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TOKEWELL | CANNABIS. CLOUDS. CULTURE

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POT BROTHERS AT LAW

WE SIT WITH THE GAMES PREMIER ATTORNEYS AND TALK ABOUT CANNABIS LEGALIZATION AND WHY IT’S IMPORTANT TO FOLLOW THE SCRIPT.

FLAWLESSLY EXECUTED ISSUE 22 | SPRING/SUMMER 2018

WE INTERVIEW THE OWNER ONE OF THE VAPE GAMES LARGEST BRANDS AND TALK ABOUT STARTING FROM THE BOTTOM TO BUILDING HIS GLOBAL EMPIRE. $4.20 U.S. $5.20 CAN.

UNCHAINED WE SESSION WITH 2 CHAINZ AND TALK ABOUT HIS HIGH OCTANE PROJECTS AND HOW HE STAYS LIT WITH THE GAS.


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FEATURES

24 Unchained

56 FLIPPING THE SCRIPT

40 CHANGING THE GAME

70 EXPOSED

We session with 2 Chainz and talk about his high octane projects and how he stays lit with the GAS.

We interview entrepreneur and the creator of the 420 Games, Jim McAlpine and talk about the current state of the cannabis movement and what we need to do destigmatize this amazing plant.

We sit with the games premier attorneys and talk about cannabis legalization and why it’s important to follow the script.

Renowned photographer Althea Salamin takes us on a visual journey through her lens and tells us how her path would've been different if it wasn't for the vaping industry.

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We interview the owner one of the vape games largest brands and talk about starting from the bottom to building his global empire.

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Cut the Fat I'

m not one to cut all the fat off my steaks, simply because that's where all the flavor is. However, when it comes to friendships, family, and business, it's a whole different story. Too much fat in your social and personal life or business network is unhealthy and simply put, you have to trim down on the people that slow you down and strip you of your time and energy.

If someone around you is lazy, procrastinates or fails to follow through with responsibilities, then why waste your time having them at the table? Life's too short to become a crutch for someone's inability to align themselves with your vision, and if they're not as hungry as you are, then why are they even sitting at the same table as you and enjoying the fruits of your labor? Simply put, if they want to eat, they should help put food on the table, because there's no such thing as a free meal. It is imperative that you stay efficient, keep your network lean, crew tight and remain focused. Recognize red flags, and go with your instinct. Stop being a crutch to repeat offenders. They have their own path to travel and you’re not on the same road as them. Embrace the haters and align yourself with individuals who will elevate you and that share the same mindset and goals. Remember, it's easy to pick up the psychology of people around you, and just like yawning - success is contagious. You know what they say, You are what you eat.

PUBLISHED BY FR3SHLAB CREATIVE GROUP, LLC PRESIDENT, FOUNDING PARTNER RICHARD COYLE RICH@TOKEWELL.COM CO-FOUNDER SENIOR V.P., OPERATIONS CINDY GALINDO CINDY@TOKEWELL.COM DESIGN HONEST KITTY STUDIO "NO-NONSENSE DESIGN" EDITOR-IN-CHIEF RICHARD COYLE EDITOR LEILANI ANDERSON DIRECTOR OF FINANCE YVONNE MORTON YVONNE@TOKEWELL.COM CONTRIBUTING WRITERS MAXIMILLIAN STERLING, ROY FOKKER , PATRICK CALHOUN, RICK HUNTER, RYAN THOMAS AND JOHN CHOE. LEAD PHOTOGRAPHERS LEAH MORIYAMA | TAADOW69K CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS JONATHAN MANNION, JOE MOORE, GROW STUDIOS AND ALTHEA SALAMIN CREATIVE AGENCY FR3SHLAB CREATIVE GROUP Tokewell Magazine is published bi-monthly by Fr3shlab Creative Group, LLC. Tokewell Magazine does not condone the illegal use or obtainment of cannabis. All content within this magazine is copyright protected and may not be reproduced in part or in whole without explicit written consent from the publisher. Tokewell Magazine is strictly for entertainment purposes only, and is not to be held liable for any misleading orinaccurate material produced herein. ©2017 FR3SHLAB CREATIVE GROUP LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. PO BOX 444, ALHAMBRA, CA 91802 AD SALES INFO@TOKEWELL.COM TOKEWELL.COM FOLLOW US

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GROWING PAINS WORDS BY: JOHN CHOE | MASTER GROWER, HYDRO EMPIRE

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s many of you know, our industry is making a huge shift due to the legalization of recreational cannabis in many states. We’re seeing the growing pains as a result - what is legal in one state may not be in another, and there is a lot of information that is just not clear to everyone. To top it off, the regulations often change faster than growers can implement any of it. One thing is clear though: recreational cannabis is here and ready for all responsible adults to use. That is, if you can find a dispensary that has gotten their temporary license for recreational sales. The throughline for all of this is that there just isn’t a lot of clarity on this topic. One of the things I believe you will start to see, though, and may not be aware of, are test results for all products that are in the dispensaries. The problem that exists now is the fact that the testers are not being regulated - not yet, at least - and can be paid off by the producers to give them passing results. I applaud the fact that there are actual

requirements for testing, but thus far the execution has been terrible. We should be seeing changes to this in the near future, but in my opinion, it is not happening quickly enough. With increased regulation placed upon growth, transportation, production, and testing, you will naturally see an increase in price on the end product. As all of these professionals in the middle will have to pay fees and taxes, that increased cost will only get passed along to the end users. Another confusing part for both producer and consumer is the taxes. They will vary from city to city and state to state, with some stores showing price with tax included while others show prices before tax. Be aware of these things when going to the recreational dispensaries so you don't get sticker shock - the 30%+ in taxes alone can be a game changer. Unfortunately, taxation has allowed the black market to make back gains in the cannabis market because some

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consumers aren't willing to pay the increased prices. The illegal “Cowboy” dispensaries are still thriving without having to charge and pay taxes, but going to those places comes with a price of its own. You never know what kind of product you are getting if it isn’t being tested by a reputable lab that is regulated by the government. Really, the only way to know 100% what has gone into your cannabis is to grow yourself. While growing your own may sound intimidating, it is almost certainly better than getting a product that is covered in pesticides and mold. The good news is that we will be here to help with the full particulars of growing, and the industry as a whole as it unfolds, here at the end of cannabis prohibition.


FLAVA IN YA EAR WORDS BY STEFAN DIDAK | CEO. NOT BLOWING SMOKE

D

o you vape and do you use flavors other than tobacco? Is it keeping you off smoking cigarettes or minimizing the number of cigarettes that you smoke? Would you like to continue having access to flavored vapor products?

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On March 21st the FDA put out an ANPRM (Advance Notice of Proposed Rule Making) to seek public input on the regulation of flavors. Depending on who you talk to you may hear expressions of fear that this is the prelude to a federal flavor ban that will prohibit all characterizing flavors in vapor products. You may also hear that under the new regime it may lead to less of a destructive type of regulation. Regardless of assumptions and conjecture, it is critical that the FDA hears from both industry stakeholders and consumers. Preferably with an overwhelming number of personal stories and actual data if you have any. Historically, the FDA deeming regulations had sought to ban all flavors. Between the draft of the regulations and the final version, those provisions were taken out by

the OMB (Office and Management and Budget). However, the deeming regulations have always been said to be “foundational” and that the FDA would continue to add new rules to it over time. This is one of those times where they are looking at adding to it and most likely not in the best of ways. The last thing any of us would like to see happen is the FDA prohibiting the use of flavors in vapor products. If you are a business and you can substantiate your comment by showing sales data that proves you sell more flavored products and why your customers prefer those over tobacco-only flavors, please do so. If you are a consumer, please relay your personal story as best you can. Data is more important to the FDA than personal stories. However, Scott Gottlieb, the current FDA commissioner has publicly stated that personal stories are, indeed, important to him.

what you wish to tell them is to your liking because it’s common to send off comments too fast and realizing you wanted to add another important bit of information. In the next several weeks many of the national organizations, including CASAA, VTA, SFATA, and Not Blowing Smoke, will put out information with further guidance, suggestions, and advice to help you write appropriate comments so please stay tuned for that information.

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You can read more about the proposed regulation of flavors and submit your comments via the following link: https://goo.gl/ oh1B5v and we certainly hope that you will. Let’s not give the FDA a reason to claim they didn’t know about the importance of flavors because they didn’t hear much about it. Also, please encourage everyone else you know to submit their comments.

There is a little bit of time to submit your comments as the period closes on June 19th. Write your comments in a separate document and let it simmer for a day. Look at it again a day later and edit and add as needed. Take your time to ensure

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NOV/DEC 2017


WE THE PEOPLE WORDS BY: RYAN THOMAS | OWNER, LOST ART LIQUID

I

believe that government transparency is

Big Pharma and from Big Tobacco in user

FDA acted arbitrarily, capriciously and/

one of the most important, fundamental

fees, does not want the public to be able

or corruptly under the influence of Big

rights we all have as citizens. The

to see the inner workings, documents,

Pharma, Big Tobacco or a political agenda

FDA for two years has sought to

emails and memos that we are

that does not comport with the law.

avoid transparency and keep secret

requesting they produce in our litigation. In order that officials may be held

from the public over 290,000 pages of

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documentation which FDA claims it relied

In a democracy, the principles

accountable, the principle of transparency

upon between 2012-2015 to formulate the

of government transparency and

requires that the decisions and actions

deeming regulation.

accountability are tenants designed to

of those in government are open to

deter and expose corrupt government

public scrutiny and the public has a

The deeming regulation "deems"

officials and those who abuse their

right to access government information.

technology products like e-cig devices

power.

Without accountability and transparency, democracy is impossible. We must hold

and non-nicotine e-liquids, to be

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"tobacco" and regulates these products

Government officials — including FDA—

our elected and appointed officials

in the same way as deadly cigarettes.

are responsible to the citizenry for their

accountable- including those at the

As many of you know, the deeming

decisions and actions.

FDA. Without accountability, voters are necessarily ignorant of their electoral

regulation, if left unchecked, will eliminate nearly all vapor products from

We believe it is the undeniable right

choices; elections and the notion of the

the market leaving smokers with no

of all vapers, and the right of every

will of the people lose their meaning and

choice except to use products created and

person who knows, loves or cares about

government has the potential to become

sold by Big Pharma or Big Tobacco.

someone who vapes, to have access to

arbitrary and self-serving.

the full body of evidence that FDA used to Therefore, in furtherance of our lawsuit

create the deeming rule. The rule, in our

There are tens of millions of vapers who

challenging the deeming regulation,

opinion, illegally deems vapor products,

are leading healthier and longer lives,

Lost Art has filed documents with the US

which are often made of metal, acrylic,

who will undoubtedly suffer if vapor

District Court in Los Angeles. This motion

circuitry, and batteries, to be tobacco

products are regulated out of business

seeks to force FDA to allow us at Lost

products.

and left in the hands of Big Pharma and Big Tobacco.

Art Liquids to disclose to you, the public, the complete, unretracted administrative

We believe it is your right to be able

record that FDA relied upon in creating

to examine the evidence that we are

The stakes are very high. Your voices are

the deeming regulation. FDA, which

obtaining from FDA, which FDA wishes to

needed!

is staffed largely by former pharma

keep from you and subject to a protective

lobbyists and executives, and which

order. We believe it's your right to

receives hundreds of millions of dollars

be able to read these documents for

each year in free products and funds from

yourselves and determine whether or not

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#TechnologyNotTobacco.


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Long before “Vaping” was a word in the Oxford dictionary, we were smokers dreaming of a life without the negatives of ash or lingering odors. Blu's desire to explore alternatives, adventure without boundaries and our right to self-expression fueled our drive to introduce our first innovation to the world - myblu™ myblu™ is a simple, reliable, quality product that easily fit into your day-to-day. The road most traveled isn’t your style. You work hard to forge your own path, that’s what myblu™ stands for: the individual. Like all great brands, myblu™ doesn't ride the waves of culture, they make them. In the era of influencers and social media, it’s not "likes" that measure a brand’s success but it’s commitment to the scene. As streetwear secures it's legacy over the fashion universe more and more every year, it’s messaging is essential to making or breaking a brand. Flawless was never designed to be pretentious or take itself too seriously. Its message is clear - Be Flawless as Fvck. Streetwear has always been about using graphics and style as a way to convey messages, whether in a political or social context. While Flawless was initially spawned from vape culture, it's not where it's focus is. Flawless was meant to reflect the attitude and swagger of a boss and designed to be rocked by those on the street to the corporate boardroom. Their summer line is out. Don't sleep and be Flawless As Fvck! SHOP: WWW.FLAWLESSLIFESTYLEBRAND.COM

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An e-cig leader since '09, myblu™ is continually evolving the brand to meet the needs of adult smokers and vapers. - A sleek and stylish design that fits in the palm of your hand; - Long-lasting and fast 20 minute USB recharge; - Pre-filled Liquidpods featuring 11 flavors in three nicotine levels including a nicotine free option - The myCARE™ guarantee - blu’s first-lifetime device warranty! SHOP: WWW.BLU.COM

NEW PRODUCTS


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Summer is around the corner, so it's time to #beastmode! With the rise in popularity of CBD products, a Denver- based dietary supplement company, WillPower Products released the first hemp oil infused protein powder, ReGen. A completely natural, grass-fed whey protein blend, ReGen provides 20g grass fed whey, 20mg cannabinoids, and 6g BCAA’s in each serving (15 total) and will be available in cinnamon cocoa or vanilla flavors ideal for keeping an active, fitness-focused lifestyle. They are introducing an evolution to the sports nutrition industry that has previously never been seen on the market. WillPower's hemp oil is THC-Free, it has been tested to contain zero traces of THC. There are no banned substances present and are completely clean, natural, and healthy to use. In addition, you can also find their certificate of analysis on their website.

You've heard hip-hop aficionados use the term, "That's the cut!" "The Cut" is simply part of today's popular vernacular and used to describe something of great affection. Consequently, it brings me to the emotion I had when I first vaped Lost Art's newest flavor aptly named, The Cut. The Cut is a sweet butterscotch tobacco flavor with a touch of cream sans the calories. Pair it with a cup or coffee or damn near anything and you'll be telling yourself, "Thats the cut!" Available in 30ML, 60ML, and 120ML sizes in 0MG, 3MG, 6MG, and 12MG options. WWW.LOSTARTLIQUIDS.COM

NEW PRODUCTS

SHOP: WWW.WILLPOWER-PRODUCTS.COM

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Pho to by Jonathan Mannion

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UNCHaInED WO R DS BY : R I C H A R D C OY LE S NA P S BY : J O NATH A N MA NNI O N & J O E MO O R E

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Photo b y Joe Moore

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ou've seen him on The Daily Show flirting with a possible mayoral run, or giving us a VIP pass to opulence by ballin' out on The Most Expensivest. It should be unquestionably apparent, that 2 Chainz, is also one of the hottest rappers in the game. He's self-aware, savvy, and incredibly witty. He's got the uncanny ability to lull you into your comfort zone and evoke a sense of security - a trait not common in superstars. This could be attributed to his Georgian roots and that renowned "southern charm" we all hear about. Speaking of roots, he’s a unifying authority in the ATL, where he’s been hard at work cementing his city’s legacy among the pantheon of new hip-hop for the past decade. Dude has been making dope music at an extraordinary pace, while catching several winds in his renowned career, to the point where very few artists walking on Gods green Earth can be considered his equal. Despite dropping project after project with certified heat, he used to be one of the most underrated MC's in the game – until now. As blasphemous as this may sound, It was probably due to "Tity Boi's" collection of completely absurdly humorous lyrics with bars like, “You know I look like a safe, I put you back in your place / I look you right in your face, sing to your bitch like I’m Drake”. With his new record dropping, it appears that we will be getting a broader insight into the genius of 2 Chainz. "My next album is going to be titled, "Rap or Go To The League." It's my version of a black excellence album. What many of my African American peers were told in our youths is that our options

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Atlanta has been leading the surge in rap music for the past decade.

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were to hold a note or dribble a basketball and that's our only way out", states Chainz. We wonder if this drop will be a departure from his patented excessive ostentations and sexual escapades, or will he fuse them with social consciousness. From what we've come to expect from 2 Chainz, he usually finds a way to creatively blend and adapt to what's on trend or set it. That said, we are absolutely down. We caught up with HairweaveKiller and rapped about his various entrepreneurial endeavors and projects outside the rap game in which he has dominated, and he is excited. "I'm just pushing the entrepreneurial envelope as much as I can you know. I'm collaborating with various brands. I have several restaurants and lounges. One of my real passions is real estate investments.", says Chainz. One project he's particularly passionate about is his cannabis startup, GAS, available now. 2 Chainz excitedly declares, "GAS is my biggest baby man. It


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Photo by Jonathan Mannion

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What many of my African American peers were told in our youths is that our options were to hold a note or dribble a basketball and that’s our only way out.

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I used to be in it when it was illegal. Why not get in when its legal?

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How did the series with Vice Most Expensivest come about? P hoto by Jo e Moore

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comes in 3 different flowers from 87, 89 and 93 in terms of strength. I'm really excited about this. I've waited a long time to do this. I'm building GAS from the ground up." 2 Chainz takes time out of his bustling schedule to talk to us about his new music, his affinity for couches and kush and why his latest high-octane project has him smashing on the GAS and not letting off.

It initially started out as a web series I did with GQ and it was only like 2 minutes per episodes, and it gained so much attention that I started taking meetings with various networks to partner up with me to extend the experience to 30 minutes, give people an insight on baller flamboyant lifestyle by yours truly. It’s going well for my campaign and honestly, it's my favorite TV show at the moment [laughs] With the trap movement so prevalent today, do think you had some influence?I think I played my part. There's definitely some 2 Chainz DNA out there. Atlanta has been leading the surge in rap music

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I’ve waited a long time to do this. I’m building GAS from the ground up. No royalties just to slap my name on something. This is my shit.

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for the past decade. I'm proud of being from Atlanta, proud of being relevant and proud of helping usher in this new movement of rap music. I'm grateful.

Photo b y Jonathan Mannion

How did the series with Vice Most Expensivest come about?

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It initially started out as a web series I did with GQ and it was only like 2 minutes per episodes, and it gained so much attention that I started taking meetings with various networks to partner up with me to extend the experience to 30 minutes, give people an insight on baller flamboyant lifestyle by yours truly. It’s going well for my campaign and honestly, it's my favorite TV show at the moment [laughs] With the trap movement so prevalent today, do think you had some influence?I

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Photo by Joe Moore

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think I played my part. There's definitely some 2 Chainz DNA out there. Atlanta has been leading the surge in rap music for the past decade. I'm proud of being from Atlanta, proud of being relevant and proud of helping usher in this new movement of rap music. I'm grateful.

What do you think the current state of hip-hop is? Everything has to evolve and change. I don't really have anything negative to say about it. I'm just proud to be relevant today. You have to be able to evolve and get in where you fit in. I don't think fans, stop being fans. Hip-hop is hiphop. You can't make another Nas. I see a lot of people trying to be Wayne, but you can't make these artists. You can't make another Jay Z.

Tell us about your next album TOKEWELL MAGAZINE

My next album is titled, "Rap or Go To The League" It's my version of a black excellence album. What many of my African American peers were told in our youths is that our options were to hold a note or dribble a basketball and that's our only way out. I feel that's somewhat stereotypical as a race and as a culture. This album will definitely have a little more substance than my previous work. I'm really looking forward to putting out this version of me.

Are you a Sativa or Indica guy? I like being on the couch, you dig? I like to fight that sleep. I love to be sleepy high, not sleepy-eyed. That's how I can tell the difference between Indica and Sativa. I like to be in-dacouch [laughs]

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What's your preferred way to medicate? I'm still a flower guy, but I vape here and there.

Why are you getting into the cannabis game now? I used to be in it when it was illegal. Why not get in when its legal?[laughs]

Talk to us about your projects outside of rap. I'm just pushing the entrepreneurial envelope as much as I can you know. I'm collaborating with various brands. I have several restaurants and lounges. One of my real passions is real estate investments.

Talk to us about your weed project GAS TOKEWELL MAGAZINE

GAS is my biggest baby… years in development and now it’s ready for the world. We’ve developed a family of cannabis products that really personifies quality, luxury and dependability. We’ve launched in Cali, and we have 3 different octanes 87, 89 and 93 with differing strengths and effects. Flower, Oil, Pre-rolls, Vapes…. All the best of the best. I'm really excited about this. It's not me really doing anything outside of my comfort zone, and being able to be at the front end of the legal movement is something that excites me. I've done it illegally before, and for me to put my stamp on this and do it legally is a blessing. I've waited a long time to do this. I'm building GAS from the ground up. No royalties just to slap my name on something. This is my shit.

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Photo by Joe Moore

I’m really excited about this. It's not me really doing anything outside of my comfort zone, and being able to be at the front end of the legal movement is something that excites me.

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CHANGING

THE Game WO R DS BY : R I C K H U NTER S NA P S BY : LEA H MO R I YA MA | G ROW S TU DI O S

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here are some people that are just born to change the landscape and disrupt the perception of what we view as normal. They take their skewed versions of our reality and strive to normalize the stereotypes we are acclimated to. Take Bill Gates, Roy Choi, Steve Jobs, and Michael Phelps for instance. Every single one of them changed the game for us all and how we perceive their contribution to society. The world’s optics on cannabis has been evolving exponentially in the past few years as evidenced by mainstream media coverage, the current political climate and shrewd investors from various industries. As a result, the time is now for the proverbial

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stoner stereotype to dissipate up in smoke. We’ve traveled the long road from reefer madness, to where we are now and Jim McAlpine has no intention of taking us back down that path with his own contribution. Originating from the ski and snowboard industry, Jim's name was synonymous with hosting some the most notable consumer winter events. Once coined "The greatest ski & snowboard shows in the universe", Jim's shows highlighted interactive environments where customers could interact with ski resorts, brands and all aspects of the winter lifestyle. "Coming from the ski and snowboard industry, marijuana is pretty socially understood to be part of the

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culture. As legalization became imminent, I didn't see anything focused on how many athletes use cannabis.", says McAlpine when asked what sparked his interest in developing the 420 Games. Being athletic growing up, Jim quickly found out that cannabis enhanced his performance and state of mind before games and gym sessions. So why not integrate his two passions in cannabis and fitness? Jim was never your typical "stoner", in fact, he despises the word and finds it insulting to even be blanketed in that definition. "The 420 Games are athletic events fairly uniquely built to change the stigma around marijuana and the perception of cannabis users. Were not all, stupid, lazy, munchie-eating couch potatoes. We are lawyers, doctors, educators, athletes, and businessmen", answers Jim. Today, Jim hosts the 420 Games in various parts of the country, "..places like Texas, that's where I really want to take the 420 Games to. To hopefully help move the needle in a more impactful way.", states McAlpine. Luckily for us, the needle is moving in the right direction. We sit with athlete-turned cannabis advocate and entrepreneur and talk about how the mission to dispel the negative stigma of cannabis users is a daunting task and his daughters hilariously unapologetic response when people ask what her dad does.

Okay, you need to tell us about this father/daughter story. [Laughs] Here's a funny story. My daughter has a friend named Sakura, and her family is very traditionally Japanese. Sakura's grandfather asked my daughter what her dad does, and Mia without batting an eye said, "oh, my dad sells marijuana!" [laughs].

That's interesting that she doesn't see it as something taboo. The cool thing that she doesn't think there's anything wrong with it. We never had to hide what we did. But now we need to make sure she understands others may have issues with cannabis and how to talk about it around others. It’s important to me she knows it is something not to be ashamed of but also that

cannabis is medicine and not for kids. It is like coffee or alcohol in that we don’t glorify it’s use to our kids. We discuss it as medicine.

How did you come up with the 420 Games? I've always been pretty athletic growing up. I was the starting pitcher on my baseball team, the starting forward on my soccer team, so I was always a high-level athlete. Although I never played professionally, I was always athletic. I always used marijuana before I went to the gym or before I played many times. I'm also from the ski and snowboard industry where marijuana is pretty socially understood to be part of the culture. As legalization became imminent, I didn't see anything focused on how many athletes use cannabis. The 420 Games was born from the life of being an athletic user. I wanted to be the first to come out of the closet and have others join me on that journey.

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For those who have never attended a 420 Games event, what can they expect? The 420 Games are athletic events fairly uniquely built to change the stigma around marijuana and the perception of cannabis users. Were not all, stupid, lazy, munchie-eating couch potatoes stoners. We basically do a 4.20-mile run, yoga, action sports and a bunch of other engaging active things around the country and different cities.

What's next for the 420 Games? We've had great success in areas where cannabis is thriving like California, Colorado, and Seattle - places where marijuana is already accepted. Where it's outlawed, places like Texas, that's where I really want to take the 420 Games to. To hopefully help move the needle in a more impactful way.

Talk about your other projects in the cannabis space. New West Summit is a B2B conference based on cannabis and technology and the

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“Although it’s going in the right direction, regulation is needed but, it’s being done in a pretty poor way right now. There is still a lot of work that needs to be done.” SPRING/SUMMER 201 8


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“Everybody should consider marijuana use for health and wellness.” TOKEWELL MAGAZINE

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furtherment of what technologies will increase the ROI's of the entire industry.

You've really started this whole movement of breaking the stigma associated with cannabis culture. When people hear the word cannabis or marijuana, people think immediately about Cups, festivals, dab fests and things of that nature. With the 420 Games, they will now think of athleticism, and with New West Summit, that was built around technology. Now my next event will be a pride parade with the mantra, "Coming Out Green 2018" and it's going to be in Oakland, California. We are shutting down Broadway and doing full on with floats and a parade while inspiring people to come out green. That's our evolution. Marijuana does not equal stoner, marijuana equates to good people - Jeff Sessions!

Where do you think the cannabis industry is in 5 years? I see the cannabis industry going more mainstream. It already is in California and Colorado. I think in the next 5 years, other states will catch up and allow cannabis in medicinally and about 10 years out from full-on

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What do you feel the current political climate is for cannabis? The current state of the union is fucked up. I mean California just went legal, but all the regulations that came along with it have been crushing and make it incredibly hard for anybody trying to do something legally. I have an edible company and it's been a nightmare to try and get our facility permitted and just doing things the right way. Although it's going in the right direction, regulation is needed but, it's being done in a pretty poor way right now. There is still a lot of work that needs to be done.

What is your preferred mode of medication? Personally, I like high-dose edibles. I prefer to eat something with a lower sugar and caloric intake. About 100mg is preferred functional dose for me. I like to eat vs smoke when I can. When I do vape, it's a VapeXhale.

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Are you a Sativa or Indica guy? I personally don't believe in the Sativa vs Indica thing. Here's my rationale to debunk that myth. In my opinion, Marijuana affects everybody polarly oppositely. I could smoke and the person next to me could smoke, and we'd get totally different reactions. Personally, I think it's about how it affects you. It's just a myth in my opinion.

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“You should do everything in moderation except sweat.” TOKEWELL MAGAZINE

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I

n November of 2016, Californians passed the Adult Use of Marijuana Act, better known as Prop 64. This means that according to the law, adults 21 and over can legally possess up to one ounce of weed, and grow up to six plants in their home.

While still illegal under federal law, legalized cannabis use allows those complying with state law to enjoy this wonderful little green plant, although with some strings attached: you cannot drive impaired (which I believe we can all agree is reasonable), and you cannot smoke in public, while edibles are legal wherever eating is permitted. The biggest issue, however, is that while you can find legal pot shops throughout the state, you'll only find them concentrated in certain areas, partly because many cities still aren't allowing such businesses to open. So how does one access legal marijuana if one cannot find it? That is a question people are still trying to figure out. While it seems likely that cannabis is slowly but surely on the road to being taken off the Drug Scheduling list, it hasn't yet, and that's a problem. The stigma surrounding a plant that is on the Schedule I list is partially the reason why out of 482 cities across the Golden State, less than a third allow cannabis activity.

Let's break it down

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What does this mean for cannabis users and growers? Well, for users, this means that access to legal cannabis is extremely limited. If you're a patient looking for a legal shop to access your medication, what are you to do if the closest one is hours away? Well, one option is the state's massive marijuana black market, which continues to thrive thanks to limited access to legal pot shops. Black market shops operate without proper permits and licenses, and you can't always be sure where your medicine is coming from. Another option is to wait until something opens up around you, but the likelihood of that occurring will only go up with the effort of local citizens.

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Oddly enough, for growers, their only real options are far too similar - with so many cultivators with proper licenses who have too much product on their hands and not enough stores to sell it to legally, they can get into illegal stores, but if you spent all the time, effort, and money to legally gain your cultivator's license (no cheap nor easy feat), are you really going to risk losing that state license by selling your weed to an unlicensed place? Most probably wouldn't. And not to mention, after spending all that money on your state license, too many cultivators are finding spaces to rent and set up shop to be too expensive. Where one space may have been $1 per square foot prior now sees prices of $3-$4 a square foot, either forcing cultivators to wait or move elsewhere where pricing is more fair. Moving past plain ol' access, let's talk usage. You're allowed to possess and grow cannabis if you are 21 or over, but in regards to recreational use, or "adult use", as it is referred to in California, is a legal grey area - you cannot smoke out in public, which leaves solely the comfort of

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your own home, which isn't the worst thing, but not ideal for people who want or need to medicate throughout the day while they are out and about. So cannabis is legal, but it also isn't. People are still getting arrested for what is essentially a victimless crime. Cannabis still being illegal on the federal level and people are still suffering criminal penalties, a senseless use of local taxpayer money. There seems to also be this idea that opening up marijuana dispensaries could lead to a whole slew of negative consequences, but yet no one bats an eye when yet another bar opens up in town. What many cities fail to realize is that allowing marijuana businesses could lead to lowered levels of crime such as DUIs and domestic disturbances. Think about this - to smoke a joint after work is much like going out for a drink after work. It's self medicating either way, just through different mediums. In the end, relaxation is the goal, whether by a plant or a fermented product. One, however, affects you very differently from the other. Inebriation makes people act differently, and depending on what caused the inebriation is a major factor in determining the follow up behavior. You are much more likely to get behind the wheel of a car when under the influence of alcohol than you are when under the influence of marijuana. If you've drank too much, you're more likely to convince yourself that you can drive just fine (you can't). If you've gotten too high, you're much more likely to sit and wait it out.

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“We’re professional, we get our work done, we kick ass, and we medicate….We don’t care about the stigma or what anybody else thinks. If someone doesn’t like it, they don't have to talk to us or use our services.” - Craig TOKEWELL MAGAZINE

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Another thing to consider: if you or anyone you know has smoked cannabis, you're probably pretty aware of the fact that it makes you feel better, makes you calmer, more relaxed. Alcohol affects people quite differently, some relaxing with its effects, while aggravating others. Bar fights, domestic abuse, and other acts of aggression are much more likely to have been aided by alcohol than by marijuana. Marijuana just doesn't affect the mind in that way. If it did, then PTSD sufferers, opiate users, and people suffering from injury wouldn't be using cannabis to medicate, simple as that. The US may be in short supply of these types of studies, but there are plenty examples from reputable

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establishments all around the world that suggest the very same.

Meet the Pot Brothers at Law So how do we the people navigate this new and uncharted territory? Meet the Pot Brothers at Law - Craig and Marc Wasserman, California's premier medical marijuana and criminal defense attorneys, at your service. Based in SoCal, the Wasserman brothers are one of the most recognized and knowledgeable medical marijuana law firms around, and have been serving the state of California for years, and not only

cover everything from criminal defense to cannabis manufacturing and cultivation, but also cover areas like workers comp and family law. Craig specializes in practice compliance and regulatory permitting, while Marc handles most of the firm's criminal defense work. When these two brothers began down the path of cannabis law, there really was no practice beyond criminal defense. Craig started in business litigation and civil work in 1986, while younger brother Marc began his professional law career ten years later in 1996, the same time that Prop 215, also known as the Compassionate

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Use law went into effect for medical marijuana patients. Together, these lawyering siblings provide the ultimate legal advocacy team for the cannabis community.

Their mission Even in 2017, it's really only in the last five or so years where cannabis law practices have moved beyond the criminal defense realm. With the help of social media, the Wasserman brothers have come out of the "green closet" and have done their best to break the stigma surrounding cannabis and recreational use. They've started a consulting firm, alongside their legal firm,

where they can reach out and help the community at a more reasonable basis. They started an Instagram to provide and spread tips about cannabis law and how to navigate the hazy space that is legalized cannabis in California, as well as a web series/podcast called Cannabis Talk 101 where they medicate and provide an element of open and honest conversations about one of the most talked about topics across the country. And their audience is organically grown - no followers bought or anything like that. Their message is genuinely spread solely by the people they've naturally reached.

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"We're professional, we get our work done, we kick ass, and we medicate," says Craig. "It's better than having three martinis and two Vicodin at lunch…I mean, it's just ridiculous. We don't care about the stigma or what anybody else thinks. If someone doesn't like it, they don't have to talk to us or use our services." Indeed, it's no secret that self medication is abundant in many professional fields, law practices included. Having to deal with people's lives and businesses can be very stressful, and it just so happens that they choose cannabis to self medicate rather than alcohol. "The more professionals that come out, the more it'll help (break the stigma), because they're all over the place," says Marc. "Doctors, lawyers, judges, professionals of all sorts, and they're afraid to come out of the green closet and just be like, 'Hey, this is what I do.' More and more are starting to come out - doctors, scientists, and many others, but it really needs to just happen en masse. There's just still too much of this reefer madness baloney floating around in people's heads."

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How they're doing it

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The Wasserman brothers are very hands on in their pursuits - they gather signatures at cannabis related events for petition such as CCHI, otherwise known as the California Cannabis Hemp Initiative, or "Free the Weed." But there's only so much two men can do, no matter how many cannabis events they go to. The biggest thing to catch on in their efforts to break the stigma around cannabis has been their STFU catchphrase. On the back of every one of their business cards, you'll find 25 words, lovingly referred to as "The Script", which tells you exactly what to say should you get pulled over by a member of law enforcement. Including the phrase I DO NOT CONSENT (to a search), you'll find "Why did you pull me over?", "I'm not discussing my day," "Am I being detained or am I free to go?", and if detained, "I invoke the 5th (amendment)," and then you SHUT THE FUCK UP!" Those last four words have caught on like a wildfire, spurring social media tags such as #STFU and #STFUNation, and the guys are regularly contacted and recognized as the STFU Guys. "It's nice because we get those calls from people across the country saying they've used it and were left alone," says Marc. "And even better are the cases we get to handle since Prop 64 has passed, since smell is not probably cause to search, and some cops still don't understand this. We can help, unless the client consents to

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“More and more (professionals) are starting to come out - doctors, scientists…but it really needs to just happen en masse. There’s just still too much of this reefer madness baloney floating around in people’s heads.” - Marc SPRING/SUMMER 201 8


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#22 a search, which you should never do. Part of shutting the fuck up is not consenting." "You never consent to a search, ever," Craig advises. "You comply, you step aside, you let them do whatever they're gonna do, you say you do not consent, and you hand them our business card, which should always be sitting in your wallet just behind your ID." And how did STFU come to be? "One of my law professors said something to me about when the cops ask you questions, you just simply shut the fuck up," Marc laughs. "And in our own practices, that what we would teach our clients. You don't need to talk to the cops - it's your constitutional right to remain silent and not incriminate yourself." The best part of this handy bit of advice is that it applies all across the nation, not just California. If law enforcement is asking you questions, they don't have enough to arrest you, otherwise they would have, and while you may occasionally get lucky with the reasonable officer, it is probably unwise to place your bets on talking it out with an officer. It's much easier to stick to "stick to the Script", know your rights, and ultimately just shutting your mouth, and it works!

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Communal effort So while cannabis is becoming a more and more widely accepted part of society, we as a community still have a long way to go in order to break the lazy stereotype stoner stereotype that perpetuates the national mindset. If we want to "free the weed", we need to become a more organized and active community. Gone should be the days of solely commenting on Instagram and Facebook posts and Reddit - so many people comment online daily about their thoughts and feelings about cannabis and what they wish their home town or state would do, why not just pick a different website where the comment actually makes a difference? Websites like the Americans for Safe Access website are ones where you can take action - you can find your Senate representative and send them a formal statement about your side of the issue on weed. It's really as easy as that - not too many more steps than going to Facebook or Instagram to make your voice heard. Why write to your senators? Because if there is anything that our politicians want, it's to keep their seats and stay in power. To not listen to their constituents is risking the very career they've worked so hard to get - no one wants to get voted out and they know we the people can do that. Our representatives at the federal level,

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#22 however, aren't listening to us, so there needs to be a big push at the state level first, and that starts with local municipalities, who still seem to be behind on the times in regards to cannabis and what the people want. "At the federal level, it looks like there's a bill being circulated that will prevent the feds from going after anyone in the state as long as the person is in compliance with the state," says Craig. "It's still not off of Schedule 1 yet, and they're trying to get it into the actual budget, but I'm telling these same politicians to just take it off the Scheduling list and stop playing this game! If a state wants to make it a felony, that should be up to the people of that state." So attend your town hall meetings. Contact your city council. Tell them why you want safe access in your city. Tell them you don't want to have to go two cities over in order to pick up your medication. The cities absolutely need to be involved in order for safe and legal access to cannabis to work, and not just in California but in any and every state, and the only way to do that is to get more people to say so out loud. We as a community like to think that we are in the beginning throes of a green rush, but until cities open up to marijuana businesses, there really won't be any green rush.

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In the end though, it's not just people talking about marijuana. Big Money is what's going to win in the fight to free cannabis. Initiatives like CCHI have a hard time even getting on the ballot, let alone earning the vote, because there are not enough investors pouring the same kind of money that other less controversial initiatives get. Money and funding means getting more people out there to get the necessary number of signatures to get initiatives on ballots. CCHI has been trying for years, and are currently aiming to be headed onto the 2020 ballot, but the funding needed is nowhere to be found in a state where it could theoretically easily be funded at least five times over based on the sheer number of adult users, both medicinal and recreational, as well as those with a business oriented state of mind. Until we as a community can come together and get behind the things we believe in most, and not just in a "let's comment back and forth on social media" kind of way but in a "spread this message, and let's talk to real people" kind of way, cannabis will remain a hotly debated topic that continues to sit on the Drug Scheduling list. Consider this the one time that the Pot Brothers at Law advise you not to shut the fuck up.

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EXPOSED WO R DS BY : MA X I MI LLI A N S TER LI NG S NA P S BY : A LTH EA S A LA MI N S O C I A L: @ A LTH EA _P H _P H OTO | @ A LTH EAG A R DEN_P H OTO G R A P H Y

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W

e sit with notable shutterbug, Althea Salamin. Born in the Hawaiian Islands and transplanted to Southern California, this former vape brand owner-turned renowned photographer is a killing the game one shot at a time. The vaping industry like many others has its share of wannabe "social photographers" whose sole purpose seems to be "flexing for the 'gram" or fishing for "likes." In direct contrast for Althea, her social media presence, her artistry, and respect for the vape industry has not only provided much of her subject matter but a passion she would never have realized without it. Formerly the co-owner of a notable vape brand, she turned her focus to her viewfinder and never looked back. Her social feeds are full of artistic, positive and organic imagery versus objectifying women to push a brand. As a result, she is one of the games most sought-after artists. "Emotion is the most important part of photography to me. Whether its a product shot or an impromptu shoot, being able to capture the essence of that moment is paramount. It has to evoke an emotion." , says Salamin when asked about her craft. That said, have a look at some of Althea's works and find out what type of emotions they evoke for you.

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“Emotion is the most important part of photography to me. Whether its a product shot or an impromptu shoot, being able to capture the essence of that moment is paramount. It has to evoke an emotion.” TOKEWELL MAGAZINE

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“Vaping has given me so much. From allowing me to quit smoking, travel the world, and to make a living.”

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FLAWLESSLY

EXECUTED WOR D S BY: C IN DY G ALIN D O SNAPS BY: TAAD OW6 9K

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“That’s what my dad taught me. Do whatever it takes. I’ve always refused to work for somebody. My dads never worked for anybody else, and neither will I.”

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R

aised in the New York City projects, Howard Schultz could never imagine starting his own business. Schultz absolutely never envisioned he'd one day run the worlds largest coffee empire. Schultz was raised in a Brooklyn workingclass family. Essentially, hustling and doing whatever it took. His father held a series of blue-collar jobs, including truck driver, factory worker, and cab driver. That value of doing whatever it took to get by was instilled in him by his father and that helped make him the man he is today - the CEO of Starbucks. Today, there are over 20,000 Starbucks coffee shops in over 65 countries and the company is valued at $77 billion. Schultz notes that he still identifies with his blue-collar persona whose determination and resolution more than offset for his lack of training. "I've always been driven and hungry," says Schultz. "Long after others have stopped to rest and recover, I'm still running, chasing after something nobody else could ever see." Rick Wood, co-owner of Flawless Distro - one of the largest brands in the world shares a similar narrative with Mr. Shultz. Rick, a high school dropout and a blue-collar worker was determined to not be under the employment of anybody else. He wasn't going to let his sweat equity and hustle go to the bank accounts of another person. He knew early on that he was determined to go into business for himself, "That's what my dad taught me. Do whatever it takes. I've always refused to work for somebody. My dads never worked for anybody else, and neither will I.", states Wood. Relocated to Huntington Beach at an early age, Rick picked up a gig at Home Depot and although he made decent money for a twentysomething driving a truck, he also knew it wasn't for him. The silver lining of that job was that he met his future partner Jason Grace who shared the same sentiment. "I owned a couple Cash for Gold stores with Jason at the time. Jason was also a long time smoker and he said to me,"Let's check out this place Vape Rev." He

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Funny thing is, I don’t even vape. My partner Jason Grace was the one who was vaping and wanted to jump in. I give him mad respect and credit. He grinds hard and he’s taught me a lot. He’s like family to me! #22

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went and he picked up an e-cig and showed it to me and I thought, "Man, that's fucking stupid. That's not going to make any money.", reminisces Rick. With a $3,000 investment, Rick and Jason opened up their first vape shop in an affluent neighborhood in Orange County, which was wildly successful and translated to 4 shops in a year. Having the self-discipline to manage their money and success early on by betting on themselves,and putting all their profits back into the company they built from scratch, you have the global brand Flawless Distribution here today. They have distribution warehouses and retail shops all over the globe. No financial backers. No loans to pay back. No excuses. Rick's story is a perfect recipe of self-belief, blind determination and hustling over everything. His multimillion dollar global

empire is proof of that. Not bad for high school dropout. “All the people I see that make real money, hustle and grind. But some motherfuckers want to sit back and wait for it to come to them. I've been in this business since early 2013 and I've never been on one vacation.”, tells Wood. Rick takes time out of his incredibly schedule to sit with us and talk about his path to global domination in the vape industry and why hustle beats talent when talent doesn't hustle.

What were you doing before Flawless?

Was your passion for vaping the catalyst for getting into the game?

I owned a Cash for Gold stores with my partner Jason. Jason was a long time smoker and he said to me,"Let's check out this place Vape Rev." He went and he picked up an e-cig and showed it to me and I thought, "Man, that's fucking stupid. That's not going to make any money." He was adamant about opening up a vape store afterward and telling me it's going to be the future.

Funny thing is, I don't even vape. My partner Jason Grace was the one who was vaping and wanted to jump in. I give him mad respect and credit. He grinds hard and he’s taught me a lot. He’s like family to me!

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Nothing really. I come from nothing honestly. I'm a high school dropout from Huntington Beach, CA. I was working at Home Depot. I was driving a truck at the time with Jason. We were just two dudes trying to make shit happen. I was making a thousand a week and was like, "Fuck, this is awesome!"

Why did you decide to get into the vape game?

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We started this whole business from scratch with $3,000. A lot of guys start a business and pump all kinds of money into their business or have all kinds of backers.

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How did you start Flawless Distro? We started this whole business from scratch with $3,000. A lot of guys start a business and pump all kinds of money into their business or have all kinds of backers. We started this in the back of a 1,000sq ft store and from there we grew. We made and designed the Tugboat Atty. We hustled and grinded to where we are when we released the first Tugboat. We drove from store to store just hustling out of the trunk of Jason’s car to get ourselves in this market. We would make some money and we just kept putting it back in. Next thing you know, we got our 3rd and 4th stores. We went out and bought some racks along with a few hot products. Today, we have over 8 warehouses globally with Flawless Distribution centers in Asia, the UK, India, and Africa.

You clearly have a hustlers mentality.

I started this from literally nothing. None of my family has money, I didn't borrow anything. We are self-made. When I was a kid, I always watched my dad hustle. He was never poor or rich, but he just did what it took to get by. He taught me that shit. I could easily pay somebody to run this so I could chill at home, but this is my shit. I'm going to be involved 100%. That's what my dad taught me. I did whatever it took. I've always refused to work for somebody. My dads never worked for anybody else, and I won't as well. Through the highs and lows, millions of dollars to five dollars. That's how I am. I don't give a fuck about money. I came from nothing.

What motivates you to grind so hard? You gotta do whatever it takes. I've been here days on end without going home. At the end of the day, it all lies with me. I work my ass off man. 5 years ago, my kids were living in

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housing and food stamps man. Its always been the drive and the constant and hustle. All the people I see that make real money, hustle and grind. But some motherfuckers want to sit back and wait for it to come to them. I've been in this business since early 2013 and I've never been on one vacation. I'm here from the time the office opens to the time it closes.

Do you feel the vape industry is oversaturated? I do. There have been some people who have made a shit ton of money in this industry and people want to jump in. The thing is, too many people are coming in this business too late. They think because they have a couple hundred grand, that they're going to succeed. They think they're going to buy all this product and start a race to the bottom. Well see what happens with the FDA, but a lot of guys that are in the game are tripping and are going in a bad direction.

What do you think the industry needs to do to thrive? There needs to be uniformity. The vaping industry so cutthroat. Some people want to get a quick buck and cut out. Nobody is on the same page. All the big players aren't on the same page. They need to hold the market and enforce an agreed price point. There's no uniformity. We need to come together for us to succeed.

Are you a Sativa or Indica guy? I'm an Indica guy man. I like to chill.

You also have an affinity for cannabis. Any plans on getting in the game? We already are. Stay tuned.

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TOKEWELL MAGAZINE ISSUE 22  

We session with 2 Chainz and talk about his high octane projects and how he stays lit with the GAS.

TOKEWELL MAGAZINE ISSUE 22  

We session with 2 Chainz and talk about his high octane projects and how he stays lit with the GAS.

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