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January

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13, 2013

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Top cop

JOHN THARP becomes Lucas County’s first new sheriff in nearly 30 years. Story by Brandi Barhite, Page A6 10x1.25_TolExp_AA_pr#691682.pdf

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A2 n Toledo Free Press

JANUARY 13, 2013


Opinion

JANUARY 13, 2013

Publisher’s statement

Visit www.toledofreepress.com

n A3

DON LEE

Thanks, Jamie O

ther than glass itself, Jamie Farr has been Toledo’s greatest ambassador. He embodies Toledo’s hardworking, talented journeyman spirit and has used his fame and position to aggressively promote Toledo. Like the Jeep and Tony Packo’s hot dogs, Farr represents the heart and soul of Toledo. The news that he will no longer be the front person for the annual LPGA tournament in Sylvania does not diminish his status one iota. To the contrary, it allows us to marvel at his 27 years of service to the tournament and the untold dollars it has contributed to our community and specific charities. As Toledo Free Press Pop Culture Editor Jeff McGinnis wrote in 2011, “No one celebrity embodies ‘Toledo’ as much as Farr. The actor has long since carved out an indelible legacy as one of the stars of the legendary sitcom ‘M*A*S*H,’ bringing the Glass City along for the ride by incorporating many local institutions into his character. Thanks to Farr, when you say ‘Mud Hens’ or ‘Tony Thomas F. Pounds Packo’s,’ a good chunk of the American populace knows what you’re talking about.” Findlay-based Marathon Petroleum is the new title sponsor of the event, set for July 18-21 at Highland Meadows Golf Club, and we welcome the company and thank it for its commitment to the tournament. In a news release from the LPGA, Farr said: “Because of pending show business concerns which may prevent me from hosting the tournament in the future, I have decided to pass the baton to Marathon. I will always appreciate the loyal and generous support of our FARR faithful sponsors, volunteers, fans, media and LPGA golf professionals and I extend a special thanks to all of them. Please extend to Marathon your generous support which you so devotedly gave to me.” During the eight years Toledo Free Press has covered life in Northwest Ohio, Farr has been accessible and helpful, whether for interviews for each year’s tournament, cutting the ribbon at Hollywood Casino Toledo or his 2011 contribution of “A Visit from St. Nicholas” to our Make-AWish benefit CD. “I am so honored and proud to be able to do positive things for my hometown,” Farr told McGinnis in 2011. “Having the local businesses support our LPGA tournament is a testimony to how much they want to do for the city and the charities involved. They are more than generous.” Perhaps the just-launched “Klinger’s Club” on the 14th hole can be retained as a tribute to and reminder of Farr’s three decades of service. The Marathon era is welcome and great news for the community and the future of the LPGA tournament. But we will always remember Farr’s contribution and wish him well as he gets ready to tee off on other projects. O Thomas F. Pounds is president and publisher of Toledo Free Press and Toledo Free Press Star. Contact him at tpounds@toledofreepress.com.

LIGHTING THE FUSE

T

he salt for our home water softener is delivered in 50- few circles in the kitchen, trying to reconcile the idea that pound bags. The bags are left on our front porch and I just a few months ago, I carried that much weight, plus andrag them down to the basement to pour their crystal- other 20 pounds, on my frame every day. Setting down one bag was a relief. Setting down the line contents into the water softener tank. This has been a regsecond bag was a revelation. ular process for a decade, but the most recent At the beginning of the bariatric surgery salt delivery included a bonus — an epiphany. process, I weighed 380 pounds. My current As I lifted a 50-pound bag over my left 260 is more than an adjustment of aesthetics shoulder and started for the basement, it and habits; it is a reclamation of my life. Not struck me that since beginning a bariatric quite four months after the sleeve procedure, surgery process on Sept. 1, I have lost 120 which involved the removal of 85 percent of pounds, nearly two and a half of the 50my stomach through laparoscopic surgery, I pound bags of salt. I wasn’t ready to navicontinue to break through plateaus and lose gate the basement stairs carrying three pounds. My eventual goal is to get down to bags of salt, but I did manipulate a second 225 or so, the weight I was when I graduated bag over my right shoulder and started for Michael S. miller from high school, and then maintain around the basement. that weight forever and ever, amen. I was lumbering, slow, hesitant and felt crushed under the extra 100 pounds of salt, but I walked a n MILLER CONTINUES ON A4 Thomas F. Pounds, President/Publisher tpounds@toledofreepress.com

A publication of Toledo Free Press, LLC, Vol. 9, No. 02. Established 2005. EDITORIAL Mary Ann Stearns, Design Editor mastearns@toledofreepress.com James A. Molnar, Lead Designer jmolnar@toledofreepress.com Sarah Ottney, Managing Editor sottney@toledofreepress.com Brigitta Burks, News Editor bburks@toledofreepress.com Jeff McGinnis, Pop Culture Editor PopGoesJeff@gmail.com

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Opinion

A4 n Toledo Free Press n MILLER CONTINUED FROM A3 I remain on a high-protein, minimal sugar and low-carbohydrate diet, and I am often asked if I miss food, both quality and quantity. Yes. Yes, I do. Every day. Every hour. Every minute. I miss quaffing Coke. I miss pasta, especially Mueller’s spaghetti with Ragu tomato sauce, ground beef and fresh, warm bread, all doused with a snowfall of grated Parmesan cheese. I miss breads in general, and McDonald’s french fries and Wendy’s cheeseburgers and Fricker’s buffalo wings and the parade of cookies, candy and ice cream that pass by my eyes at parties, grocery stores and restaurants. I miss eating more than a few spoonfuls at a time. But I do not miss those things enough to lose the ground I have gained through the weight I have lost. On the last day before Christmas vacation began, I ran and played tag with my 6-year-old son, Evan, in the driveway as he waited for the school bus. We chased each other in circles and froze in time-out spots and laughed as we slipped by each other’s outreached hands. I do not believe Evan recognized the moment as the landmark event it was, but after nearly six years of sitting by as Evan and his younger brother Sean ran and played and tried without success to get me to join them, I felt a burst of “hallelujah!” that still makes me smile. I would not trade that game of tag with my son for an ocean of spaghetti and meat sauce, or a lifetime supply of crispy, saucy chicken wings from Fricker’s. In tandem with food discipline, I have been unshakably dedicated to exercising an hour every day. I am simply walking, at a decent but not record-setting pace, for at least one hour every day. (Not that speed has ever been my strong suit. My Libbey High School football coach, Dave Merritt, used to say he should time my 40-yard dash with a calendar. Assistant coach Fred Wesoloski once asked how, since I moved so slowly, the sperm that became me beat all the others to my mother’s egg. I believe my response was that the sperm carrying me must have eaten all its competitors). I usually walk during lunch hour for three laps on a one-mile course through Downtown Toledo, down Monroe Street, along Summit Street, north on Washington Street and across 10th Street. During the holiday vacation weeks, I experienced a number of different paths. Visiting friends in Fort Wayne, Ind., our walking path took us to Parkview Field, home of the Fort Wayne TinCaps baseball team. It’s a marvelous facility, newer than our Fifth Third Field if not as ambitious and regal, but it has one friendly advantage over the home of the Mud Hens; it stays open every day for walkers to circle its nearly one-mile

pavilion lap. It’s still outdoors, but it is safer than dodging car traffic and fosters a great affinity for the facility. Perhaps the difference between the growth in downtown Fort Wayne and the stagnancy in Downtown Toledo can be summed up in the difference in attitude between the open and utilized Parkview Field and the locked and empty Fifth Third Field. On Christmas Day, I watched the sun rise as I walked a three-mile path around Big Fish Lake in Ortonville, Mich. Snow had dusted the trees and freezing lake, and the Christmas morning was silent except for the geese and the crunch of snow under my feet. It was a peaceful, spiritual walk, one I never would have contemplated before I dropped 120 pounds of fat from my bones. My New Year’s Day walk was 1,500 miles south, on the Don Soffer Exercise Trail in Aventura, Fla. That path, circling a golf course, is also three miles, but that is where its similarity to Big Fish Lake ends. The Soffer trail is lush with green palms and tropical plants, flush with flamingos and iguanas and geckos. It is also a display area for people with great tenacity and athleticism (T&A). T&A is in abundant display in South Florida, at beaches, pools, clubs, shopping malls, temples, etc., but the Soffer trail is home to some of the finest T&A a married Midwesterner is likely to see in an environment without shiny silver poles. It’s damn inspiring. I am loathe to admit I enjoy exercise and walking, regardless of the path, weather or scenery. And while I am walking farther and slightly faster each week, I am still no Usain Bolt; I tried jogging once, but the resulting brontosaurus-like, Richter-scale motion was a freakish blend of Miller walking and jogging I called “Millogging.” It wasn’t pretty. But as the weeks and months have slipped by, I find that hour of moving not only breaks up my day, it energizes my mind and inspires my stilladjusting legs and feet. The bariatric surgery and resulting 120-pound weight loss have changed everything for the better. What is a piece of bread compared to playing tag with my son? What is a glass of Coke in relation to seeing a Christmas Day sunrise over a snow-dusted lake? What is a cheeseburger next to the sensory indulgence of tropical birds, green palms and inspiring T&A? My journey is not easy, and will not end until I do. But I no longer sit like a sloth and watch life speed by. I move. I may not move as fast as life does, but I move. Therefore, I am. O Michael S. Miller is editor in chief of Toledo Free Press and Toledo Free Press Star. Email him at mmiller@ toledofreepress.com.

JANUARY 13, 2013

DON LEE

MEDIA WATCH

Easy steps to restoring FOX Toledo

I

f you are like many Northwest Ohio residents affected by out if this is the right move for you, call 1-855-893-4614. DIRECTV is my recommendation; I’ve been a custhe breakup of FOX Toledo and Buckeye CableSystem, do not worry another second; I can help you through this tomer for almost 13 years and I would recommend them to anyone. Call them at 1-800 DIRECTV. If annoying problem. Here are some simple soluyou are interested in switching, tell them I tions to make sure you don’t miss things like sent you and they will hook you up! (DISH the NFL playoffs, “American Idol” or Zooey Network can be reached at 1 877 625 3561.) Deschanel’s hipster hotness. You could ditch cable and satelite altoMy first suggestion is the easiest thing you gether. As technology evolves, so do the altercan do — hook up an antenna. native choices to TV cable/satellite providers. O Step One: Visit your local Best Buy, If your New Year’s resolution was to be more Walmart, Target, Meijer, etc., and purchase proactive and save money, here’s a great sugan HDTV antenna — the newer version of gestion: Cancel Buckeye CableSystem and rabbit ears. buy a Roku. A Roku is a small black box that O Step Two: Connect the HDTV antenna works with any high-speed router (wireless to any available input opening. If you have the Jeremy BAUMHOWER Internet) to provide your TV with channels Buckeye Cable connected via HDMI cable, connect the HDTV antenna via the old-school coaxial cable like Hulu Plus, Netflix, Amazon VOD, UFC, MLB, NBA, connection. If you have an older TV which only has one etc. Roku is constantly adding channels and choices for coaxial connection, simply purchase a coaxial splitter, read your programming desires. The best part is the cost: They start around $50 per unit the instructions and you will be all set. O Step Three: Once you have the HDTV antenna con- and require no monthly charge. However, Netflix and Hulu nected, use the remote and reprogram the TV. Simply hit Plus both have monthly fees around $8 per month. So if the “menu” button on your TV manufacturer’s remote and you combine a Roku with my above recommended HDTV find the “TV programming” option. Once you locate the antenna option, you will have access to nearly 100 percent programming option on your remote, hit “enter” and relax. of the same programming at a cheaper rate. All of my TVs O Step Four: After the TV finishes its auto program- have a Roku and my family loves it. One final prediction — if Block Communications conming, simply take the TV remote and hit the number 36 tinues to sue FOX Toledo’s parent company, how much and voila! — Ryan Seacrest is back in the house. Did you know that Buckeye CableSystem is not the only longer before it pulls WTOL-11 as well? Answer: not game in town? If you have not figured it out yet the drama long. Help stop companies that bully with lawsuits — it is between the company that owns WTOL-11 and FOX To- Toledoans who are ultimately paying the price. If you are tired of tuning in daily to see if FOX Toledo is ledo and the parent company of The Blade is not going away anytime soon, so maybe a switch of cable providers back on the air with Buckeye, or if you are still ticked off about missing the NFL playoff game Jan. 6, you are welcome! O will help send a message. Time Warner Cable is now available in the area. In fact, there is a current promotion where you could get up to a To follow Jeremy Baumhower, friend him on Facebook or $500 gift card from Best Buy if you switch providers. To find follow him on Twitter @jeremytheproduc.


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n A5

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A6 n Toledo Free Press

community

JANUARY 13, 2013

TOLEDO FREE PRESS photo and cover photo by joseph herr

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New sheriff John Tharp said he intends to run an open administration. he said he wants to be visible to his 500-plus employees so they feel free to give him recommendations.

Sheriff Tharp: ‘It’s more than just making an arrest’ By Brandi Barhite

Toledo Free Press Community Ombudsman bbarhite@toledofreepress.com

The new Lucas County sheriff isn’t afraid to arrest and book bad people. He believes in aggressively pursuing criminals — both teens and adults. He believes some people should never be released. But John Tharp does not believe that strategy alone will curb crime. Crime-fighting starts with crime prevention. It involves working with children who are struggling with learning or behavioral disabilities, he said. These young people feel ostracized. They can’t keep up in school; they feel defeated. So they start acting out in little ways, then big ways and finally in ways that affect everyone in society.

Tharp is as much an enforcer as he is an educator. In addition to an associate degree in law enforcement technology, he has bachelor’s and master’s degrees in education from the University of Toledo. He specialized in behavioral and learning disabilities. “Education is a good fit for law enforcement. All of my friends were doing administrative degrees wanting to be police chiefs. I had no intention of being a police chief — or sheriff,” he said. “I liked working with at-risk kids, gang members, hoodlums, thugs and young people who were going down the wrong path. I thought there has to be a better way for these kids. I kept thinking if I had more information about them, I could deal with them a little easier. I thought the wave of the future would be law enforcement interfacing more with youth, which turned out to be true.”

Tharp built his 40-year career on that philosophy and is now bringing those ideals, along with others, into his newly elected position as Lucas County sheriff. He replaces longtime Sheriff James Telb, who retired. “The sheriff really has to be open to suggestions,” Tharp said Jan. 9, his third day on the job. “As sheriff, I don’t have all the answers.” The 64-year-old intends to run an open administration. He wants to be visible so his 500-plus employees are comfortable giving him recommendations. “Our administration needs to be coming in on nights to meet with correction officers and deputies,” he said. “We need to be out at the road patrols saying hello. We need to encourage our staff to step up and be men and women for others. It is more than just making an arrest; we have to look at the big picture.”

Not playing cops and robbers

Tharp said he wasn’t thinking about the big picture, let alone law enforcement, when he was growing up in West Virginia. He actually wanted to be a farmer. “My dad died when I was super young, so young I didn’t even know him, and there were farmers who I liked and idolized,” Tharp said. His dreams shifted when his mother, a registered nurse, moved the family to Toledo. They lived next to Libbey High School, where Tharp played football and wrestled. It was at Libbey that he started to think about law enforcement. He had friends who had older brothers in the career; however, his mother couldn’t afford college raising four children, and the GI Bill ended up paying for his three degrees. n SHERIFF CONTINUES ON A7


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n SHERIFF CONTINUED FROM A6 “Everything I did in the military was so disciplined and everything in Vietnam was so violent,” he said. “As a combat medic, you are with the troops and taking fire at the same time they are taking fire. It is being there for them and not leaving.” Tharp plans to apply some of those wartime lessons to being sheriff. “The sheriff needs to be engaged, the sheriff needs to be present and stepping forward and making recommendations. And if something is going the wrong way, the sheriff must, must straighten it back up.” When he returned from Vietnam, his friends said, “You need to find Jim Telb because he is a cop and drug agent.” Tharp took Telb’s law enforcement technology program at UT, while working nights at a factory. He started at the Toledo Police Department (TPD) in 1972 with many of his years spent on the drug unit and homicide squad.

Oregon Police Chief Mike Navarre worked with Tharp back then. Navarre became TPD chief in 1998, one year after Tharp left to work at the sheriff ’s office. “John was always an excellent investigator. He was well-liked by his colleagues because he was helpful,” Navarre NAVARRE said. “He has a lot of people skills. I think that is what is going to help him succeed as the sheriff.” Tharp is respected for his experience and collaborative nature as well. “I have nothing but great things to say about John and we will be working on collaborative things in the future as he takes the office of sheriff,” said Toledo Police Chief Derrick Diggs. One of Tharp’s greatest partnerships was with the local schools back

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in the mid ’80s and early ’90s. For nine months, he served as a consultant to Toledo Public Schools. A grant paid for him to make recommendations on how to safeguard the school from drugs and gang activities. When the grant ended, the schools wanted him to continue. It was at this time that TPD came up with the idea of school resource officers. Tharp had to convince some school administrators that it was a good idea. Back then, cops in schools were taboo. “If I had my choice, I would have an officer in every school and it wouldn’t have to be paid for by the school system,” Tharp said. “It is something we should be doing. Law enforcement agents need to be around schools in the morning and around 3 p.m. That is when crimes are happening that involve young kids.”

Becoming sheriff

In 1997, Tharp had finished his master’s and had 25 years in at TPD when Telb asked about his retirement plans. Tharp thought he might teach, “unless you have something for me,” he joked. Telb told him there would be an opening in 60 days. Tharp became a major in the sheriff ’s office, and continued mentoring youth, even working with young people who were skipping school, per principals’ requests. “I would rouse them out of bed and take them to school. Their guardians had no problems with me coming into the house.” The deputies also adopted Ella P. Stewart Academy. “We will read to the younger ones; we will do anything that we need to do to make life better for them,” Tharp said. “If they are going to the library and don’t have enough money for busing, we will escort them to the library.” Teresa Quinn, principal at Stewart Academy, appreciates Tharp’s support, in particular providing deputies at dismissal. Plus, the students love the new sheriff. “We were just having a conversation about having a small assembly with him and the children,” Quinn said. Phyllis “Sam” Tharp said her husband is passionate and dedicated. She remembers when he coached underprivileged students. The only requirement was that the truant students go to school. The whole family — sons John and Andrew and daughter Kati — supported his bid for sheriff, she said. And the family is growing as Tharp is about to become a first-time grandfather in the same month he became sheriff. “It just seemed like a natural flow,” Tharp said. “It wasn’t anything that I had planned. I didn’t come here to be a sheriff. n SHERIFF CONTINUES ON A8


A8 n Toledo Free Press n SHERIFF CONTINUED FROM A7 “I came here to work within the community. I came here to do whatever I could do to help others. I came here to help Sheriff Telb.” That’s not to say he minded running unopposed. “Probably no one else wanted the job,” he said with a chuckle. But he wanted it, and he is tackling one of his biggest challenges already — the budget. “One thing we started already, just a couple of days ago, was job sharing,” Tharp said. We have to reallocate our manpower to put [employees] where we need them at the busy times. If they are slow at a particular time, they need to be moved and need to be placed in a different location.” Pat Mangold, president of UAW Local 3056, which represents employees of the sheriff ’s department, said employees are excited about the new sheriff. They are looking forward to the implementation of an efficiency analysis. The study addresses different ways to manage inmates’ behavior and much-needed maintenance issues at the aging Lucas County jails. “We think there are going to be some positive changes,” Mangold said. Another of those changes could be a renewed battle on gang activity, a growing problem in the county. Fortunately, Tharp has experience from serving on a TPD gang task force.

community

We have to go after them, we have to arrest them, we have to book them. We can’t let them slide. We have to be aggressive.” — Lucas County Sheriff John Tharp “We would bust up the gangs, arrest them, book them and let them know we were there. We were taking guns off the street. We were taking murderers off the street,” he said. But due to budget constraints, the task force folded, and the gangs reappeared. “We have to have the manpower to address it,” Tharp said. “I am still in the old-school way of thinking, we have to get out there with the gang members, interface with the gang members and work with the ones who we can get out of gangs.” Yet for those gang members who continue to commit crimes, the tough guy Tharp re-emerges. Some people deserve to be put away, he said. “We have to go after them, we have to arrest them, we have to book them. We can’t let them slide. We have to be aggressive.” O

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n A9

ANIMAL CRUELTY

Police: Family was targeted in dog killing/mutilation case By John P. McCartney

Toledo Free Press Staff Writer jpmccartney@toledofreepress.com

The mutilation killing of a 20pound female terrier mix dog in Oregon has citizens appalled, angry and concerned for the well-being of their pets. But Lt. Hank Everitt of the Oregon Police Division, said the detectives working the case do not believe it was a random occurrence. “If it were looked at being some kind of random act, I think there would be more of that [kind of concern],” Everitt said. “Everything we’re hearing, we just believe this family was targeted or the dog was targeted to send a message to the family. “Our detective bureau is looking into it. We’re not getting a lot of cooperation from the family, so there’s not a whole lot of leads right now. Everything we’ve gotten has been rumor, innuendo, Facebook-type stuff.” The dog, Khloe, also called Lola, went missing Dec. 27 after being put in the backyard of her owner, Melody L. Wilhelm. When the dog did not bark at the back door to indicate that she

wanted to come back into the house, Wilhelm told police a small group of family and friends unsuccessfully searched the neighborhood for Khloe. The following day, the police report states that Adam T. Rodriguez, 28, discovered the back hindquarters of Khloe on the east side of Wilhelm’s backyard. The police report states that Rodriguez “is the live-in boyfriend” of Wilhelm. Wilhelm was unavailable for comment. The man who answered at the phone number on the police report for Wilhelm said it was a wrong number and that he did not know anyone by the name of Melody Wilhelm. Rodriguez was also unavailable for comment. Everitt said that the police report was filed by Wilhelm’s sister, Michelle D. Becker of Oregon. The report states that Becker made the report after she “heard about the incident which was also posted on Facebook.” Becker did not return phone calls seeking comment.

Mental health concerns

Everitt said police are “not dis-

counting that it could be something like the behavior found in people who later become infamous as serial killers,” but Everitt does not believe that is the case with this situation. Everitt said the Oregon police have “not seen any other incidents like this” in the past 18 months, “and I pretty much see all the reports. I know there has not been any.” Everitt referred Toledo Free Press to Detective Sgt. Kelly Thibert, who is handling the case, for additional information. Thibert did not return phone calls. The Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Los Angeles reports on its website that “many studies in psychology, sociology and criminology during the last 25 years demonstrate that violent offenders frequently have childhood and adolescent histories of serious and repeated animal cruelty.” FBI analysis of serial killers since the 1970s also reports that most had killed or tortured animals as children. Additional research shows patterns of animal cruelty among perpetrators of more common

forms of violence, including child abuse, spouse abuse and elder abuse, something Dr. Jill M. Fox said she has seen in children.

Psychiatrist’s insight

Fox, a psychiatrist and physician with a private practice in Rossford, said she has treated “little children who have been mean to animals. At least 30 percent of the time, they’ve witnessed some domestic violence. And they act on the animals because obviously they are too little to act out on people.” Fox also said that although “I’ve never taken care of anyone who did this kind of thing to an animal, I do have some insight to what possibly is going on. “Generally speaking, all of us cringe when we hear about something like this. It really is kind of the same kind of mentality you would almost think of in a rape. There’s a power thing. You have a big person having power over the dog. They feel more powerful by doing grotesque things. “It could have been like an intimi-

dating kind of thing, a ‘This is what I’m doing to your dog. If you talk, this is what I’m going to do to you’ kind of thing,” she said. Fox said the person who mutilated the dog probably killed the animal first because it would be almost impossible to cut an animal in half with the precision described by Oregon Police Sgt. Chris Bliss, given how an animal’s instinct would cause it fight as vigorously as it could. “They killed the animal first,” Fox said. “[This is some kind] of sick intimidation or something like that. I think there are people on drugs or whatever who will do just about anything that their higher-ups order them to do. That’s kind of the mentality of the gang.”

Personality indicators

Fox said she doesn’t think the person who did this “would have much of a conscience. And I think they would just come across as very, very shallow, very ‘me-oriented,’ although everybody who is shallow and ‘me-oriented’ is not a person who would mutilate a dog. n MUTILATION CONTINUES ON A10


A10 n Toledo Free Press

I’m just appalled and outraged, and I’m sure everyone is who loves dogs. Even people who don’t love dogs would be outraged.”

community

JANUARY 13, 2013

Eat hEalthy, slEEp morE, drink watEr and gEt moving!

Screen Time

— Dr. Jill Fox

What does watching TV or playing video games have to do with your child’s health?

n MUTILATION CONTINUED FROM A9 “However, it would be someone who just was really very removed from their conscience or they really had a vengeance streak or perhaps they’re addicted to drugs, and their drug dealer said, ‘You have to go do this and I’ll give you more drugs.’ These are people who will ‘numbness out’ on drugs and do just about anything anybody says when they’re high.” Fox also works at Family Services, which she describes as a very small community health center in Downtown Toledo where many of the clients are referred from Lucas County Children Services. The children she sees typically suffer from disorders like depression, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder and behavioral and/or impulse control problems.

Doctors suggest limiting the time children spend watching TV, playing video games or using computers for reasons other than schoolwork to no more than 2 hours per day.

Absolutely outraged

And remember:

Fox said she has heard of doghaters who say things like, “‘Oh, I hate that dog that comes to poop in my yard every day.’ But that would be a pretty sick neighbor who would do a thing like this, don’t you think?” Fox said she would “absolutely” expect most citizens to be deeply disturbed by a situation like this. “Of course, my stomach just turns knots,” she said. “I’m just appalled and outraged, and I’m sure everyone is who loves dogs. Even people who don’t love dogs would be outraged.” Fox said that people bothered by this crime can funnel their outrage into volunteering for organizations like Assistance Dogs of America and the local humane society as well as donating money to organizations that rescue dogs. “There’s also the Delta Society,” she said. “It’s a rescue group. You help train dogs. And for almost every breed of dog, there’s a rescue kind of group. There’s a ton of organizations whose goal is to make dogs’ lives better. “There are a lot of things that people can do. So if they are extremely outraged by this behavior, rather than just sit back and be outraged, why don’t they turn that energy into doing something productive for animals?” O

Children are spending more time in front of a screen (screen time) and less time getting the 60 minutes of daily exercise they need to stay fit and healthy.

Parents find themselves so busy these days, it’s sometimes tempting to use the TV or computer as a babysitter. • Ask a friend or relative to play with the kids while you get your work done. • Team up with family or adult neighbors to spend one day a week supervising play activities for the kids. • No snacks, sugary drinks and fast food during screen time. • Turn off the TV during meals and use that time to discuss the events of the day. Mercy Children’s Hospital and Kohl’s Cares believe that fostering positive behaviors in health and nutrition will help children be healthier and happier. We’ve teamed up to offer parents and other caregivers’ practical advice on raising healthy children. Kohl’s Kids in Action is focused on four valuable steps that are important to better health: good nutrition, increased physical activity, proper water intake and good sleep habits.

• Keep TV sets, DVD players, video games and computers out of children’s bedrooms. • Channel surfing is a sure sign of boredom. • It’s time to turn off the TV and get active! Mercy Children’s Hospital and Kohl’s Kids in Action offer free obesity prevention education to your elementary school or at health fairs. For more information, call Kohl’s Kids in Action at 419-251-1246 or visit us online at kohlskidsinaction.org.


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JANUARY 13, 2013

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n A11

RELIGION

Marty leads slate for Bill Chidester Lecture Series By David Yonke

EDITOR, ToledoFAVS.COM David.Yonke@ReligionNews.com

Following the success of last year’s inaugural Bill Chidester Lecture Series, Sylvania United Church of Christ (UCC) has lined up another slate of theological heavy-hitters starting next week (Jan. 19-20) with the Rev. Martin Marty. Marty taught for 35 years at the University of Chicago Divinity School, where he is now a professor emeritus, and founded the Martin Marty Center for the Advanced Study of Religion. He is the author of nearly 40 books, including “Righteous Empire: The Protestant Experience in America,” which won a National Book Award

in 1970, and is an ordained Lutheran minister who served for 10 years as pastor of a suburban Chicago church. Marty is a past president of the American Academy of Religion, has received 80 honorary doctorate degrees and is the Mohandas M. K. Gandhi Fellow of the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences. Speakers in MARTY last year’s inaugural series were Marcus Borg, the Rev. Julian Davies, the Rev. Jim Bacik and Mark Douglas. While the 2012 program was

Tuesday, January 15, 2013 4-7 p.m. Whitmer High School 5601 Clegg Dr.

funded by a $28,000 grant from the Templeton Foundation, most of this year’s financial support comes from a memorial fund in honor of the late Rev. Chidester, who served as pastor of Sylvania UCC for 25 years. He died of liver cancer in May 2011 at age 61. “What we try to do is to focus on the values that Bill offered to the congregation for the 25 years that he was here,” said Susan Rowland Miller, one of the organizers of the series. “One of the things he was very invested in was environmentalism, as well as science and technology, so those topics will always be a piece of the puzzle” in putting the lecture series together, said Rowland Miller, a former Sylvania UCC pastor who

This series seeks to help create and spark a dialogue with people and with communities, while taking seriously our journey of faith.”

— Susan Rowland Miller is associate executive director of Maumee Valley Habitat for Humanity. A brochure for the series includes an excerpt from a letter Chidester wrote to his congregation: “I do not so

much care that people remember me, but that I might be a part of creating with you and other people of faith a world community which reflects more clearly the society God wishes for us and which we can experience through our faith.” Other lecturers scheduled in the series are Alan Jones, dean emeritus at the Grace Cathedral in San Francisco, March 16-17; Diana Butler-Bass, author of eight books on religion, Sept. 21-22; and Daniel Spencer, a professor at the University of Montana who specializes in religious communities’ response to environmental issues, Nov. 16-17. Walter Brueggemann, an Old Testament scholar and theologian, will open the 2014 series with lectures at the Sylvania church on Jan. 18 and 19, 2014. The theme of the series this year is “God Is Still Speaking,” a phrase borrowed with permission from the United Church of Christ’s national campaign. The goal is “to challenge people to think,” Rowland Miller said. “That is one of the things Bill did very well. Also to take seriously the call of faith in our culture today, which is getting harder and harder to figure out what it means.” Too often, Rowland Miller said, churches try to tell people what it means to be a Christian instead of letting them think it through as individuals. “This series seeks to help create and spark a dialogue with people and with communities, while taking seriously our journey of faith,” she said. She added that the Bill Chidester Lecture Series is an ecumenical program, featuring speakers of different Christian traditions, and that people of all faiths are welcome to attend. The lectures are scheduled from 4-5:30 p.m. on Saturdays, including time for questions and answers followed by light refreshments, and from 9:30-10:20 a.m. on Sundays (between services) at Sylvania UCC, 7240 Erie St., Sylvania. The cost is $10 per lecture or $35 for the 2013 series. More information is available at www.sylvaniaucc.org, by calling the church at (419) 882-0048, or by sending an email to bclecture@ sylvaniaucc.org. O David Yonke is the editor and community manager of Toledo Faith & Values (ToledoFAVS.com), a website that provides in-depth, nonsectarian news coverage of religion, faith and spirituality in the Toledo area.


SPORTS

A12 n Toledo Free Press

JANUARY 13, 2013

SHAG ON SPORTS

Baseball Hall of Fame process needs changing N “

I am worried, however, that it won’t early 600 baseball writers got together and decided that be just this one year that nobody gets in, absolutely nobody was fit and that it’ll be because of the stupidest for induction into the Baseball Hall turf war we’ve ever seen in journalism. There is a rift opening of Fame this season. between the younger Not Craig Biggio, writers who lean heavily not Jack Morris, not on statistics and adJeff Bagwell. No one vanced sabermetrics, and player broke through the old-school guys who the 75 percent barrier measure a player with to Cooperstown. the classic numbers and It’s not necessarily unmeasurables like “grit,” unusual for the writers “sticktoitiveness” and “the to pitch a shutout, as eyeball test.” it were — in fact, it’s We saw a microhappened seven other Shaggy CULBREATH cosm of that in the times, even as recently as 1996. And when your first-year American League MVP voting: candidates include the likes of Barry Miguel Cabrera’s Triple Crown was Bonds, Roger Clemens and Sammy honored with the hardware, but Sosa, you could certainly under- there were those championing Mike stand the hesitancy of this particular Trout and his superior baserunelectorate to put anybody through. ning and defense. We saw it again If anything, it resembles a protest with Morris: The traditionalists feel vote: Documentarian Ken Burns was Morris belongs in, the stat heads say quoted in The Hollywood Reporter as his 3.90 ERA is too high. I’m not here to argue with these saying, “I want them to suffer for a while.” I think we can all agree with two camps — I think they’re both idiots for discounting the other. I’m that sentiment.

more interested in bringing the two sides together for the sake of the Hall. Bickering over an MVP vote is one thing — all you need is 51 percent of the voters on your side. If a player needs three-quarters of the vote for enshrinement in Cooperstown, and half of the voters are split as to what makes a player worthwhile, we could be in for disaster. That’s why I’m throwing my hat in with the small but growing group of people who want to see the process change. When the Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA) began inducting players into the Hall in 1936, there were 226 total ballots submitted. That number has doubled and there’s simply no way that all these writers talk amongst themselves when it comes time to submit their ballots. With no discussions being held (except in their own columns), the chance for consensus becomes slim to none. The Pro Football Hall of Fame, meanwhile, has an actual committee: a 46-person panel representing local media to each team, the Hall itself,

There is a rift opening between the younger writers who lean heavily on statistics and advanced sabermetrics, and the old-school guys who measure a player with the classic numbers and unmeasurables like ‘grit,’ ‘sticktoitiveness’ and ‘the eyeball test’.”

and 16 at-large voters. They meet, they discuss particular players, how they played, what they accomplished and the content of their character. A list of hun-

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dreds is narrowed down and just before the Super Bowl, four to six names are sent to Canton. Simple and painless. My suggestion to the BBWAA is two-fold. First step is to simultaneously trim and diversify the voter pools. Five hundred voters is about 400 too many, and they’re mostly writers. Get some broadcasters in there, the people who have to talk about these players on a daily basis. Secondly, you need to get together and actually talk these things through. Stat Guy might be talked into voting for a Jack Morris if OldSchool Guy can tell him about the kind of pitcher he was. “Eyeball Test” Man might be swayed into looking into the WAR rating of a player by New-School Dude if he can stress how new numbers are simply old numbers dressed up. We could have peace in the press box. Imagine all the players, voted in the Hall ... right, John? O Matt “Shaggy” Culbreath is sports director at 1370 WSPD. Email him at shaggy@wspd.com.


WAR OF

u a n r a y 19 & 2 J : y r a s r e v 0 i n n a h t 200

2012 2015


A14 n Toledo Free Press

200th anniversary - BATTLE OF RIVER RAISIN

r o y a M e h t m o r f e m Welco . h ic M , e o r n o M and City of

eRiver Raisin Battl the Friends of the storical Hi ty un t: Co es e ro Gu field, the Mon Dear Honored County HisYou are cordially m, the Monroe eu us M ee th d d the Sawyer Hom invited to atten torical Society an to ts en mo ev me of m y co da events to present a full ad ste r be em ten m en ry and to re rating the bic celebrate our histo ng di of e fen ttl de Ba es e liv th nial of lost their in those who the River Raisin n. tio na w ne r ou nce at Monroe, Mich., on age your attenda ur co en e W and As ry . na 19 e extraordi Saturday, Jan. one or all of thes , are aw be y you ma t unique events. nity partners have one of the bloodies Our commu ar these living CLARK battles of the W tirelessly to develop ed rk wo e th ive our at , . 18-23, 1813 nces and help rev of 1812 occurred Jan on the banks of the history experie ar.� O W n tte go or “F is nt understanding of th rely, Frenchtown settleme day Monroe. ce Sin ntRiver Raisin, in prese d with its comark Cl rt be Ro The city has joine r roe including the Rive Mayor, City of Mon un m ity partners, , rk Pa eld efi Battl Raisin National

JANUARY 13, 2013

Bicentennial: Bienve Friends of the River nue from the Raisin Battlefield Chers Amis, centuries

Two hundred years ago, the snow and ice on the Rive r Raisin were staine d with the blood of many brave me n fighting for the ir ideals, for their home s and for their way of NAVEAUX life. Frenchmen an d Na Kentuckians and Bo tive Americans, stonians, British an d Canadians, all were engaged in a great an d terrible battle to de cide the course of the War of 1812. In the end, destroyed, a comm an entire army was unity was devastated , and the words, “Rem em came a national battle ber the Raisin,� becry. Please join us on Jan. 19, 2013, as we journey back through the dusty

to revive our m that was very differe emories of a land nt from today. We’l l smell the acrid sm oke from the musk ets and cannons. We’l l pa courageous men, wo y homage to the m children who endu en, and, yes, even red the conflict an d eventually rebuilt the we have now come community which to lest we forget, we’ll call Monroe. And, celebrate the ensuing peace that eventuall y created the world ’s longest unfortified bo United States and Ca rder between the nada. Votre humble servit eur, Ralph J. Naveau x President, Raisin Battlefield; Friends of the River Chair County War of 18 man, Monroe 12 Steering Committ Bicentennial ee Michigan Comm ; Vice-Chair, Bicentennial of theission on the War of 1812

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n A15

A look back: Battle of the River Raisin

T

he American army that drove the British out of Frenchtown on Jan. 18, 1813, consisted of 667 men, mostly Kentuckians and about 100 local habitants. Although a tenth of the Kentuckians were killed and the habitants dismissed to return to their homes, Gen. James Winchester brought up reinforcements totaling about 250 men. The British had not been idle, either. Across the Detroit River at Fort Malden, Col. Henry Ralph Procter assembled every man he could spare for a massive counterattack on the American position at Frenchtown. His force eventually consisted of 525 soldiers, mostly from the 41st Regiment of Foot and the 1st and 2nd Regiments of the Essex County Militia out of Canada. Also included were elements of the Royal Newfoundland Fencibles, along with a few members the 10th Royal Veterans Battalion and an officer of the Royal Engineers. Three 3-pounders and three small howitzers were manned by personnel from the Royal Artillery and the Canadian Provincial Marines. Nineteen Indian Department employees accompanied an estimated 600-800 Indians from such diverse tribes as the Shawnee, Wyandot, Potawatomi, Ojibwa, Ottawa, Delaware, Miami,

Creek, Winnebago, Sauk and Fox. Crossing the ice of the Detroit River and reassembling at Brownstown, Mich., this force finally appeared out of the woods north of the River Raisin in the predawn hours of Jan. 22, 1813. Dismissing repeated warnings from some of the local French habitants that the British were coming, Winchester had taken few extra precautions to guard NAVEAUX his camp against surprise, other than posting the usual sentries. At approximately 6 a.m., as the American drummer beat reveille to the tune of “The Three Camps,” a sentry saw the British already forming for battle and fired a warning shot into their ranks. In response, the British commander, Col. Henry Procter, opened up with his artillery, which he had pushed forward in front of the British regulars. The Kentuckians inside Frenchtown were well protected by the puncheon fencing, which the British at first mistook for a formed body of troops in the early morning darkness. However, the American right wing under Maj. Elijah McClenahan was in a more exposed and isolated position. They withstood a hail of grapeshot and bullets for about 20 minutes

before falling back to a more sheltered position along the river bank. Gen. Winchester, having just arrived from his headquarters and seeing his regulars outflanked by Roundhead and his Wyandot and Delaware warriors, ordered Col. John Allen to take some troops into the gap and cover the retreat. He and Col. William Lewis attempted to bring the right wing within the Frenchtown fences, but after a brief stand the men panicked and burst across the river ice like a flock of startled ducks. Capt. James Price of the 5th Kentucky led his company out to rescue the fallen, only to have his arm smashed by a bullet and his Jessamine County Blues cut down by Indians hidden along the riverbank. An attempt to form a line on the south bank of the River Raisin was hindered by the arrangement of fences and buildings, and the troops were soon running down a narrow lane through a gantlet of fire coming from Indians hidden in the tall grasses on either side. Potawatomi and others from the British right had by now swept across the river to circle behind Frenchtown and join with their brethren from the left who had been pursuing the fleeing regulars. Gen. Winchester was overtaken by Jack Brandy, a Wyandot from Roundhead’s band, and several other warriors. n NAVEAUX CONTINUES ON A16

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200th anniversary - BATTLE OF RIVER RAISIN

n NAVEAUX CONTINUED FROM A14 Winchester pointed his pistol and pulled the trigger, but it misfired, and Brandy took him prisoner along with trader and Indian interpreter Whitmore Knaggs. Col. Lewis was captured along with them. Scattered into small groups and fatigued from running for miles through knee-deep snow, the remaining Americans soon fell prey to their pursuers, some of whom were mounted on comparatively fresh horses. The last organized group of 40 men led by Ensign Isaac Baker of the 17th made a last stand, but with only five rounds left per man, they soon ran out of ammunition and were forced to surrender. Of up to 400 men involved in the flight, only 33 escaped, including three officers: Maj. McClenahan, Capt. Michael Glaves and Capt. Richard Matson. Most survived by running east into the marshes along Lake Erie rather than south along Hull’s Road. Some removed their shoes so that their tracks would look more like those of Indians. While this disaster was unfolding on the American right, the remaining Kentuckians, now under the command of Maj. George Madison, were busy repulsing the British regulars who pushed their attacks across the open ground to within 80 yards of the puncheon fences. In fact, one British cannon was abandoned only 20 yards from the Kentuckians, who jumped out to seize it but were driven back by British musket fire. The cannon was only saved by the superhuman efforts of the wounded Lt. Robert Irvine, who single-handedly dragged it back to the British lines.

JANUARY 13, 2013

Photos Courtesy of Floral City Images

A16 n Toledo Free Press

Having failed in three separate assaults, Col. Procter switched his efforts to enfilading the American flanks with his artillery and capturing some barns overlooking the puncheon fences. Although the British succeeded in occupying Benjamin Lenfant’s barns, Kentucky volunteers were able to rush out and burn down the two most strategically located ones. The American casualties inside French Town that morning amounted to five killed and 40 wounded, compared to a British loss of about 24 killed and 158 wounded, many of whom were still being shot at as they attempted to crawl out of range. About 11 a.m., the firing began to die and a man was soon seen approaching under a white flag. Thinking the British were going to ask for a truce to remove their dead and wounded, Madison went to meet him. The man turned out to be Winchester’s aide-de-camp, Maj. James Overton, with a note from the captured general advising, but not ordering, Madison to surrender. Factors considered by Madison included the

losses suffered by the right wing, his remaining force being completely cut off and low on ammunition and the continuing threat of Procter’s artillery and Indians. After some negotiation, Madison complied with Winchester’s recommendation to surrender, but only after extracting verbal assurances that private property would be respected, the officers’ sidearms restored, the American wounded cared for and protected and the dead buried. Sometime between noon and 3 p.m., the Kentuckians marched out and stacked their arms. American losses eventually amounted to about 290 dead (including some killed the next day) and 644 prisoners. The prisoners, including those recuperated from the Indians, were taken to Fort Malden, from where they were marched off to Niagara before eventually being released on parole. Nearly half the population of French Town either fled or were taken away to Detroit. O Ralph Naveaux is an author, historian and ancestrial Monroe native.

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200th anniversary - BATTLE OF RIVER RAISIN

Visit www.toledofreepress.com

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By Brigitta Burks Toledo Free Press News Editor bburks@toledofreepress.com

Historical re-enactors and musicians will help eventgoers travel through time Jan. 19 and 20 to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the Battle of the River Raisin in Monroe. From Jan. 18-23, 1813, the United States and Great Britain fought for control of Michigan and the lower Great Lakes in the Battle of the River Raisin. The battle was part of the War of 1812, which lasted from June 1812 to February 1815. “[The 200th anniversary is a] very busy time for a lot of people. All of Monroe is kind of wrapped up in this. It’s not just the park, it’s not just the city and it’s not just the college,” said Dan Downing, chief of education, interpretation and operations for River Raisin Battlefield Park. The commemorative weekend kicks off at 10 a.m. Jan. 19 with a reenactment of Gen. James Winchester’s march. Winchester commanded the United States forces during the Battle of the River Raisin. Re-enactors will march from the Sawyer Homestead, 320 E. Front St., to the River Raisin National Battlefield Park Visitor Center, 1403 E. Elm Ave. “Actually [Winchester] rode a horse, but we’re marching,” said Ralph Naveaux, who will serve as narrator of the tactical demonstration later that day. At 10:30 a.m. Jan. 19, after the group has arrived at the visitor center, there will be a flag and wreath laying ceremony. The family of Alma Moore-Egen will be honored in addition to other families whose ancestors served during the War of 1812. Moore-Egen is a descendent of Joseph Navarre, who had 30 family members serve. A commemoration ceremony honoring soldiers from Kentucky who fought in the Battle of the River Raisin is set for 2:30 p.m. Jan. 19 at Memorial Place, 620 S. Monroe St. At noon Jan. 20, there will be a “Salute to the Fallen” at the visitor center. The tactical demonstration is set to occur around 11 a.m. Jan. 19 at the Monroe Multi-Sports Complex, 33 N. Dixie Hwy. A portion of the Battle of the River Raisin will be re-created using cannons, muskets and rifles. “There’s no way to rehearse this thing. We’re going to try to re-create what happened,” Naveaux said. The weapons use black powder, he added. “So there will be lots of noise and smoke and everybody will be in uniform,” he said.

Nearly 300 people will be in historical costumes during the commemoration weekend. The re-enactors come from around the region, including Indiana, Pennsylvania, Canada and Western Ohio. “The people that put on these demonstrations are very interested in history, in the War of 1812 in particular. And not just reading about it or studying it, but trying to replicate some of the lifestyle,” Naveaux said. Naveaux became interested in re-enacting during the bicentennial of the Revolutionary War while serving as a history teacher. “It’s very fascinating to me because I’ve always been interested in local history and early culture in Monroe,” he said. “For me, it’s a way of connecting back to my historical and genealogical roots.” Eventgoers also will have the chance to experience music of the times during the “Musical Remembrances” concerts set for 3:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. Jan. 19 at Monroe County Community College, 1555 S. Raisinville Road. “This period of time was an extraordinarily enlightening period,” said Bill Saul, the concerts’ facilitator. “All of the music that we’re listening to today, like the Beethovens and the Bachs, all of them were alive during that period.” The two-hour concerts were arranged by musician Michael Mohn and Agora Chorale Director Catherine Brodie. The shows will feature about 115 performers and include an intermission. The concerts will feature unique acts like the Leh Nah Weh Drum group, which will perform a Native American chant accompanied by drums, and the Branch 28 Royal Canadian Legion Pipe Band, a bagpipe group coming in from Ontario accompanied by the 1st Michigan Colonial Fife and Drum Corps. The group Fiddlesix, featuring six family members ranging in age from about 8 to 20, is also set to perform historical music. The Agora Chorale will showcase a “beautiful” song based on an 1813 poem by Brandon Ulrich, Saul added. William McCloskey, a professor at Monroe County Community College, will narrate the concerts. Other featured groups include the Inside Out Dance Ensemble, the All Star Community Band and the Monroe County Community College Bicentennial Band, which includes area high school and college students. “We’re bringing our youth to let them be part of this because these will be memories they have the rest of their lives,” Saul said.

Photos Courtesy of Floral City Images, Monroe, Michigan

Commemoration weekend features re-enactments, music and more

Tickets to the concerts are $15 for adults, $12 for seniors 60 and older and $5 for children younger than 10. Tickets are available at monroenews.com/1812concert. All other weekend events are free. Several educational lectures are also set for Jan. 19. At noon, “Michigan at War,” a documentary aired on public broadcast channels, will screen at the visitor center. “I found it interesting. I’m prob-

ably one of the more critical viewers in that I wished it had all been about the Battle of River Raisin,” Downing said with a chuckle. After the documentary, Eddie Price will present on the historical novel “Widder’s Landing” at 1 p.m. Jan. 19 at the visitor center. Brian Dunnigan will talk about the use of alcohol and spirits during the war at 3:30 p.m. Jan. 19 at the Monroe Museum, 126 S. Monroe

St. At 4 p.m. at the museum, L. Nelson will present “Northwest Campaigns,” an overview of the Great Lakes. Downing said he recommends dressing appropriately for the weather and arriving early to get a parking spot during the weekend’s events. He added that eventgoers should bring extra camera batteries because, “You’re going to be taking a lot of pictures.” O


A18 n Toledo Free Press

200th anniversary - BATTLE OF RIVER RAISIN

JANUARY 13, 2013

Musical remembrances of the War of 1812 slated for January 19

To cap off a Saturday of Bicentennial Activities on Jan. 19, the Monroe County Community College is hosting an international assembly of musical talent in the 500-seat Meyer Theater. The College’s Agora Chorale, Inside-Out Dance Ensemble, Monroe County All Star Band, 1st Michigan fifers and drummers, and Fiddlesix will perform a variety of period songs,

dances, and music, from boisterous drinking songs like “Gary Owen” to the mournful “Parting Glass.” The Royal Canadian Legion Bagpipe Band will add an international touch, underlining the 200 years of peace with Great Britain and Canada that followed the War of 1812. In addition, Leh Nah Weh’s Drum and Singers will remind us of our Native

Battle of River Raisin Bicentennial events Saturday, Jan. 19, 2013

O 10 a.m.: Gen. Winchester’s March — March begins at Sawyer Homestead, 320 E. Front St. and continues to the River Raisin National Battlefield Park Visitor Center, 1403 E. Elm Ave. O 10:30 a.m.: Flag and wreath ceremony — River Raisin National Battlefield Park Visitor Center, 1403 E. Elm Ave. O 11 a.m.: Tactical demonstration — Musket and cannon fire, Monroe Multi-Sports Complex, 33 N. Dixie Hwy. O Noon: “Michigan at War” — Documentary by Dr. J. McConnell, River Raisin National Battlefield Park Visitor Center, 1403 E. Elm Ave. O 1 p.m.: “Widder’s Landing” — Kentucky historical novel by Eddie Price, River Raisin National Battlefield Park Visitor Center, 1403 E. Elm Ave. O 2:30 p.m.: Commemoration ceremony — Honoring of the soldiers from Kentucky, Memorial Place, 620 S. Monroe St. O 3:30 p.m.: “Uncorking the Truth” — Presentation: “Alcohol Use in the War” by Brian Dunnigan, Monroe County Historical Museum, 126 S. Monroe St.

O 4:30 p.m.: “Nothwest Campaiogns” — Overview Presentation of the Great Lakes by Dr. L. Nelson, Monroe County Historical Museum, 126 S. Monroe St. O 3:30 and 7 p.m.: “Musical Remembrances” — Performances of period-inspired music by an international assembly of musicians and singers, Monroe County Community College, 1555 S. Raisinville Rd. (Admission fee)

Sunday, Jan. 20, 2013

O Noon: Veterans’ salute to the fallen — Family of Alma Moore-Egen to lay the wreath of remembrance, a descendant of Joseph Navarre. River Raisin National Battlefield Park Visitor Center, 1403 E. Elm Ave.

War of 1812 exhibits

On Jan. 19 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., 20 bicentennial works done by local artists will be on display at the Michigan Welcome Center, northbound I-75 between the South Otter Creek Road and LaPlaisance Road exits. Other special exhibits will be on view at the Monroe County Historical Museum, the Monroe County Community College, and the River Raisin National Battlefield Park Visitor Center. O

American culture and heritage. Narration will be provided by William E. McCloskey, whose involvement in community theater has stretched over 40 years and led him to perform for the Wyandotte Community Players, Huron Civic Theater, Ann Arbor Civic Theater, Toledo Repertory Theater, and Croswell Theater.

Perhaps the most engaging highlight of the performance will be “The Kentucky Volunteer,” a poem written the year of the battle and put into music and song by Brandon Ulrich expressly for the Bicentennial of the War of 1812. Mr. Ulrich is currently working towards a Doctor of Musical Arts degree in Choral Conducting at Michigan State University while serving as

Director of Choirs at Stoneyh Creek High School in Rochester Hills. Drop by the Book Nook or the River Raisin Battlefield Visitor Center to purchase your tickets at $15 for adults, $12 for seniors, and $5 for children 10 and under. Tickets are also available by phone at (734) 755-0968 or at the door. Performances are at 3:30 and 7 p.m. O

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JANUARY 13, 2013

200th anniversary - BATTLE OF RIVER RAISIN

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Four flags regularly fly over the River Raisin National Battlefield Park in Monroe, Michigan. The first is a replica of the StarSpangled Banner, the 15-star, 15-stripe flag that flew over Fort McHenry in the Baltimore Harbor and inspired Francis Scott Key to write the National Anthem. It symbolizes the status of Michigan, which was not yet a state, but rather, a U.S. Territory. It reminds us of the regular federal troops present, mostly members of the 17th and 19th U.S. Infantry Regiments. Also honored under this banner are the volunteers from the U.S. Territories, largely from the River Raisin settlement in Michigan Territory. Off to the side are two flags representing the British, Canadian, and Native American opponents of the United States. The red ensign was flown over Serving nW OhiO & Se Michigan!

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forts and trading posts in Canada and signals the presence of British and Canadian troops who participated in the battle: the 41st Regiment of Foot, Royal Newfoundland Fencibles, Royal Artillery, Royal Veteran Battalion, 1st & 2nd Essex Militia, and Provincial Marine. The British presented a blue ensign to their ally Tecumseh and is flown here to represent the Native Americans allies of the British, including the Shawnees, Wyandots, Potawatomies, Ojibwas, Odawas, Delawares, Miamies, Creeks, Sauk & Fox. Normally the flag of the State of Kentucky flag is flown to honor the contributions of the volunteers from Kentucky who formed the bulk of the American troops at the battle, members of the 1st, 2nd, and 5th Kentucky Volunteer Militia and the 1st Rifle Regiment. Nine counties in Kentucky are named after participants in the Battle of the River Raisin. Eight of them died at French Town. The flag flying on the occasion of the 200th anniversary of the battle, however, is to be a replica of the flag carried by the Kentuckians at the time. It was taken by the British and kept for many years on display at the Chelsea Hospital in England. Although it eventually disintegrated, sketches were made of it so we can reproduce the design today, including the eagle, the liberty cap on a pole, and the motto: “United We Stand.” William Otter of Kentucky has produced copies of the flag out of modern materials in standard 3’x5’ format for resale. However local artist Dave Stahl created his own design and painted it on natural fiber the size of an actual battle flag, which is carried each year at the annual commemoration of the battle. O

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A20 n Toledo Free Press

200th anniversary - BATTLE OF RIVER RAISIN

JANUARY 13, 2013

Perspectives of the 1812 era: Remember the Raisin U

sually, I try to begin these columns with some clever anecdote from my life, which hopefully relates somewhat humorously to the 1812 subject at hand. But on today’s topic, with recent news still fresh in mind, I find little to make light of. Like you, I’m still reeling from the tragic events at Sandy Hook Elementray and other similar mass murders. Irrational episodes like these are labeled a “massacre� in our society and unfortunately they have occurred throughout history. In 1813, the country was rattled by one that took place in nearby Monroe, Mich. On Jan. 22, 1813, the Americans battled the British/Indian alliance along the River Raisin. Today, less is remembered about the battle than of the events afterward. This is evident by the fact that historically the event is referred to more often as the River Raisin Massacre, rather than the River Raisin Battle. Along this river, where grapes grew in abundance, a small French community had developed. In January 1813 a British contingent appeared and made camp near the town. Unnerved by this presence, the civilians solicited help from the American troops approaching from the south. Gen. James Winchester, second in command of the Northwest army, sent troops and secured the Frenchtown area. At Fort Malden, just 30 miles away across the frozen Detroit River, word of the conflict reached the British

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commander, Gen. Henry Procter. Immediately, additional troops were sent to the Raisin. After their victory, the Americans should have retreated to the Maumee rapids where Gen. Harry Harrison was amassing more troops for an assault on Fort Detroit, but Winchester decided to stay. Four days later, a superior British and Indian force attacked. Though they made a fight of it, a reluctant American surrender was agreed to on Winchester’s order — isFrank sued while he was a captured prisoner. The British did not have enough sleds to transport the many severely wounded American POWs and so Winchester’s surrender came with one critical condition — that Procter provide British guards over the POWs left on-site until additional sleds arrived. Fresh in Winchester’s mind was news of a massacre at Fort Dearborn (Chicago) just a few months earlier. There, Indians had ambushed Americans, brutally killing defenseless women and children. He would not tolerate anything like that potentially happening here, where ruthless Indians were known to conspire. Procter promised the protection, and then he reneged. Prisoners able to walk were herded off to Malden while the seriously

wounded were left alone nervously awaiting those promised sleds. They never came. The helpless POWs survived the night without incident, but suddenly, about mid-morning, insanity arrived in the form of several inebriated warriors. They looted any goods they could find and abducted any men still healthy enough to be worth something in trade. The rest of the men, deemed worthless, became sport for these possessed ghouls. KURON From one house rose the stench of burning flesh, the home having been torched while full of wounded men who had no ability to move and hence no recourse. A few were seen inching desperately to a doorway only to finally succumb to the flames. Other injured men were dragged out of houses screaming in agony. They were repeatedly kicked and thrown about the grounds for amusement before finally being scalped, tomahawked and left for the roaming wild hogs to feast upon their bodies. One survivor recalled a startling moment during this affair that occurred while talking to a fellow prisoner seated directly across from him. With no warning or apparent cause, a Native American casually walked up to

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the man and planted an ax in his skull. Wounded prisoners who faltered on the march to Malden were not tolerated. Dozens were left where they fell and slowly died in the snow. Stretched over several miles, their bleached bones were found by American troops months later. Most of these mutilated men were actually boys — only a few of them older than 18 and most were from Kentucky. It’s nearly impossible to find good coming from massacres like this, but the horror witnessed here stirred the country, and the Kentuckians in particular, to contribute fiercely to the war effort. Their resolve to be victorious reached new heights and henceforth their battle cry and sentiment was “Remember the Raisin.� O

Frank Kuron is author of the War of 1812 book, “Thus Fell Tecumseh.� Email him at kuronpubs@bex.net.

Upcoming Events

O The River Raisin National Battlefield Park will commemorate the Bicentennial of the Battle of the River Raisin on Jan. 19-20. Several ceremonies and presentations are scheduled throughout the weekend. Visit their website for more information at www. nps.gov/rira/index.htm O Fort Meigs will host the next presentation in a monthly Bentley Lecture Series on Jan. 17. Martin Land, a Fort Meigs volunteer, will speak on “The March to Fort Meigs�. The presentation is free and meets in the Fort Meigs Visitor Center, 29100 W. River Road in Perrysburg at 7:30 p.m.

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200th anniversary - BATTLE OF RIVER RAISIN

JANUARY 13, 2013

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How the muskrat saved Monroe Native American people have their own stories about the Great Flood, which once covered our world. One such tale told how the lowly muskrat was able to dive deep below the rising waters to retrieve some solid earth with which to reconstruct the earth. Well, that may only be a legend, but it is certain that the presence of the ubiquitous muskrat enabled our pioneer ancestors to survive the darkest days of the War of 1812. Of course, there was no City of Monroe back in those days, only a thin strip of farms stretching for a dozen miles along both banks of the River Raisin. Here, and along most of the other streams of Monroe County, the settlers grew wheat, corn and other crops. They planted huge orchards full of tempting fruits like snow apples and French pears. Beyond that, they

You’re Invited!

raised herds of cattle, pigs and horses. These farms made tempting targets for the soldiers and warriors of both sides to raid for food and other supplies. The wild game in the forests disappeared and even the fish became scarce. To make matters worse, in January 1813, French Town on the River Raisin became the scene of a violent battle. In the aftermath, homes, barns, fences and other property were destroyed. The population was reduced by half and those who remained were starving. That winter and the next, people were reduced to eating leather and boiling hay for sustenance. In desperation, they turned to the only abundant source of food they could find. That was the muskrat. Formerly looked upon mainly as a source of fur, the hairy rodent had readily survived in Natural Scholarship Pageant

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the marshes and streams bordering Lake Erie. The experience of many is typified by the example of the Reau family. Driven from their home by the fighting, they fled across the ice on Maumee Bay and sought shelter on Guard Island. Sometimes the location is given as Grosse Isle, but wherever they were, Father Gabriel Richard eventually found them huddled in some native huts. It was Friday, a day when good Catholics abstained from eating meat. But they had just caught some fresh, juicy muskrats, so the hungry family appealed to the father for permission to eat the meat as though it was fish. The good Father consented, and since that day, local families have regularly eaten muskrats on Fridays during Lent. Pierre Navarre, the famous frontier scout of the War of 1812, would later claim that if it hadn’t been for the muskrat, the people would have starved. Eventually, a whole cuisine developed around the muskrat, which is still eaten today in many public dinners put on by boat clubs, veterans groups, firemen’s associations, civic clubs, churches and shooting clubs in southeastern Michigan and Northwest Ohio. In 1985, Mushwa the Muskrat was honored as the official icon of

Monroe’s bicentennial celebration. His progeny, Francois, has appeared in effigy around the town, and

Major Muskrat has been accepted as a mascot of the River Raisin National Battlefield Park. O


200th anniversary - BATTLE OF RIVER RAISIN

JANUARY 13, 2013

Photos Courtesy of Floral City Images, Monroe, Michigan

A22 n Toledo Free Press

River Raisin National Battlefield Park

The Battle of the River Raisin, also called the Battle of French Town, was actually two separate battles that took place on Jan. 18 and 22, 1813, during the War of 1812. A number of wounded soldiers were murdered on Jan. 23, despite promises of protection by the victorious British forces. These actions represent the largest battle ever fought on Michigan soil and account for more American deaths than any other single battle of that war. “Remember the Raisin!� became a battle cry that inspired other

American troops to continue the fight against the British for control of the Old Northwest. After the war, however, the battle site began to recede from memory. The 50th anniversary was overshadowed by the momentous events of the Civil War. The centennial was observed with speeches and parades, but by then the land had been purchased by paper companies, who were busily erecting factories on the historic site. As the 20th century approached its close, people began to worry about the dire predictions for the end of the mil-

lennium. The paper companies, which had been in decline, finally closed their doors and the factories were torn down, leaving open the possibility that the land could be reclaimed and developed into a battlefield park. In 1990, the Monroe County Historical Commission established a small museum on one edge of the site at 1403 E. Elm Ave. The millennium passed without incident, but it still took years of effort by community groups, political coalitions and generous donors to bring the dream to reality. On Oct. 22, 2010, the National Park Service accepted the do-

nation of the site lands from the City of Monroe, its port commission, Monroe County and the Monroe County Historical Society. The River Raisin National Battlefield Park thus became the 393rd U.S. national park. In addition to preserving, restoring and interpreting the history of the battle, the war, and the cultures involved, it is hoped the park will serve as an economic catalyst for the area. The task ahead will be to acquire other battlefield lands and artifacts critical to the interpretation of the battle, restore the cultural landscape, create educational materials and estab-

lish a new visitor center. An important regional addition is the River Raisin Heritage Trail, a bicycle/pedestrian pathway between the visitor center and nearby Sterling State Park. The trail is believed to be the nation’s only pedestrian link between a national park and a state park. Eventually, the trail will link other historic, natural and cultural assets from the beaches of Lake Erie through the City of Monroe and as far west as the Navarre-Anderson Trading Post and the Monroe County Community College. O


JANUARY 13, 2013

200th anniversary - BATTLE OF RIVER RAISIN

Visit www.toledofreepress.com

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Key outdoor activites for Saturday, January 19 O 10 a.m.: Winchester’s March, Sawyer Homestead, 320 E. Front St. — Visitors can come and watch the troops form up for the march at the Sawyer Homestead and follow along as we recreate the route that General Winchester took from his headquarters at the home of Colonel Francois Navarre to the sound of the guns on that fateful morning of January 22, 1813. Of course, he was mounted on Navarre’s best horse, while you and I and the troops will be covering the one mile distance on foot. So, if you prefer, you might simply report to the River Raisin Battlefield Visitor Center and wait comfortably until you see us come marching in just before 10:30 a.m. O 10:30 a.m.: Flag raising and wreath laying ceremonies, River Raisin National Bat-

tlefield Park Visitor Center, 1403 E. Elm Ave. — We expect to have over 150 uniformed soldiers in line for the raising of 4 historic flags in honor of those who struggled and died in defense of their ideals, their way of life, or simply their homes at the Battle of the River Raisin and during the War of 1812. Descendants of actual battle participants and pioneer families will be asked to step forward and be recognized as the Wreath of Remembrance is laid by representatives of the Navarre family, which is said to have produced some 30 volunteers during the war, including Colonel Francois Navarre, the founder of what was to become the City of Monroe, and the famous Scout Peter Navarre, one of the original settlers of Toledo. O 11:15 a.m.: Tactical deomstration, Monroe Multi-Sports Complex, 333 N. Dixie Hwy. — Watch as 150 soldiers and 4

cannons duel once again over the possession of French Town on the River Raisin. The tactical will take place on the site of the Godfroy and Beaugrand property, which played a key role in the battle. It was their store on Jan. 18 that a group of local habitants were playing cards when an Indian broke in to announce that the “Long Knives” were coming. He ran out yelling, “Kaintuck, by God!” After their successful battle against the occupying force of Canadians and Indians, James’ Company of Spies of the 2nd Kentucky Volunteer Regiment took shelter for the night in their barn and stable. Their house was turned into a hospital after the disastrous battle of Jan. 22. The following day, the building was set on fire, and some of the wounded men died in the flames, while others were murdered or taken away

as prisoners by the Indians. O 2:30 p.m.: Tribute to Kentucky, Kentucky Monumet at memorial Place, 620 S. Monroe St. — Uniformed troops and ladies in 1812 dress will assemble as Representatives from the States of Michigan and Kentucky join the Mayor of Monroe and the Friends of the River Raisin Battlefield in laying a wreath in a colorful ceremony to rededicate the monument as Michigan’s Tribute to Kentucky. O Remember to spend some time in the warm indoors, looking over the exhibits at the Battlefield Visitor Center and listening to speakers there and at the Monroe County Historical Museum. Later in the day, please plan to attend the spirited 1812-themed concert at the Monroe County Community College, 1555 S. Raisinville Road. O

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200th anniversary - BATTLE OF RIVER RAISIN

JANUARY 13, 2013


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Fake reality

lthough I have not seen very many of the “fake reality” shows on television, other than “Deadliest Catch” on the Discovery Channel, I am very aware of the formula. During the first season you capture the interest of the audience with the nuances of the jobs and try to discover which characters the viewers love and which ones they love to hate. During the second season you introduce Gary L. drama. You have characters throw a temper tantrum and yell at the cameraman and storm off the boat, the dredge, the job or whatever is deemed the “set.” Family members and/or business partners start to fight, sometimes verbally, sometimes physically. The threat is always there that maybe by the next show they will be out of business, broke or partners with someone else. By the third, and usually last, season the show is no longer about the job or profession but more about

who owns what, who is now in charge, who is in jail and whose ego is being pacified by their agent and sponsors. I preface with this commentary because watching the manufactured drama in Washington, D.C., over the “fiscal cliff ” reminded me of this formula. As I sat on New Years day watching the Rose Bowl, I saw on the Internet that the Senate had saved the country at the last minute, RATHBUN leaving the House to decide if they would be the good guy or the bad guy. Regardless we will have to “stay tuned” for the ultimate solution sometime in February when they will put together a plan that will carry the decisions into the next “season.” Even thought the House approved the bill, it will not be good for the economy or the country. As I understand the bill out of the Senate currently, there is $1 in spending cuts for every $41 in tax increases. n RATHBUN CONTINUES ON A26

n A25

RETAIL toledo free press photo by joseph herr

A VIEW FROM THE GULCH

Visit www.toledofreepress.com

n

Mike Dahlhofer, manager, and his staff from left, Ashley Graves, Steve Rudolph, Maren Tregillis and Bill VanEck.

Tile Shop opens store in Holland By Duane Ramsey

TOLEDO FREE PRESS SENIOR BUSINESS WRITER dramsey@toledofreepress.com

The Tile Shop opened three new stores last month, including one in the Toledo area. The other locations are in Bloomfield Hills, Mich., and Edison, N.J. The specialty retailer of manufactured and natural stone tiles, tools and accessories opened its first store in the Toledo market three weeks ago at 1244 Corporate Drive in Holland. The shop is located near the intersection of Airport Highway and Holland-Sylvania Road. “It’s the biggest tile store anyone has seen in Toledo,” said Mike Dahlhofer, manager of the store in Holland. “We opened just in time for the holidays and saw a lot of traffic before Christmas.” The Tile Shop features a 22,000 square-foot showroom complete with 42 bathroom and kitchen displays to show its large selection of floor and wall tiles in ceramic, glass, porcelain, faux wood and natural stone. It also includes about 10,000 square feet of warehouse space to stock all of the tile products and accessories, according to Dahlhofer. “We cater to the do-it-yourselfers and carry all the tools and accessories needed to install and maintain the tile,” Dahlhofer said. He said a large portion of The Tile Shop’s business involves working with local contractors who purchase the products for residential projects. He estimated that their business is about 60 percent to contractors and 40 percent directly to consumers. The Tile Shop also offers a free class every Saturday at 9 a.m. to teach do-it-yourselfers how to install and maintain tile. Dahlhofer said that attendees learn the basics about the materials and tools and actually get to set some tiles to see how easy they can be to install. Dahlhofer said he has a staff of six employees at the Toledo store, including Ashley Graves, Erica Krischbaum, Steve Rudolph, Maren Tregillis, Bill VanEck and himself.

Builders, contractors and installers, who have come from as far away as Archbold and Napoleon, have been impressed with the large selection of tile products they carry, according to the staff. The store is open Monday through Friday from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m., Saturday from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. The sign for The Tile Shop can be seen from I-475 just north of the Airport Highway exit. Dahlhofer has worked for The Tile Shop organization for 10 years, recently serving in Ann Arbor and then managing his first store in New Jersey. Originally from the Detroit area, he wanted to be closer to home so he accepted the job to manage the new location in the Toledo area. The Tile Shop also announced Jan. 2 that it had completed the purchase of a new 150,000-square-foot distribution facility located on 15 acres in Durant, Okla. The company already operates a distribution center just north of Toledo in Ottawa Lake, Mich. Dahlhofer said it will be convenient having the distribution center located so close to the Toledo-area store. Tile Shop Holdings is the parent company of The Tile Shop. It opened 15 new stores in 2012, bringing its total to 68 stores in 21 states. It now has seven stores in Ohio, six in Michigan and four in New Jersey. “We are extremely pleased that we have successfully demonstrated our ability to significantly grow our store count through the opening of 15 new stores in 2012. This is a great way to end the year and it positions us well for continued growth in 2013,” said Robert Rucker, CEO of Tile Shop Holdings, in a news release announcing the openings. “We are excited about the acquisition of the distribution facility in Oklahoma as it will enable us to accelerate our national expansion plans,” Rucker said. The company expects to begin operations at the new distribution center by the end of the second quarter of 2013. It will utilize that facility to distribute products to its eight stores located in Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska and Missouri. For more information, visit www.tileshop.com. O


A26 n Toledo Free Press

Business Link

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Constructive obstructionism

J

ust days ago, the House of Rep- layed by several months, according to John Boehner and Paul Ryan saw this coming, but caved under pressure and resentatives approved a fiscal cliff The Washington Post. On top of all of the heated negotia- went against their principles by voting deal that previously had been approved by the White House and the tions, the rhetoric and the mud-slinging, for the deal. Just remember, come 2013 our commander in chief tax season, or when you get your weekly Senate. As predicted, (by executive order) paycheck and it is a little light, those a “compromise” was passed a pay increase for “hate-mongering, poor people-hating” reached which resulted federal workers before Republicans saw it coming and tried to in tax increases for a the New Year, including stop it. This is the bed that we have made majority of households. $900 a year for members for ourselves, and now we shall lie in it. O (Bloomberg reports that of Congress and a $6,400 77.1 percent of houseraise for Vice President Ben Treece is a 2009 Graduate from the holds will see a tax inJoe Biden. Luckily, despite University of Miami (FL), BBA Internacrease in one form or House Democratic oppo- tional Finance and Marketing. He is a another, according to sition, Georgia Blue Dog partner with Treece Investment Advisory the Tax Policy Center.) Ben TREECE Democrat (www.TreeceInvestments.com) John Barrow Corp. However, also as predicted, many Republicans caved on pushed forward an effort to block this and a stockbroker licensed with FINRA, their stance and voted for this deal, pay increase, siding with House Repub- working for Treece Financial Services Corp. The above information is the exwhich reportedly has $1 in spending licans and 55 other Democrats. The anger and frustration directed press opinion of Ben Treece and should cuts for every $41 in tax increases. For months we have been hearing at the Republican Party during these not be construed as investment advice or about how Republicans were keeping negotiations was misguided. Reps. used without outside verification. this deal from happening and how every House Republican hated middle-class America; that was the narrative that the public was fed and many ate it up. Let’s look at what exactly was passed in this deal. The Tax Policy Center states that 90 percent of the tax increases would hit $1 million-plus earners, and The Wall Street Journal reports (via the Kogod Tax Center) that a home earning Special pricing available $1 million with one child would pay roughly $37,000 more in taxes in 2013. The top rate on income would go from 35 percent to 39.6 percent, while the top rate on estates would increase 5 percent to 40 percent. Deductions are also being reigned in for high earners. However, The Wall Street Journal reports that the Social Security payroll tax will increase across the board 2 percent. On top of that, the top rates on capital gains and dividends are set to increase from 15 percent to 23.8 percent (20 percent plus the 3.8 percent Obamacare Medicare tax). The New York Daily News also reports that individuals making $50,000 a year will likely pay $1,000 more a year in taxes thanks to the payroll tax increase. These taxes alone are major hits on middle-class Americans who were promised that they would not pay any more during these turbulent economic times. Somehow these tax increases on the majority of households will still be spun as being the Republicans’ fault, without a doubt. The staunch opposition that Sylvania, OH 43560-1428 House Republicans showed back in the fall does not seem so unreasonable now. This is exactly what they were fighting against: the majority (77.1 percent to be info@toledomemorialpark.com precise) financing out-of-control government spending. It does not come as a shock that the cuts to federal spending were minute compared to the tax increases, and any cuts were actually de-

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JANUARY 13, 2013 n RATHBUN CONTINUED FROM A25 This will make politicians happy but will do nothing for our long-term economic problems and does not begin to address all of the laws that went into effect Jan. 1. Whatever happens, the “drama” is not over, not by a long shot. The drama will continue regarding the debt ceiling, which will be a couple of weeks long and end with Republicans rolling over again. We will also have the discussion on further taxing the millionaires and billionaires since this Band-Aid will not generate any revenue for the federal government. Our country is on the exact path that these people want even though they yell and scream that we are going in the wrong direction. They are playing their roles according to the script and I am sure they congratulate themselves at the end of the day for their performance. All of this “wrangling” keeps us right where they want

us and keeps them right where they want to be, in power and renewed for another season. In thinking about this, even though I don’t watch these shows, I have a sudden urge to see if listening to some duck calls, buying a failing bar or driving a truck on ice would erase the memory of this sausage making machine that is etched in my brain. I swear that if the politicians didn’t wear such nice suits and generally have all of their teeth, I wouldn’t be able to tell the difference. O Gary L. Rathbun is the president and CEO of Private Wealth Consultants, LTD. He can be heard every day on 1370 WSPD at 4:06 p.m. on “After the Bell” on the Afternoon Drive, and every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday evening at 6 p.m. throughout Northern Ohio on “Eye on Your Money.” He can be reached at (419) 842-0334 or email him at garyrathbun@privatewealth consultants.com.


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ARTS Life

A28 n Toledo Free Press

JANUARY 13, 2013

IN CONCERT

Country star Mattea shares coal heritage in song Toledo Free Press Staff Writer vkroll@toledofreepress.com

Photo courtesy David McClister

When Kathy Mattea started digging into her family’s West Virginia history, she unearthed a load of Appalachian mining songs. “When ‘Coal’ came out [in 2008], in order to do that album, I wound up exploring all this music that I grew up hearing, kind of in the background, but there was nobody to teach me about it when I was young,” she said. “So it was like going back and picking up a missing piece of a jigsaw puzzle, and it was so rich and so fun that I just wanted to keep going.” Released last September, “Calling Me Home” finds the singer again paying tribute to her roots with more mountain music. The Grammy winner grew up in Cross Lanes, W. Va. Both of her grand-

fathers were coal miners; her father was able to forgo the mine and attend college thanks to an uncle who owned a hardware store, Mattea said during a call from her Nashville, Tenn., home. “I always thought of coal mining as my mom and dad’s story, but not my story — until I made ‘Coal,’” she said. “I’ve realized that even though I was born a generation removed, coal was still my story as well, and I just couldn’t see how influenced my life was from coal even though my dad wasn’t a coal miner.” It was the 2006 Sago Mine disaster that killed 12 in West Virginia that struck Mattea. “I was really surprised by how much grief I was feeling, just visceral — I was bursting into tears for people I didn’t know,” she recalled. A musician friend suggested she channel that emotion into music. Her search for songs was fueled by a uni-

fying element: coal. “Someone said to me this process has got to be really different than what it used to be for you; now you’re more like an archivist. And it’s true,” Mattea said. “I kind of go everywhere. I talk to people who know this music. One song I found sitting on a porch late at night near Asheville, N.C., in a jam session. “You just kind of keep your ears open as you’re walking through your life,” she said. “It’s like turning over a whole lot of rocks, but it’s really fun.” Twice named Female Vocalist of the Year by the Country Music Association, Mattea has charted with

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nearly 30 hits, including “Love at the Five and Dime,” “455 Rocket,” “Eighteen Wheels and a Dozen Roses,” “Goin’ Gone,” “Come From the Heart,” “Burnin’ Old Memories,” “Lonesome Standard Time” and “Where’ve You Been,” which was co-written by her husband, Jon Vezner. Mattea will perform some of her best-known songs as well as tracks from “Coal” and “Calling Me Home” at 7:30 p.m. Jan. 18 at Monroe County Community College’s La-Z-Boy Center Meyer Theater. Tickets are $25 and $35 for VIP seating. “The songs I’m best known for have a certain kind of truth to

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them, and my biggest success is with [‘Where’ve You Been’] that my husband wrote about his grandparents. That was just a moment of digging into his own life for something that was really meaningful and it really resonated with a lot of people. “And it really wasn’t written to be a commercial song; he didn’t even know if anybody would record it, let alone if it would ever get on the radio,” Mattea said. “I think for him and for me both, that we got to have that success and sort of make our mark, our biggest moment in the music business with a collaboration together, that was a very, very sweet thing.” O

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ARTS Life

JANUARY 13, 2013

Visit www.toledofreepress.com

n A29

Series of winter travel shows and films scheduled At a time of year when we might not get out and about so much, travel programs are a wonderful way to relieve cabin fever. This local series of travelogues will again take place at 2:15 p.m. on Saturdays during January through March at either Oak Openings Lodge or Buehner Center (OO) or Wildwood Metroparks

Hall (WW). Free refreshments will be provided. This series is sponsored by Maumee Valley Adventurers (formerly Hosteling International) in conjunction with Metroparks of Toledo Area. Each week they offer a group walk in the park at 1 p.m. O Jan. 19: (OO Buehner Center) “Bicy-

cling in Ireland,” Bill Hoover O Jan. 26: (WW) “From St. Petersburg with Love,” Tatiana Gorbunova O Feb. 2: (OO Lodge) “Germany and Austria: ‘The Sound of Music,’” Judy Pfaffenberger O Feb. 9: (WW) “Costa Rica: PURA VIDA,” Rose and Andy Kandik O Feb. 16: (OO Buehner Center)

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“Cuban Spirit,” Bill Potvin O Feb. 23: (WW) “18 Wheels of Adventure,” Scott Grenerth O March 2: (OO Buehner Center) “Cruising the Mexican Riviera,” Connie Bauer O March 9: (WW) “The Nature and Culture of Wild India,” Sally Albert O March 16: (OO Buehner Center) “Japan: Temples, Shrines, Mountains and Seashore,” Diane DeYonker and Jim Hawkins O March 23: (WW) “Kenya,” Mindy Cross O March 30: (OO Buehner Center) “Canoeing in the Minnesota Boundary Waters,” Larry Lindsey The Way Library in Perrysburg will continue its REEL ART series of foreign and art films on Friday evenings at 7 p.m. O Jan. 18: “Of Gods and Men” (Algeria) in French with subtitles

O Feb. 15: “The First Grader” (Kenya) in English with some subtitles O March 15: “The Music Never Stopped” (USA) in English In conjunction with the Kenyan movie in February, Judy Pfaffenberger will present a travelogue “Tanzania: Animals, a Masai Village and Schools” on Feb. 19 at 2 p.m. At the Kiwanis Club Travel and Adventure Cinema of Tecumseh, Dale Johnson takes us north with “Lure of Alaska” on Feb. 12. On March 12 we will travel with Doug Jones on “The Great Trans-American Train Ride.” The series finishes April 9 with Rick Howard showing us “The Real World of Fiji.” The presenters are all professional photographers and lecturers. All programs begin at 7:30 p.m. at the Tecumseh Center for the Arts, 400 N. Maumee St. Tickets are $5 per person. O — Judy Pfaffenberger

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ARTS Life

hate to complain, but … You added about 25 years to our life exjust knew there was going to be pectancy due to many perils of the a “but” there, didn’t you? Yes, past being significantly lessened, yet “I hate to complain, but I’m going we likely spend that extra time just to anyway” is the modern Amer- worrying about peril anyway. We worry that the water puriican way. It may be the way of the modern world as a whole, but I’m fication process that has aided in a typical egocentric American so I removing the words “cholera” and really can’t say for sure. Being typ- “typhoid” from our everyday voical, I’m going to go ahead with my cabulary is somehow sickening us in new, less obvious complaint. I hate to ways. We worry that complain, but I would the immunizations like to take a few hunthat have severely limdred words to critique ited and even eradiour progress. cated once-feared There is an episode diseases are silently of “The Simpsons” attacking us too. We that is a fantastic alrally against the inlegory of modern life novations our ancesin America and betors would have given yond. Homer lands Shannon SZYPERSKI up nearly anything for what appears to be a wonderful new job and the family in order to protect their children seems to get everything they’ve al- from harm. Even those of us who ways wanted. Homer has an under- do appreciate them on some level standing boss, Marge is virtually still have the disrespect to complain chore-less in a self-cleaning house about having to pay for that which and Lisa is surrounded by the out- past generations would have considdoor wonderland she has always ered bona fide miracles. Oh, how we complain. We comdreamed of. Despite happening upon the life they think they’ve al- plain about the speed of machines ways wanted, Homer’s boss turns that were barely fathomable to the out to be a much different person average person even 20 or 30 years than he first thought, Marge is ago. We then use those same mabored and Lisa doesn’t quite enjoy chines to complain about any other little thing we can possibly think of. nature as much as she thought. Much like the Simpson family’s All day, every day. I wonder if all of the comtrek into a pseudo-utopia, we’re living longer, more abundant lives plaining and lack of appreciation than in centuries past, but we’re have to do with being born into honestly still kind of miserable at the wealth of our society without knowing firsthand what it was like times. Or most of the time. Many major medical, financial, to first go without such things. Yet, safety, social and other hurdles had I can’t help but think of how some in been significantly lowered or re- our elder generations seem to enjoy moved altogether in our neck of the debunking the innovation that has woods before we were even born, al- come to our younger generations. lowing us freedoms our foremothers In my day, we didn’t need computers and forefathers couldn’t even or cellphones or video games, just imagine. Wild animals are unlikely like generations past didn’t need to maul us to death, most of us don’t washing machines or automobiles need to travel hundreds of miles or telephones or electricity. It’s not so much that we necesover rugged terrain just to look for work, invisible hazards in our food sarily need such things, but do and water are probably not going to we really need to complain about sicken our families tonight and we having them? Do we really need to can spend our summers lounging at complain about most everything? the pool instead of worrying about What good is having it good if you don’t think of it as good? polio killing our children. If our supposed through-theWe don’t really feel that much better about our current, much- roof stress levels are any indicaimproved state of affairs, however. tion, the easier life our predecesWe still seem to be convinced that sors imagined for us and worked we live in the most dangerous, most so hard for isn’t really that much difficult time in the history of the easier after all. Apparently having the world as world. In the past 100 years, we’ve

your oyster is much more stressful than having the world as your canvas. I hate to complain, but

it’s not really progress until we allow ourselves to be happier and more content. O

Shannon and her husband, Michael, are raising three children in Sylvania. Email her at letters@toledofreepress.com.

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Varied Programs Friends Friends Friends King Movie Varied Programs The Mentalist The Mentalist

King Seinfeld Movie Varied The Mentalist

Chris

Two Men

Chris

Fam. Guy

8:30

9 pm

9:30

Fam. Guy

Two Men

January 13, 2013

MOVIES

3 pm

5:30

News News News at Five Dish Nat. TMZ The Dr. Oz Show Cyberchas The First 48

10 pm 10:30 11 pm 11:30

Private Practice (CC) Paid Paid Juice and Lose! The Bachelor Sean meets the women. (CC) News ABC Funny Home Videos Once Upon a Time Revenge “Sabotage” Happy Apt. 23 News Insider Paid College Basketball Michigan at Ohio State. (N) (Live) NFL NFL Football: AFC Divisional Playoff -- Texans at Patriots 60 Minutes (N) (CC) The Good Wife (N) The Mentalist (N) News Criminal NFL Football: NFC Divisional Playoff -- Seahawks at Falcons Bones (CC) The Closer (CC) Mother Mother Burgers Cleveland Simpsons Burgers Fam. Guy American News Leading 30 Rock Office Paid Beauty Paid To Be Announced USSA Snowboarding Paid Paid News News Arrivals Special The 70th Annual Golden Globe Awards (N) (S Live) (CC) News Jdg Judy Woods. W’dwright Kitchen Sewing POV “Reportero” POV “The City Dark” American Masters Moyers & Company NOVA (N) (CC) (DVS) Queen & Country Masterpiece Classic American Songbook Austin City Limits (N) ››› Ghost (1990, Fantasy) (CC) Shipping Shipping Shipping Shipping Shipping Shipping Shipping Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills Shahs of Sunset Shahs of Sunset Housewives/Atl. Housewives/Atl. Housewives/Atl. Housewives/Atl. Shahs of Sunset (N) Vanderpump Rules Happens Atlanta Welcome Home Roscoe Jenkins Futurama Futurama Futurama Futurama ›› Semi-Pro (2008) Will Ferrell. (CC) ›› Dumb & Dumber (1994, Comedy) Jim Carrey. (CC) Daniel Tosh: Happy A. Jeselnik: Ca. A. Jeselnik: Ca. Good Jessie Jessie Jessie A.N.T. Farm (CC) Jessie Shake It Good Good Austin ANT Farm Shake It Good Dog Austin Shake It Jessie Jessie Good Austin Austin PBA Bowling Strong Strong Strong Strong Strong Strong Strong Strong Strong Strongest Man SportsCenter (N) NFL PrimeTime (N) SportsCenter Special SportsCenter (N) ››› Home Alone (1990) Macaulay Culkin. ››› Matilda (1996, Comedy) Mara Wilson. ›› Ramona and Beezus (2010) Joey King. ››› Despicable Me (2010), Jason Segel ››› Despicable Me (2010), Jason Segel Bunheads (CC) Restaurant: Im. Diners Diners Diners Diners Diners Diners My. Din My. Din Diners Diners Rachael v. Guy Sugar Dome (N) Rachael v. Guy Iron Chef America Restaurant Stakeout Property Property Property Property Property Property Property Property Property Property Hunters Hunt Intl Hunters Hunt Intl Extreme Homes (CC) Property Brothers House Hunters Reno Hunters Hunt Intl Reviving Ophelia (2010) Jane Kaczmarek. Sexting in Suburbia (2012) Liz Vassey. (CC) The Preacher’s Daughter (2012) (CC) Walking the Halls (2012) Jamie Luner. (CC) A Mother’s Nightmare (2012) (CC) Walking the Halls Snooki & JWOWW ››› Mean Girls (2004, Comedy) Lindsay Lohan. BUCK BUCKWILD Washington Heights Teen Mom 2 Snooki & JWOWW BUCKWILD Washington Heights Dupree › Cop Out (2010) Bruce Willis. (CC) › Rush Hour 3 (2007) Jackie Chan. (CC) ›› Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Wedding Band ››› Royal Wedding ››› The Last Time I Saw Paris (1954) (CC) ››› Spellbound (1945) Ingrid Bergman. ››› Bullitt (1968) Steve McQueen. (CC) ››› Anna and the King of Siam (1946) ››› Magnificent Obsession (1935, Drama) Law & Order “Illegal” Law & Order ››› Patriot Games (1992) Harrison Ford. (CC) ››› The Sum of All Fears (2002) Ben Affleck. (CC) ››› The Bourne Ultimatum (2007, Action) Matt Damon. ››› The Bourne Ultimatum It’s Com ›› He’s Just Not That Into You (2009) Ben Affleck. Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU ›› The Game Plan ›› Danny Deckchair Made in Hollywood Cooking Now Eat! Chris Chris Friends Friends Two Men Two Men Big Bang Big Bang 1st Fam 1st Fam Box Offi Box Offi Browns Payne Scoop Made

Monday Evening ABC 13 CBS 11 FOX 36 NBC 24 PBS 30 A&E BRAVO COM DISN ESN FAM FOOD HGTV LIF MTV TBS TCM TNT USA WTO5

10 am

Good Morning News This Week Conklin Bridges Round Full Plate Your Morning Sunday CBS News Sunday Morning (N) Nation Leading Mass Better H20 Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Dish Fox News Sunday WEN Hair Pain? Paid Prog. Prostate FOX NFL Sunday (N) Today (N) (CC) Meet the Press (N) Van Impe Back Fat? Insanity! Paid Prog. Paid Prog. SMART Sid Cat in the Super Dinosaur Toledo Stories (CC) Plugged In Stella Antiques Roadshow CSI: Miami (CC) CSI: Miami (CC) ››› Pretty in Pink (1986) Molly Ringwald. (CC) ››› Ghost (1990) (CC) Happens Happens Kathy Real Housewives Matchmaker Real Housewives Comedy ›› The Goods: Live Hard. Sell Hard. (2009) ›› Semi-Pro (2008, Comedy) Will Ferrell. (CC) Welcome Jake and the Pirates Phineas Phineas Good Jessie Dog Shake It Good Good SportsCenter (N) (CC) SportsCenter (N) (CC) Sunday NFL Countdown (N) (Live) (CC) BH Chihuahua ››› Big (1988) Tom Hanks, Elizabeth Perkins. ›› Richie Rich (1994) Macaulay Culkin. Giada Trisha’s Pioneer Paula Not My Guy’s Sand. Be.- Made Chopped “Trout Bout” Income Income Income Income Income Property (CC) Property Brothers (CC) Love It or List It (CC) R Schuller Jeremiah J. Osteen Skincare Chris Chris Dance Moms (CC) Double Double Cribs Cribs Cribs Cribs Washington Heights JP plans a performance. Catfish: The TV Show Friends Friends Friends Friends Cougar Wedding Band ›› You, Me and Dupree (2006) ›› Balalaika (1939) Nelson Eddy. (CC) ›››› Les Miserables (1935) Fredric March. ››› Royal Wedding Law & Order Law & Order Law & Order “Driven” Law & Order Law & Order Miracles J. Osteen ›› The Game Plan (2007), Madison Pettis (CC) ›› It’s Complicated (2009) Meryl Streep. (CC) Paid Prog. Back Fat? Missing Old House Paid Prog. Beauty Cooking Now Eat! ›› Danny Deckchair

Sunday Afternoon / Evening ABC 13 CBS 11 FOX 36 NBC 24 PBS 30 A&E BRAVO COM DISN ESN FAM FOOD HGTV LIF MTV TBS TCM TNT USA WTO5

January 13, 2013

MOVIES

9 am

n A31

Visit www.toledofreepress.com

7 pm

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January 14, 2013

10:30

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Ent Insider The Bachelor (N) (CC) Castle (N) (CC) News J. Kimmel Wheel Jeopardy! How I Met Big Bang Broke Girl Mike Hawaii Five-0 “Kapu” News Letterman The Office How I Met Bones The team investigates a dancer’s death. Fox Toledo News America Seinfeld Jdg Judy Jdg Judy The Biggest Loser “Cut the Junk” (N) (CC) Deception (N) News Jay Leno NewsHour Business Antiques Roadshow Market Warriors (N) Independent Lens (N) Charlie Rose (N) (CC) To Be Announced The Haunting Of... The Haunting Of... The Haunting Of... The Haunting Of... Housewives/Atl. Real Housewives Real Housewives Vanderpump Rules (N) Happens Real Colbert Daily Futurama Futurama South Pk South Pk Brickle. South Pk Daily Colbert Good Luck Charlie, It’s Christmas! Shake It Austin Dog ANT Farm Good Austin Jessie College Basketball Louisville at Connecticut. College Basketball Baylor at Kansas. (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (CC) Switched at Birth (CC) Switched at Birth (N) Bunheads (N) (CC) Switched at Birth (CC) The 700 Club (CC) Diners Diners Diners Diners Diners Diners Diners Diners My. Diners My. Diners Love It or List It (CC) Love It or List It (CC) Love It or List It (N) Hunters Hunt Intl Love It or List It (CC) My Life, Movie My Life, Movie My Life, Movie My Life, Movie My Life, Movie Snooki & JWOWW Catfish: The TV Show Teen Mom 2 Teen Mom 2 (N) Catfish: The TV Show Seinfeld Seinfeld Family Guy (CC) Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Conan (N) (CC) Truth-Murder AFI Master Class (N) ›› What Lies Beneath (2000) Harrison Ford. Premiere. AFI The Mentalist (CC) The Mentalist (CC) The Mentalist (CC) The Mentalist (CC) CSI: NY “Veritas” (CC) NCIS “In the Dark” WWE Monday Night RAW (N) (S Live) (CC) NCIS: Los Angeles Big Bang Big Bang The Carrie Diaries (N) The Carrie Diaries Rules Rules Amer. Dad Amer. Dad

Tuesday Evening ABC 13 CBS 11 FOX 36 NBC 24 PBS 30 A&E BRAVO COM DISN ESN FAM FOOD HGTV LIF MTV TBS TCM TNT USA WTO5

BRINGING THE FLAVORS OF

Loma Linda

Bienvenidos A Celebrating C elebrating 5577 yyears. ears. migos!

stt ToledoRe’sstaBures a t an Mexican yearss!! o er 57 y for ov for

10400 Airport Hwy. (1.2 miles east of Toledo Express Airport)

419-865-5455

HOURS: M Mo Monday-Thursday onday nd day ay-T -Th Thu hurs hurs rsd day 11 da 11 aa.m. .m. .m m. – 11 11 pp.m. .m m. d 11 a.m. – Midnight Mid i h | Sunday S d Closed C Cl Friday-Saturday

7 pm

7:30

MOVIES

8 pm

8:30

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January 15, 2013

10:30

11 pm

11:30

Ent Insider Mod Fam Suburg. Happy Apt. 23 Private Practice (N) News J. Kimmel Wheel Jeopardy! NCIS “Shiva” (N) NCIS: Los Angeles (N) Vegas (N) (CC) News Letterman The Office How I Met Raising Ben-Kate New Girl Mindy Fox Toledo News America Seinfeld Jdg Judy Jdg Judy Betty Betty Go On (N) Normal Parenthood (N) (CC) News Jay Leno NewsHour Business Pioneers of Television Abolitionists Frontline (N) (CC) Charlie Rose (N) (CC) Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Real Housewives Real Housewives Housewives/Atl. Matchmaker Happens Vander Colbert Daily The Burn Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 The Burn Daily Colbert Good Good Good Jessie ANT Farm Shake It ANT Farm Good Austin Jessie College Basketball Tennessee at Kentucky. (N) College Basketball Wisconsin at Indiana. (N) SportsCenter (N) (CC) Pretty Little Liars (CC) Pretty Little Liars (N) The Lying Game (N) Pretty Little Liars (CC) The 700 Club (CC) Chopped “Own It!” Chopped Chopped “Trout Bout” Chopped (N) Chopped “Charge!” Hunt Intl Hunters Love It or List It (CC) Property Property Hunters Hunt Intl Scoring Scoring Dance Moms (CC) Dance Moms (CC) Dance Moms (N) (CC) America’s Supernanny Teen Trouble “Lexi” Teen Mom 2 Catfish: The TV Show Snooki & JWOWW Snooki & JWOWW (N) Snooki & JWOWW Seinfeld Seinfeld Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Cougar Big Bang Conan (N) (CC) ›› I Thank a Fool ››› The League of Gentlemen (1960) ››› Dead Heat on a Merry-Go-Round (1966) Castle (CC) Castle (CC) Castle (CC) Castle (CC) CSI: NY “Turbulence” Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Big Bang Big Bang Hart of Dixie (N) (CC) Emily Owens, M.D. (N) Rules Rules Amer. Dad Amer. Dad

mexico

to northwest ohio THE ORIGINAL MEXICAN RESTAURANTE & CANTINA IN TOLEDO

7742 W. Bancroft (1 Mi. West of McCord) 419-841-7523

Open Monday to Saturday 11 a.m. Closed Sundays &10” Holidays x 10.25” ad


TV Listings

A32 n Toledo Free Press Wednesday Evening ABC 13 CBS 11 FOX 36 NBC 24 PBS 30 A&E BRAVO COM DISN ESN FAM FOOD HGTV LIF MTV TBS TCM TNT USA WTO5

7 pm

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Thursday Evening ABC 13 CBS 11 FOX 36 NBC 24 PBS 30 A&E BRAVO COM DISN ESN FAM FOOD HGTV LIF MTV TBS TCM TNT USA WTO5

January 18, 2013

10:30

11 pm

11:30

Ent Insider Last Man Malibu Shark Tank (CC) (DVS) 20/20 (CC) News J. Kimmel Wheel Jeopardy! Undercover Boss (N) CSI: NY (N) (CC) Blue Bloods “Framed” News Letterman The Office How I Met Fringe The team implements a plan. (N) (CC) Fox Toledo News America Seinfeld Jdg Judy Jdg Judy Betty Betty Dateline NBC (N) (CC) News Jay Leno NewsHour Business Wash Deadline Great Performances at the Met “L’Elisir d’Amore” (N) (CC) Toolbox Duck D. Duck D. Duck D. Duck D. Duck D. Duck D. Storage Storage Storage Storage › Mr. Deeds (2002) ››› Meet the Parents (2000) Robert De Niro. ››› Meet the Parents (2000) Robert De Niro. Colbert Daily Tosh.0 Tosh.0 ››› Get Him to the Greek (2010, Comedy) Jonah Hill. (CC) A. Schum. Good Good Good Jessie (N) Phineas Gravity Dog Good Austin Jessie NBA Basketball Chicago Bulls at Boston Celtics. (N) (Live) NBA Basketball: Thunder at Mavericks ››› Drumline (2002) Nick Cannon. ›› A Cinderella Story (2004) Hilary Duff. The 700 Club (CC) Restaurant: Im. Diners Diners Diners Diners My. Diners My. Diners Diners Diners Hunt Intl Hunt Intl Living So ’80s Famous House Hunters Hunt Intl Hunt Intl Hunt Intl Hoarders (CC) Hoarders (CC) Hoarders (CC) Teen Trouble (N) (CC) America’s Supernanny Washington Heights BUCKWILD BUCKWILD ››› 8 Mile (2002) Eminem, Kim Basinger. Seinfeld Seinfeld Worse Worse Worse Worse ›› The Bucket List (2007) Jack Nicholson. ››› Monkey Business Chickens Politiquerías (1931) Blotto (CC) La Vida Nocturna (Premiere) Laurel The Mentalist (CC) ›› The Fast and the Furious (2001, Action) ›› 2 Fast 2 Furious (2003) Paul Walker. (CC) Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Suits “Blind-Sided” Big Bang Big Bang Nikita “Intersection” Beauty and the Beast Rules Rules Amer. Dad Amer. Dad

Saturday Afternoon / Evening ABC 13 CBS 11 FOX 36 NBC 24 PBS 30 A&E BRAVO COM DISN ESN FAM FOOD HGTV LIF MTV TBS TCM TNT USA WTO5

January 16, 2013

MOVIES

8:30

Ent Insider Middle Neighbors Mod Fam Suburg. Nashville (N) News J. Kimmel Wheel Jeopardy! NCIS “Recovery” Criminal Minds (N) CSI: Crime Scene News Letterman The Office How I Met American Idol “Auditions No. 1” (N) (CC) Fox Toledo News America Seinfeld Jdg Judy Jdg Judy Whitney Guys-Kids Law & Order: SVU Chicago Fire “Pilot” News Jay Leno NewsHour Business Nature (CC) (DVS) NOVA (CC) Life on Fire (N) (CC) Charlie Rose (N) (CC) Duck D. Duck D. Duck D. Duck D. Shipping Shipping Barter Kings (N) (CC) Barter Barter Real Housewives Housewives/Atl. Top Chef: Seattle Top Chef: Seattle (N) Happens Top Chef Colbert Daily Work. Work. South Pk South Pk Work. Kroll Show Daily Colbert Good Luck Charlie Good Lemonade Mouth (2011) Bridgit Mendler. Good Austin Jessie SpoCenter NBA NBA Basketball Houston Rockets at Dallas Mavericks. (N) NBA Basketball: Heat at Warriors ››› Remember the Titans (2000) ››› Remember the Titans (2000) Denzel Washington. The 700 Club (CC) Restaurant: Im. Restaurant: Im. Restaurant: Im. Bobby’s Dinner Battle Restaurant: Im. House Hunters Reno Cousins Cousins Property Brothers (N) Hunters Hunt Intl Property Brothers (CC) Wife Swap (CC) Wife Swap (CC) Wife Swap (CC) Double Double Project Runway BUCKWILD Snooki & JWOWW Washington Heights Washington Heights Washington Heights Seinfeld Seinfeld Fam. Guy Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Conan (N) (CC) ›› Cromwell (1970) ››› A Man’s Castle ››› Suez (1938) Tyrone Power. (CC) ››› Kentucky (1938) Castle (CC) Castle (CC) Castle (CC) Castle “Pretty Dead” CSI: NY (CC) NCIS “Leap of Faith” NCIS “Dead Air” (CC) NCIS “Baltimore” NCIS “Swan Song” NCIS “Pyramid” Big Bang Big Bang Arrow “Burned” (N) Supernatural (N) (CC) Rules Rules Amer. Dad Amer. Dad

Friday Evening ABC 13 CBS 11 FOX 36 NBC 24 PBS 30 A&E BRAVO COM DISN ESN FAM FOOD HGTV LIF MTV TBS TCM TNT USA WTO5

8 pm

JANUARY 13, 2013

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January 17, 2013

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January 19, 2013

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Good Morning News Hanna Ocean Explore Rescue Recipe Food Your Morning Saturday Busytown Busytown Liberty Liberty Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Wild Am. Aqua Kids Eco Co. Hollywood Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Kids News Paid Prog. Today (N) (CC) Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Wiggles Pajanimals Poppy Cat Justin LazyTown Noodle Sid Cat in the Super Dinosaur MotorWk Michigan Wild Ohio Out Mag. Nature (CC) (DVS) To Be Announced To Be Announced Flip This House (CC) Flipping Vegas (CC) Flipping Vegas (N) Vanderpump Rules Vanderpump Rules Real Housewives Real Housewives Real Housewives ››› Hot Fuzz (2007) Simon Pegg. (CC) ›› First Sunday (2008) Ice Cube. (CC) Code-Cleaner Jake and the Pirates Phineas Gravity Good Austin Jessie Dog Shake It Shake It SportsCenter (CC) SportsCenter (N) (CC) SportsCenter (N) (CC) College GameDay (N) College Basketball Cinderella Story ›› A Cinderella Story (2004) Hilary Duff. ›››› Mary Poppins (1964) Be.- Made Best Thing Paula Paula Pioneer Trisha’s Contessa Giada Chopped Buying and Selling Property Property BathCrash BathCrash YardCrash Kit. Crash Hse Crash Hse Crash Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Chris Chris Perfect Husband: Laci Teen Mom 2 Washington Heights Washington Heights Snooki & JWOWW I Made It I Made It Payne Browns There Jim King of the Nerds ››› The Witches of Eastwick (1987) (CC) Phantom-Crest ›› They Met in Bombay (1941) › Smashing the Money Ring ›› Blondes at Work Law & Order Law & Order Dallas (CC) Dallas (CC) Law & Order Paid Prog. Paid Prog. ›› War (2007) Jet Li, Jason Statham. (CC) ››› Chaos (2005, Action) Jason Statham. (CC) Sonic X Rangers Transform. Justice WWE Dragon Yu-Gi-Oh! Yu-Gi-Oh! Career Icons

MOVIES

3 pm

10 pm

Ent Insider Last Resort (N) (CC) Grey’s Anatomy (N) Scandal (N) (CC) News J. Kimmel Wheel Jeopardy! Big Bang Two Men Person of Interest Elementary (CC) News Letterman The Office How I Met American Idol “Auditions No. 2” (N) (CC) Fox Toledo News America Seinfeld Jdg Judy Jdg Judy 30 Rock Parks The Office 1600 Penn Rock Center News Jay Leno NewsHour Business Toledo Stories (CC) Midsomer Murders Live From Artists Den Charlie Rose (N) (CC) The First 48 (CC) The First 48 (CC) First 48: Missing Beyond Scared Beyond Scared Matchmaker Matchmaker Matchmaker Kathy (N) Happens Matchmkr Colbert Daily South Pk Tosh.0 Kroll Show Work. Sunny Sunny Daily Colbert Good Good Good Radio Rebel (2012) Debby Ryan. ANT Farm Good Austin Jessie College Basketball Teams TBA. (N) (Live) College Basketball Teams TBA. (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (CC) ›› Step Up 3 (2010, Drama) ››› Drumline (2002) Nick Cannon, Zoe Saldana. Premiere. The 700 Club (CC) Cupcake Wars Chopped Chopped Sweet Genius (N) Rachael v. Guy Hunt Intl Hunters Hawaii Hawaii Extreme Homes (CC) Hunters Hunt Intl Home Strange Home Project Runway Project Runway Project Runway Double Double Dance Moms (CC) Snooki & JWOWW BUCKWILD BUCKWILD BUCKWILD (N) BUCKWILD Seinfeld Seinfeld Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Big Bang Big Bang King of the Nerds (N) Conan (N) (CC) Ghosts -- Italian Style ››› Cry Danger (1951) (CC) ››› 99 River Street (1953) Tomorrow-Day NBA Tip-Off (N) (CC) NBA Basketball: Clippers at Timberwolves NBA Basketball: Heat at Lakers NCIS “Dog Tags” (CC) NCIS (CC) NCIS “Knockout” (CC) Suits “Blind-Sided” (N) CSI: Crime Scene Big Bang Big Bang The Vampire Diaries The Carrie Diaries Rules Rules Amer. Dad Amer. Dad

Saturday Morning ABC 13 CBS 11 FOX 36 NBC 24 PBS 30 A&E BRAVO COM DISN ESN FAM FOOD HGTV LIF MTV TBS TCM TNT USA WTO5

MOVIES

8 pm

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January 19, 2013

10 pm 10:30 11 pm 11:30

J. Hanna Full Plate Paid Paid Shark Tank (CC) ESPN Sports Saturday (N) News ABC Insider Lottery 20/20 (CC) ››› Blades of Glory (2007) Will Ferrell. News Castle Paid Paid College Basketball Regional Coverage. (N) College Basketball Oregon at UCLA. (N) News News Wheel Time NCIS “Phoenix” Hawaii Five-0 (CC) 48 Hours (N) (CC) News CSI Paid McCarver The Closer (CC) Bones (CC) Leverage (CC) UFC on FOX 6 Burn Notice (CC) Burn Notice (CC) Cops (N) Cops Kitchen Nightmares News Seinfeld MasterChef Paid Got Paid Paid Paid Paid Skating & Gymnastics Spectacular (N) (CC) News News Jdg Judy Academic Deception Chicago Fire Law & Order: SVU News SNL This Old House Hr Cooking Quilting Great Performances (CC) Sun Stud Globe Trekker Steves Travels Lawrence Welk History Detectives Antiques Roadshow As Time... Wine Contemporary First 48: Missing First 48: Missing First 48: Missing Barter Barter Barter Kings (CC) Barter Kings (CC) Storage Storage The Haunting Of... The Haunting Of... The Haunting Of... The Haunting Of... Real Housewives Matchmaker Matchmaker Shahs of Sunset Shahs of Sunset Housewives/Atl. Housewives/Atl. Housewives/Atl. Housewives/Atl. Real Housewives Vanderpump Rules Code-Cleaner › Let’s Go to Prison (2006) Dax Shepard. ›› Sex Drive (2008, Comedy) Josh Zuckerman. (CC) ››› Get Him to the Greek (2010) Jonah Hill. (CC) ››› Wedding Crashers (2005) Owen Wilson. (CC) › Joe Dirt Shake It Dog Dog Dog Austin Austin Shake It Shake It Good Dog Good Good ›› Beverly Hills Chihuahua Beverly Hills Chihuahua 2 (2011) Phineas Dog Austin Jessie College Basketball College Basketball Missouri at Florida. (N) College Basketball Syracuse at Louisville. College Basketball College GameDay College Basketball Gonzaga at Butler. (N) SportsCenter (N) ›››› Mary Poppins (1964) ››› Lady and the Tramp (1955) ››› Hercules (1997), Josh Keaton ››› Aladdin (1992), Robin Williams ›››› Cinderella (1950, Fantasy) ›���› Alice in Wonderland (1951), Ed Wynn Legend Giada at Home Restaurant: Im. Restaurant Stakeout Diners Diners Iron Chef America Rachael v. Guy Restaurant: Im. Restaurant: Im. Restaurant: Im. Restaurant: Im. Iron Chef America Love It or List It (CC) HGTV Dream Home Brake for Yard Sales Flea Mar Flea Mar Flea Mar Flea Mar Hunters Hunt Intl House Hunters Reno Love It or List It (CC) Love It or List It (CC) Hunters Hunt Intl Hunters Hunt Intl Perfect Husb. ››› Taken in Broad Daylight (2009) (CC) ›› The Elizabeth Smart Story (2003) (CC) Taken Back: Finding Haley (2012) (CC) Prosecuting Casey Anthony (2013) (CC) Beyond Head. Double Double BUCKWILD Catfish: The TV True Life True Life True Life True Life True Life True Life BUCKWILD BUCKWILD Washington Heights Witches ›› The Bucket List (2007) Jack Nicholson. Friends Friends Friends Friends King King Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Wedding Band (N) Cougar The ››› Sahara (1943) Humphrey Bogart. (CC) ››› Moby Dick (1956) Gregory Peck. (CC) ››› Quo Vadis (1951) Robert Taylor, Deborah Kerr. (CC) ››› Lolita (1962) James Mason, Sue Lyon. (CC) (DVS) ››› The Big Knife (1955) (CC) Law & Order ››› Terminator 2: Judgment Day (1991) (CC) ››› Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines (2003) (CC) ›› Terminator Salvation (2009) Christian Bale. ›› The Book of Eli (2010, Action) Denzel Washington. ›› Crank (2006) Jason Statham. (CC) NCIS “Hiatus” (CC) NCIS “Hiatus” NCIS “Singled Out” NCIS “Requiem” NCIS (CC) NCIS “Borderland” NCIS “Patriot Down” NCIS (CC) ›› Crank (2006) (CC) Live Life On Spot Game Raceline EP Daily EP Daily ’70s ’70s Rules Rules Two Men Two Men Big Bang Big Bang ›› Heaven (2002) Cate Blanchett. Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Futurama Futurama

Friday, January 18th

Toast & Jam

facebook.com/blarneytoledo

601 Monroe St. Right Across from Fifth Third Field

Saturday, January 19th

Noise Pollution

You’re only a hops, skip, and jump a whey from Blarney Blueberry Ale and a great time.

HAPPY HOUR Mon-Fri 4-7 pm Live Entertainment Thurs-Fri-Sat

BLARNEY DINNER SPECIAL

St. Patty’s Day COUNTDOWN

ONLY 10 MORE WEEKS!

2 FOR $20

Choose one from each of the following: APPETIZER

Cup of loaded Baked Potato soup, small Loaded Tater Tots, small Irish Black & Bleu Chips or small order of Potato Latkes

ENTRÉE

Banger & Mashed Potatoes, Shepherd’s Pie, Two piece Fish n’ Chips or Corned Beef Reuben

DESSERT

Blarney’s famous Bread Pudding or Homemade Focaccia’s Chocolate Cake Cannot be combined with any other offer. No discount or coupons will be accepted. Good through 1/24/13.

10” x 10.25” ad


ComicS

JANUARY 13, 2013 Solution, tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com

Games

Visit www.toledofreepress.com

n A33

BIFF & RILEY

BY JEFF PAYDEN

DIZZY

BY DEAN HARRIS

n ANSWERS FOUND ON A34

Third Rock

Almanac

n ANSWERS FOUND ON A48

By Elizabeth Hazel

Your Tarotgram and Horoscope

JAN. 13-19, 20123

Sun and Mercury enter Aquarius (19th) Aries (March 21-April 19)

Libra (September 23-October 22)

Plots thicken as people put their heads together and whisper in corners. Fortunate and convenient alliances can turn problems into advantages. With effort, a major hurdle can be jumped Friday. Indulge in luxuries and some gloating with friends Saturday.

If you dropped a pebble in the interpersonal pond last week, the ripples show up this week. Invisible boundaries dissolve between you and others. Property and locations change quickly midweek. An important identification is made Friday – names are named.

Taurus (April 20-May 20)

Scorpio (October 23-November 21)

Distant connections and plans/projects in development hold sway this week. Someone dissolves an unsuspected barrier for you for the pleasure of your company and talents. Be a tough negotiator Friday and a jukebox hero Saturday. Popularity grows in new ground.

Circle the wagons around the people and things you value. Exits and entrances in the daily environment disrupt comfortable patterns. Conversations Thursday and Friday illuminate intentions and expectations. The weekend offers time to come to terms with changes.

Gemini (May 21-June 21)

Sagittarius (November 22-December 21)

Inaction is a choice; then choice falls to others. Procrastination seems safe, but can be costly. Some connections are obliterated or irrevocably transformed this week. People’s jobs and loyalties change quickly after Thursday. Important conclusions are made Friday.

Deeply held desires and ambitions are up-thrusting seedlings. Past experiences and accumulated skills open doors to new avenues of expression. Money, property and inheritance matters unfold; truth arrives Friday. Abundance and joy flows Saturday.

Cancer (June 22-July 22)

Capricorn (December 22-January 19)

People with multiple priorities discover limitations. Thwarted outcomes may cause someone close to you to whine about the way the real world operates. Stick to your resolutions about dealing with specific individuals. Be productive and focus on personal projects.

Health and wellness are a necessary focus. Acquaintances and family assist in locating helpful experts. Conduct good initial meetings Wednesday and Thursday. People impress you with their depth of knowledge. Celebrate with loved ones and friends Saturday.

Leo (July 23-August 22) Recognize your bottom line and know your limits.

Aquarius (January 20-February 18)

Situations with others are reaching outcomes and endings. Patience is strained Friday. Numbers and reports fall short of greater truths. Traveling or group events revitalize your spirits over the weekend.

Overriding priorities and unpredictable emotions influence how people behave this week. Be cautious about asking for favors or making proposals. Wait until after Wednesday, and don’t spring things without warning. You may obtain what you want without even asking.

Virgo (August 23-September 22)

Pisces (February 19-March 20)

Your main focus is people/situations in crisis or transition. Different people share unique skills to dramatically improve or resolve root causes. Extremes of good and evil are apparent in your environment. Savor time and activities with your loved ones Saturday.

Leverage your personal, family and social connections for the resources and expertise you need. Your domestic/ family cycle is ready for a new chapter. Past standards or contracts are subject to divided options. A woman strongly influences events and outcomes after Friday.

Elizabeth Hazel is a professional tarotist-astrologer and author. She gives readings every Wednesday at Attic on Adams above Manos Greek Restaurant. She may be contacted at ehazel@buckeye-express.com (c) 2013

TFP Crossword

1

“Champs” ACROSS

1. See 13-Across 6. Notice 10. Enemy 12. President twixt Harry & Jack 13. With 17-Across & 1-Across, the event 16. Storm center 17. See 13-Across 20. “Golly!” 23. ---- Side Montessori (7115 Bancroft) 25. Piece of procedure 28. Public face 30. Opponent in the Final 33. Twinkle 35. Author Bagnold 36. Tater 38. Under the weather 40. The winning coach 42. Sixth sense 45. The Champs

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49. Army bed 50. Part of SASE, in brief 52. Improve, healthwise 53. Start High alum and member of 45-A ross DOWN

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Six-pointer, for short ET’s ride CD ---Must

05. AWOL pursuers 07. Cleaner scent 8. Acceptable 9. Port of prompter beginning 11. Hit musical at the Valentine in March 14. Time past 15. Perspective 18. Container 19. Church’s ten per cent

by Dave DeChristopher 20. Female friend 21. For example, for short 22. Poet Cummings 24. ---- man (unanimous) 25. Monroe or Adams: abbr. 26. Velvet finish 27. Jazz great Louis 29. Barker and Kettle 31. From Perugia 32. Minn. neighbor 33. Joe or Jane 34. Bean or Cool J 37. Trick 39. Conservative pundit Carlson 41. Blubber 42. Outline roughly 43. Wheel drag 44. Animal activist org. 46. “Pick me! Pick me!” 47. Termination 48. Sets at home 51. Working n ANSWERS FOUND ON A34


CLASSIFIED

A34 n Toledo Free Press

ØØØØØ ØØØØØ ØØØØØ ~nO~ Ø Ø Ø Ø Ø 419-882-7171 BAD CREDIT OR NO Ø Ø Ø Ø Ø No Need to wait oN your

community legal notice A+ Self Storage at 1324 W. Alexis Toledo, OH 43612 will offer for public sale at 3:30PM on January 22, 2013 the following units: Unit 104, Irene Preuss P.O. Box 8593 Toledo, OH. 43623: Clothes, Ladder, Boxes; Unit 269, Maria Christian 7805 Erie St Sylvania, Ohio 43560: Sofa, Rugs, Clothes; Unit 310, Kristy Williams 2335 Georgetown Ave Toledo, OH 43613: Dryer, Washer, Refrigerator; Unit 602, Ernest VanDeilen 5220 Spicer Toledo, OH 43612: 2 Cabinets; Unit 633, Nicole Ruch 3616 ½ Fremont Pike Perrysburg, OH 43551: Boxes, Toys, Air Conditioners; Unit 658, Jesse D Richardson 3549 Terrace Dr Toledo, OH 43611: Air Conditioner, Chair, Clothes; Unit 719, Robin Basilius 3411 W. Alexis #3-E Toledo Ohio 43623: TV, End Table, Table Lamp; Unit 801, Kerri McLeod 4737 Secor Toledo, OH 43623: Storage Tubs, Boxes, Computer Equipment; Unit 1032, Mie’cha White 2647 Thoman Pl. Tol., Ohio 43613: Sofa, Loveseat, TV; Unit 1041, Tracy Quinn 5725 Silverside Dr. #5 Toledo, OH. 43612: Mattress, Sofa, TV; Unit 1311, Nancy L. Suber 1547 W. Central Ave. Toledo, OH 43606: Light bulbs, Store Fixtures, Unused Boxes; Unit 1504, Chris R. Presley 1913 Brame Toledo, Ohio 43613: Remote Control Car, Shelving, Cash Register. Cash and Removal. Call ahead to confirm: 419-476-1400.

REAL ESTATE commericial OFFICE/RETAIL SPACE FOR SALE 116 E. William St., Maumee Call Dave (419) 575-2820

Condominiums SYLVANIA TOWNSHIP – NEW LISTING 2 Bed, 1-1/2 Bath, 1151 sq ft, attached garage. Not a foreclosure or short sale – $54,900 SOUTH – $10,000 PRICE REDUCTION 3 Bed, 1-1/2 Bath, 1580 sq ft, attached garage. Not a foreclosure or short sale – $69,900 Mary Ann Stearns, Loss Realty Group 419-345-0071 or marstearns@bex.net

homes WEST TOLEDO – NEW LISTING 3 Bed, 1Bath, 1050 sq ft, 1 car garage, large eat-in kitchen, 4 season sunroom, updated bath, large fenced backyard, well maintained. Priced to sell quickly at only $49,900 Mary Ann Stearns, Loss Realty Group 419-345-0071 or marstearns@bex.net Toledo, 614 Euclid Ave. 4BR/2BA Multifamily Home. Fixer-upper, Great Investment! Owner financing or cash discount $150 Down, $174/mo 803-978-1539 or 803-978-1607

Toledo Free Press publishes classified ads and cannot be responsible for problems arising between parties placing or responding to ads in our paper. We strongly urge everyone to exercise caution when dealing with people, companies and organizations with whom you are not familiar.

All real estate advertised in this paper is subject to the federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, in the sale, rental, or financing of housing. This Publisher will not knowingly accept any advertising that violates any applicable law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this paper are available on an equal opportunity basis. If you believe you have been discriminated against in connection with the sale, rental, or financing of housing, call the Toledo Fair Housing Center, (419) 243-6163.

JANUARY 13, 2013

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n CROSSWORD ANSWERS FROM A33

n ANSWERS FROM A33

T O U D F WO V I N V E E WE S S G L E I L L E T C H

S H O E

P E T A

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M E N P S N A G T I O I T E P H E R E N I M C I A R Y R O O I C H

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n A35


A36 n Toledo Free Press

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Toledo Free Press – January 13, 2013