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Community Newslet ter september 2012

Report Card on

Center Grove’s

Schools Richard Arkanoff Superintendent of Center Grove Schools

Photo by John Cinnamon

A part of the TownePost.com Network of Hyper Local Newsletters


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centergrove Community Newslet ter

contents

Publisher: Dann Veldkamp Dann@AtCenterGrove.com (317) 345-9510

4 Publisher’s Welcome

Sales Manager: Jody Veldkamp Jody@AtCenterGrove.com (317) 507-4334

5 Making ¢ents: Protect

by Jody Veldkamp

Mailing Address: P.O. Box 36097 Indianapolis, IN 46236-0097 Phone: (317) 823-5060 Fax: (317) 536-3030

17 Discovering the Dressler Home

18 Creating the BuZZ

6 Trails in Center Grove? We Can Do It!

by Tonya Talley

20 Christian Help Inc. Helps

by Sonya Hallett

8 The Town of Center Grove:

Homeless Families

The Conversation Continues

The Center Grove Community Newsletter is published by Britt Interactive, LLC and written for and by local Center Grove area residents. Newsletters are distributed via direct mail to nearly 14,000 Center Grove area homeowners and businesses each month. For more information, visit www.AtCenterGrove.com.

Weeds & Seeds

by Dann Veldkamp

by Kate Rhoten

Publisher, TownePost Network: Tom Britt Tom@AtCenterGrove.com

16 The Gardening Nana: by Nancy Craig

Your Family: Life Insurance Awareness Month

Accounting: Jeanne Britt Jeanne@AtCenterGrove.com

September 2012 Vol. 1, No. 6

by Barbara Augsdorfer

22 Word Search: Breeds of Dogs

by Joyce Long

11

2012 Southside Realtor Directory

12

Report Card on Center Grove Schools

by Lucy Stravers

by Ann Craig-Cinnamon

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Publisher’s Welcome By Jody Veldkamp I have lived two-thirds of my adult life as a Center Gove resident. Over the past few years it has become clear to me how much this community is part of my life. I attend Center Grove Church; my daughter is a Center Grove High School graduate, where my son still attends. My wife’s first office was in the medical building at the corner of 135 and Stones Crossing. For nearly four years my brother and I have been following White River Township government, local politics and the reorganization effort with Greenwood on our website CenterGroveInc.org. When the reorganization failed to get on the ballot, I found there were many people who wanted to find another way to take responsibility for our community’s future. It was this desire that lead to the creation of Citizens for Center Grove.

Dann and Jody Veldkamp

always thought that Center Grove would be great opportunity for a third edition. Having grown up in a small town we realized that a community’s identity comes from its people, that Center Grove would benefit from a 100% locally focused publication that would help express that identity and provide a platform to connect our community. I have three strong passions in my life, faith, family and the future of Center Grove. Regardless of the outcome of the effort to create the town of Center Grove, we will continue to publish the Center Grove Community Newsletter. The Newsletter is not part of the incorporation effort, it is simply a way to tell the stories of Center Grove, and that effort won’t stop. cg

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Making ¢ents

By Kate Rhoten

Protect Your Family: Life Insurance Awareness Month

Death benefit amounts per insured can be addressed a couple of different ways. One method is eight to ten times the income of the insured. Another option is to use a life insurance needs calculator located on insurance company websites. This will factor in current debt, college expenses, and income to the surviving spouse or caregiver.

Insurance is designed to transfer the risk of losing an income stream or potential income, if someone passes too early, to an insurance company. It’s important to think how a family would be affected if the primary breadwinner was to die unexpectedly without a life insurance policy. This applies for a stay at home parent as well. There is value having a parent available to the children at home during the day therefore life insurance should be a consideration for that individual as well. If that person passes, how will you provide the additional care and expenses to the children? A person may need to be hired to help with after school activities and transportation, for example. In our household, we have term policies for both of us that name each other as beneficiary. Term policies are set up for a specific period of time ranging from 10- to 30- year terms at a pre-determined death benefit and cost. This does not change even if your health changes. Once the policy term ends, the coverage ends and the traditional policy has no return of premium or cash value. We chose not to have any type of cash value or variable policy due to the cost and we can use that money elsewhere in our long-term financial plans. Policies that have cash components cost more and the cash or invested portion is not given to the beneficiary in addition to the death benefit amount of the policy. The premium is higher and only a small portion is actually added to the cash or investment

Kate is a financial expert of what to do and not do with money as well as owner of 4 Walls Financial, A Coaching Focused Company. She has attended and completed Dave Ramsey’s Counselor Training. Follow Kate on Twitter 4WFCoach, reach out to her via email at kate@4wallsfinancial.com or visit www.4wallsfinancial.com. Feel free to share ideas or questions for future articles. It’s simply the best…I cannot tell a lie…It’s simply the best

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Insurance is designed to transfer the risk of losing an income stream or potential income – if someone passes too early – to an insurance company.

According to LIMRA, an insurance research group, the percentage of US households that have no life insurance of any kind, whether through work or personally purchased, is 30 percent. The number of households with life insurance has dropped in the last six years by 11 million. Are you in the 30 percent? Please protect your family’s financial future; take time in September to contact an insurance agent in the area or review your policies with your agent. cg

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Life insurance is not a topic most people want to discuss. But the peace of mind it can provide when the unthinkable could happen to one of us is worth more than the cost. There are different types of life insurance available subject to insurability.

sub-account that is tied to the policy. I encourage you to learn about the different policies and ask how they fit into your financial planning.

I cannot tell a lie…It’s simply the best…I cannot tell a lie…

While I was working in the financial services industry, I helped clients with their insurance and investment accounts. Insurance is an integral part of planning. The month of September is Life Insurance Awareness Month. Even though it was a focus with each client, September was a reminder to review policies, update beneficiaries and change policies (amount or company providing coverage) as necessary.

atCenterGrove.com

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Trails in Center Grove? We Can Do It! By Sonya Hallett

When I moved to Center Grove six years ago, my daughter was still in preschool. She went to Prince of Peace on Smokey Row Road at SR 135. Each morning I buckled her in her car seat and headed south on Mullinix Road. And each morning, we would see a jaunty elderly man walking north, wearing a bright yellow jacket. As soon as he caught sight of us cresting the hill, he routinely crossed to the other side to get out of our way, tipping his hat to our eager good morning waves. I thought good for him. He’ll live forever! It was all very quaint, but I wondered why he was walking on the road. Aren’t there safer places for him to work on his health? Are there no trails nearby? Once I started

venturing on our country roads, I quickly learned, no. Center Grove needs trails. It’s not a luxury. It’s a must. It’s really a matter of life and death. We need stay active, so we can live longer – not get mowed down in the middle of Morgantown Road. We can even argue we need to beat energy costs. We need more ways to meet and build community. We need safe ways for kids to walk to school. But, maybe first, we need to change our attitudes and behaviors. You would have thought it was child abuse last spring when I walked my third grader to school, less than one mile away. My vehicle was in the shop. I didn’t want a rental for just a couple of days. No fewer than four well-meaning neighbors offered to take us and wagged their heads when I said no. My kid wailed about it until I relented that we could ride our bikes in our community and then park them. We walked the rest of the way in the grass, far off the too narrow road. Her shoes, socks and pant legs were soaked by the time we got to school. And the home owner where we parked our bikes behind the community entrance sign called the police because she thought the abandoned kid’s bike there was a sign of a child abduction! Really? In 2007 Center Grove Trails, Inc. incorporated as a nonprofit. Its mission, “A future in which White River Township has a wellused, network of multi-use trails and pathways accessible to all to safely walk, jog or bike to many destinations, including other trail systems, in support of a flourishing, walkable community.” Great, but I would add, “and not be killed.”

Two new trails are coming to Center Grove! One begins in Brentridge Estates and heads west to Morgantown Road then south to Center Grove Elementary School. The other is located along Stones Crossing Road between the School Administration Building and the entrance to Forest Hills Subdivision. 6

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n e wsl e tt e r | September 2012

Here’s why – to the lovely runners, walkers, bikers and the occasional mother with a stroller, I plead with you to please take note. I run errands all day long. I take my kid to school and pick


her up. I run to SR 135 all the time. I am a soccer mom. I take care of my mother. I go to church. I am always driving. I’m on Mullinix, Olive Branch, Stones Crossing, Smokey Row, SR 144, Whiteland Road, and Morgantown Road. Almost every day. All of them. Consider all the hills and curves on these narrow roads that keep anyone from either seeing a bicyclist or making it possible to go around safely, especially in the double yellow lines. And know that when driving west with the sun at just the right angle and bug guts on my windshield from driving to mom’s in the country, I can’t see you! To the guy who was out on Morgantown Road Saturday night after my kid was done cheering for Bantam football around 9 p.m. – thank you for having a flashing red light on the back of your bike, but it took me way too long to figure out what it was. That was all I could see. Anita Knowles leads Center Grove Trails. She’s been working on this for years. She’s done a yeomen’s job. I met her when I headed up the Johnson County Community Foundation in Franklin. I lived in Franklin at the time and was spoiled with the fantastic trail system there. What a gem for the Franklin community. Why can’t we do that here? Knowles says, “It is so much more complicated than you think.” Well, I do imagine that. But, we are an educated, fairly affluent, roll up your sleeves kind of community. With twice as many people as Franklin. We can’t do it? Add to it that our roads are narrower with more hills. Listen, I’m at that age where in the past few years I’ve been touched with the death of a parent,

another with a serious ailment, divorce, loss of a job, crazy inlaws, taking care of a young child, illness, medicines that read “May Cause Drowsiness. Use Care When Operating A Car Or Dangerous Machinery,” and barely can read that on the bottle because I’m old enough to wear glasses but still vain enough not to. As my angel of a State Farm agent could tell you, I’ve had a few fender benders in the last few years. (Sorry to my neighbor’s red Taurus, and the red mailbox on north Mullinix. You’d think I could see red. Apparently, not.) Oh, and while we all know it’s illegal to text and drive, no one said anything about facebook or my phone’s navigation app, and really it only takes about ten seconds for me to call Mom after opening the security pattern, clicking on favorites, scrolling down and clicking twice on her name. I also put makeup on and paint my nails – a master at French tips. Here’s the crazy thing, I’m not the only one out there. I know I’ve more than made my point. But, I can’t stress enough that this truly is a matter of life and death. Still, building trails is at the bottom of the list for county government – way behind roads, police, fire, etc. “It

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is practically impossible without being incorporated. Without a town or city, it is challenging,” says Knowles. However, there has been significant work done by this organization. Center Grove Trails, working diligently with the Johnson County government, has received three grants that total $659,000. Finally, in 2013, two trails will be built!

w e a lt h

The trail in Brentridge Estates includes a pedestrian bridge, sidewalks, and heads west along the north edge of the soccer fields to Morgantown Road, south to Center Grove Elementary School. Total length is to be 2700 feet. The other trail is located along Stones Crossing Road between the School Administration Building and Forest Hills, a 120’ X 6’ pedestrian bridge over Honey Creek along with connected sidewalks. A map is available on the atCenterGrove website. With both trails completed there will be a continuous loop on sidewalks, pedestrian bridges, and 10’ wide trails. I challenged Knowles about Brentridge and Forest Hills. These aren’t exactly underserved areas. Why can’t they pay for at least some of it? But the grants were through a Safe Routes to School program. These trails will improve safety for our children and anyone wanting to go to and from our schools safely.

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At this point, Knowles has gotten the two trails paid for 100%. Yes, the monies are from federal tax dollars. But, if Center Grove didn’t get it, some other community would. And they have. This is significant for us, because government grants most often require a 20% match. We didn’t have to do that for these trails. But we truly need more. More to be connected to the other trails. More to allow us to have the amenities other communities have. More to provide a safe place for our children, teens, elderly and we middle agers to get fit. Our churches have been so great to build fitness and community centers for our area. Wouldn’t it be even better if we had trails leading to their front doors too? Ok, just a thought. I’ll move on. Truly, Knowles has been working on this for a long time. Help is needed. I too believe it would be easier if we were incorporated like Franklin or Greenwood, but the need is now. Call Knowles. Yell at her even if you want to, but not unless you’re willing to roll up your sleeves and dig in your pocket a little. As my daughter says, “Everything costs.” Well, yes. But, together, we can do it. Contact Anita Knowles at 317-885-1290, or email her at akaanitak@gmail.com. Check out the Center Grove Trails, Inc. website at centergrovetrails.org. Educate yourself. Get involved. By the way – for all except the jaunty elderly man with the bright yellow jacket, who’s still walking, still tipping his hat, still living because he’s still crossing the road to get out of my way – I drive

a huge gold Land Rover, constructed of 6063 lbs of steel and Bondo. Please be on the lookout for me. Well, not right now. I’m driving Mom’s Buick while mine’s in the body shop. But later this week….look out! cg Sonya Hallett, adjunct faculty with The Fund Raising School, is a writer/editor and speaker on topics that include philanthropy, giving circles, planned giving, proposal writing, voluntarism and community involvement for many area organizations.Sonya served the Johnson County Community Foundation (JCCF) on its board of directors for ten years before becoming its president/CEO.

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60,000 dollars in 60 days! To keep the town of Center Grove moving forward, it is CRITICAL that residents raise more than $50,000 to send over 10,000 certified letters. If you want to gain control of the future of our community now is the time to make your pledge. Find details how you can support your community: Visit CitizensForCenterGrove.org and look for the blue “Donate” logo.

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we only have 60 days to raise the funds. Make your pledge now, or lose the opportunity to be a town forever!

CitizensForCenterGrove.org Paid for by Citizens for Center Grove inC. a not for Profit Community orGanization.

September 2012 |

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the town of center grove the conversation continues Most of us Hoosiers will speak up when politics, religion, and food are on the table. Currently the freshest talk-fest in Johnson County involves whether or not Center Grove should become a town. While many don’t have a clear-cut opinion, several local residents recently shared their feelings. Five years ago, Marianne Fischer moved with her family to the Center Grove area from Whiteland. While Marianne was surprised by Center Grove’s low property taxes, this was not the primary reason for the move. “I don’t pay too much attention to taxes unless they’re hefty.” In her opinion, a tax increase is a small price to pay for representation. Former White River Township fire chief Howard Bennis notes, “If we don’t do something now to protect ourselves, there will be some future expansion by either Bargersville or Greenwood, especially when I-69 borders us.” Offering a contrasting view, Ann Reaume believes “there is simply no advantage to Center Grove becoming a town. We have enough government without adding another layer.” She also cites town government may make changes people don’t want, like conversions from septic systems to sewers. According to Ann, seventy per cent of those signing the opposition petition are retirees on a fixed income who are concerned about rising taxes.

According to Nielsen, “In short, the door is unlocked and wide open. So, whether to become a town may not be the question. The question may be how much do Center Grove residents want to control the overall look, feel and costs of their future lifestyle?” Residents need to understand determining a town versus a city is not based upon population. Rather it depends upon organizational structure. State requirements for a town include an elected town council with five people and a clerk/treasurer while a city requires a mayor and public works department. As an example of a large town is Fishers with 90,000 residents.

What Next? Johnson County commissioners have acknowledged receipt of the petition, which will be reviewed for compliance with state law. After it is officially accepted, commissioner chair John Price will need approval from Greenwood and Indianapolis. As cities they have certain control over a three-mile “buffer zone” around their cities. One thing they can do is stop the formation of a new town or city in that area. Within 60 – 90 days after the petition goes live, the county will hold a public meeting most likely at Center Grove High School. Until then, the conversation continues. cg Joyce Long, Greenwood Middle School language arts teacher from 1992-2000, has called Center Grove home for the past 25 years. Currently Joyce works as the communications coordinator for Center for Global Impact and is passionate about engaging people to empower the poor.

Also questioning Center Grove’s advantage as a town, Marion Martin believes residents already feel a part of Greenwood and wouldn’t want to change addresses. She states the need for more details. “The people who are not definitely against it would like more information. There are just so many questions unanswered.” (Editor’s note: The answers to many questions can be found on CitizensForCenterGrove. org. If you have questions, you can participate in the discussion on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ 29,0 00 po pu lati on C4CenterGrove.)

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Greenwood resident Tia Nielsen, as an interested bystander, wood green notes Center Grove has changed rapidly in the past 20 years and will continue to evolve, as there is no legal entity to “guard” the barg er sv ille territory’s interests.

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REaltor directory Barbara Dunn-Stear Keller Williams, Indy Metro South 317-501-7186 Greenwood/Center Grove bstear@kw.com Brian Burries Burries Realty Group, LLC. 317-205-1285 Greenwood/Center Grove brian.burries@yahoo.com Catherine Michel Pennington Line Realtors 317-701-0471 Greenwood/Center Grove clmichel@penningtonline.com www.penningtonline.com The size of the agency doesn’t matter... the personal service of the agent does. Serving Center Grove, Greenwood, and Indy South.

Charlene Brown Carpenter Realtors 317-331-1810 Greenwood/Center Grove CharleneBrown.com cbrown@callcarpenter.com I see open doors all over Center Grove

southside realtor directory Cheryl Sider Nicholson Century 21 Scheetz 317-691-7456 Greenwood/Center Grove csider@mibor.net Heather Burries Burries Realty Group, LLC. 317-205-1769 Greenwood/Center Grove heatherburries@yahoo.com Joe “DOC” Bottorff, CRS DOC Real Estate, Inc 317-888-7333 Greenwood/Center Grove/Franklin

Steve Hoagland The Hoagland Group at Keller Williams Realty (317)506-6651 Greenwood/Center Grove Steve@PerfectPlaceForYou.com Sue A. Wheeler Tomorrow Realty Inc. 317-694-1516 Greenwood/Center Grove swheeler99@aol.com Sue Cox Carpenter Realtors 317-881-8100 Greenwood/Center Grove suecox.callcarpenter.com suecox@callcarpenter.com Listing homes for sale and selling them is what I do! Sue Can Do! Call today for a market analysis of your neighborhood!

Lisa Johnson F.C. Tucker Company 317-701-1868 Greenwood/Center Grove LisaJ.Tucker@sbcglobal.net Robert King FC Tucker 317-405-7643 Greenwood/Center Grove Scott Combs Complete Real Estate Solutions 317-885-5099 Greenwood/Indianapolis http://www.cresindy.com/ scott@cresindy.com Center Grove & Greenwood Real Estate services at a lower cost to you, flat fee, or reduced commission! Scott Smith Scott Smith 317-507-4663 Greenwood/Center Grove Scott@IndyMetroHomes.com

Tonda Hoagland The Hoagland Group at Keller Williams Realty 317-340-4575 Greenwood/Center Grove tonda@perfectplaceforyou.com Tony Arthur Keller Williams Realty 317-885-5599 Greenwood/Center Grove HomeSalesByTony@aol.com

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local real estate outlook Saying the “real estate market has been in the doldrums” could win the understatement of the year award. However things are starting to turn around in the Center Grove and Greenwood areas. Dave Durrett of Carpenter’s office on 135 & County Line Road has been in the business for 20 years. Dave is having his best year ever and his July sales were the best month any Carpenter agent has ever had. He says the “market is definitely getting better. People like to spend money but have been walking on pins and needles do to the economy.” He senses a feeling of optimism that is driving sales. Cathy Michel who focuses on Greenwood, Center Grove and southern Indianapolis for Pennington Line Realtors says the market has price corrected. “Buyers are more in tune to the economy. Homes that are selling are those were the owner has realized the true market value of their home. Owners need to realize their home may not be worth what they think.” Michel recommends that those looking to sell get a detailed competitive market analysis of their homes value so “you know the true value of your home.” It is a great time to sell or buy a home according to Sue Cox of Carpenter Realtors Greenwood office says “Real estate sales have been brisk.” She added that favorable interest rates should remain for the foreseeable future and that helps both buyers and sellers.

September 2012 |

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Report Card on Center Grove Schools By Ann Craig-Cinnamon | Photos by John Cinnamon and Dann Veldkamp ou know the start of school is upon us when you can’t swing a cat without hitting a back-to- school sale. So as the notebooks, pencils and backpacks go flying off the shelves, now might be a good time to assess how Center Grove schools are faring. After all, whether we have children in the school system or not, we are all paying for it in property taxes and the job our school corporation is doing does affect us as a community. Besides the ultimate concern about the preparation of young minds, there’s also the issue of property values. Living in the Center Grove School district has always been a plus when it comes to selling your home. People actually want to move here because of the reputation of the school system. But there have been a lot of changes over the past few years, not the least of which was in the School Superintendent’s office and there are big issues facing all schools in today’s world such as school funding, student testing, teacher merit pay, and school referendums. When just up the street you have a school district in which less than 65% of students actually graduate from high school and another nearby district that made headlines by charging families for bus transportation, it is a front and center issue that affects everyone. 12

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“I don’t believe teachers do the job for the pay. They do the job because they love to teach and they love kids.” – Richard Arkanoff Superintendent of Center Grove Schools

So, we visited with the Superintendent of Center Grove Schools to get an update; a report card, if you will, on the challenges facing Center Grove Schools. Richard Arkanoff is beginning his sophomore year as the head of our school district and he is quite accessible and open to input. In fact, that is the major thing that I took away from my conversation with him. He wants community input. He wants people to get involved. The major challenges for Center Grove Schools, as Superintendent Arkonoff sees them, are all the changes in state law, especially the new teacher evaluation model and the fact that all school corporations now have to have a performance based pay system. He says a committee was formed that was made up of teachers and administrators that developed a teacher evaluation model that he believes will work, but then, down the road, merit pay will kick in. He is not a big fan of merit pay saying “I don’t believe teachers do the job for the pay. They do the job because they love to teach and they love kids.” He continues, “In almost all the research I have


“maintaining success is a challenge. It’s one thing when you are working toward becoming successful. We are successful and now we must be more focused.” – Richard Arkanoff Superintendent of Center Grove Schools

Center Grove High Schol’s Hall of Excellence

read, motivation for teachers comes from the gratification of working with students not from the salary; not from the pay. So, I’m not sure that merit based pay is going to be as effective as our legislators think.” School funding is a constant problem that many school districts are grappling with these days. So, how are Center Grove Schools doing financially? Is there red showing on the bottom line? Is there the chance of increasing the school property tax or charging parents for bus transportation in the near future? Mr. Arkanoff says no. He says that Center Grove Schools are in a good financial position. We’re not well-to-do but when we compare with other districts, we are doing ok. Enrollment, however, needs to be monitored because last year was the first year that it actually declined in Center Grove School history. It was minimal, fewer than fifty kids, and he attributes it to charging around $2000 a year for kindergarten, which was on the high end for schools in Indiana. That has now changed after the state came up with funding for kindergarten and he thinks enrollment will go back up as a result. You may have noticed that no new school buildings have been built for a few years and that West Grove Elementary is now leased to a church and Maple Grove has been repurposed as an Academy for the high school. Mr. Arkanoff says we are one classroom away from capacity on elementary schools but unless there is a ridiculous boom, he sees no need to build any additional buildings for the foreseeable future. He calls the high school snug but says with a few modifications it should be able to handle growth for the next ten years.

Center Grove Elemntary School,l ocated at 2455 S. Morgantown Rd., is one of five elementary school in Center Grove. 14

center grove c o mm u nity

If you are like many people who have a problem with the building of what has been referred to as football and basketball palaces, you’ll be happy to hear that those days are well behind us. Athletics are now being funded through donations and any significant building that impacts property taxes must go to a taxpayer referendum. Referendums have created major problems for other school districts but, so far, we’ve had no such issues in Center Grove. Superintendent Arkanoff says “people want a lot of unique programming for public schools, but what they don’t understand is that that costs a significant amount of money. If you want small classroom sizes, then we need the funding to pay teachers.”

n e wsl e tt e r | September 2012


The Superintendent says that Center Grove Schools still have a great reputation and are considered one of the top districts in the state. When considering the Indianapolis area’s best districts, we usually rank up there with Carmel, Hamilton Southeastern, and Zionsville Schools. But even though our students scored above the state average in the most recent ISTEP tests, we were still 1% to 2% shy of the state goal of 90%. He says “maintaining success is a challenge. It’s one thing when you are working toward becoming successful. We are successful and now we must be more focused”. He says we need to use more data in determining if students are learning, not just being trained for the ISTEP tests. Toward that goal of a more focused future, the school district is currently developing a three to five year strategic plan with emphasis on four areas: programming, communication, environment and staffing. There are committees for each of the focus areas and the district is looking for volunteers to serve on the committees. This is a great way for you to get involved in your school district and help determine its future. One of the areas being studied is online learning with the goal, according to Mr. Arkanoff, of becoming a world class online program that can be accessed anywhere. He adds that traditional learning won’t go away and teachers are still the most relevant factor when it comes to learning. He calls today a challenging time for education on many levels. Accountability is now a major issue for teachers and

KinderCare Center Grove 980 South SR 135, 46143 317-882-7775

administrators alike. The impact of social media is a big factor for schools too and to deal with it, Center Grove had to create a new policy. Mr. Arkanoff says it’s a balancing act to control potential bullying and harassment and at the same time being careful not to tread on students’ freedom. All in all, Superintendent Arkanoff is a very upbeat person who takes very seriously his job of making sure that each child has the opportunity to learn. “Just like I tell teachers every year, this is all new to the child. We want it to be the best experience it can be. That will draw the child into a love of learning and onto college. That is everyone’s job, that the child has a great experience of going to school.” For more information about Center Grove Community School’s Strategic Plan go to http://www.centergrove.k12.in.us. If you want to volunteer, give Richard Arkanoff a call. He wants to hear from you. cg Ann Craig-Cinnamon is a 30 year Radio & TV Broadcast veteran. You may recall her as the host of popular radio morning shows in Indianapolis for many years. She and her husband, John are also business owners. Her lifelong love of world travel led them to start a travel franchise, CruiseOne, in Center Grove. Ann is a writer, travel speaker and author of an upcoming book about her time spent living in Iran.

KinderCare (135 & County Line Rd) 25 Country Woods Drive, 46217 317-882-4955 NAEYC Accredited We accept CCDF, NACCRA, United Way funding sources

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the

gardening

Nana

By Nancy Craig

Weeds & Seeds Why the only thing green in this drought are weeds? “Nana, why don’t you like dandelions?” my great nephew, Eli, asked as he was helping me pick flowers for a bouquet earlier this spring. We had beautiful blue & white flowers and a dandelion or two wouldn’t have hurt but he knew that I didn’t pick the yellow flower he liked so much. Good question, since we have all picked them for our mothers and nothing is more fun than blowing the fluffy white seed heads. In fact, those seeds can “parachute” five miles away! It seems that weeds have the most seeds and very clever ways to survive the most severe weather like drought. So I’m sure you noticed this dry summer that the only plants really hardy and green were the weeds.

Sunflower seeds almost ready for harvest.

To me a weed is a plant growing where you do not want it to grow. So dandelions are a weed in the lawn, just ask my husband who spends many hours hand pulling

them out of our lawn. Yet what I call a weed here in Indiana may be a wildflower in Colorado. So I like the book, Weeds: Friend or Foe? by Sally Roth, which lists many common weeds and what are their good and or bad qualities. (Roth has lived in many planting zones, even Indiana, and is a great garden writer. http:// sallyroth.com/) So even though many of us see them as weeds, dandelions are one of those plants that have many good uses from salad greens to wine and even a “root beer,” dandelion and burdock, a beverage consumed in the British Isles since about 1265. My daughter, Ann, who is studying to be an organic herbalist, sees the good side to many weeds that I grew up pulling out of the garden. She even brought me a burdock root to eat! I just could not do it, since it was one of the weeds we fought growing up on the farm. We are harvesting the sunflower seeds from our “Sunflower Fort.” We will roast some for snacks and save some to plant next year; the birds have already had a feast! I am still looking into ways to make “seed bombs” or balls of clay with seeds inside that should be a muddy, messy project for my great nephews to garden next spring. cg Nancy’s love of flower gardening intensified while living in Holland and was perfected with Master Gardener courses.

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n e wsl e tt e r | September 2012


Discovering the Dressler Home By Dann Veldkamp If you drive north on Morgantown Road in Smith Valley you no doubt have noticed the large home with the wrap-around porch. From the porch, you have a great view of the woods along Honey Creek. This unique home had a more humble beginning. Over twenty years ago, Sue Dressler and her husband went shopping for a “farm” home that they could renovate. One requirement was that after the

Before

renovation the home retain the look of an old farm house. In the fall of 1994, they began working with Gettum and Associates to design the upgrade. When it was complete, an existing playroom at the front of the house had been converted into a walk-in closet for the master bedroom. Part of the playroom was also used to expand the existing living room. A wrap-around porch was added retain the charm of the older home. On the second floor, three bedrooms were added along with one bathroom. Outside a deck was placed off one of the bedrooms and additional storage was added. About five years ago an additional 700 square feet was added above the garage. After Over the course of the two projects, the home more than doubled in size. Mrs. Dressler says that Gettum was very easy to work with, brought innovative ideas to the table that the home owners would not have thought of on their own. You can see more pictures of the project on AtCenterGrove.com. cg

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Creating the

BuZZ By Tonya Talley The leaves crunched under the weight of their feet, while a honeybee flitted from leaf to leaf, stopping in a near-motionless hover while collecting water from the leaf’s early morning dew. She looks as if her wings are not moving at all, but they’re actually flapping 11,000 times per second. This was the scene in which my husband and Center Grove resident Emet Talley joined his brother John for harvesting his honey. “Backyard beekeeping is not difficult. It doesn’t take any more time than say a garden or a pet,” John said. “It’s a great hobby for those who enjoy nature, science and agriculture. And the honey is a bonus.” To locate their food or the nectar source for making honey, honeybees have one of the most interesting communication systems. They communicate through an excreted chemical substance called pheromone. “It is quite a sight to observe,” Emet said in awe.

Sting Protection

In late summer when harvest season is at its peak, so is the population of a typical beehive. By now, each hive has anywhere from 40,000 to 60,000 bees, which can increase the probability of being stung. “Even though bees are small, they are very good team players,” Emet said with a chuckle.

Beekeepser checking the progress of a new hive. Beekeeping can be a rewarding hobby with proper planning and research.

While knowledge of the bees is the first line of offense, most beekeepers also wear some protective clothing . “At a minimum, beekeepers should wear a veil to protect against stings on the face,” said John. “Many experienced beekeepers don’t wear gloves or a covered suit, but doing so can help minimize stings.” A third defense against stings when opening a hive is smoke. Most bees duck into an open cell and engorge on nectar or honey when exposed to the smoke. Bees filled

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with honey are more docile; they are far less likely to sting. Thus, a smoker is used every time a hive is opened.

Harvest Time

Many beekeepers harvest in June, August and September extracting the purest honey from the different pollination seasons. Careful attention is made in the amount of honey taken within the fall months. “Bees need enough honey left for them in the fall to keep them fed during the winter. They usually need 50-80 pounds of honey,” Mike Seib, 42-year beekeeping veteran, said. “Because of the heat this summer the bees have had to work harder keeping their hives cool. If they do not produce enough honey for the winter, sugar water will need to be used to feed the bees. Once the temperature drops below 40 degrees, raw sugar is used.” Understanding the harvest process is easier when you can visualize how the hive is set up. The super or hive looks like boxes sitting on top of each other. In the bottom box the queen busies herself with laying her eggs. If the top boxes were opened, each box would remind you of a filing cabinet drawer. As a cabinet drawer would have files hanging downward and hinged on two-sides of the drawer, the bee boxes have 8-10 frames hinged on two-sides of the box that hang down. Here is where the bees build their honeycomb, produce the nectar and cap it off with wax.

bottom of the extractor, which has a valve on the bottom. “At this point, you can bottle the honey, but I suggest the honey be strained for particles that may have come off the frames,” said John.

Backyard Beekeeping

If you are interested in beekeeping, now is the time to plan for it. You can purchase your boxes and get them made and painted for the weather. “In February the Indiana Beekeepers Association (www.indianabeekeeper.com) has a class for beginners,” John said. For those wanting to have a backyard beehive, Mike recommends starting slowly. “Start out with two hives so you can compare. If one hive is not doing well, you should be able to recognize it by the activity of your other hive.” Mike, a volunteer with the White Lick Beekeepers Association, suggests coming to a meeting and socializing with beekeepers of all levels of expertise. The meetings are at the Mooresville Library, 220 West Harrison Street, on the second Wednesday of each month at 6:30 p.m. cg Tonja Talley has called Center Grove home since 1993. An 11year bi-lateral lung transplant survivor, Tonja enjoys speaking on behalf of the Indiana Organ Procurement Organization. She also volunteers for the CF Foundation, byTavi, and her church.

haven’t a bailout. You You haven’t takentaken a bailout. Neither Neither havehave we. we.

Crops, we all know, are harvested whenever the vegetables, fruits and grains are ripe. Honey is no different. But since bees make the honey, how do we know when it is “ripe” and ready to SinceAmeriprise 1894, Ameriprise hashard worked hard Since 1894, FinancialFinancial has worked harvest? “Easy,” said Mike. “Honeybees ripen nectar by drawing to give ourahaven’t clients future better than today - neve to give our clients future abetter than - never You taken a today bailout. moisture from the syrupy mixture. Once the moisture level is to losing sight ofproprietary our clients’ best interests losing sight ofNeither our clients’ best or takingor taking Discover how our C #TI interests onfident have we. their satisfaction the worker bees will seal it with wax. They do ® Retirement # T I approach can help answer questions a bailout. Discover the one-to-one relationship you a bailout. Discover the one-to-one relationship you this cell-by-cell until the entire frame is capped.”

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capped. “While pulling the honey frames out of the hives is easy a bailout. Discover the one-to-one relationship you legacy deserve. to my loved to do, removing the bees from the frames is a different story,” Call ones?# us for#TI a complimentary 30-minute John said. “There are several ways to remove bees from the Call usconsultation. today and learn how you can get on track to ® Your WITHIN Our YourMORE Dreams. MOREREACH WITHIN REACH® frames to get to the honey. Many people, including myself, useOur Advisors. retireAdvisors. withDreams. confidence. a brush. Others with a bigger operation employ air compressors, Our Advisors. Your Dreams. MORE WITHIN REACH Call us today at today (317) 660.2454 Call leaf blowers or bee escapes.” Using a brush, a beekeeper will take Call us me todayat at (317) (317) 660.2454 660.2454 Call us today at (317) 660.2454 435 E Main St a frame at a time and gently brush the bees from the frame. After William Robertson William Robertson 435 E Main St William William Robertson 435 E Main St Ste 220 Financial Advisor William Robertson Ste 220 Financial Advisor Financial Advisor Ste 220 each frame is completed, new frames are placed in the super. Greenwood, IN 46143 Greenwood, IN 46143 Financial Advisor Greenwood, IN 46143 ®

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Utilizing a scraper or an electric uncapping knife, the capped wax is removed from the frame to uncover the honey underneath. Newly made wax will be a bright white. As it ages through the years, the wax becomes darker.

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William.D.Robertson William.D.Robertson Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA and SIPC.

The initial consultation provides an overview of financial William.D.Robertson@ampf.com planning concepts. You will not receive written analysis and/or Financial Services, Member FINRA and SIPC. recommendations. Ameriprise Financial Inc. Services, Inc. Member FINRA and SIPC. honeyAmeripriseAmeriprise Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA and SIPC. Confident Retirement is not The initialaThe consultation provides anprovides overview ofoverview financial ©of2012 Ameriprise Financial, Inc. All an rights reserved. of financial initial consultation guarantee future financial results.

Multiple frames can be placed in the extractor to spin the AmeripriseYou Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA out. Once the honey is extracted from the comb, it collects in the planning concepts. will not receive written analysis and/or © 2012 Ameriprise Financial, Inc.You All rights planning willreserved. not written analysis and/or and SIPC.concepts. Confident Retirement is receive not a guarantee recommendations. recommendations. of future financial results. © 2012 Ameriprise Financial, Inc. All rights reserved. © Ameriprise Financial, Inc. All rights reserved. 19 © 2012 2012 Ameriprise Financial, All rights reserved. | atCenterGrove.com September 2012 Inc.


Christian Help Inc. Helps Homeless Families By Barbara Augsdorfer When you hear the words “homeless person,” your mind automatically pictures a very dirty, smelly, unshaven man in ragged clothes standing on a street median and holding a cardboard sign. However, many homeless (and those just barely hanging on) are women, children, and entire families. The sudden loss of a job, a sudden catastrophic illness of a family member turns a family’s security of a home and food topsyturvy, and without a back-up plan, many end up on the street. Some may be lucky enough to find a relative to temporarily take the kids and shield them from the brunt of the disaster. LeTheda Noonan, Director, Christian Help, Inc.

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Still others may be lucky enough to scrape together a few dollars to hole up in a motel for a few days. Many homeless people lack a network of other people and resources to rely on – and very soon, survival instincts kick in – anything goes. Many times pride is a culprit. Who wants to admit that they’ve “hit bottom” and have nothing? Christian Help Inc. in Franklin was founded in 2003 with the mission of helping the homeless meet their immediate needs, and also help them get the skills needed to become self-sufficient – the “give a man a fish/teach a man to fish” concept. Before 2003, Johnson County did not have a shelter or any other resources for the homeless. CHI was begun with six people and $1,000 raised from a raffle at Our Lady of the Greenwood Church. After one year of prayer, service, and formation, CHI began to approach other churches to become involved. The “vision” is that CHI would be made up of Christians from all denominations who come together to help the poor and needy as taught in the Bible. Congregations that have joined with CHI include: St. Barnabas, New Hope Church, The Vineyard, Grace United Methodist, Sanctuary Church, Grace Assembly of God, Greenwood United Methodist, Greenwood Christian Church in partnership with Leadership Johnson County, and Mount Pleasant Christian Church. On Jan. 25, 2012, Christian Help Inc. counted 122 homeless people in Johnson County. It doesn’t sound like much, but when the numbers are broken down, those numbers are really people: men, women, children, whole families. The statistic was part of the U.S. Housing and Urban Development Department’s data that provides Congress with the information it needs to allocate funding for homeless services such as housing, residential programs, hotel/motel vouchers provided by a public/private agency. Christian Help Inc. was serving 41 of the 122 counted on that January day. From 2005 through June 2012, Christian Help Inc. worked with “Friendly Village” to refurbish mobile homes for homeless families. In addition to working on the refurbishing, CHI clients attended classes on life skills and home maintenance, and if applicable, completed a GED and gained job skills. After two years, the client graduated from the program. The client gained a refurbished mobile home to live in, job skills and in many cases, a job. “We urge our clients to set goals and work toward meeting those goals,” says CHI Executive Director LaTheda Noonan. “Each client is treated as a unique individual. If that person didn’t finish high school, the client is encouraged to attend the classes necessary to attain his or her GED. The clients are also encouraged to attend classes that will give them job skills.” It’s all about setting and meeting goals, according to Noonan.

n e wsl e tt e r | September 2012


Christian Help Inc. has set goals for itself as a mission and organization. Among those goals is that within five years, CHI hopes to have sustainable business where its clients can work to not only earn income, but also acquire valuable job skills. “We don’t have a specific type of business in mind, yet,” says Noonan. “One of the ideas proposed was a restaurant.”

appreciated was the safeness of a building, immediate use of bathroom facilities and sleeping on air mattresses. (The entire journal of the “homeless van” is available at www. christianhelpinc.org/journal-of-a-homeless-van.) They each admitted the experience was “hard” but they met many helpful people along the way.

If that cold day in January was a revelation, here is another one: Those 122 people were only a portion of the actual homeless in Johnson County. Many don’t seek help and so are not counted. “In July we received 219 calls from people who needed help paying rent or utilities or for food,” Noonan said. “Those 219 calls represented 162 children, and 45 of the callers were already homeless. “We help as many as we can, but we are unable to help everyone who calls when funds are low or depleted,” Noonan adds. “In July we were able to help ten families with a total expenditure of $1,695. We are always seeking monetary donations to help the people who ask for it. We know the tough economy has made it difficult for people to help us.” And every little bit helps. Jennifer Petgen, CHI caseworker adds, “Don’t be afraid to give a donation because you think it’s not enough. A lot of ‘not enoughs’ makes something more.”

Christian Help Inc. is located at 227 E. Jefferson Street, Franklin. CHI is always seeking volunteers and of course more church and community partners. For more information, call (317) 3469957. Monetary donations may be sent to: CHI, P.O. Box 7112, Greenwood, IN 46142. cg

To get a brief perspective of what the life of a homeless person is like, Noonan and three caseworkers became “homeless” last summer, living in the “homeless van” for one week. They parked the van each night in a different location within Johnson County. The four women realized immediately that being homeless means not being to wash their faces and hands whenever they wanted; not having a debit card; not having a comfortable bed to sleep in; and having to take turns staying awake so none of them were in danger. Unlike other homeless people, though, the four women set some parameters. Most importantly, they agreed that if anyone’s health deteriorated to an unhealthy level, the experiment would end. Although the women lived as “homeless,” they still went to the CHI office and did their jobs each day. By day-three of the experience each of the women missed the routine and stability that having a place to call home provides. On day-six, the women “camped” at the CHI offices. Among the first things each of them

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word search: Breeds of Dogs Presented by the Rick Chambers Agency | Created by Lucy Stravers Hidden in the puzzle are the names of the kinds of dogs that are listed below. Names may appear in any direction in a straight line. O

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Lucy Stravers lives in Pella, Iowa and is the mother-in-law of Dann Veldkamp. Need a large print version? Find it on AtCenterGrove.com “Even our biz has rock stars. Which means this highly-skilled agent could very well be sporting insurance tattoos.” – Prof Nathaniel Burke

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n e wsl e tt e r | September 2012

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West Smith Valley Road and SR 135

882-8200

Š2012 The National Bank of Indianapolis

1922 Greenwood Experts_7.37x9.58.indd 1

www.nbofi.com

Member FDIC

4/24/12 6:38 AM


AtCenterGrove.com P.O. Box 36097 Indianapolis, IN 46236-0097

ECRWSS POSTAL CUSTOMER

PRSRT STD US POSTAGE

PAID

Indianapolis, IN Permit No. 100

James D Heck DDS 1638 W Smith Valley Rd., Suite B Greenwood, IN 46142

(317) 881-4726 www.greenwoodcosmeticdentist.com

Center Grove Community Newsletter - 2012-09  

September 2012 Focus on Center Grove Schools