind of Islamic architecture. Therefore, my project contains a variety of Islamic architect elements in different areas which can create unique matching between buildings and other parts of the project. This design shows the phases involved in the contemporary Islamic architecture. There is a plan to rebuild a light railway metro infrastructure in 2030 all over Sydney. In order to improve UNSW metro station, redesign the surrounding environment such as other bus stations and traffic movement taken into consideration.


B

C

D

A. B. C. D.

Site perspective. West Mall Village plaza. The Mine axis for the project. West Mall Village sketch.


Embracing Change 64

Ling Wei Liang

Email nasirymm@gmail.com Phone 0422 340 444


66

SAFE HOUSE [KX]

Madeleine Rowe

Having identified the need for a “safe house” for street sex workers in Kings Cross my research led me to define two opposing spaces to address the needs faced by workers on the streets of Kings Cross, Woolloomooloo and Darlinghurst. The first “house” is the Safe House/ Safe Sex; a purpose built safe house brothel where street sex workers rent rooms by the hour to service their clients. The primary aim of the safe house is to place control back with the sex workers who otherwise are placed at considerable risk. In designing the building I focused on this inversion of power. There are separate circulation spaces for workers and clients and varying volumes and floor levels have been explored to push this aspect of inversion. While working with a building of a domestic scale, standard building

Email madeleinerowe@hotmail.com Phone 0422 340 444 A

elements such as the window had to be rethought and challenged due to the fact that the building operates only at night and controls around views into the sex premise. The second “house” is mixed use, with the primary focus is of accommodation for sex workers or women leading a street based lifestyle and a safe women’s space. Located on the ridge line that topographically defines The X, the Women’s space allows those leading a street based lifestyle to enter, relax , and to seek access to services and specialized staff. The dialogue between the individual and the community is explored through the sequencing and volume of spaces. It is argued that this more rehabilitative space seeks to stimulate the sense through materiality, volume, light and landscaping.


B

C

A. Site Model : Safe Space B. Sections through both sites C. Women’s Space: Entry Courtyard


68

“Building a Place for Student Expression”

Ryan Townsend

“How do the students express themselves, where is their place?” ‘Building a Place for Student Expression’ seeks to answer this exact question. “Architecture acts as mediators of social practices of power,” (Dovey, Framing Places) Drawing philosophical grounding from Dovey’s work, this project seeks to represent and physically manifest student expression within the campus of UNSW. The aim is to show that practices of power as mediated in built form are multidimensional; they are an understanding of the tensions between paradigms. The two paradigms embodied within this are ARC; the ‘Agency’ of student expression and The University of New South Wales; the ‘Institution’ representative of academia.

Email talk2townsend@gmail.com Phone 0400 432 454

A

‘Building a Place for Student Expression’ is in favour of the “New Urbanism Field” by Harrison Franker, carrying a belief in the renewal of a nineteenth-century walkable, transit accessible development model, including a traditional range of public open-space types to support student expression and cultural diversity. Like an anatomical model, the building displays its internal organs. From the exterior the transparent lantern is conceived as a solid, not as a void and with the interior is this role reversed. The functions that lie within are as solids inside the crystal, floating within it in an amoebic suspension. These are then represented on the surface of the glass as shadowy presences, their three-dimensionality displayed ambiguously and flattened, superimposed on one another, in a play of amorphous densities.


B

C

D

A. B. C. D.

Facade Perspective inside Central Courtyard Journey from University Mall Night Performance Interpretive Sketch of Front Facade


70

Architecture for Care, Not Cure: A Proposed Pathways Model for Homeless Youths and Youths at Risk of Homelessness

Alexandra Whitty

Within Australia, 105,000 people are counted as being homeless each night (ABS 2006 Census). The research project accepts that whilst people who experience homelessness may have significant problems and vulnerabilities, it should not pose a barrier to accessing stable accommodation - the shortage of appropriate affordable, stable, safe and supportive housing currently available in Sydney only serves to increase the challenge involved in reducing the rates of homelessness within Australia. Housing solutions for 18 - 24 year olds who are homeless or at risk of homelessness has been identified as a significant need within the Kings Cross area and a continuum of care which includes stable housing in conjunction with the provision of personal development and vocational solutions has posed as the design solution.

Email a.e.whitty@gmail.com Phone 0415 306 912

A

The creation of stable housing options for homeless youths will positively contribute to the fostering of a sense of self and self worth, and with the provision of vocational and personal development on-site services (a continuum of care), a holistic and individually controlled pathway to treatment and choice will be established. Without the physical, emotional and mental stability that affordable and secure housing can provide, access and dealing effectively with mental and physical health problems, addictions or participating in employment or training becomes particularly difficult to establish for homeless youths, and is even more difficult to maintain.


B

C

A. B. C. D.

Homelessness comorbidity of disorders storyboards. Interior perspective of living pod. Sectional perspective of building. Community cafe and chevron concept diagrams.

D


72

Theatrics on Campus

Daniel Wight-Wick

The New South Wales University Theatrical Society, more commonly known as NUTS, is the theatrical society at UNSW. An Arc ‘Gold’ club, with over 500 members, NUTS conducts up to 8 shows each year, all with different focuses and themes depending on what society wants to do and what they feel the community will most enjoy. Focused on getting students involved in theatre, NUTS allows students to break free from the stresses of academia, let loose and engage in something that they are passionate about.

Email d.wightwick@gmail.com Phone 0424 151 498 A

Theatrics on Campus, aims to give NUTS a greater presence on campus, in a larger, centralised and more significant location. The project has been designed specifically to suit their theatrical needs; for performance type, cast size and audience. When not in ‘production mode’ the project also provides a casual environment for the society and university students to enjoy through a series of intimately designed and organised spaces. Double height glazed spaces facilitate interaction on a public level and ultimately put the building on display during the day and at night.


B

C

D

A. B. C. D.

Proposed development and context Interior perspective High Street view Concept sketch


74

The University Vein

Herry Yuen

Open spaces in institutions are important for as they serve as a ground for learning, exchanging values and also a place for individuals to express themselves. The new UNSW Recreational and Sporting Centre will form a new social hub at the gateway of UNSW and encourages the interaction between student groups. The building sites for a light rail stop which resolves the congestion issue for students and staff travelling from city, therefore the main circulation area is generously dimensioned and cuts through the building form, acting as a gallery viewing into the activities within.

Email herryyuen@gmail.com Phone 0414 670 522 A

Circulating through the ramps and steps forms a restless journey flowing through a sequence of dynamic spaces, creating series of visual and spatial interactions between the people, sporting activities and the exterior historical Moreton Bay Fig trees.


B

C

D

A. B. C. D.

High Street as an arcade for the enrichment of student lives. Elevation and Sections of Sports hall and pool. Atrium serving as a viewing platform. Structure mimicking the Historical Fig Trees.


76

A Courthouse for Children

Adjunct Professor Diane Jones Student Refletion

The studio project is a new courthouse for children on a central city site in Newcastle. An early 20th century building of disputed heritage significance stands at one end of the otherwise vacant site and was offered for re-use as part of the design, or demolished. Students were encouraged to explore emerging models of therapeutic and virtual justice and to undertake independent research in order to understand the historic, cultural and physical context of the site, of courthouses, of judicial rituals and of justice in our society. This included looking at the future of these rituals, particularly in relation to children – and at all the inherent contradictions and dichotomies. Students were asked to continually give physical expression to their research and conceptual thinking through physical models, conceptual artwork and diagrams.

Further, students were encouraged to understand their design process and to participate in the critique of their studio colleagues. It is hoped that the studio has assisted students in understanding the role of architecture as an “aware and active participant in the public debate about justice as a reflection of society” (Katherine Fischer Taylor). As a group, we worked to re-define a place of justice for children through thorough research that included literature searches, observation and consultation with a multi-disciplinary team. Students strove to find and articulate a design process that works from research to concept to architectural form, with a “knowing” use of the elements of architecture and the power of their interaction with people.

The studio demanded us to understand the role of public architecture in creating community-oriented spaces for children and adolescents. The site presented opportunities for rigorous analysis of a negative community image and of civic responsibility. Many students had not addressed such a multi-faceted public project before. Inquiry into the role of the ‘architect as social translator’ was necessary to transform our social, economic, legal, psychological and architectural research into a constructible reality. We developed a sense of social empathy and an evidence-based ethical stance toward the environmental requirements of justice architecture so to transform any problems we identified into a solution. A challenge lay in understanding a child’s needs and the unique relationship between family, child and agency. We used our insight into the difference between intended and actual patterns of use to design appropriate, tailored

places for children to wait, play, meet and have informal interactions. We found that ideological contradictions existed in security and protection, perception and stigma, enclosure and openness, accountability and responsibility and surveillance and privacy. We constantly asked ourselves – What is a ‘Court House’? Do we cater for the 1% or 99% who affect our programmatic translation? To achieve balance between dichotomies we thoughtfully interrogated the nature of transitions, thresholds, symbolic representation and material assembly in creating a architectural vocabulary that strengthened the reliability of space for children. The resulting projects are a manifestation of the architect’s ability to re-establish core values and social meaning and to reflect community needs in all dimensions of architectural experience.

Nicholas Brennan Christopher Paul Malouf Lauren Sideris

Flora Ma Amy Beech-Allen Kah Mun Tham

Julia Wilson Melissa Chan


78

The Initiative

Amy Beech-Allen

The scheme explores a new courthouse typology that addresses the needs of adolescents and the wider community in the Newcastle region. Research has shown the importance of providing adolescents with opportunities for active participation in community based activities to aid the development of their sense of identity, feelings of self worth and place. Increased feelings of belonging within a community have been linked to a reduction in the rates of juvenile offending. The program incorporates a courthouse, community centre and an additional facility providing a range of support services including a 24hr short-term residency for adolescents and a free community clinic.

Email amy_beechallen@hotmail.com Phone 0434 392 337

A

In conjunction with the more formal program, the proposal explores the concept that social interaction is a measure of community. Key points of social interaction within the program, such as a public basketball court, amphitheatre and cafe act as catalysts to initiate the rehabilitation process in central Newcastle by activating the area. Through the integration of adolescents within the wider community, a symbiotic relationship can develop and a mutual rehabilitation can occur. The proposal works as a microcosm to support both the individual and collective in Newcastle, through the provision of social development and rehabilitation.


B

C

D

A. B. C. D.

Courthouse foyer adjacent to Hunter Street Section taken through residential bedrooms Perspective of community centre from King Street entry Spatial sequencing


80

Newcastle Children’s Courthouse – Gradated Justice

Nicholas Brennan

Newcastle Children’s Courthouse pays homage to an industrial past whilst embodying cutting edge concepts in the implementation of youth justice. The design proposition involves a courthouse based on the concept of a gradated justice system, where successive grades of intervention and mediation are utilised to combat youth crime and recidivism. This system calls for the creation of three tiers of ritual spaces, ranging from informal conference spaces, to intimate courtrooms and concluding with the formal courtroom. Through each stage variations in scale, volume, symbolism, formality, light and views are utilised to determine and express the differing nature of the roles each space plays. Ritual spaces are expressed as context based industrial forms, drawing inspiration from the coal silos and tanks that formed an integral part of

Email nick.brennan@me.com Phone 0438 300 327 URL www.nickbrennan.com.au A

Newcastle’s industrial heritage, and that are still in use nearby. The open and trafficable ground plane houses a cooperative supermarket, music shop, trainee restaurant and cafe. These commercial ventures are utilised in the scheme two fold. Firstly, they form integral parts of the action plans put in place by the court to help young offenders to reform and break the cycle of recidivism. Here young offenders gain valuable life skills under supervision of the courthouse community centre by servicing the public or working towards a qualification. Secondly, commercial ventures are utilised to reactivate the urban context of Burwood Street by enlivening the ground plane with increased pedestrian activity and acting as a plug-in catalyst for much needed urban renewal, redevelopment and rejuvenation.


B

C

A. Equality of arms - formal courtroom in the round B. Industrial forms housing courtrooms varying in hierarchical gradation C. Courtroom concept - blending International and Australian courtroom layouts


82

Newcastle Community Youth Outreach

Flora Ma

This project responds to contemporary trends in restorative justice by engaging marginalised youth with social community interaction to destigmatise and prevent recidivism of youth crime. In addition, these initiatives are paralleled as facilities for public amenity to further act as catalysts for urban change in Newcastle. The project strives to encompass a new city centre, an alternative path to justice and a sense of ‘place’ to explore by providing a one stop shop community centre to rehabilitate and divert youth crime. Key spaces include a community sports facility, a young offender run bicycle workshop and a series of

consultation and conferencing spaces for the informal resolution of low to medium severity community crimes. Furthermore, in response to the historic significance of the site, the proposal seeks to reestablish and re-activate Burwood Street as a key pedestrian link to the city, treating it as an important street frontage. Restorative ‘place’ setting is established by the reveal of spaces through movement and sequencing, where internal connections and views to identifiable city landmarks are used to create a dual sense of removal and connection, whilst also providing opportunity for incidental social interaction.

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Hunter Street entry foyer Ritual waiting space Birds eye perspective Process models


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Newcastle Children’s Courthouse - Accountability With Assistance

Christopher Paul Malouf

The design for the courthouse is based around the notion of ‘accountability with assistance’. It explores the restorative justice model and seeks not just to look at whose responsible for the crime but also searches for what’s accountable for it occurring within the community. Through the understanding that different children and age groups have different psychological states and sociological attachment issues, the design of the courthouse and the use of agency services, places the individual with the type of court process and ritual space best suited for the individuals needs and circumstance. It is through this action that the rethinking of the children’s courthouse experience is reflected into the design. The courthouse transforms into a place for the individual to explore, learn through experience and gain different social interactions with the community, the implied self-directed rehabilitation though awareness. It allows for the individual to be provided with choice, a voice and equality within the judicial system.

The open plaza beneath the whole courthouse utilises the haptic nature of architecture and materiality from the Newcastle context to transforms what the typical Australian courthouse is from one of exclusion to the selected user and evolves it into one of inclusion. Open views to entry and points of destination allows the individual time to make a decision, the extended threshold. The concept of the “core” with a “wrapping skin” is used to explore the incorporation of environmental technologies for ventilation, water collection and sunlight penetration, way finding for circulation and passive surveillance. Transforms architectures role from merely being a singular requirement of the “place” and expresses architectures ability to be a catalyst for discovery, exploration of personal knowledge, spiritual/physical sensitivity and social understanding beyond the physical and visual realms.

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King Street - Living symbol of community authority Mental Anxiety Courtroom - Ritual space transformations Burwood Street - Places of separation and activation Concept - Cores and the skin


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Re-thinking youth justice: Assisting the ‘cross-over’ kid

Lauren Sideris

The ‘cross-over’ kid constitutes 60% of dually represented youth in the justice system who often “slip through the cracks” due to unclear agency accountability. A history of maltreatment often manifests ‘a cycle of violence’ where children react against abuse with delinquent behaviour. The Hunter Street Youth Justice Center is thus conceptualized as an auxiliary ‘filter’ building to Newcastle Children’s Court that uses a needs assessment approach to identify these underlying and unnoticed problems contributing to juvenile crime. Programmatic decisions were made to ensure that no child is left behind and that every child is engaged at all stages of the justice journey. Hierarchical circulation and spatial volumes are punctuated by a symbolic transition space that communicates the significant move from justice conferencing to formal courtroom procedures. Other transition spaces

Email lauren_sideris@hotmail.com Phone 0418 489 433 URL www.laurensideris.com A

help mediate between the intimate and collective, the volatile and the insecure and separation and attachment. A healing, haptic-focused environment was required to support re-prioritisation of the child’s physical, psychological and physiological wellbeing. Rich sensory queues in the form of colour, light and materiality aid youth to develop cognitive memory and ownership to soften the unfamiliar and intimidating nature of the courthouse. The architecture is sculpted from site light and shadow patterns to track the passing of the day giving a vital radiance and sense of empathy to space. The result is a humanised architecture, which sets precedent for future attempts at reinstating the urban gestalt of Hunter Street through vibrant, socially appropriate and temporally enduring architecture.


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A. Section through agency, circulation and conferencing rooms B. Cross-over threshold C. Sally has her youth Mentor waiting at the entrance; Josh and his youth mentor in Court D. Study model of light conditions and massing

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Newcastle Children’s Court: The Notion of Play in a Place for Waiting

Kah Mun Tham

The majority of the time spent in a physical court building is engaged in waiting- as a result, courthouses become mere instruments that ‘process cases’ leading to the desensitisation of the user and the rituals associated with being in a courthouse. More often than not, it results in stress and anxiety that can and often manifest in dangerous behaviour. There is thus a need to alleviate but at the same time acknowledge the act of waiting. This is achieved by providing a restorative environment contrary to this anti-place: evoking a sense of play in the waiting room. This design desterilises the waiting room and facilitates play. Waiting becomes the main program throughout. Users of the court weave in and out of an inhabited wall which

Email kahmun.tham@gmail.com Phone 0406 331 938 A

reveals niches where different opportunities for waiting exist: reading, scribbling, music and media, play theatres and seating areas. Whilst the program for waiting in both care and crime courts may be similar, the passage of movement and the quality of these waiting rooms are slightly altered given that the two buildings are providing for different needs. The care court operates on a linear path, opening out into niches along the length of two main arterial corridors. There is a secondary circulating route moving upwards in the care space that allows continuation of program from one level to another. The crime court differs with a radial plan in which upon entry, reveals all the waiting spaces around that central point on each level.


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A. Section through Care building B. Section through Crime building C. Central gathering space between Care, Crime and Staff buildings D. Glass Atrium through building

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90

Intervention to Recovery – A One-Stop-Shop for Newcastle

Julia Wilson

Child abuse has been identified as a growing issue of significance in the Hunter Region. 75 percent of abused children are unable or unprepared to give evidence to police. Newcastle’s Care and Protection Centre will include all the services required to aid traumatised children involved in a child abuse case. A One-Stop-Shop solution allows these children to return to a familiar environment for each stage of the recovery process. Health services, legal services, agencies support and educational professionals will work together to provide the necessary environment and resources required to facilitate a supportive setting for child abuse victims. The centre will include a Paediatric Health Clinic which will improve access to health services for the wider community. Victims of abuse may be treated here before any necessary police interviews

are conducted and counselling and family court proceedings are undertaken all within in the same building. The stressful atmosphere will be managed through environmental intervention. This aligns with studies that show how connections to nature significantly reduce stress and promote healing. Each entry point is preceded by a preparation garden allowing participants to regulate their emotions before beginning their journey. Natural light and green connections inform the building’s design. Ritual spaces within the building including courts, family mediation rooms and patient rooms each have access to external green space. This allows people to remove themselves and regulate their emotions. The centre will assist abused and neglected children in all of the necessary stages from Intervention to Recovery.

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Preparation Garden Sky Garden for Emotional Release Hunter Street Facade Design Concept


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City of Parramatta Annex Integrated Centre for the Arts

Dr Paola Favaro Student Refletion

In his book, Look Listen Read, anthropologist Claude Levi-Strauss celebrates how visual, musical and literary artworks: ‘touch our essential humanity in a way that transcends nationality converging cultural differences into universal principles.’ Over the last decade the City of Parramatta has witnessed rapid economic growth. One of the oldest settlements in Australia, the city has become a place of cultural and economic significance, due mainly to its geographic location and demography. With approximately two million residents of metropolitan Sydney living west of Parramatta, the city can rightly lay claim to being the centre of Australia’s most populous city.

The final architectural projects for the Centre for the Arts expose the integration of the site of the Old King’s School with the urban context and the larger City of Parramatta. The school and its buildings are located along the Parramatta River, just south of St Patrick Cathedral.

(1) reflect critically on the urban morphological study of the City of Parramatta, its context and the actual site, as well as reassess specific ‘parti’ or organizing ideas and the embedded contents of specific precedents

Vanesa Molitorova Leslie Lam Vinayagamoorthy Sivasubramaniam Chiu Yin Chan Dee Lai Tahereh Samadi Lachlan Pierce Carolyn Cheung Shahab Karimi Thomas Chomer

(2) define a program for an overall masterplan in terms of architectural/ urban articulations (3) design a series of spaces for looking, listening and reading, which explore ways that architecture would modify and/or reinforce the nature of the existing heritage buildings of the Old King’s School (4) question creatively the proposition put by David Leatherbarrow: “Buildings can be dislocated from all forms of internal definition in favour of a shared topography.” David Leatherbarrow, Architecture Oriented Otherwise, 2009.


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Arts Annex – Parramatta Old King’s School

Vanesa Molitorova

As the Old King’s School in Parramatta has gone through many changes throughout its history dating back to the 1830s, when the site was first established by William Grant Broughton, throughout the last year the design concept for the new addition has morphed and developed to turn the now derelict site into an Arts Annex. With many of the buildings in such disrepair the original concept was to hollow them out to create courtyards and build a new structure around them. As the year progressed the concept changed to focus on gardens and creating differing gardens within the site that the public can experience as they move through. The overall form of the new building is based on the idea that the grass and earth around the old school

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has been sliced out and elevated below which the gallery spaces are contained. This extensive green roof flows around the buildings joining them together with two entrances into a primary and secondary building. The primary building contains the art gallery, the museum and library which are interconnected and people are free to move from one space to another once they have entered through the main gate and security point. The secondary building holds the auditorium and the recital rooms; a large garden forest acts as the entry to a private outdoor musical hall. The site currently is a forsaken eyesore and keeps the public out and the new arts annex would help activate the Northern area of the city of Parramatta.


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Garden entry to auditorium Main entry Gallery Space Gallery space looking into the reading garden


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Urban Edging through Solids and Transparency

Vinayagamoorthy Sivasubramaniam

Urban edging is the concept of blending a site aptly to the city where it is located, to an extent that the boundary between the city and the site will always remain fuzzy and never crisp. The buildings appended should not remain detached from the tradition, plan or the fundamental nature of the city. Since the urban environment is a contextual urban matrix of interaction through sharing of public space, it is important to take into account the larger environment as an entity rather than the site alone while visioning an architectural initiative in the urban environment. In my design proposal I have tried to incorporate this concept to integrate the new with the old. Also, like explained before, I have strictly followed the grid system which already is existing in the city. Urban edging makes sure that the building doesn’t act as a standalone facility in the bigger environment of the city but blend with the plan of the city enhancing the worth of the city as well as the site.

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Night View Model View Art Gallery Lobby Integration of contemporary architecture with the Historic building.

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The Old in New, The New from Old

Chiu Yin Wilson Chan

Architecture conveyed not only the image of the architect, but also the memories of the history which contributed to the construction of the present. It is essential to preserve the past instead of simply replacing the monument. The ideas of the Annex Centre is to integrate the modern architecture to the existing structure in order to bring a new life to the Old King’s School Site. The existing fabric will be refocused by the new adaptation, while the new intervention will be incorporated with a series of insertion to the original framework. The integration between the old and new will provide a clear circulation rhythm across the structure as well as the interlocking manner between different functional programs. As a result, the heritage building will be ingeniously reused for different purposes.

Email Chanchiuyinwilson@gmail.com Phone 0433 884 292 +852 6254 1956 A

The value of the existing fabric should be refurbished from the monumental facade to each construction pillar. The design approach is to preserve the original structure as much as possible and give each of them a new function according to the three main programs: the Art Galleries, the Library and the Auditorium. Through the transformation of the heritage, the visitors can re-gain the new vision of the historical building and the new layer of design will respect the original layout without losing the aesthetic of the existing brick structure. The idea is to re-emerge the historical monument with a new version of Old King’s School, which can reminds the visitors with the past.


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Sectional Perspective for the Art Gallery Annotated Roof Plan Parramatta Annex Centre Initial Sketches

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100

Up-lifting the City of Parramatta Public Forum

Minoo Samadi

In today’s society in which the political and economic landscape weaken the human relationship with art and threat the sense of creativity, the idea is to create a place in which people and art can come together, a place where artists meet the public and public becomes creative. To achieve this, the new Annex becomes a place for entertainment rather than being conventionally a place for exhibiting objects that have lost their social, religion and public function. This sense of togetherness also enables the society to combat issues related to cultural differences and move toward a more homogeneous society. As a result, concepts of flux, rigidity versus fluidity and hierarchical versus non-hierarchical have been considered during the design process. Further, the notion of movement and experience within

Email Minoo_samadi@hotmail.com Phone 0405 939 304 A

a space as well as the emphasis on boundary-less architecture and the sense of up-lifting freedom became the prime aspects of the new Centre for the Arts. Besides, considering the heritage sensitivity of the site and its strong link to the past, further investigation in approaching such a project was conducted. Digging into the history of the site and revealing the underlying layers of the past upon which the present life flows, became the cornerstone of the design proposition and emergence of this new architecture, an architecture which not only draws people closer together but also demonstrates the history of the land on which it stands. The palimpsest concept as the ‘writing upon the past’ was adopted during the design process to link the past to the present.


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Sectional Model .the new and the old relationship. Model of Proposal. Parramatta Old King’s School Proposal. Hand sketch. Bird’s view of the site

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Parramatta Annex

Lachlan Pierce

The first consideration of this project was the heritage value of the site. As a result it has been deemed necessary that certain buildings be knocked down to ensure that both the cultural significance of the site can be celebrated as well as provide an Annex for the people of Parramatta. What is proposed is a restoration of parts the Old Kings School with the inclusion of new buildings bringing life to what is currently a neglected pocket of Parramatta. In addition to the restorations new works and a public square will be included. This square will become a major focus of the site and activate the buildings that form its boundary. The new additions consist of an art gallery and concert space while other arms of the annex will be accommodated

Email l.pierce@student.canberra.edu.au Phone 0414 215 585

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through adaptive re-use of existing buildings surrounding the square. The design focuses on three main principals that are needed to revive this precinct, continuity, quality and curiosity. A continuity of form is provided though a series of gateway canopies that unites an otherwise disjointed building typology. A quality viewing experience is achieved in the new art gallery which has an integrated natural lighting system and customizable wall system to allow for a consistent light quality within an infinite choice of layouts. The underground music auditorium has a minimal intrusion to the existing fabric as it will be located under ground and will create curiosity as it will appear to be carved from the earth.


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A. Sketch of shelter structure B. Context of heritage site in Parramatta C. Render underground foyer space


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From Picturesque Principles to Contemporary Architecture Transformations

Carolyn Cheung

In response to the significant role that the heritage buildings of the Old King’s School has played for the early European settlers and to the contribution that the entire site and its main oval have made to the picturesque principles of the Australian 18th and 19th centuries landscape, the transformation of the Old King’s School site proposes to: (1) maintain most of the original appearance of the heritage buildings and the oval as reminiscence of a typical historical development sited on the brow of a hill overlooking sloping land bordering a river (2) modify the interior spaces and adapt them to the new program with an innovative interior/exterior circulation

(3) connect local residents as well as national and international visitors from diverse cultural backgrounds through the universal visual, musical and literary languages of the program (4) extend the oval towards the northern part of the site through the repetition of sunken and risen lawns, which follow the solid/void figure ground pattern established by the heritage buildings, aiming to direct people circulating throughout the site in a gentle manner (5) introduce a new diagonal axis through the site as a viewing platform that celebrates the view towards the Parramatta River, the Old Government House within the Parramatta Park and the City behind with the aim of diminishing the absolute boundary between the south (old) and north (new) parts of the City of Parramatta.

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Concept models – Mat Landscape and the new axis Sectional model of art gallery Ground floor master plan with circulation flow Overall view from Marsden Street


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Parramatta Annex Art Centre

Shahab Karimi

The existing Old Kings School site has become a large dead space over the years and is located in the heart of Parramatta. From numerous site visits and site analyses it became my goal to activate the site by creating an urban place for the public. The proposed urban place connects the site from North to South and from East to West. The East to West connection of the site provides access from O’Connell St into the urban place, through to St Patrick’s Church and onto Church St. The North to South connection plays a vital role in the activation of the riverside as the natural topography of the site invites the public to the river. It also determines the boundary of the urban place due to the line of existing buildings such as St. Patricks church and its neighbouring buildings.

Email sh.k8264@gmail.com Phone 0416 192 874 A

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Marsden Road has been transformed into a pedestrian walkway into the urban place, creating a strong connection from the Southern side of the river, resulting in a connection with Alfred park to the urban place. These connections play an essential role in the activation of the site since it originally had a long fenced off frontage along O’Connell St with a lost entrance, it blocked off access to its surrounding streets and the riverside had become an uninviting place due to the over growth of trees and plants and aged boardwalks. With this proposal the site’s issues have been effectively solved due to appropriate axis of pathways, large frontage with various points of entry, activated riverside recreational walkways and large central green space.


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View from urban place to library Exploded axonometric of art centre Various views from interior and urban place Freehand sketch


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Connection

Thomas Chomer

Project Description: The continuity/ discontinuity between the urban elements is the essential requirement for forming a city’s abundant image, which interestingly links all elements together on a morphological, social and historical level and make the whole urban fabric continuous. The project intends to clearly respond to that concept by considering three mains aspect the landscape (morphological), the monument (historic) and the program (social). The program refers to the combination of activities which produce space and movement. The monument refers to the spectacular quality, the edifying aspect

Email ThomasChomer@hotmail.fr Phone 0424 699 041 A

that is promoted by fine arts culture and through which an edifice imposes an idea such as the program. The landscape takes place as a bond by connecting the urban environment. By lifting the building of the ground, it created a covered public plaza linking two level of urban environment (river and city) which offers strong connection at an urban scale as transitional and static dynamic in term of pedestrian movement. This urban gesture rather than architectural improve the building access making the building threshold very clear and increase the monumentality of the building.


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Perspective, built form, historical connection Perspective, Covered plaza, urban connection Sketch, building connected to landscape Perspective, Interior space, light connection

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Multi-Functional Building for the La Perouse Local Aboriginal Land Council (LPLALC) Architecture Ethics Aesthetics

Andrew Macklin

Students designed a new multi-purpose headquarters for the La Perouse Local Aboriginal Land Council (LPLALC), currently at Yarra Bay House, which included reception, offices, boardrooms, a gallery and café, a community space with industrial kitchen, the youth haven with recreation rooms and classroom and an outdoor amphitheater. The course explored 4 key areas: aboriginality, green theory, the site context and sustainability. The strong spiritual and ecological relationship that Koori people have traditionally had with nature through the ‘Law’ was crosspollinated with green theories - Gainism, permaculture, ecopheneomenology or the global justice movement - to expand the role of architecture to how it can address functional requirements while simultaneously empowering the aboriginal community and respecting the rights of nature. In first semester students formulated their designs

by developing a series of ethical principles informed by aboriginality and green theory interwoven with passive architecture principles – orientation, thermal mass or solar panels. In second semester they designed the building using hand-made highly material models using the body and physical thinking as the source of ideas. Hence there was a stress on structure, materials and tectonics and on developing a philosophy of detailing. By engaging with issues such as indigenous rights or earth justice I hope my students understand the political and ideological dimensions of architecture and their ability as designers to create buildings where ethical influences orient design and aesthetic decisions. Importantly, I also hope in this era of global warming inflamed by global capitalism they go forward and practice architecture with empathy, humanity, care and respect for both their clients and the earth.

Student Refletion

The design of a multi-purpose community building for the La Perouse Local Aboriginal Land Council provided the studio with an opportunity to question our own ethical positions on architecture. Beginning with an in depth investigation of aboriginal spirituality and ecological theory, we carried through these ideas into the manifestation of physical forms driven by our own understanding of ethical architecture and philosophy’s of detailing. Through an emphasis upon haptic design we transitioned from research into the construction of archetypal forms, generated from our own philosophical positions. In an attempt to move beyond the jargon of sustainability we sought to create designs that embedded a phenomenological connection with ones surroundings. We questioned why and how we build, discovering that architecture is not a static entity, but rather an opportunity for kinetic interaction with people and the environment.

As a community center for an Indigenous population, we were able to borrow from thousands of years of culture in harmony with the land and re-contextualise principles such as intergenerational learning and stewardship for the land into a contemporary form. The brief also allowed us to explore how a building may empower a community through identity, education and interaction, providing opportunity for integration within the wider social and ecological fabric of the area. The nature of Andrews teaching has provided all of us with the opportunity to engage in critical thought and as such discover our own philosophy of self. As a studio we willingly collaborated and shared ideas, fostering a sense of community that we may hopefully bring to future architectural endeavors.

Dean Chivas Daina Cunningham Nicole Cusack Yammie Ho

Janice Jiang Mansoor Khan Jed Long Kristi Neou

Patricija Novosel Nicola Thorogood Shasha Wang


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“A Justified Permanence�

Dean Chivas

The design draws upon research precedent studies into the vernacular rice barns of Thailand, which deliberately expose and celebrate structural composition. An analysis which resonated with the simple yet extremely effective sustainable credentials of the Indigenous community of La Perouse we are designing for. An interplay of a justified permanence with a floating timber structure forms a pivotal component of the design proposition. It presents a scheme that is devoid of literal analogies, instead embodying the outlook of its inhabitants through a connection with the land and nature. The idea of permanence stems from the Indigenous community that lived on this site uninterrupted for thousands of years prior to colonisation in 1788. They have a deep connection with this land and this is explored in the design through

Email dchivas89@hotmail.com Phone 0434 930 502

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heavy precast concrete forms which will anchor both the building and community to the site. Indigenous vernacular architecture is explored with a light, floating timber structure that integrates nature with enclosure and embodies a proud community. Involving unskilled labour from the Indigenous community will involve, educate and empower throughout the construction process and necessitates a high degree of sophisticated rationalisation in design and detailing. Drawing from local and precast materiality will provide a mergence of contemporary construction with a sensibility and tactility that characterises this community. A community building designed from ethical principles that consider for life cycle and work collaboratively with nature to empower, educate and embody its inhabitants to enrich daily life.


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site massing and orientation open air community pavilion north facade and entry perspective perable office awning and louvre system

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114

Building a Communicative Landscape

Daina Cunningham

During my research into the design for a hybrid office and community building for the La Perouse Local Aboriginal Land Council, I have learned that architecture is a powerful tool in enabling people and communities and I have learned how necessary it is to be aware of the situation, culture and workings of the communities you design for and with. Therefore, in order to empower communities through design it is integral that the design is kinetic, adaptable and appropriate. Thus, my project is based on creating connections and engaging interaction between people, the building, and the surrounding landscape.

Email daina.cunningham@gmail.com Phone 0413 172 091 A

In addition, this Aboriginal community will be empowered through their involvement in the construction and finishing of different construction elements as well as the provision of permaculture gardens, including kitchen gardens, medicinal gardens and men’s, women’s and youth areas, allowing the organisation and community to be self-sufficient, thus enhancing their positive identity. This idea of empowerment is further explored through additional spaces such as a cafe, allowing an additional source of income as well as providing a source of local employment and developing interaction with the broader community.


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Land Council and Guriwal Offices Site context Central courtyard and north facade of offices Sketch concept of community entrance


116

LPLALC Multipurpose Project

Nicole Cusack

Designed for the La Perouse Local Aboriginal Land Council, this multipurpose project extends not only to the organizations currently working at Yarra Bay House, but the entire local Indigenous community. After research into Aboriginality, site analysis and green theory as well as the marine history of Yarra Bay, the overall theme for the project has developed into the idea of a ‘vessel for change’ and self sufficiency. Connection to land is an important part of Aboriginality, expressed in the way the buildings flow with the sloping site. The series of buildings are connected by wraparound verandahs and elevated walkways that weave around and through gardens. Emphasising the idea of community, the project can be seen as a ‘village’ growing over time that is built by and for the people in the spirit of bush carpentry; educating local people with construction skills for

Email ntcusack@gmail.com URL www.creativitycaptured.tumblr.com

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self-empowerment. The buildings have been organized according to degrees of privacy and functionality into 3 key areas of activity: community, office + commercial. Flexibility of the building fabric blurs the threshold between interior and exterior with sliding walls enabling spaces to be opened up entirely for community events. The roof can be seen as a layered canopy, altered depending on the season to bring natural and diffuse light into spaces. A philosophy of detailing has been emphasised through phenomenology in modelmaking as a way of developing structure; reiterating the idea that simple details can be learnt and shared as intergenerational knowledge within the community for its future growth.


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model section through bathroom + communal kitchen detail sectional model revealing the primary structural system aerial view of the site with proposed design sketch looking north from the sacred site


118

Channelling of Culture

Yammie Hoi Yan Ho

The heart of my design for the La Perouse Local Aboriginal Land Council studio is to integrate architecture with the landscape on a beautiful promontory site. My approach elaborates the Aboriginal eco-spiritual tenet of the ‘Law’ - people, flora, fauna and land are interrelated and interconnected. The two linear pavilions cluster along the ridgeline stepping into the natural topography to minimize the impact of the building on the site. A central courtyard and deck form the spine of the design connecting two pavilions. With the operable walls and sliding doors, the pavilions open onto the courtyard, seamlessly channelling the flow of culture, people , air, water and light, merging humans with the elements of the earth.

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Community hall open to landscape Central spine channelling element s of earth Model of community hall Sketch to explore \integration of architecture to landscape

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120

Multipurpose building for LALPLC (La Perouse Local Aboriginal Land Council)

Mansoor Khan

Designing for LPLALC was a great challenge and learning for me. This whole year was a journey of finding problems, solutions and their applications and most important the achievements. I approached this project by understanding the aboriginality and spirituality then finding a strong connection between them. The challenge was me to show the connotation of Aboriginality + Spirituality in my design. After understanding the significance of Aboriginal culture my building is based on two key design rudiments. PROTECT + FLOW. The word protect comes from the aboriginal history of vernacular architecture. The time when they start protecting themselves from natural weather conditions and built simple shelters. In my design the key design idea Protect is not only a shelter against

Email mansoorkhan14@hotmail.com Phone 0411 835 274 A

weather conditions, but its more about protecting a culture by designing a place which enhance the interaction of community. A place which empowers the old generation to transfer and share their cultural responsibilities, a responsibility towards nature and other human beings and dreamtime stories to young generation. A place which also welcomes others communities to learn about Aboriginal culture and interact with each other. The main focus of my building is self sufficient design and is based on a design principle Flow. Considering the annually amount of rainfall in La Perouse challenges me to design a building to catch and use the rainwater. In my design the big steel roof plates grasp the rainwater and drains through exposed water channels for direct harvesting and in rainwater tanks.


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Master plan relationship with site contours Conceptual Sketches impressions Real proposed material sectional relief Detail internal planning of one main part of design

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122

Architecture Ethics Aesthetics

Jed Long

The white settlement of Australia two centuries ago caused drastic and irreversible damage to a culture that had existed sustainably on this land for thousands of years. Our studio provided the opportunity to explore how colonial intervention has shaped contemporary Indigenous culture. My design for the La Perouse Local Aboriginal Land Council is centred on the idea of hybridity drawing upon the vernacular knowledge of Indigenous society and recontextualising it for a contemporary urban population. The result is a highly material building that will age and change, yet also has the strength and flexibility to ensure that it will remain a relevant piece of infrastructure for the local community for many years.

Email Jed_llong@hotmail.com Phone 0416 066 858 URL http://www.caveurban.com

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Its design is derived from the spatial layouts of Indigenous campsite, in particular focusing upon the notion of shelter; from the sun and from the wind. My buildings seek to reinterpret the idea of a tree as a place of shade and a screen as a mitigation of wind, into a contemporary form that will form part of a larger ecological system. Through a series of models, I have been able to examine both the macro and micro spatial and ecological relationships of the site and the building, which has allowed for a clearly defined hierarchy of form that seeks to engage with the microclimatic and social conditions of our site.


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Sectional model through office space Section through community space Central Bunggul with surrounding buildings Shade and shelter


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LPLALC Multi-Purpose Building

Kristi Maree Neou

This design proposal features a multipurpose building for the La Perouse Local Aboriginal Land Council (LPLALC). The key idea for this project is that we are designing for the Aboriginal community ñ a group of people that has suffered over 200 years of endemic racism and continues to fight for their land rights. This design has arisen from the notion of INCLUSION ñ opposing the idea of exclusion which is inherent in todayís society as a result of corporate capitalism. This design aims to include nature, relocalise the site and empower the people. The notion of organic architecture is extrapolated through the pure essence of form ñ the curvilinear copper roof used as a rainwater harvesting device and exposed glulam timber beam structure. The intention of this project is to create a self-sufficient building as well reharmonise

Email kristi.neou@gmail.com Phone 0404 902 172 A

the site through the unity and inclusion of people, nature and architecture through ethics, sustainable principles and Aboriginal identity. The building project consists of 4 structural entities that create a dialogue through physical form ñ the repetitive roof structure and alternating rammed earth wall and corten steel panel system. The operable louver systems and manually operated canvas screens engage users with the building asserting a level of control over the building creating empowerment. To create a sense of the inclusion the building is seen as a didactic device able to open up and become kinetic ñ architecture is more than just producing static structures with a signature; they hold the ability and responsibility to teach and translate a sustainable way of life employed by Aboriginal people over thousands of years.


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1:200 Context Model North Face of Office Building 1:50 Detailed Model Sketch of Office Building


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LPLALC Office and Community Building

Patricija Novosel

The building for the La Perouse Local Aboriginal Land Council is a multifunctional building is located on a site that houses one of the oldest Aboriginal groups. The design integrates offices, community and social spaces and nature. The idea of passing on knowledge has always been important in Aboriginal culture. In this project, knowledge is passed onto its users as they interact with the building. This is achieved through the building process itself. Mudbrick walls are built by the local unskilled people and are an opportunity for the community to directly influence design decisions and give the building a deeply rooted identity. The process contributes to bringing the community together and will be a great reconciliation exercise. The structural system used also addresses the communal nature of

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this complex. The timber frame system used enables an open plan design, facilitating interaction. The space can be closed off in smaller bays, according to the rhythm of the structure. The landscape is designed using elements that emphasize the importance of taking care of land. The upkeep of the permaculture garden will educate people about principles of caring. Selling the produce from the garden, running the cafe and selling handicrafts will bring in revenue and promote self-reliance. Furthermore the building is self-sufficient in an ecological way - through harvesting solar energy and using rainwater. This building is seen as a mediator of a 200 year old and still ongoing Aboriginal struggle. It attempts to help enhance the self-respect, identity and pride of the indigenous community.


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Perspective Site model Ground floor plan Concept sketch


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La Perouse Local Aboriginal Land Council Multi-Purpose Buildings

Nicola Thorogood

This course has deepened my philosophy to make architecture important to people and place. My design for the La Perouse Local Aboriginal Land Council hopes to fulfil the needs of the community and enhance the connection to the land. The layout of individual shelters and campsites in aboriginal cultures has always been a response to their kinship and behaviour patterns. The layout of these buildings is also dictated by usage, connection and hierarchy. It is intended as a community of buildings that follow the topography and form an appropriate complex for the LPLALC. This complex uses a modern steel structure and natural materials of sandstone and timber creating a light, open and spacious architecture which embraces the views of the ocean and landscape as well as incorporating passive design principles and sustainable practices.

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Cantilever roofs allow for shelter and shading, transitional spaces for people to gather inside and outside feeling the sun and wind on their skin. The regeneration of the landscape also plays an important part in the design. Endangered ecological communities as well as indigenous and native species will be planted. A permaculture garden will help promote the importance of health and sustainability and bring the community together. The Bush Tucker Trail will be extended up the site and assist the Guriwal Corporation’s initiative to pass on traditional knowledge to the youth and wider community. Themes of community and connection are expressed throughout this design.


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Building Sketches LPLALC Complex Office Interior Perspective 1:50 Model of Office Building


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Multi-Functional Building for the La Perouse Local Aboriginal Land Council

Shasha Wang

I have designed a hybrid building for the La Perouse Local Aboriginal Land Council (LPLALC) which includes offices, a youth and elder heaven, community kitchen, café and entertainment spaces. The building is designed around the idea of ‘community’ via a plan that consists of three separate buildings connected by continuous corridors which merge with courtyards to embrace the natural scenery. The building is quite open, designed to give views of the charming bays nearby and the Banksia woods through numerous windows and the openness of some external walls which bring landscape into the interior. The planning of the building continues the theme of openness through internal communication spaces that extend

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to outdoor decks generating places for people to flow to, sit and talk together. My design has many sustainable characteristics. First is the choice of materials exemplified by the internal walls of rammed earth with their high thermal mass. Second is the double roof structure – a monitor roof on a gable - which induces stack effect to influence temperature. Third is the roof with its skylights which flood the building in natural light. Solar panels and rainwater collection are also included to save energy. Ultimately, I hope my building provides a place for the aboriginal community to come together and coexist with each other and the land in harmonious ways.


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site plan entrance typical pattern sketch of typical pattern


132

Lounges of Leisure: Investigations into High Density Urban Prototypes.

Ivan Ip Student Refletion

The intent of this studio was to generate a diverse range of solutions that addressed the challenge of Sydney’s aspiration to maintain its status as a Globally Competitive and Innovative City. Owing to the high value of land in our cities, population and other urban pressures, it is a valid argument to assert that it is no longer possible to construct built form which serves a single purpose or to create buildings, disconnected from our cities. The premise for this studio was to challenge the current notion of the city office tower and related work environments as autonomous locations of transactional paid employment. Research undertaken by students focused on the design of high density tower types and their potential to provide linkages to other more diverse uses that directly affect the wellbeing of the population such as cultural centres, entertainment media and forums for public opinion. The studio looked both locally and abroad with design studies focussed upon projects completed in

Australia, Europe and Asia to assist in understanding solutions proposed to similar problems around the globe. Through this research stream, students were encouraged to conclude upon their own findings on the topics of Home, Work and Leisure in an Australian context and integrate these results into their own studio projects. The student work draws together four key strands of architectural design: High Density, Connectivity, Work and Leisure. Their challenge was to re-imagine the vertical tower typology as an architectural proposition capable of supporting a number of diverse programmatic functions with a clear focus on enhanced user connectivity and greater social inclusion. The studio sought to generate a range of solutions that address the challenge of Sydney’s aspiration to maintain its status as a Globally Competitive and Innovative City.

The studio was an opportunity to explore the hybrid, high-rise typology on a site at the fringe of Sydney CBD, in close proximity to The Rocks, adjacent to Cahill Expressway. It’s prominence from a number of vistas – from George St, from Circular Quay, and from the Harbour Bridge, as well as its identity as an in-between site gave rise to diverse responses and wide topics of research. The exploration of the hybrid type also offered us flexibility and choice in determining the program, as justified by our individual lines of research. The technical aspects specific to high-rise buildings, including high-rise structure, lift strategies, services and ESD (Ecologically Sustainable Development) added to the challenge of the task. Whilst the challenge was immense, we believe that high-rise buildings will be increasingly relevant to more cities around the world in the future, making it a worthwhile and rewarding topic of study and design.

Daniel Shin Kai Ming Wong Jin Soon Ng Nicola Kwong Winnie Sheung Andy YH Tsui Marieta Ng Bruce Lam Ellen Zhu Chung Yan Joel Cheuk


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The Urban Hybrid

Daniel Shin

Sydney is subject to constant changes and challenges that many large cities experience around the world such as of population growth, economic development, globalization, sustainability and urban sprawl. Studying these issues from a greater urban perspective and magnifying into the subject site can provide impetus for a design solution to meet the broad demands of Sydney. The proposal as a vertical high density hybrid solution focuses on several core public and private programmatic precincts; cultural, commercial and residential in response to the larger urban context and the directly surrounding CBD.

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The sustainable hybrid design proposal attempts to address the current and future needs of Sydney faced with an increasing population, employment demands and new venues for cultural activities. The hybrid design provides a centre in the global arc of Sydney a high density solution for commerce, residential, cultural/social activities and innovation allowing contribution to a stronger economy for competing with other major cities at a world stage.


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A. The site on a stepped landscape urban park. B. Connection the city and public realm. C. Office tower interior.


136

CONTRA – Proximity of Difference

Kai Ming Wong

Situated prominently on George St at the edge of Sydney CBD, Circular Quay and The Rocks, the project re-evaluates the hybrid high-rise typology in a local context. In the global race for iconic, hybrid buildings towards more enduring futures, a common approach is to amalgamate disparate program into a singular structure that operate as a self-sustaining entity. In high density cities, this approach alleviates heavily congested streets with active, internal environments. However, it is ill-suited to Sydney. Sydney is characterised by our proximity to water, views and sunlight. The internalisation of human activity in monolithic hybrids would deteriorate street-life, solar access and vistas. Instead of singular and independent, the project proposes a hybrid typology that is multiple and interdependent. Responding to a North-South street axis, solar orientation and historic fine-grain

street patterns, the overall program of office, hotel, ballroom, sports hall, aquatic centre, cafes, bars, restaurants, artist studios and gallery is pulled apart and distributed in distinct, linked volumes. Programmatic mixing is concentrated at the podium, ‘thickening’ the ground plane instead of distributing public space vertically. The interconnections necessary in vibrant contemporary cities are reflected in tower volumes which are separate yet interdependent programmatically and structurally. At the in-between space, movement between buildings is amplified and exposed; spaces of private interaction are externalised, creating a vertical assemblage of human activity as an active backdrop to street-life. The project recognises the city as a network of interdependencies between people, organisations, buildings, manifested in architecture.

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Design strategy Podium from George St Tower from George St Tower volumes from Circular Quay


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City2

Jin Soon Ng

Public life and vertical living are two conditions which are often disengaged and read as separate and distinct from one another in urban environments, such is the result of the disconnection inhabitants of conventional skyscrapers experience to the ground plane, and to a larger extent street life. The project seeks to question and challenge the ‘Podium + Tower’ typology in skyscrapers and its relevance in a changing society and changing urban structure. The highly efficient ‘extruded

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floor plate’ skyscrapers we have today are designed for and therefore only encourage mono functionality on and above our city streets. Explorations into program hybridity as well as the accommodation and expression of the public realm in the city’s vertical domain through elevated streets and micro parks which lift the public domain from the single dimensionality of the ground plane, serve as tools for city regeneration which identify possible future conditions for the urban skyscraper.


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Boundary along Cahill Expressway Elevated Street condition Urban Fringe condition Pockets in suspension


140

M Precinct

Nicola Kwong

The Mediatheque Hybrid Precinct activates the arts and cultural ribbon of Sydney to celebrate urban ‘vivacity and dynamism’ in the interactive media landscape. The diverse programmatic mappings and contours across George Street is folded vertically across the site. This forms a dissolution of boundaries from ‘The Rocks’ the ‘City’. The vertical folding of mixed diverse communities are interspersed with interlocking terrace residences, recreation, boutique hotel and commercial programs above the interactive Mediatheque Plaza and Parklands landscape. Occupants interact like fields of pixels in this digital centre to form active,

day and night nodes with of distinctive cultural identity. Urban connectivity and interaction is fused with the wider streetscape, and internally though the series of vertical courtyards between the interlinked programs. The sustainable precinct merges technology, culture with urban farming, trigeneration and water treatment systems to function as a collective whole. New cultural and spatial typologies of leisure, work and living spaces blur the boundaries between inside and outside through the series of carved courtyards from the folded landscape facade, which celebrates views of the harbour and Sydney’s outdoor lifestyle.

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Interlocking terrace residential section Folding Hybrid across The Rocks to City View from Circular Quay and Mediatheque plaza Interior of Mediatheque gallery


142

Hybrid: Inviration

Winnie Wing Ning Sheung

City of Sydney is now facing a situation of social disconnection. There is a lack of interaction between people and imbalance of daily activities (working and traveling occupy a large proportion within a day). Therefore hybrid building is proposed to apply multi- function in order to satisfy and balance people’s daily activities which aimed to reactivate the City of Sydney with life. Locating at the boundary of Circular quay (CBD) and the Rocks, people on the site receives an extreme difference of street and walking pattern, mood, and environment from two distract- Tense and relax, dense and open, fast and

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slow. The aim of the development is to reactivate city with life by introducing the living pattern and atmosphere on the Rocks to the CBD. Slowing down the pace of working people, so that they can stop and make contact with their surroundings. Enjoyable and relax working environment bring higher productivity.


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Merging the Rocks street environment into city hybrid Share void garden as a backyard of work space George Street major entrance Zig – zag circulation in responds to landscape

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144

A Hybrid Metropolitan Prototype

Andy Yat Hang Tsui

In the 20th century the urban development that it looked like endless, some used-tobe architectural marvels have now seen as too enormous, too far apart and too much consumption of resources. Like many well developed global metropolis of today, the Sydney City has a plentiful traces of urban spaces and architectural marvels developed from the last century. Despite some of the good urban spaces and symbolic skyscrapers that once had supplied quality commercial spaces, it is easy to find residues of underused spaces that, while the ecosystem of economy changes through time, are neglected and let alone harming the city’s social and economic sustainability. This project aims to explore an urban prototype that opposes the conventional model of enclosed “podium�

development by achieving a coherent urban mix which belongs to the city. It aims to reconcile the relationship of the two strata, the ground floor interface and the inevitable soaring vertical tower. On the ground, when reconsidering the human interface where the public enter the site, there can be a direct reference to the adjacent The Rocks site where it contains the spontaneous historical fabric - we are to create a hybrid ground plane that consist of small and open structure that selflessly and seamlessly integrate the urban fabric which it belongs to. Therefore, in the air, with the help of piloti, vertical development in any shape, any height and whatever scale can be raised at any heights to achieve optimum intimacy to collage a high density urban landscape.

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The collage of a high density prototype. A liberated ground plaza of heterogenous mix. Sectional perspective. Perception of urban landscape intimacy.


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Lounges of Leisure

Qiujing Ellen Zhu

Hybrid is believed to be opened up to the city and encouraged contact among strangers, intensified land use, densifying relationships and left room for indetermination. (Aurora Fernandz Per) A variety of programs is proposed which are designed for not only the inhabitants on site, but also the visitors to enhance the interactions of different communities. An inner street is addressed to avoid the heavy flow on George Street, offering occupants a safer and more relaxing living/working environment.

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The building’s form is sculpted to respond to its surroundings; maximising the iconic views of Sydney harbor available from all the floors. The open floor plate maximizes connectivity and views, while locating the cores where views are constricted. The double-skin façade system is designed to enhance the building’s geometry and respond to natural ventilation, reducing heat load without losing views. Initiatives to reduce energy demand, to increase the indoor working/living quality of the building, and to minimize environmental impact were incorporated from the outset.


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Working model Detail Section for Office Main Entrance from George St. Building Hand sketch

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148

Ubiquitous Cities

Dr M. Hank Haeusler

The studio investigated as an overall theme the idea and principles of a ubiquitous city (U-City) [1]. The aim of this approach was in preparing students for the changes and challenges of a 21st century city where, as outlined in The Economists magazines special report on smart systems, “The physical and the virtual worlds are converging, thanks to the proliferation of sensors, ubiquitous wireless networks and clever analytics software. Increasingly there will be two interconnected worlds: the real one and the digital reflection... and “Smart cities”, in which more and more systems are connected, are multiplying... the number of [smart] applications is vast. Yet the most promising field for now may be physical infrastructures” [2]. Using the first semester of the Master studio for an extensive research in smart systems the students focused particularly on one of the following three projects:

Project 1: Responsive transport environments: spatial and visual user information technologies to allow improved passenger flow and a better customer experience. Project 2: New forms of community engagement: Bringing old and new developments together by informing citizens through digital technology and game environments about change and development in their neighbourhood. Project 3: Digital facades on public car parks: a revenue strategy for establishing bicycle hubs in car parks to support cyclists working in small to medium enterprises with bicycle related facilities. The outcomes of the studio are first steps of using digital technology as a design enabler for an Australian context to merge physical and virtual worlds.

[1] Ho Lee, Sang (2009): Ubiquitous City – Future of City, City of Future; IACF of Hanbat National University, Korea. [2] Economist Magazine (2010) It’s a smart world. Special report on smart systems. November 6th 2010.

Ying Ying Chang Kevin Cheung Shari Cheung Yee Ling (Elaine) Chow Hossein Gholami Yau Wai (Thomas) Leung Tran Thien Toan Ngo Reihaneh Pourhamedani Siok Hong Yap Wilson Yiu Fai Cheung Muhamad Hanafi Rahmat


149 Under the tutorage of Dr Matthias Haeusler, these questions were raised and formed very effectively. Moreover, his attention to group punctuality and realistic expectation have levitated much of the unnecessary burdens on typical graduation studios, and as a result, we were able to complete a much more substantial amount of work than it would be otherwise possible. The group atmosphere was very unified considering the diverse arrays of research areas and building typologies that each of the members of the groups have been pursuing, and that was not without the help of a well-structured studio programme which we organised ourselves upon. This studio is unreservedly amongst the best in my student career.

Student Refletion

Ubiquitous City, as a graduation studio, has been a challenging and rewarding course to conclude my five years architectural studies in UNSW. The topics and issues presented to us were challenging enough to be stimulating and current enough to be relevant to the studio members. For their currency and stimulation, the process we went through has been, in my opinion, both enjoyable and educative. The studio serves to not merely testing our architectural competence to be a graduate architect, but also raised in us questions about future directions and working philosophy, the areas that we as newly graduated members of the profession have to think long and hard, and most likely to wrestle with repeatedly in our professional career.


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Ubiquitous City - Re-Cycling Carpark

Tran Thien Toan Ngo

We are now at new transportation threshold, and unlike those before, this time we can expect the reverse effect of the previous threshold, of the the sustainable revolution, which brought about a renewed interest in less “intensive” mode of transportation. As a result, the aim of this research project is directed at envisaging a new form of urban hubs for the new mindset of urban dwellers in 21st century Sydney. It focuses on the conversion of carpark to bicycle parking as the main catalyst to achieve this aim. There were three main areas of concern in the project: Economic Viability, Environmental Sustainability and Social Appropriability. The façade of the building is the most important element for this project as it was

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the catalyst that prompts for the conversion in the first place. It has to be able to handle multiple purposes such as reduce power consumption, advertisement, drawing attraction and creating a piece of urban attraction. The building it self seeks to create an urban space and encourage a culture of doing rather than buying. The design obeys the existing structural constraints of the building to maximise its potentials, allowing for the creation of communality through the use of open space and ramps at the central light well. It is as much a device for light harvest as it is a vertical extension of the ground floor concourse, the kind of space where visual and audial ambiences are those of civic quality.


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The Concourse The Project in Transition Plan and Elevation The Extension Employs Tensile Structure to Cantilever


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Electricity Substation No.164, 183 Clarence Street, Sydney, NSW Adaptable Re-use

Yingying Chang

The aim of this design thesis is twofold. It explores a potential evolution in architecture with local energy generation at a precinct level and creates a communal space where public will discover the current available energy efficiency technology. As locally generated energy (electricity and heat) for local use is more efficient, any building with local power generation can be seen as a power station in Smart Grid. The project adapts a disused electricity substation and a deserted commercial building adjacent to it to a multifunction building with local energy cogeneration, underground waste collection and waste to energy facilities in place. Together with other forms of local energy generation in other buildings in the local area, the project is to build an energy

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and environmental sustainable precinct. A public street is created at the ground level of the building. A screen display area, an amphitheatre for casual seating and educational talks, a store for energy efficient appliance, as well as a cafĂŠ and a lavatory can be found within the street. Energy generation facilities are also located in the ground floor with glass walls facing to the public domain. The building provides electric car charging points at parking level, natural ventilated offices in the middle levels and solar powered houses with smart appliance on the roof top. The building is not only a show case of energy efficient study but a place where communication between technology and public awareness of it could be built.


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Existing Electricity Substation No.164 Precinct design concept Building design model stage 1 and stage 2 Building design cross section


154

Capsule Hotel design in Central Station

Kevin Cheung

Central Station is one of the landmarks in Sydney. It has a long history. In the past 100 years, it served billions of people and demonstrated as an important transport interchange. The station, however, is ageing because the facilities are inadequate for nowadays. From time being, there are also some left-over spaces that I would propose to reuse as part of my scheme - Capsule Hotel. Capsule hotel requires less space than a traditional hotel and it shares advantages by putting within the station: 1. the left-over space can simply reuse and renovate to continue the lifetime of the station; 2. it is a value-added service; and 3. the price is cheaper. I divided the hotel into several parts in order to serve different kinds of customers. The circulation pathways are designed in

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accordance with “necessarily”, i.e. Travellers would stay in somewhere closes to entrance and transport interchange for instance. The design idea is derived from the game “Tetris”, which is using stacking order to maximise the internal space and make the design more interesting. Some capsules are elevated and specifically arranged according to the user types. Hence, privacy and spatial quality are considered within the structure. The outer space is not simply ignored. I created my design as a glass box to suggest the difference between old sandstone and new structure, but they are not contradicting to each other. I built the new structure according to the height variation and let the building sit into the surrounding context harmoniously.


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Site analysis – User habit and preference Overall circulation diagram Overall looking of design (platform side) Quality of interior space


156

Central Station: Transport Interchange

Shari Cheung

Central Station is the largest railway station in Sydney, servicing almost all CityRail network lines. Over the years, with new extensions and increased commuter use, the station has come to accommodate different transport modes and has evolved to become a major centre of activity. However, despite being a significant point of interchange, there is a lack of an integrated system, highlighted on both an urban scale and station scale through the circulation and wayfinding system both within and outside of the station area. Moreover, as Sydney continues to increase in population, the station is also reaching its peak capacity, and the problem of this rapid growth in population

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faced with the limitation of available space becomes ever more pressing. The project focuses on exploring the potential of a new pedestrian network, which integrates a new above ground pedestrian walkway with the existing underground tunnel system, platforms and station building, and has the promise of addressing and resolving the aforementioned issues. Three points are key to the design: the design of the walkway (as pathways linking nodes across the site), the design of junctions (as overlapping pathways exploring different spaces created), and the design of modules (as prefabricated modules for ease of construction and installation).


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Framed views on the walkway View from station area Anamorphic wayfinding Twist, flow and transformation


158

The City Router - A Change of Experience

YeeLing (Elaine) Chow

The design is to transform an existing car park to an interchange station. It is to encourage employees parking their cars there and commute to work via other transportation modes. The location of site has its advantages of surrounded by numerous of small to medium enterprises. Efficiency is the key word of this project. Thus the car park is being lift up in order to free up the ground level for public access. There are several complains of the existing car park acting like a barrier between UTS and the Darling Harbour. Freeing up the GF can help enhancing the efficiency through spaces. “Quicker” programs are allocated in ground level whereas “slower” programs are placed in upper levels, such the main car parking area. The programs situated by circulations,

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edges are then smoothen to create the sense of movement and flow. Curvedwalls are used to lead pedestrians through space. Bike-parking-areas are distributed throughout the site thus it shortens the distance to walk from bikes to destinations. One of the car park blocks has been taken away, a large atrium is revealed, it immediately gives a vertical experience to pedestrians. Bridges are used to connect the 2 blocks of building; they provide visual linkages for visitors between upper and lower levels. The gaps between bridges act as frames to frame the sky like several small atriums. The curviness of the bridges creates interesting and always-changing shadows to the ground level. A dynamic environment is something crucial for an employee who has the same boring daily routine.


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Exterior view from Paddy’s Market Perspective of the central courtyard Aerial night view of the new SEC Carpark Conceptual sketch of circulations


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Connection Catalyst

Hossein Gholami

The aim of this urban intervention is to intensify and diversify passive connectivity with the urban tissue. Creating an harmonious sustainable rhythm between buildings and public space’s social/ cultural activities. The design seeks to find a new approach to respond to the issues of our current CBD’s. While we need to consolidate and centralize our cities there are many unwanted areas that seem to be inevitable. Her, I tried to find an approach based on urban Biotope (integrating nature with architecture and structure) that is based on site condition which apparently differs from site to site based on different conditions, however since the approach is based on computation and using scripting as a tool for design, there is no need to redesign from site to site and generally it is just the input that changes not the design approach. Here, the aim is to create a flux

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architectural product allowing for future interventions or expansions. This intervention will have the capacity to accommodate change of use and upgrade performance allowing freedom for inhabitants to shape their own space to suit their performance. A sustainable urbanization combining ecology and architecture, generating a healthy environment and adding green areas, roof top garden and a large quantities of trees and greens in public places. Comprised of horizontal serial sections, this project transforms a once sociallydeprived voluminous-void into a socially activated replacement. The form of project starts from a ‘bounding box’ of the site, including all the city regulations. Then this box is gradually altered, based on the site characteristics and parameters. The use of section and topographies become the driving force behind this project.


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View to central court Bird eye’s view View from ground court yard conceptual sketch


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Car Park Reset

Yau Wai Leung

In order to fulfil the city‘s future development – car reduction and bicycling promotion, Sydney Entertainment Centre car park has to seek for a new role in city. The existing car park space will be minimized and new programs will be introduced to response the urbanization nowadays. The design theme is urban farming. The new program will include farming space, market, and educational centre. Besides, the free-up space from car park will partly transform to bike parking space. In traditional education, most fruit and vegetable knowledge or farming skills are acquired from books or videos. In this building, it intends to provide a new journey for them to experience the whole farming processing. Children can closely see and touch the final products

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in food market and greenhouse; gain knowledge from the educational centre; experience farming on the top of roof. Therefore, a dynamic and smooth circulation is necessary. Firstly, the food market will be designed as open/ display space rather than conventional enclosed/ dark interior space with limited number of windows. The existing building will be crafted internally to open up space. People can walk through the market along the split level which will be led by view. People, shops, vegetable and background view form a lively picture along the podium level to activate the previous restrained car park. The reduced car park space will remain at the bottom and bike parking space, changing rooms and toilets are set at podium level.


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Operable louvers on western faรงade Market interior Farm area on roof top Sketches of concepts


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Enhancing Social Sustainability in Rapidly Developing Communities; Integrating Architecture and Digital Technology

Reihaneh Pourhamedani

The Rhodes Community Centre project is standing at the intersection of three significant concepts of today’s Australia: sustainable communities, digital networking, and communication. It aims to enhance social experience, comfort and safety of citizens in the rapidly developing suburb of Rhodes. Rhodes peninsula is becoming increasingly diverse, expanding socially and culturally, resulted from rapid developments on western side of the railways line, creating two distinct morphologies. These changes not only bring about opportunities for progress, but also pose many challenges in sustaining community cohesion, comfort, and growth. Intricate digital networking elements, embedded into an innovative architectural design as “Rhodes Community Centre” is an interesting and promising project to enhance opportunities as well as tackling

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those challenges. Pervasive mobile digital networking expands the physical boundaries of the community centre, turning the whole suburb into interconnected information interfaces. Such hybrid community centre –half physical, half virtual- would facilitate interaction and dialogue between residents over issues such as leisure, safety, participation and control. Cultural and language exchange, flow naturally through this ambient network, creating an atmosphere of empathy and pleasure. Specific design features are proposed to support basic concepts of the project. The building concept was taken from a computer circuit board, symbolising digital technology and connectivity. Translucent and LED concrete emphasize information flow and visibility within community. Digital interface stands, erected at various focal points in the suburb creates a ubiquitous digital suburb.


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A. Showing order of floor plans B. East faรงade indicating visibility, transparency, engagement and connectivity C. 1:1000 site model D. Movement and access concept sketches


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Street Arts Uprising

Siok-Hong Yap

The Urban Street Arts Centre– the new contemporary urban art hub in Darling Harbour – will endow the existing Sydney Entertainment Centre Carpark with an exciting life of colour and music. The project recognizes a major opportunity of extensive ground activation to entice the huge pedestrian flow from Chinatown and Darling Harbour. It serves as a test ground for media facades and digital arts, by bringing together urban arts and cycling, skateboarders, performers and audience, all in one place. The design concept envisions an open and lively public space enhanced by spectacular visual feast of vibrant colours and movements intertwined. Rooms and dance studios are broken into smaller compartments enveloped by colourful media facades. The colours do not end just there; they transform into interactive dance floors, which flow onto the plaza and gradually

Email yshperonel@gmail.com A

bleed into adjacent buildings in bits and pieces. The media facades and interactive floor constituted of energy-efficient LEDs creatively interact and change appearances accordingly in relation to the movements of dancers, skateboarders and cyclists. The key idea is to highlight the connectivity between inside and outside, hence a particular emphasis on the visual and physical linkages between spaces. The building consists of interwoven horizontal slabs crossing at split levels. The interwoven slabs act as streets to allow for dynamic exchanges between performance spaces and audience seats, as well as enhanced visual permeability between levels. Moving along the streets one will experience a mesh of open sky and closed environment, and a sweeping panorama of all programme elements.


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Dance studio enveloped by media facades Skating bowl embedded with interactive LEDs A sweeping panorama of colours upon entry Flow of interactive LED dance floor across Chinatown

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Newtown Canopy

Muhamad Hanafi Rahmat

Newtown is a hub in Sydney where people are proudly showing their own cultural identity in many creative ways. On top of that, multicultural community existed in Newtown has added the value to its exquisiteness, making Newtown as the suburb that is painted with colourful stripes of lifestyle. One of the most appreciated cultures in Newtown is the existence of the’ food street’ along the King street and Enmore Road as well as the variety of markets which has become one of the attractions for people to come to Newtown. Based on these two rejuvenation factors, an idea of having a cooking hub where people could come and learn how to cook the dishes from different countries together with a cultural food market where people could easily get any authentic spices for their traditional food has been developed. Knowing that Newtown is rich with its own character, an approach to adaptive reuses the architectural buildings on the

Email muhamadhanafi@yahoo.com Phone 0433 685 909

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chosen site by keeping and restoring its façade and inserting the suggested program inside. This brings to the implementation of Gaudi’s Hanging model as a symbol of connecting the buildings on the site to one another. The structural form emerged from the technique is then translated as the canopy to cover the entire project. The roof is clad by the tiles which are individually designed based on the different colours of the countries underneath it. And as to support its organic shape, the structural system of ‘timber grid shell’ is apply to the entire roof, not only to maintain the form but also for its aesthetic purposes. The project is located at the heart of Newtown, where King Street and Enmore Road are intersected right opposite the Newtown Train Station. The project is then going to preoccupy the Newtown Neighbourhood Centre, The HUB as well as the residential houses bounded by the Australia Street, Denison Street, Alton Lane and Hoffman Lane.


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Creative cuisine theater Cooking school Colourful roof tiles of the market Market interior


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Alumni Profile

Juliet is a Development Manager, working with the NSW State Government’s Barangaroo Delivery Authority “I chose the Architecture Program at UNSW because of its leading reputation and high-calibre graduates. There was a genuine buzz of excitement and learning around the Faculty. Within weeks of starting the program, I knew that I’d made the right choice. There was fantastic diversity and a healthy tension of ideas amongst the lecturers. The environment stimulated intense discussion and output, leading us in entirely new directions.

Juliet Byrnes Bachelor of Architecture (1999)

“THERE WAS A GENUINE BUZZ OF EXCITEMENT AND LEARNING AROUND THE FACULTY.”


171 My advice to anyone considering studying architecture is to select a university with good networks in industry and academia. Have a look at the guest lecturers they are attracting. The teaching culture at UNSW balanced the value of both practical and academic experience and, in my opinion, equipped us for the realities of working in industry. Also have a look at the ‘extracurricular’ activities available (and I don’t just mean the Roundhouse!). A highlight of my time at UNSW was taking part in an architectural survey to Udaipur, India and in my final years I was employed by UNSW’s SOLARCH research group, to help represent Australia on an international solar energy research task led by the International Energy Agency (IEA). During this time, I also contributed to developing the first sustainability policy of the Australian Institute of Architects NSW and was on the board of the National Association of Women in Construction (NAWIC) and Chair of its Education Committee. My research work and first class honours degree from UNSW gave me the edge over hundreds of other people applying for a graduate trainee programe with Lend Lease. The interviewers were impressed that I had already been published in academia and presented at conferences. Since graduating from the Architecture Program at UNSW Faculty of Built Environment in 1999, I‘ve held senior management roles in developing and delivering $2.8 billion dollars worth of awardwinning property development in Australia and the United Kingdom. I’ve worked directly with leading advocates of design excellence such as Jean Nouvel, Sir Richard MacCormac, Sir Terry Farrell, Simon Allford, Mark Whitby and Peter Rogers, former chair of the UK’s ‘Constructing Excellence’.

Between 2002 and 2007 I played a key role in delivering the London portfolio of the UK’s largest developer Land Securities. In collaboration with different sections of the industry, I fostered new practices and legal agreements whereby multiple parties could share cost and time risks whilst maintaining a common and overarching approach to design excellence. These initiatives involved changing attitudes towards the responsibilities for design quality. Several of the projects received awards including the RIBA Regional Architecture Award 2011; Winner International Property Awards 2010, Best Mixed-Use; RIBA National Architecture Award 2008; Civic Trust Award 2008; and the RIBA National Architecture Award,2004.


172 Architecture Program Community Academic Staff

Acknowledgments

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Ann Quinlan | Program Director Professor Bruce Judd | Head of Architecture + Design Discipline

Session 1 -----------------------

Dr. Ainslie Murray Andrew Macklin Associate Professor Catherine Bridge Dr. Catherine de Lorenzo Catherine Lassen Professor Deo Prasad Dr. Dijana Alic Graham Bell Associate Professor Harry Margalit Jeremy Harkins Jim Plume John Carrick Maryam Gusheh Dr. Paul Hogben Dr. Peter Kohane Russell Lowe Dr. Stan Fung Stephen Peter Steve King Tam Nguyen Professor Xing Ruan Dr. Yinong Xu

Session 2 ------------------

Built Environment Practice Professors ----

Professor Richard Johnson MBE Professor Ken Maher Professor Glenn Murcutt AO In 2012 administrative assistance and support for the Architecture Program Community was provided by Dr Nico Wanandy, Lisa Harricks, Julia Miller – Karlsen and Vanessa Blount Faculty Student Centre support was provided by Brendan Harrison and Li San Chew guided by Julia Wibowo.

Dr. Ainslie Murray Andrew Macklin Associate Professor Catherine Bridge Catherine Lassen Dr. Dijana Alic Associate Professor Harry Margalit Jim Plume John Carrick Maryam Gusheh Dr. Paul Hogben Dr. Peter Kohane Russell Lowe Dr. Stan Fung Stephen Peter Steve King Professor Xing Ruan Dr. Yinong Xu

Industry, Professional and Postgraduate Student Sessional Staff ----------------------------

Anne Warr Aaron Ballin Anuradha Chatterjee Ashley Dunn Carol Marra Christian Grennan Diane Jones Ehsan Khoshsima Emma Rowden Harry Levine Heleana Geneaus Ian Anderson Ivan Ip Jorgen Liaris Julia Dowling Laurice Elhaj Lester Partridge Lily Tandeani Mano Ponnambalam Marian Macken Nicholas Simpson Peter Chivers Rob Brown Shaowen Wang Sumati Ahuja Swetik Korzeniewski Vivien Chow


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Message from the CEO


Faculty of Built Environment The University of New South Wales Online be.unsw.edu.au Phone +61 2 9385 4799 Email fbe@unsw.edu.au


UNSW Master of Architecture