Broad Ripple Magazine June 2021

Page 1

JUNE 2021

MAGAZINE

NEW ELEMENT BARBER PROVIDES AN EXPERIENCE UNLIKE ANY OTHER YOUR ULTIMATE HOMETOWN TEAM Catching up With the Indianapolis AlleyCats BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT Harrison Center

TownePost.com


BRING YOUR CAMERA FOR AN EVENING OF PHOTOGRAPHY!

Food sets, models, live music and more!

1101 E 54th St. Thursday June 17th 5:30pm - 8pm Photography experts from Roberts will be available to answer gear questions and offer tips and techniques. No matter if you are shooting on a mobile device or the newest mirrorless camera system, we will have something for everyone. Space is limited. Masks and social distancing will be practiced during this indoor/outdoor event. To register visit RobertsCamera.com or scan here

Brought to you by

Complimentary beer from Sun King Brewery Limit one per customer while supplies last


A TOWNE POST NETWORK PUBLICATION

For advertising information, contact:

I N THI S I SS UE

JUNE 2021

PUBLISHERS

M ICHAE L & LI N DSAY DURR

SUN, JUNE 13TH 3-5PM AT HALF LITER 5301 WINTHROP AVE

MICHAEL@TOWNEPOST.COM

630.853.1142

TOWNE POST NE TWORK, INC. F O U N D E R /C EO

TOM BRITT

TOM@TOWNEPOST.COM

317.496.3599 PRESIDENT

JE A N N E BR I TT

JEANNE@TOWNEPOST.COM

317.810.0011 ASS O C I ATE PU BLISHER

ROBE RT TUR K

ROB@TOWNEPOST.COM

317.810.0011 D I R EC TO R O F D I G I TA L E N G AG E ME N T

JOSH BROWN C R E ATI V E /S OCIAL T EAM

TON I E A DS VAL HACK ER CO PY E D I TO R S

JON S HOU LD ER S JE NNY E L I G

4 9 12 18 21 24 26

Ch an g in g th e B ar b e r G ame : New E le m ent B ar b e r Provid e s an E xp e r ie n ce U n like Any O th e r Th r ive In d ian ap olis Make s It E asie r to Be G re e n : Eco-Fr ie n d ly In itiative H e lp s Indy Li ve S u stain ab ly You r U ltimate H ome town Te am: Catchi ng up With th e In d ian ap olis Alley Cats Are You Car b on Ne u tral Ye t? B road Ri ppl e Familie s an d B u sin e sse s O p t for Fu n , E ffe ctive Action on Climate Ch ild Wate r S afe ty Tip s for Th is S u mmer

B u sin e ss S p otig h t: H ar r ison Ce n te r Th is S ou r Is Pre tty Swe e t: U p lan d ’s S o ur Al es Are A H it In B road Rip p le & B eyon d K E Y CO N TRI BU TO RS

ALESHA MCCARTY / MOLLY DYKSTRA MICHAEL DURR / SETH JOHNSON / KORY EASTERDAY

REAL-TIME ANALYTICS

Scan the QR code to see this magazine’s real-time reach and distribution numbers.

@ B ROAD R IPPLE MAG

TOWNE POST NETWORK, INC.

8800 North Street, Suite 117 | Fishers, IN 46038 Phone/Text: 317-810-0011

FOR FRANCHISE INFORMATION, VISIT FRANCHISING.TOWNEPOST.COM


Owner Antwain Booker 4 / BROAD RIPPLE MAGAZINE / JUNE 2021 / TownePost.com


Changing the Barber Game NEW ELEMENT BARBER PROVIDES AN EXPERIENCE UNLIKE ANY OTHER Writer / Seth Johnson Photographer / Michael Durr & Provided by Advanced XP

For Antwain Booker, there’s a lot more to being a good barber than cutting hair. “Guys come in, and they may have been broken up with,” says Booker, who’s known to many by his nickname, Kuts. “There’s always something that a guy wants to come in and talk to you about, but when they leave the chair they feel like a different person. That’s what I like about cutting hair.”

The owner and founder of New Element Barber, Booker cuts hair around the city in his own mobile barbershop. In addition to Booker’s professional barber setup, his stripped-out RV features its own bathroom and waiting room, providing customers with a unique barbershop experience. Each week Booker stations his mobile barbershop at different locations around central Indiana, including Broad Ripple on Mondays, Fountain Square on Thursdays, Fishers on Fridays, Carmel on Saturdays and Zionsville on Sundays.

Having cut hair since the age of 13, Booker realized he wanted to be a barber while attending college at Indiana State University. While there, he was also given the nickname Kuts, which has stuck ever since. “I was at Indiana State, and I used to have flyers called ‘Kuts by Twain,’” Booker says. “I was at football practice one day, and they said, ‘We’re just going to start calling you Kuts. You cut everybody’s hair on campus.’” When Booker moved to Indianapolis, he first started cutting hair professionally in 2002 at Craig’s Creations at 49th Street and College Avenue. “That’s always been my area,” Booker says of the Broad Ripple neighborhood. After working at several other barbershops around the area, however, he eventually decided it was time to start his own business.

CREATE A FRESH LOOK IN YOUR HOME.

5352 Tacoma Ave, Indianapolis, IN | (317) 251-0350 | brothers-floorcovering.com 5 / BROAD RIPPLE MAGAZINE / JUNE 2021 / TownePost.com


317-795-1295

PET OF THE MONTH Pet's Name: Sophi Age: 3 years Type: medium hair domestic Your Name: Michele is her foster mom. Carmel_Opening_Ad_6_2020.indd 1

How can adopt this pet? adoptarpo.org/adopt-me/

6/18/20 11:37 AM

What is the best thing about this pet? The best thing about Sophi is her super sweet nature. She's very calm and is quiet unless you're late to her dinner plate then she politely reminds you that she's hungry. What is your pet's favorite thing to do? Sophi loves to have her belly rubbed. She's quick to lay down beside you and soak up the attention you bestow upon her.

BROAD RIPPLE LOCATION

1430 Broad Ripple Ave., Suite 1 Indianapolis, IN 46220 317-588-8181

BR_Opening_Ad_5_2020 copy.indd 1

6 / BROAD RIPPLE MAGAZINE / JUNE 2021 / TownePost.com

5/14/20 2:49 PM


Since going mobile, Booker has experienced his fair share of hardships - most notably the death of his son Antwain Booker Jr., who is survived by his newborn son Kingston. “A good friend told me, ‘Go home. Save your money up. You have good clientele. You’ll do fine,’” Booker says. With this notion in mind, Booker started New Era Barber out of his home in 2010 before eventually deciding to build his own mobile barbershop in 2015. Inspired by his father’s purchase of a drilling rig, Booker wanted New Element Barber to be something that would help his family prosper well into the future. “I started this for my family because I saw what my father was doing at a later age, and I wanted to get ahead of him so I could have a generational business going for the family,” Booker says.

“We lost my son December 11, and it crushed my soul,” Booker says.

After taking some time off to grieve, Kuts and New Element Barber are back in full swing, • Tree Removal, • Garage/Basement/ thanks to help from his marketing team at To make an appointment with New Topping & Trimming Attic Cleanout Advanced XP. Element Barber, visit NewElementBarber. • Shrub Trimming com or call 317-665-7844. • Gutter Cleaning “New Element Barber is doing well,” Booker Removal says. “I’m excited about where&I’ll be heading • Mini Barn / Shed / • Tree Removal, • Garage/Basement/ this summer. I feel rejuvenated because my Lighthim Hauling / Deck Cleanout grandson Kingston is here. •Seeing is Topping & Trimming Fence Attic motivating me to go a little bit harder.” Demolition & Removal

• Shrub Trimming • Construction Clean-up

Booker is truly trying to change the game & Removal when it comes to his mobile barbershop • Junk Removal • Light Hauling business model.

• Gutter Cleaning

• Appliance E-Waste • Mini /Barn / Shed / Removal Fence / Deck

Demolition & Removal • Brush Pile•Cleaning Construction Clean-up • Stump Grinding

“I’m just trying to go forward and give

See you at the Farmers Markets 8-noon on Saturdays this summer Broad Ripple Farmers Market (2nd Presbyterian Church)

Creamer Elson & O’Brien REALTORS since 1986

something different to the city, and also blaze a new lane where a stylist can make more money,” he says. “My end goal is to get trucks to the house instead of being in one location. I’m doing this right now because I’m coming out as my company and letting my name get around the surrounding areas in the city. Then I’m going to branch out and get smaller trucks, and we’re going to start coming to the houses.”

• Appliance / E-Waste Removal

• Junk Removal

Tree Removal, • Garage/Basement/ • Brush Pile Cleaning• Topping • Stump Grinding & Trimming Attic Cleanout • Tree Removal, Topping & Trimming

TreeRemoval, Removal, • •Tree Topping&&Trimming Trimming Topping ShrubTrimming Trimming • •Shrub Removal &&Removal

• Shrub Trimming &•Removal Garage/Basement/

• Garage/Basement/ Attic Cleanout • Light Hauling Attic Cleanout Gutter Cleaning Cleaning • Construction Clean-up •• Gutter

• Shrub Trimming Removal • &Garage/Basement/ Attic Cleanout • Light Hauling

• Gutter Cleaning

Gutter Cleaning •• Construction Clean-up •• Junk Mini Barn / Shed / Removal Fence / Deck Demolition & Removal • Brush Pile Cleaning

• Mini Barn / Shed / Fence / Deck Demolition & Removal • Appliance / E-Waste Removal

Call today for prompt service! • Stump Grinding

Binford Farmers Market (near 65th & Binford)

Eat Fresh & Buy Local!

317-626-5973

• Appliance / E-Waste Mini Barn / Shed / • Junk Removal •• Mini Barn / Shed / Removal • Light Hauling Fence / Deck Call today for prompt service! • Light Hauling Fence Deck • Brush Pile/Cleaning Demolition & Removal • Stump Grinding Demolition & Removal • Construction Clean-up • Construction Clean-up • Appliance / E-Waste • Appliance • Junk Removal Removal / E-Waste • Junk Removal Removal FredAndSons.com Call today for prompt service! • Brush Pile Cleaning • Stump Grinding • Brush Pile Cleaning 317-626-5973 • Stump Grinding

FredAndSons.com 317-626-5973

FredAndSons.com Fred+SonsAd_Geist_3.5x4.75.indd 1 Call today for prompt service!

317-626-5973

Fred+SonsAd_Geist_3.5x4.75.indd Fred+SonsAd_Geist_3.5x4.75.indd 1

2/5/18 11:46 AM

Accepting New Consignments! 20+ Call today for prompt service! Call today for prompt service! 317-626-5973 years of experience 317-626-5973 FredAndSons.com offering to collectors FredAndSons.com worldwide. FredAndSons.com

Fred+SonsAd_Geist_3.5x4.75.indd 1

Fred+SonsAd_Geist_3.5x4.75.indd 1

Fred+SonsAd_Geist_3.5x4.75.indd 1

Angie Kubacki

Molly Creamer

akubacki@ c21scheetz.com

mmcreamer@ gmail.com

317-695-7372

317-413-5646

Eileen O’Brien

317-445-0393 eobrien@ c21scheetz.com

John Creamer

317-250-5646 jcreamer@ c21scheetz.com

Rick Elson

317-490-5646 relson@ c21scheetz.com

7 / BROAD RIPPLE MAGAZINE / JUNE 2021 / TownePost.com

1

2/5/18 11:46 AM

2/5/18 11:46 AM

2/5/18 11:46 AM

317-251-5635 dan@ripleyauctions.com

2/5/18 11:46 AM

2/5/18 11:46 AM


#broadripple #brfarmersmarket broadrippleindy.org

SATURDAYS 8A - 12P OPEN OUTDOORS

MAY 1

NEW Market Location

7700 N. Meridian St.

ST

second presbyterian church

(snap accepted)

Enjoy fresh, local produce, meats, eggs, cheese, breads, honey, flowers, plants, pickles, jams, popcorn and so much more! 70+ vendors, several new this year! 8 vendors will be serving breakfast items & coffee. TITLE SPONSOR:

8 / BROAD RIPPLE MAGAZINE / JUNE 2021 / TownePost.com

PRESENTING SPONSOR:


THRIVE INDIANAPOLIS MAKES IT EASIER TO BE GREEN ECO-FRIENDLY INITIATIVE HELPS INDY LIVE SUSTAINABLY Writer / Molly Dykstra Photographer / Michael Durr

orking sustainable living into everyday life can feel like a daunting task. The challenge seems almost too large to overcome when the focus is not just on the local community, but also on the climate and other communities across the globe. It can be difficult just to keep up with local recycling guidelines or know which small lifestyle changes will do the greatest good. With all this in mind, the Office of Sustainability, also known as SustainIndy, has launched Thrive Indianapolis, thriveindianapolis. com, the first plan in the city’s history that brought together communities, agencies and residents to create an actionable plan to help Indianapolis prepare for its role in the 21st century. With 59 action items, this ambitious plan is seeking partners and suggestions to help Indianapolis communities thrive in a way which is sustainable, inclusive and workable for local residents. Broad Ripple is an important part of Thrive Indianapolis. With its mixture of residential, nature and business areas, the village is uniquely suited to sustainable living. The Monon Trail offers an opportunity to bike or walk for commuting to work or just having fun. At 18.1 miles long, the trail runs from Sheridan to downtown; connecting Downtown, the Indiana State Fairgrounds, Broad Ripple, Carmel and Westfield along the way. Because May is National Bike Month, what better way to celebrate than by bicycling on the Monon? There is a map available at indy.gov/activity/bikeways-and-bikeboxes, showing bicycle parking locations for

9 / BROAD RIPPLE MAGAZINE / JUNE 2021 / TownePost.com


LookingFor For Summer Summer Tutoring? Looking Tutoring? Contact Contact

Looking For Summer Tutoring? Contact

We can help with

BEFORE

In-Person HSPT SAT/ACT or Virtual Tutoring Available.

you have coffee with your neighbor. you hug your grandmother. you meet your friends for lunch.

TEST PREP

We can help with

SAT/ACT SUMMER MATH TEST PREP SAT/ACT

GET VACCINATED.

PACKETS TEST PREP MATH REVIEW

The COVID-19 vaccine is here. Along with the reunions it allows. Safe and effective, the COVID-19 vaccine will help protect you, your family and friends. Numerous vaccination centers are near you and the registration process is quick and simple. To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine, eligibility and how to schedule your vaccination, please go to EskenaziHealth.edu.

SUMMER SCHOOL We COURSES can help with

SUMMER SCHOOL SUMMER COURSES ILEARN MATH SCHOOL

PREP

HSPT PREP

COLLEGE HSPT APPLICATION PREP ESSAYS

GRADES 6-8 COURSES SUMMER MATH COLLEGE SUMMER MATH COLLEGE ISTEP MATH APPLICATION PACKETS COLLEGE APPLICATION COLLEGE PACKETS GRADE 10 ESSAYS MATHMATH REVIEW ESSAYS WRITING MATH REVIEW ILEARN MATH ILEARN MATH COURSES GRADES 6-8 GRADES 6-8 ISTEP MATH ISTEP MATH COLLEGE COLLEGE owned, Locally NOT GRADE 10 a franchise! COLLEGE COLLEGE GRADE 10 WRITING MATH WRITING MATH COURSES 317.205.9215 COURSES Email: maggie@bender-rocap.com

Locally owned, NOT a franchise!

bender-rocap.com Locally owned, NOT a franchise! 317.205.9215 Email: maggie@bender-rocap.com

317.205.9215 bender-rocap.com Email: maggie@bender-rocap.com

bender-rocap.com

Yo

ur guides for Midtow

n

CoWorking Space for lease in the heart of Broad Ripple next to Monon Trail. We offer an array of memberships month to month with breakfast and fitness included!

NOW OPEN! 317.449.2300 gbloc.site rphipps@thomasenglish.com

Indy Scene Real Estate Team Plat Collective 317.902.2989 230 E 16th Street | Indianapolis, IN | 46202 | IndySceneTeam.com 10 / BROAD RIPPLE MAGAZINE / JUNE 2021 / TownePost.com


people wanting to spend the day enjoying all that the trail offers. This month, the Metropolitan Planning Organization is also running a crowdsourced fundraiser to install airing-up stations along the trail. This is important because, as Morgan Mickelson, Office of Sustainability director, says, “[There’s] nothing worse than having a flat on your bike ride.” Donations can be made at indympo.org/news/public-invited-tocontribute-to-crowdsourced-bike-map. The Indiana Pacers Bikeshare program will once again be offering free bicycle use from their stations on three Knozone days this summer. Air quality is an increasingly important issue and residents are urged to do their part on all Knozone Action Days. Individuals can help by choosing to bike or use public transit on those days. They can also do simple things like combine trips, not idle cars, refuel only after 7 p.m. and mow after 4 p.m. They can also help spread the word that taking small actions can protect our at-risk neighbors and improve air quality. More information is available at knozone.com. Transitioning to an electric vehicle (EV) is another way to help with air quality and sustainability. On the Highly EVolved website, behighlyevolved.com, people can learn more about available EV technology and find answers to many questions about charging and maintaining these vehicles. Indianapolis has made a commitment to achieve carbon neutrality by 2050 and urging residents to transition to EVs plays an important part in reaching that goal. The city is also considering

what will happen to the sites of the BlueIndy electric vehicle carsharing program, now that it has ended. A program called Reimagining the Curb is planning the best use for the BlueIndy sites, including those in Broad Ripple Village. More information about this is available at indy.gov/activity/re-imagining-the-curb. Another important part of sustainable living and carbon neutrality is recycling. The Office of Sustainability is currently updating the signage at the local Broad Ripple Park Recycling Center to educate users about how to use the facility. Recycling can be tricky since guidelines for what can go into the containers is changing. “Don’t wish recycle.” Mickelson says. “If you were to hope that something is recyclable, and put it in there anyway, it can actually contaminate the entire thing. So really learn what is recyclable.” She urges people to read the current guidelines at indy.gov/ activity/find-a-recycling-drop-off-location. Supporting local farmers markets can be a fun and delicious part of sustainable living.

11 / BROAD RIPPLE MAGAZINE / JUNE 2021 / TownePost.com

The Broad Ripple Farmers Market has moved to a new location, the Second Presbyterian Church at 7700 N. Meridian St. It is open every Saturday from 9 a.m. – 12 p.m., (masks recommended) with a safety hour from 8 to 9 a.m. (masks required). Preorders are encouraged at broadrippleindy.org/farmersmarket. There are also many other farmers markets to choose from around Indianapolis. “We have so many throughout the greater city,” Mickelson says. “It would be fun to do a bucket list!” She likes the idea of making a list of farmers markets in different communities, then exploring a different one every Saturday this summer to “have some breakfast and get veggies for the week.” Whatever part of sustainable living fits into your lifestyle will help Indianapolis thrive and meet its goal of carbon neutrality by 2050. It doesn’t have to be difficult. Small changes will not only help your local community, but also signify that every day you are working to build a better future.


YOUR ULTIMATE HOMETOWN TEAM CATCHING UP WITH THE INDIANAPOLIS ALLEYCATS Writer / Alesha McCarty Photographer / Kory Easterday and Michael Durr

12 / BROAD RIPPLE MAGAZINE / JUNE 2021 / TownePost.com


Carpenter says. “Sometimes they’re getting their first frisbee or he members of the Indianapolis AlleyCats thoroughly enjoy competing as part of the American our autographs, and seeing their pure excitement is inspiring.” Ultimate Disc League. Derek Tow, a minority owner, is excited to get back to the game. Travis Carpenter, team member, stresses the simplicity “I miss the camaraderie,” he says. “There’s nothing like seeing and various physical challenges of the game in particular. ultimate live. They have exciting plays, big dives and big jumps on a regular occurrence.” “All you need is a disc and a field,” Carpenter says. “I love the challenge - running, stamina and coordination. It’s low impact in contrast to other sports. You don’t even need cones. You can play Tow’s enthusiasm for the sport is infectious. Game day is family day, and you can find his wife Cindy running the merchandise just about anywhere.” stand, or his kids running the flag during halftime. The AlleyCats are passionate about revamping the kids club this Although being a pro athlete is a full-time job, most team year, including an opportunity to run the flag across the field. members have other careers and are involved in their communities. The AlleyCats kids club membership is a perfect gift. The humility of the players makes them relatable, and several of “We want to keep it accessible for everyone,” Held says. the players say that the team meet-and-greets are some of their favorite moments on game days. You can chat with your favorite A one-year membership is $30, and comes with a membership AlleyCat player before and after each game. Tim Held, majority card, frisbee, water bottle, merchandise discount, game tickets, owner of the team, previously owned a sporting goods store and access to meet-and-greets with players for the kids. Details before starting the team in 2012. can be found on the official team website. Kids 5 and under can attend games for free. Your kid may grow up to be an “I love the up-close-and-personal aspect,” Held says. AlleyCat one day, and attending can be a great way to get them introduced to the sport. The sport is for fans of all ages, and Carpenter says kids get the most excited. The AlleyCats keep one field open to kids for free play or clinics, as well as cornhole, other games and prizes. There is a new spot “It’s fun to see how super-pumped they get,”

Photo by Kory Easterday 13 / BROAD RIPPLE MAGAZINE / JUNE 2021 / TownePost.com

@letstalkphotography


INDIANAPOLIS ALLEYCATS

6/4 7:30 PM

DETROIT MECHANIX

6/5 6:00 PM

CHICAGO UNION

6/12 7:00 PM

DETROIT MECHANIX

6/20 5:00 PM

MADISON RADICALS

6/26 8:00 PM

CHICAGO UNION

7/3 7:00 PM 7/10 7:00 PM

MADISON RADICALS MINNESOTA WIND CHILL

7/17 6:00 PM

MADISON RADICALS

7/18 1:00 PM

CHICAGO UNION

7/24 6:00 PM

DETROIT MECHANIX

7/31 6:00 PM

MINNESOTA WIND CHILL

8/15 3:00 PM

MINNESOTA WIND CHILL HOME

AWAY

STADIUM: GRAND PARK

MYALLEYCATS.COM FACEBOOK.COM/INDIANAPOLISALLEYCATS

ALL GAMES IN LOCAL TIME

One campus, Endless things to see and do... classes . camps . Events . Exhibitions Outreach . ARTSPARK . Clay . Drawing Fibers . Glass . Jewelry + Metals Painting . Photo + Digital . Print + Book Arts Sculpture W o o d M a ke I t Ta k e I t s visiting Artist workshops . Art Retreats . The Library Coffee Bar . Homeschool Art . ArtReach ArtTroop . Teen Art Council + MORE!

buy gifts + art at ArtCenterMarket.com

Creative adventures for everyone! People of all ages and experience levels are welcome. Online + onsite art classes and camps ranging from 2 hours to 8 weeks. Following all CDC guidelines for safety.

Sign up for Camps + Classes at Indplsartcenter.org

14 / BROAD RIPPLE MAGAZINE / JUNE 2021 / TownePost.com


to fuel up for the day, Grand Stand Sports Pub and Concessions, which is a family-friendly environment offering a full restaurant and bar stocked with local favorites. The 150-seat space overlooks the action happening on the field, so you can fuel up and not miss any of the action. The pub will also host postgame celebration parties. “Everybody’s welcome,” Tow says. “Meet the team, get an autograph, grab some grub and just celebrate community." The meet-and-greets will also be a great time to figure out how to get more involved. Kids usually start in middle school, like Nick Phillips, the team’s youngest member at 19 years old. After a delayed season due to the pandemic, Phillips says he is excited to play. The AlleyCats are one big family, if that family had 29 brothers. “It’s been great learning about life and the game from them all,” Phillips says. Phillips is also currently studying to be a performance psychologist. Head Coach Will “Bama” Drumright has been a great mentor to Phillips, as he has a background in mental skills psychology. Drumright also started in a youth group, and thinks it is a great way to make friends. He personally enjoys the mentor aspect of the job, and is excited for the new team to get started. The AlleyCats will kick off the season with a meetand-greet on June 13 from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. at Broad Ripple’s family-friendly neighborhood spot, Half Liter BBQ. The team will be there for pictures, chats and autographs. You can learn more about future games and events as well. General admission for games will be $11, and free for kids under 5. You can also purchase a season pass for just $49. For more info, go to myalleycats.com.

15 / BROAD RIPPLE MAGAZINE / JUNE 2021 / TownePost.com


16 / BROAD RIPPLE MAGAZINE / JUNE 2021 / TownePost.com


17 / BROAD RIPPLE MAGAZINE / JUNE 2021 / TownePost.com


ARE YOU CARBON NEUTRALYET?

BROAD RIPPLE FAMILIES AND BUSINESSES OPT FOR FUN, EFFECTIVE ACTION ON CLIMATE Writer / Anne Laker Photography Provided

It’s unanimous: Broad Ripple residents love the Broad Ripple Ice Cream Station, a.k.a BRICS. But BRICS’ proprietors David and Nonie Vonnegut-Gabovitch aren’t just serving up ice cream without thought. They’re committed to doing business with a light footprint: they landscape with native plants, offer a water bottle filling station, and let you sample their famous Monon Tracks with metal spoons, not plastic.

While carbon neutrality sounds high falutin’, it’s actually the opposite. Becoming carbon neutral is a fun and effective way to respond to the climate crisis. It’s a simple way to take control, and feel hope. Carbon Neutral Indiana is a new non-profit social enterprise. They help households and businesses measure their carbon footprints

Part of this ethic was going carbon neutral, with the help of Carbon Neutral Indiana. “Becoming carbon neutral allows us to take responsibility for those aspects of our business that tax the environment,” says Gabovitch. “As ‘green’ business owners, we want to do all we can to be good stewards of this one amazing planet.”

18 / BROAD RIPPLE MAGAZINE / JUNE 2021 / TownePost.com

for free, and then they offer the option to voluntary offset those emissions. The founder, Daniel Poynter, even lives near Broad Ripple. Thanks to their fiscal sponsor, the Indiana Forest Alliance, CNI’s mission is to help Indiana become carbon neutral as soon as possible, because there is no time to waste.


T H ESE A RE A BUS IN E SS E S AND HO US E HO L DS A R E CAR BO N N E UT RA L. W ILL YOU A DD YO UR N A ME TO T H E L I ST ? • BRICS ( BOTH THE BUSINESS & THE OWNER S’ H OUSEHOLD) • N EWKIRK REALTY (BOTH THE BUSINESS & THE OWNER S’ HOUSEHOLD) • JEB & JENNY BANNER (HOUSEHOLD & COMMERCIAL BUILDING) • JULIA SPA NGLER & MARK CLAYTON • MI CHAEL CLUST • DONALD MILLER • GLORIA GRIESING ER • S ONJA & ALEX OVERHISER • DANIEL & CA IT POYNTE R • CHA RLEE A LEXE EV & FA MILY • S USAN SCHLAG

They’ve already helped 158 households go neutral in the last year, preventing a total of over $1 million dollars in social costs of carbon. Once you know your carbon footprint— how much CO2 you emit by virtue of consuming, traveling, heating/cooling your home—you can take responsibility for it by investing in verified projects that clean it up: like protecting and planting forests, shifting farmers to regenerative agriculture, feeding cows garlic to reduce methane, or hundreds of other projects that reduce carbon emissions. For about the cost of your water bill, your conscience can be carbon-clear. In a short time, CNI has become a grassroots movement, spreading from friend to friend. People say it’s a great antidote to anxiety or hopelessness about the world’s future.

Neutral Indiana is a way to get into the mindset that there are social costs for the decisions that we make,” says Clayton. “The carbon emission inventory process was enlightening. It gives you a real perspective on how we’re living in this civilization. Climate change is more than just charts and rising heat on graphs; it’s the impact on actual people. Living with that awareness is much more fulfilling than having the ‘out of sight out of mind’ mentality. He adds: “I’ve seen Carbon Neutral Indiana since its beginning. I am really impressed with the caring community that has pulled together.”

Positivity is contagious. Instead of feeling overwhelmed, anyone can take responsibility for their own carbon footprint. Forty years ago, more people threw their trash out Mark Clayton and Julia Spangler are another their car windows. Today, that’s way less carbon neutral Broad Ripple couple. “Carbon acceptable. Paying to reduce your carbon

INDIANAPOLIS LANDSCAPING EXPERTS

DESIGN | SOFTSCAPES | HARDSCAPES | FEATURES | MAINTENANCE

GREENSCAPEGEEKS.COM | (317) 801-5833 | 19 / BROAD RIPPLE MAGAZINE / JUNE 2021 / TownePost.com


emissions is like paying for trash or plumbing services in your city. It's the cost of doing business, or living life. CNI is making it normal to become carbon neutral. Feeling curious about cleaning up your “carbon trash?” Schedule a free, 15-minute carbon inventory for your household or business. Follow Carbon Neutral Indiana on social (Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, Twitter). “We care about what we leave for our children, grandchildren and the world as a whole," says David of BRICS. Anyone who goes carbon neutral is translating that concern into a sense of progress and realistic hope. Welcome to a carbon neutral future for Broad Ripple, for Indiana, and beyond. Learn more about Carbon Neutral Indiana at www.carbonneutralindiana.org, on Facebook, or at 317-721-4587.

Czarkowskii istry Pediatric Dentistry

NOW HIRING AWESOME. HARDWORKING. ROCKSTARS

key bar/shift managers servers {21+} popcorn equipment operators popcorn packaging/production

317.964.0900

1927 Broad Ripple Avenue Indianapolis, IN 46220 www.drkarapedo.com

Please email resumes & availability to Carly@justpopinonline.com

6406 cornell ave • indy 46220 justpopinpopcorn.com • 317.25.sweet

Kara Czarkowski, DDS Board Certified Pediatric Dentist

20 / BROAD RIPPLE MAGAZINE / JUNE 2021 / TownePost.com


CHILD WATER SAFETY TIPS FOR THIS SUMMER

Story & Photos Provided by Infant Swim Resources

you need to be prepared and diligent anytime there is water nearby.

Summer is here in Indiana! While drowning has no season, summer means more opportunities for your child to find their way to the water unsupervised. Drowning is the number one cause of accidental death in children ages 1 to 4. According to the CDC, in 2014, one-third of children 1-4 years old who died from an unintentional injury, died from drowning. Below are ways to ensure your kids are able to stay safe and have fun in the water this summer.

The key to water safety is multiple layers of protection. Unlike in the movies, drowning is fast and silent. However, drowning is completely preventable. As a parent, you know that children are crafty and quick so it is important to have as many barriers as possible between your child and the water. If one layer fails, another should be in place.

L AYERS OF P ROT E C T IO N

Over half of all drownings occur during non-swimming times. So

1. E FFE CT IVE S U PE RVIS IO N - The most critical line of defense is adult supervision. No level of aquatic skill can replace active supervision. While affective supervision is crucial, 83% of

21 / BROAD RIPPLE MAGAZINE / JUNE 2021 / TownePost.com


drownings occurred while children were under adult supervision so it should not be the only thing you rely on. 2 . B A RRI ERS - When effective supervision fails, additional barriers like self- locking fences, pool covers, and door locks to keep children away from water or alert you if they get out. A foursided isolation fence (separating the pool area from the house and yard) reduces a child’s risk of drowning 83% compared to threesided property-line fencing. You have to remain diligent with these barriers as well. Do not prop open gates, avoid dog doors, close the pool anytime you are not poolside. 3 . POOL A L A RM S - If your child reaches the water, pool

alarms can alert you because every second counts.

4. S URV I VA L SW I M L E SS O NS - The last line of defense should be your child’s ability to self-rescue. If your child reaches the water,, they need to know how to get out of the water or rest,

float and get air. Research has shown that participation in formal swimming lessons can reduce the risk of drowning among children aged 1 to 4 years. 5. CPR - If your child is ever missing, look in the water first. The faster CPR is started, the better the chance of improved outcomes. CPR has been shown to save lives and improve outcomes in drowning victims. S U RVIVAL SW IM LE SS O NS VS . T RADIT IONAL SW IM LE SS O NS

The American Pediatric Association recommends children start swim lessons at 1 year of age. However, when looking at swim lessons for your child, it is important to note that not all swim lessons are the same. Consider the following when you are starting your search. 1. G OALS - Can your instructor tell you what your child will

Danna Green, Agent

(317)430-7094 Walk-ins welcome!

22 / BROAD RIPPLE MAGAZINE / JUNE 2021 / TownePost.com


learn at the end of lessons? Traditional swim lessons often focus on “water acclimation” until kids are about 2 years old. Survival swim lessons will teach children starting as young as 6 months to roll to their back and float until help arrives. Children that are strong walkers can learn the swim-float-swim sequence to get themselves to the side. Consider this, if you are teaching your child that it is fun to jump in the pool, what would happen if you weren’t there to catch them?

this skill will vastly impact the way they learn and how quickly they learn it. Summer is a great time to get out and enjoy the pool. Regardless of where you go, keep the above tips & tricks in mind to make sure everyone in your party is safe!

2 . AG E - If your child is mobile, they can find their way to the water. At what age will your child learn to interact independently in the water? 3 . TIMI N G - What is the time frame of lessons? There should be a clear time frame for when your child will learn these skills. While traditional swim lessons will continue indefinitely as your child may progress through various levels, survival swim lessons typically take six weeks and at the end, every child must demonstrate their ability to self-rescue in swim gear, summer clothes and fall/winter clothes. While children that complete survival swim lessons can continue on to strengthen their swimming skills and add in strokes, they will retain the ability to self-rescue at the end of lessons. There should be noticeable progress happening in weeks, not months or years. 4. TR A I N I N G - What training does your instructor have? An 18

month old is going to learn differently from a 5 year old. What kind of training does your instructor have to recognize and address these differences? Learning to swim can save your child’s life, who teaches

Pro󰇹󰇹󰇹󰇹󰇹󰇹󰇹󰇹󰇹󰇹󰇹󰇹󰇹󰇹󰇹󰇹󰇹󰇹󰇹󰇹󰇹󰇹󰇹󰇹󰇹󰇹󰇹󰇹󰇹󰇹󰇹󰇹󰇹󰇹 fa󰇲󰇲󰇲󰇲󰇲󰇲󰇲󰇲󰇲󰇲󰇲󰇲󰇲󰇲󰇲󰇲󰇲󰇲󰇲󰇲󰇲󰇲󰇲󰇲󰇲󰇲

23 / BROAD RIPPLE MAGAZINE / JUNE 2021 / TownePost.com


HARRISON CENTER 1505 N. Delaware Street Indianapolis, IN 317-396-3886 harrisoncenter.org

in the city, patrons will get the chance to have in-depth discussions with the artist. You can book a private dinner, family celebration or corporate dinner, outside of the prescheduled Art Dish dinners. Kipp Normand, July’s feature, will collaborate with Scarlet Lane Brewing’s head chef on a circus-themed dinner. You can view upcoming dinner details and register on the Harrison Center’s official website.

Writer / Alesha McCarty Photographer / Michael Durr

The Harrison Center, previously known as the Harrison Art Center, rebranded a couple years ago.

“We’re not just for the arts - we’re for the city “Instead of canceling, we pivoted to continue as well,” says Executive Director Joanna Taft. serving the community,” Taft says regarding the challenges resulting from COVID-19. “We created social-distanced versions of The Center strives to help local artists stay and thrive in Indianapolis. They spent the last our programs and took time to invest in our building.” year investing in programs and renovating their space on Delaware Street. The Harrison Center leaders have created an One of their innovative programs is Art Dish, a monthly dinner series that combines the talents of artists and local chefs to create an interactive, immersive cultural experience like no other. The dinners revolve around each artist’s exhibit theme, paired with a fine dining experience. The event accommodates an intimate group that will get the opportunity to indulge in creative multi-course dinner created by a local celebrity chef. “This will allow people to connect to art in a way completely different than attending a gallery opening,” Taft says. While dining on some of the best cuisine 24 / BROAD RIPPLE MAGAZINE / JUNE 2021 / TownePost.com

impressive online gallery featuring current exhibits. There is something for every budget. Currently, you can check out “Greatriarchs: Local Stars” by Benny Sanders. “Greatriarchs” features a collection of portraits of the longterm residents who help write the story of Indy’s Martindale-Brightwood neighborhood. You can schedule a private appointment to view any of the pieces in the online gallery, or check them out on the Center’s social media gallery walk-throughs. “We want artists to stay and thrive in Indianapolis,” Taft says. Normand, who exemplifies the adage, “One man’s trash is another’s man’s treasure,” builds miniature museums from found objects to tell stories about himself and the community. After getting a chance to step inside his world of creativity, you can discover how he creates


“We want artists to stay and thrive in Indianapolis” - Executive Director Joanna Taft such inspiring pieces. First Fridays at the Harrison Center are back, and will run from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. on the first Friday of every month. “Everyone is welcome,” Taft says. Pre-register for your spot online, and upon arrival follow the arrows that take you on a one-way trip to the best community art show in the city. The Center provides many opportunities for the community. They host high school and college internship programs, an artist residency program and neighborhood initiatives. They also have an on-site recording studio where musicians have written more than 300 songs and created 146 videos about Indianapolis. Their online blog features resources and information for patrons. The Center leaders have made substantial improvements to the building to attract more private bookings, and have created additional spaces for the community to enjoy. In the courtyard a human-sized hamster wheel, a creative piece of public art, can serve everybody

from humans to dogs. Be sure to catch the family-friendly karaoke elevator on the way up to the renovated rooftop deck. The deck has beautiful views of the city, LED tetherball, and a fantastic observation point for the renovated smokestack equipped with a fog machine and LED lights to create colored “smoke”. The roof deck may be the newest hot spot in the city. You can book the space for private dining experiences, parties and even small weddings. The Center kicked off the summer collaborating with the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, and dedicated their new porch at May’s First Friday event to promote “porching.” “We want people to sit on their porches,” Taft says. “When you are connected, you are healthy, and porching helps connect you.”


T H I S SOUR I S PRET TY SW EET UPLAND’S SOUR ALES ARE A HIT IN BROAD RIPPLE & BEYOND Writer / Alesha McCarty Photographer / Michael Durr

It’s no secret that Hoosiers love good craft beer. Recently, local breweries have gotten a little funky with their craft. At the forefront of the Sour Ale Craft is Upland Brewery. Upland started crafting delicious, off-beat American Wild Ales in 2006 and has become one of the largest sour production facilities in the region. The process starts at Uplands’ Wood Shop, where all their sour ales are; brewed, wood-aged, and packaged in Bloomington, then shipped regionally and nationally, including the Upland Tasting Room, at 49th and College Avenue. Employees seem to have some things in common, including a love of good libations and community. Brian Hettmansperger, Upland Southern Indiana marketing manager. “I just love sours,” Hettmansperger says. He notes two bestsellers that he enjoys: Revive and Prim. Revive, a fruited sour-ale, and one of the first sours Upland brewed, with pineapple and chamomile. “Revive is the perfect refreshing summertime sour,” he says. Prim is loaded with plums and steeped with cardamom. It has a lovely; depth of flavor and will resonate with fellow wine lovers. With more than 30 sours available, there’s something for everyone. Upland’s most notable sour, the raspberry-fruited ale, a crowd favorite, winning (and still holding) the title 2018 Best American Sour. Raspberry contains more than 3.5 pounds of fresh raspberries per gallon and delights all your senses with a bright pink hue, strong raspberry aroma, and a tart flavor, ending in light floral notes. In 2006, one of Upland’s brewers was inspired by the Belgium Lambic style. Upland reached out to Oliver Winery and offered to trade them cases of beer for barrels of wine. After the first couple of Lambic releases during their popular Sour Lottery, “Upland received a ‘cease and desist’ notice from the whole country of Belgium.” Hettmansperger says. “‘Only beers produced in the Lambic region using open-air fermentation could be called Lambic.’ Upland rebranded as ‘American Sour Ales.’ After overcoming this “small” conflict with the whole country of Belgium, history was made. The Sour Ales were so popular Upland invested in their new space, the Wood Shop Sour Brewery, in 2016. The Wood Shop houses their foeders (pronounced food-ers) for making sours, ensuring that the mixed cultures do not contaminate other beers. 26 / BROAD RIPPLE MAGAZINE / JUNE 2021 / TownePost.com


27 / BROAD RIPPLE MAGAZINE / JUNE 2021 / TownePost.com


Congratulations to the Class of 2021 More than 40 million dollars in reported awards and scholarships!

16 SUMMA CUM LAUDE, 11 MAGNA CUM LAUDE, AND 13 CUM LAUDE GRADUATES RECOGNIZED FOR THEIR STELLAR ACHIEVEMENTS BOTH IN AND OUT OF THE CLASSROOM JUST UNDER 30,000 HOURS OF COMMUNITY SERVICE

19 SCHOLAR-ATHLETES CONTINUING THEIR CAREERS AT THE COLLEGIATE LEVEL

2 ACADEMY APPOINTMENTS 8 STUDENTS - NATIONAL MERIT RECOGNITION

W H E R E T H E C AT H E D R A L J O U R N E Y I S TA K I N G T H E C L A S S O F 2021 Art Institute of Chicago Auburn University Ball State University Belmont University Benedictine College Berklee College of Music Butler University California Polytechnic State University-San Luis Obispo Central Michigan University Clemson University Columbia College-Chicago Columbia University Cornell University Curry College DePauw University Eckerd College Georgia Institute of Technology Grand Valley State University Hanover College Holy Cross College Hope College Howard University Indiana University

Indiana UniversityPurdue University-Indianapolis Jacksonville University Lawrence University Lift Academy Loyola University - Chicago Marian University Marquette University Mercyhurst University Miami University - Oxford Montana State University National Outdoor Leadership School North Carolina A & T North Carolina Central University Northern Arizona University Northeast Georgia Prep Northeastern University Northwestern University Pace University Prairie View A & M University Purdue University Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology Saint Edward’s University Saint Louis University

Saint Mary’s College Savannah College of Art and Design Scripps College Spelman College The College of Wooster The New School The Ohio State University The University of Findlay The University of Texas - Austin The University of Texas - Dallas Trine University Tulane University Tuskegee University University of California - Berkeley University of California - Los Angeles University of Cincinnati University of Dayton University of Denver University of Georgia

GoCathedral.com H E D R A L/ JUNE H I G H2021 S C H/OTownePost.com O L , 5225 E A S T 5 6 T H S T R E E T 28 / BROAD RIPPLEC AT MAGAZINE

University of Kentucky University of Louisville University of Miami University of Mississippi University of Notre Dame University of Pittsburgh University of Rochester University of Southern Indiana University of Tampa University of Wisconsin United States Air Force Academy United States Marine Corps Valparaiso University Vanderbilt University Wabash College Washington University - St. Louis Western Kentucky University Wright State University Xavier University

I N D I A N A P O L I S I ( 317 ) 542 - 1481


Other breweries allocate a separate space within their brewery. All brews start in the grain room and use regional grain, such as Indianaproduced Sugar Creek malt, grains from Wisconsin or aging hops from Indy High Vines. Their mash tun, aka “Mashtun Kutcher,” is a 35-barrel vessel where grain is naturally separated from its husk. Upland works with local farmers who use the spent grain for animal feed. Most breweries then put everything into a stainless-steel brewer for 14 days. Upland uses a wooden-fermenter and pitches a mixed culture, then ages it from three months up to three years. Every ale starts in their original foeder, “General Sherman,” creating a consistent house strain. The connection between the brewhouse and the Wood Shop is just under foot, pipes run underneath the parking lot to transfer the basis.

You can find Upland sours at Upland locations, SoBro Spirits and most major liquor stores. So, Broad Ripple, are you ready to get wild? For more information, visit uplandbeer.com.

At the front, you’ll find Ige, Ray and Roux, Upland’s 90-barrel French foeders, and, ‘O’ Fallen,’ a 100-barrel foeder from St. Louis. The brewers chose blends of Basis to design their flavor profiles. Then they add fruit (locally sourced when possible) and spices. Employee’s hand pit and slice fruit, such as in the Peach Sour Ale, containing 4,400 pounds of peaches per batch. Upland’s sources Evansville’s Hoosier pawpaw for the Pawpaw Wild Ale sources.

ice t s r u o er S

Summ

Working in the Wood Shop, Upland employees bottle, package, and label all their product on site. The finished Sour Ales are then shipped cold directly from the warehouse. Consider picking up Sour Ales directly from your local Upland location, as you’ll have an opportunity to taste and chat with employees, like the College Avenue Tasting Room. Andrew Priller, General Manager of the College Avenue location, says, “We’re vibrant with regulars.”

RESERVE SOUR BOTTLE SAMPLER BOX TODAY

Andrew, a long-time resident, says the location is “a mecca for neighborhood locals,” and many “had their first experience with sours here.” The tasting room has an authentic feel with eclectic furnishings and a vibe where “everybody is welcome,” Andrew adds. Liz and Mat Huber are examples of everybody. “Every Friday, we walk over and order from the window, or come for date night; it’s just comfortable,” Liz says. “You can grab a bottle to-go or purchase one at your table,” Andrew says, whose favorite sour is Peach. However, he says, “the Sour Reserve seems to be popular here.”

AVAILABLE AT UPLAND COLLEGE AVE. 4842 N College Ave. 317-602-3931

29 / BROAD RIPPLE MAGAZINE / JUNE 2021 / TownePost.com


BEAUTIFUL LANDSCAPE ENVIRONMENTS

for residential and commercial properties

Personalized Service from Start to Finish 16 years in business

Call for a consultation

317-439-0778

capehartlandscapeanddesign.com

• Landscape Design and Installation • Paver, Natural Stone and Concrete Patios and Walkways • Retaining Walls • Grading, Seeding and Sod Installation • Walkway and Patio Lighting

• • • •

Pergolas and Privacy Panels Water Features Fireplaces, Fire Pits and Fire Features Outdoor Kitchens, Grill Areas and Pizza Ovens • Belgard, Unilock and Techo-Bloc Authorized Contractor • Financing Available

Health Coverage Made Easy As your health insurance broker, we can help with all of your health insurance needs including Medicare, individual coverage on or off the Health Insurance Marketplace/healthcare.gov, small group plans, dental and vision coverage. Our services cost you nothing and are available to you anytime of the year. We are here to help. Call us today.

Call 317-253-1990 or 866-236-4181 insurance@indianahp.com Angie Mercer

Matthew Kubal

30 / BROAD RIPPLE MAGAZINE / JUNE 2021 / TownePost.com

Matthew Mundy


JUNE LOCAL ARTIST JOHN ATKINS Meet the Artist, 6/19 4-9PM | 6/20 1-5 PM

“Banana Split Personality” Oil on canvas 12”x12” | $300

“I Thumb My Nose at You” Oil on canvas 12”x12” | $300

“Racing Thoughts” 10” x 8” Original Color Pencil Drawing NFS, On loan from a private collector

Peter Max Exhibition and Sale 6/3/21 – 8/27/21

“Love Connection” Colored Pencil on suede mat board 14”x11” | $350

Peter Max “Without Boarders” 2008, Acrylic Painting on Canvas 10”x10” | $23,000

FINE ART & FUN STUFF 6202 N College Ave Indianapolis, IN 46220 OPEN: Thur-Sat 1-7 | Sun 1-5 www.gallery6202.com | (317) 602-2185 31 / BROAD RIPPLE MAGAZINE / JUNE 2021 / TownePost.com

J & J Art Enterprises, LLC