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TOKEWELL | STACK PAPER, CATCH VAPORS

ETHER A TOKEWELL EXCLUSIVE WITH RAP SUPERSTAR B.O.B.

BE HUMBLE

WE SIT WITH MMA FIGHTER DANNY CLARK TO TALK ABOUT HOW HE'S KNOCKING OUT THE COMPETITION IN THE VAPE GAME.

SAVING SOPHIE

FIND OUT HOW TREATING THEIR CHILD WITH CANNABIS HAS HEALED HER AND GIVEN HER A SECOND CHANCE AT LIFE.

THE REALIST

WE SESSION WITH NEW ZEALAND'S RENOWNED TATTOO ARTIST STEVE BUTCHER TO TALK ABOUT ART, CANNABIS AND HIS STARTING 5. ISSUE 18 | JUL/AUG 2017

$4.20 U.S. $5.20 CAN.

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FEATURES

26 HUMBLING THE GAME

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38 KILLING THE GAME

66 THE KIDS CAN BE ALRIGHT

We sit with MMA fighter Danny Clark to talk about how he's knocking out the competition in the vape game.

We get behind the controls with this power couple to talk about negative stereotypes and how that allowed them to level up to success.

A Tokewell exclusive with rap superstar B.o.B.

Find out how treating their child with cannabis has healed her and given her a second chance at life.

80 THE REALIST

We session with New Zealand's renowned tattoo artist Steve Butcher to talk about art, cannabis and his starting 5.

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SIT DOWN,

BE HUMBLE

PUBLISHED BY FR3SHLAB CREATIVE GROUP, LLC PRESIDENT, FOUNDING PARTNER RICHARD COYLE RICH@TOKEWELL.COM

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We're not going anywhere. #TogetherWeRise

CO-FOUNDER SENIOR V.P., OPERATIONS CINDY GALINDO CINDY@TOKEWELL.COM DESIGN HONEST KITTY STUDIO "NO-NONSENSE DESIGN" EDITOR-IN-CHIEF RICHARD COYLE EDITOR LEILANI ANDERSON DIRECTOR OF FINANCE YVONNE MORTON YVONNE@TOKEWELL.COM CONTRIBUTING WRITERS MAXIMILLIAN STERLING, ROY FOKKER , PATRICK CALHOUN, SHEERLIE RYNGLER AND SERGE CHISTOV. LEAD PHOTOGRAPHERS LEAH MORIYAMA | TAADOW69K

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ou know the old adage, "Time flies when you're having fun." It's hard to fathom that we are realizing our 18th issue conceived from an idea a little over two years ago at a backyard BBQ. We are halfway through 2017 and so much has changed. We have witnessed first hand the meteoric ascension of both the cannabis and vaping industries coupled with all the uncertainty both are currently experiencing. What I do know for certain is that we are all a passionate and vigilant collective and wear our emotions on our sleeves. Nobody can take that away from us. Not the FDA. Not the DEA. Having said that, the mere fact that the federal government consistently contradicts themselves with juxtapositions such as the asinine tax increases in California aimed to extinguish small businesses and retailers. How about the FDA proposing loaded legislatures to manufacturers when vaping has been proven to be 95% less harmful than cigarettes. Small businesses and free enterprise - isn't that what America is founded on? My personal favorite is how the US government holds a patent on cannabis plant compounds, yet opts to place it on a Schedule 1 classification which makes it illegal on a federal level. It's absolutely maddening, but we all must persevere and remain vigilant and resolute. Remember, there is strength in numbers and we must continue to invoke our right to "Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness".

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS ADAM BALLARD CREATIVE AGENCY VIRL CREATIVE | SOLID GOLD CREATIVE Tokewell Magazine is published bi-monthly by Fr3shlab Creative Group, LLC. Tokewell Magazine does not condone the illegal use or obtainment of cannabis. All content within this magazine is copyright protected and may not be reproduced in part or in whole without explicit written consent from the publisher. Tokewell Magazine is strictly for entertainment purposes only, and is not to be held liable for any misleading orinaccurate material produced herein. ©2017 FR3SHLAB CREATIVE GROUP LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

“Change does not roll in on the wheels of inevitability but comes through continuous struggle. And so we must straighten our backs and work for our freedom. A man can’t ride you unless your back is bent.”--Martin Luther King, Jr.

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CALIFORNIA REGULATIONS: IS IT ALL ABOUT THE BENJAMINS?

WORDS BY: SHEERLIE RYNGLER | CREATIVE DIRECTOR, VAPE ORGANICS

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he FDA’s 2016 deeming regulations have predictably set off a chain-reaction on the local and state levels; by classifying vapor technology as “tobacco products,” the FDA invited other regulatory bodies to likewise regulate vapor products, and let’s just say that they have officially begun capitalizing on the opportunity. While we’ve probably all internalized this fact by now, the context remains that the vape industry is built on disruptive technology, meaning an entirely new market was created, in turn disrupting existing industries— namely, the powerful tobacco and pharmaceutical industries. In California, all types of vape companies headquartered in-state, or even those across state lines but selling to customers in California, are now regulated by the Board of Equalization (BOE). These regulations entail license, reporting and tax remission requirements with potentially severe consequences for non-compliance. As of July 1, nicotine-containing e-liquids and only hardware sold in combination with nicotine-containing e-liquids,

now defined as “tobacco products” by the state, have a sky-high tax rate of 65 percent; reading the fine print reveals much about why. According to the BOE, “Tax revenues have declined by hundreds of millions of dollars per year due, in part, to unlawful distributions and untaxed sales of cigarettes and tobacco products conducted by organized crime syndicates, street gangs, and international terrorist groups.” International terrorist groups illegally distributing tobacco products in California? Can we all just sit with this statement for a moment? Considering there are an estimated 10 million American vapers, and that the global vape industry is heavily concentrated in California, couldn’t it be that the long-running and, by now, expected (even demanded?) influx of tax revenue from cigarette sales to state coffers is declining, perhaps especially in California, because of smokers making the switch to vapor products? What does California use this money for, anyway? Hopefully, it’s not invested in the military to fight

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the cigarette-distributing terrorist organizations in California. Once again, according to the BOE, “The State of California has enacted excise taxes on the distribution of cigarettes and tobacco products to provide funding for local and state programs, including health services, antismoking campaigns, cancer research, and education programs.” Is it just me or might the solution lie the “problem?” Vapor technology must be seriously and systematically studied, funded by these tax revenues, for its harm reduction potential. If the results of these hypothetical studies are promising, and there is certainly scientific evidence pointing to this possibility already, couldn’t the promotion of vapor products in place of cigarettes impact the need for most of these local and state programs, like the funding of health services to treat victims of Big Tobacco? Considering the incredible success of the vape industry in such a short period, and because most vape consumers are former cigarette smokers, simply refraining from demonizing and over-regulating this industry might significantly cut down

on the state’s need to fund many of its existing tobacco-related services, including anti-smoking campaigns. Mike Hogan, SFATA’s federal lobbyist, had some wise words for the vape industry in a recent federal update: “Even those who disagree with us and fervently oppose vapor products, think they are doing the right thing. The only way to convince them of the error of their ways is to understand them, what they care about, and present them with facts that align with their goals.” Hopefully with the incredible amounts of revenue that vape companies doing business in California have the potential to generate, we will likewise generate an environment conducive to exploring and discussing the facts.


WORDS BY: PATRICK CALHOUN, FOUNDER & CEO | THE ORIGINAL GROW DADDY

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awmakers in Florida are back on the road to expanding the use of medical marijuana through the passing of a bill in the state’s constitutional amendment in favor of that clause. After legislators had built consensus on key elements, the state’s Governor Rick Scott added marijuana for medicinal use to the agenda for a special legislative session. Earlier this month (June 2017), the clause was passed by the Health and Human services committee of the House. There is a likelihood that the bill will be reviewed by both chambers when the Health Policy Committee of the Senate meet. Rep. Ray Rodrigues asserted that both sides of the political divide were able to come together after making significant concessions. The Representative added that none of the legislators got everything they wanted, but members from both parties got something they could ultimately live with. Approved by over 70% of the voters in November last year, the amendment

FLORIDA LEGISLATORS BACK ON PATH TO PASSING A BILL ON MEDICAL MARIJUANA.

broadens decriminalized use under the 2014 law for the limited prescription for low strength cannabis. Moreover, it expands the eligible medical conditions that are currently treated legally which include chronic muscle spasms, cancer, and epilepsy. It now includes post-traumatic stress disorder, glaucoma, HIV/AIDS, Parkinson’s disease, Crohn's disease and multiple sclerosis. The Senate wanted to limit each center of treatment to 15 localities with no sunset provision when late in the session, the bill amendment and implementing fell apart. Senate also wanted to subject medical marijuana to sales tax. However, the House advocated for no sales tax and no caps. Under the new bill agreement, there will be a limit of 25 dispensaries for every center of medical marijuana treatment. However, for every additional 100,000 patients to the registry, the number of dispensaries can be increased by five. If the proposal by the Senate goes through,

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the cap will have expired by the 1st of April 2020. There are also ten more treatment centers for medical marijuana that have been added to the legislation which would translate 17 centers across the state by October this year. For every 100,000 patients, four additional centers would be added. Currently, Florida’s state registry has 16,614 patients according to the Department of Health. By the year 2022, it has been projected that there is a possibility to have 472,000 patients of medical marijuana and medical cannabis sales could reach $542 million. This is according to a recent impact study on state revenue. The primary sponsor of the bill in the Senate, Sen. Rob Bradley, asserted that cannabis would not be subjected to taxation because it is considered to be medicine. However, it has been the view of caregivers and patients that the proposed rules and regulations are very restrictive. The legislation gives a provision where a patient will receive an order for three supplies of 70

days that they can take to a treatment center for medical marijuana during a doctor’s visit. Sadly, however, it bans smoking which is likely to be challenged in the courts. Doctors training will drop from eight to two hours, and they would have to strictly document the condition of the patient before giving a marijuana prescription. The rules and regulations under the new Florida legislature seem to somewhat undermine that which the constituents of the state openly voted for, and there is sure to be a new battle ensuing over deregulating the new bill agreement. Regardless, this is a huge step in the right direction for the state of Florida, and we can only hope that surrounding states soon follow suit.


THE CURRENT STATE OF THE UNION REGARDING CANNABIS

WORDS BY SERGE CHISTOV | PARTNER, HONEST MARIJUANA

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et’s face it, the laws regarding the legality of marijuana in the United States are confusing. Many states, and the people who live there, say one thing, while the federal government says something completely different. So how can you make sense of all this conflicting information? And what’s the current state of the union regarding cannabis? Here are the six main components you need to remember: • The Controlled Substances Act Of 1970 • Cannabis legalized in Colorado and Washington • The Cole Memorandum • Other states legalize recreational and medical marijuana • Rumblings from the Trump Administration • Pending legislation from the

House and Senate Think of these components as a timeline of sorts ranging from the distant past—half a century come 2020, to the not-so-distant past (just four short years ago), to the present, to one possible future. Let’s discuss each piece in turn so you understand what all the talk is about.

THE CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES ACT OF 1970 The Controlled Substances Act (CSA), or more specifically Title II (2) of the Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act of 1970, is a law that regulates, “the manufacture and distribution of narcotics, stimulants, depressants, hallucinogen anabolic steroids and chemicals used in the illicit production of controlled substances.” The CSA groups drugs into one of five schedules based upon the substance’s medical use, potential for abuse, and safety or depen-

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dence liability. In 1970, marijuana was classified as a Schedule 1 substance (the worst), which means that: • The drug has a high potential for abuse. • The drug has no currently accepted medical use in treatment in the U.S. • There is a lack of accepted safety for use of the drug under medical supervision.  Other Schedule 1 substances include heroin, LSD, and methaqualone. This law effectively made the growth, use, and sale of marijuana illegal at a federal level. Unfortunately, there was very little research on cannabis when the CSA was passed. But flash forward forty-three years, and you’ve got nearly a half-century of research and usage data to consider.  That leads to the next step.

COLORADO & WASHINGTON

In the wake of the Cole Memorandum and Colorado and Washington’s example, more and more states have legalized marijuana in one form of another. As of this writing, Alaska, Washington, Oregon, California, Nevada, Colorado, Maine, and Massachusetts have voted to legalize both medical and recreational marijuana.

LEGALIZE RECREATIONAL MARIJUANA Between 1970 and 2012, medical cannabis was legalized at the state level in a number of jurisdictions such as Virginia, California, and Maine just to name a few. Cannabis was still illegal under federal law, but the fact that a doctor’s recommendation was necessary to obtain the drug, made it less of a serious offense. Then, in 2012, the residents of Colorado and Washington voted to legalize recreational marijuana for adults 21 year of age or older. Now, any Joe or Jane could buy cannabis products from a state-approved and regulated (and taxed!) business. This flew directly in the face of the federal laws set down by the CSA and started a huge debate on state’s rights and the power of the federal government. That led to the Cole Memorandum.

THE COLE MEMORANDUM In response to the legaliza-

tion of recreational marijuana in Colorado and Washington, then-Attorney General under Barack Obama, James Cole, told states that if they implemented a strict regulatory framework and monitored the growth, distribution, and sale of regulated cannabis to prevent diversion and create a transparent, accountable market, the federal government would leave it alone. This effectively gave states the permission to pass their own cannabis legislation without actually legalizing marijuana at the federal level.

MORE STATES LEGALIZE MARIJUANA In the wake of the Cole Memorandum and Colorado and Washington’s example, more and more states have legalized marijuana in one form of another. As of this writing, Alaska, Washington, Oregon, California, Nevada, Colorado, Maine, and Massachusetts have voted to legalize both medical and rec-

reational marijuana. Montana, Arizona, New Mexico, North Dakota, Minnesota, Arkansas, Louisiana, Illinois, Michigan, Ohio, Florida, Pennsylvania, New York, Vermont, New Hampshire, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New Jersey, Maryland, and Delaware have voted to legalize medical marijuana. So here’s how things stand at the moment: • More than half of the states in the union have legalized cannabis (be it recreational or medical). • Cannabis is still illegal under the CSA. • The Cole Memorandum de-prioritizes federal enforcement of the CSA. The federal government is effectively saying, “Yes, cannabis is illegal, but we’ll look the other way if you monitor and regulate its growth, sale, distribution, and use.”


RUMBLINGS FROM THE TRUMP ADMINISTRATION Though nothing has been done yet, rumblings from within the Trump Administration have indicated that Attorney General Jeff Sessions might consider overturning the Cole Memorandum. This would open the door for possible federal prosecution of countless businesses and consumers in states where the product has been voted legal for the past four years.

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PENDING LEGISLATION FROM THE HOUSE AND SENATE A number of pieces of legislation are currently under debate in the House and the Senate that would end cannabis prohibition. One such act would enable states to set their own medical marijuana policies rather than being governed by the federal policies. It wouldn’t make medical marijuana legal per se, but it would protect patients, doctors and businesses participating in state medical-marijuana programs from federal prosecution. It would essentially ensure that people in the states where medical cannabis is legal would be able to use the substance without violating federal law.

Another piece of legislation would reschedule cannabis and allow it to be treated like alcohol and tobacco. This bill would also ease banking restrictions, allow medical research, and address the often-debilitating taxes placed on cannabis businesses.

THE STATE OF THE CANNABIS UNION For now, marijuana is still illegal under federal law. But thanks to the pioneering efforts of the people in Colorado and Washington and the Cole Memo, law enforcement agencies are now focused on: • Preventing distribution of cannabis to minors • Preventing cannabis revenue from funding criminal enterprises, gangs or cartels • Preventing cannabis from moving out of states where it is legal • Preventing use of state-legal cannabis sales as a cover for illegal activity • Preventing violence and use of firearms in growing or distributing cannabis

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• Preventing drugged driving or exacerbation of other adverse public health consequences associated with cannabis use • Preventing the growth of cannabis on public lands • Preventing cannabis possession or use on federal property (national parks, government property, etc.) That could all change over the next few years. Until then, the cannabis industry will continue to experience a waiting period while not being completely, 100% legal in the United States. Serge Chistov is the financial partner of Honest Marijuana Company, which utilizes all-natural cultivation methods to produce only the finest organic and eco-conscious cannabis products. Their marijuana is also packaged in Earth-friendly recyclable tin cans with pure nitrogen to ensure only the highest level of integrity and quality.He shares his knowledge and insight on funding, launching and managing a growery, along with the business and political climate for the industry as a whole. https:// honestmarijuana.com/


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NEW PRODUCTS TOKEWELL MAGAZINE

JUL/AUG 2017


DUVO.USA #18

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The artisans at DUVO.USA are OG's in the mechanical mod game with their hard-hitting competition rigs and RDA's. Each masterpiece is crafted 100% in the USA and built employing the highest standards and assembled in a state-of-the-art medical-grade facility. Not many manufacturers in the vape game could stake that claim to that much less than offer a lifetime warranty. As a result, DUVO is the undisputed leader in American-made competition vape mods. Step up your game and start blowing the competition away. The DUVO V3 is available now in brass, copper, raw or Cerakoted finishes.

NEW PRODUCTS

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NKTR by

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COLD WAR The flavor artists at NKTR have done it again. Tahitian Vanilla Bean steeped in creamy milk, create this perfectly sweet nostalgic treat. Indulge yourself in Cold War vapor; the silky smooth ice cream you can't afford to miss! ICE Citrus ice: A robust citrus blend, with enough ice to leave you wanting more! Frozen citrus never tasted this good! Glacier: The perfect menthol, for any menthol lovers. Don’t sleep on this one! Smooth, refreshing, with the perfect amount of cool.

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SQN @dim.slum & @artmed

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NKTR Ice by SQN is made with TFN® Nicotine, the only authentic brand of nicotine that is not derived from tobacco leaf, stem, or waste dust. TFN® Nicotine is odorless & tasteless and allows for a purer and more refined flavor profile.

NEW PRODUCTS

SHOP: WWW.VAPEREV.COM

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We sit with the owner of the vape industries fastest growing brands and talk about how the lost art of putting in the work and getting his hands dirty was the blueprint to construct his vape empire - Humble Juice Co.

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t's always refreshing to know that American ingenuity, fortitude, and hustle is alive and well in the midst of this selfie-snapping, social media-centric culture of people with their faces buried in their phones that shy away from hard work culture that exists today. Danny Clark is a throwback to what this great nation was founded on and a testament to what hard work and dedication can yield. After all, what's more American than being a hammer-wielding, blue collar construction worker while doubling as a professional prizefighter? Danny traded in his hammer and his 6 oz. gloves to become the CEO of one of fastest growing companies in the vape game - Humble Juice Co.

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Finding inspiration through some of his friends who were thriving in this burgeoning industry, Danny knew he had to get hands in. "I have a couple buddies of mine who were in the vape industry, and I saw some of the cool things they were doing and I wanted to jump onboard. I quit my job and threw all my money I had into this and hoped for the best." says, Danny. It was that mindset and drive that has taken Danny to where he is today - a self-made owner of a global vape empire. In an industry full of uncertainty, Danny has seemingly found a path to success and is knocking out the competition. With success as a professional MMA fighter and getting his hand

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#18 P 29 “Getting hit motivates me. It makes me punish the guy more. A fighter takes a punch, hits back with three punches.” – Roberto Duran raised by John McCarthy on several occasions, Danny was well on his way to stardom. Danny even fought on the same card as Ronda Rousey and was on a multi-fight win streak. His path to being a world champion was just a matter of time had he not opted to devote his efforts into starting Humble Juice Co. "I devote a lot of my time to Humble, and to allocate only 60% of my time to training when there are other fighters giving it their 100%, you’re going to lose the fight automatically.", mentions Danny. Today, Humble Juice Co. is a global brand and is proof positive of what you can accomplish through visualization, positive thinking, getting your hands dirty and surrounding yourself with the right team. Danny will be the first to tell you that is the blueprint to his success and


“The industry has generated a lot of capital, created new businesses and jobs, and they're still growing and thriving. All these new taxes and regulations are going to force people to go back home without jobs. It's really unfortunate.”

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how he constructed his vape empire. While he’s fully entrenched in scaling Humble Juice currently, he has always entertained the idea of making a return to the Octagon one day. "If I could ever free some time up, I would. It's something I think about all the time. It's in my blood..", says the fighter turned CEO. Having said that, he’s riding his wave of success and the whole team at Humble are fully aware that there is going to be be a long road ahead and they’re all prepared for that challenge. The guys know that their left stroke just went viral and they don’t see any end in sight except for the gold.

they were doing and I wanted to jump onboard. I quit my job, threw all my money I had into this and hoped for the best. The way I saw it was I only had one way to go which was up!

How did you get started in the vape game?

How did you get the team together?

A couple years ago, I was a professional MMA fighter and a carpenter. I have a couple buddies of mine who were in the vape industry, and I saw some of the cool things

In the beginning it was just me. I was doing everything from A-Z, ordering supplies,sales, packing boxes, you name it. 2 months later, Dane came on board and now he’s my

Were you a smoker as well? I smoked for bit. To be honest, I always thought vaping wasn't for me, but once I started vaping, I felt so much better physically. I can take deeper breaths, get longer workouts in, and just feel healthier overall. I don't vape too much, but when I do, its much better than cigarettes.

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“I was swinging a hammer and decided I wanted to go all-in. Everybody out there can do it. Just believe in yourself, make it happen and always stay humble.”

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Tell us about your MMA career. Growing up, I was always getting into trouble here and there for fighting. One time I went with my buddy to a gym he was training at and I got my butt kicked! This was new to me since I didn't usually experience that in the streets as a kid. I never wanted to feel that again. I signed up for classes in Muay Thai, Ju Jitsu, and wrestling and 9 years later, was 11-2 in professional fights and was even on a card with Ronda Rousey. Its was an awesome part of my life I wouldn't trade for the world.

How do you find time to train while running a successful business?

After almost two years with Humble I still train here and there. Business, going as well as it is I don't train as often as I used to. I devote a lot of my time to Humble and to devote only 60% of my time to training when there are other fighters giving it their 100%, you’re going to lose the fight automatically. I just don't have the time but I respect those that do and would always entertain the idea of getting back into it.

Is there a commonality between training to fight and running a successful business? Absolutely, I believe it takes a lot deeper concentration when you compete at a professional level. You need to keep pushing yourself. Where the other guy gives up, you gotta keep going no matter how tired or exhausted you are. You're almost like a one man team. With business, you can't just depend on other people. You gotta put in the hours and do all the behind the scenes stuff. Waking up at 3 am to talk to people around

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“I envisioned it. I didn't know how we were going to get there. You always hope for the best. But being as successful as we are now, it's literally a dream come true. It's cool that this vaping industry has given Millennials a chance to really make something of themselves.�

the world, on Skype calls to get their business. So yeah, there are lots of similarities in work ethic and I think it has definitely has played a part in the success of Humble Juice.

DANE: Our name says it all - Humble. It's the motto we live by from our product, lifestyle to customer service. In fact, #stayhumble is our hashtag. We live by our name.

Do you have any plans to step foot into the octagon again?

What do you think is the current state of the vape industry?

If I could ever free some time up, I would. It's something I think about all the time. It's in my blood and I was training and competing for the last 1012 years of my life so yes.

I feel vaping is still in its infancy. It's gotten big in the last 4 years and getting bigger. I believe there will be rules and regulations which I agree on to a certain extent. It's just like cannabis, it's going to be around for people that have done it right. It's not going anywhere.

How is Humble succeeding whereas a lot of vape companies are going under amidst all the FDA regs? DANNY: Our company does well because we offer something different. We wanted to bring an affordable and quality product versus charging too much on the back end. I feel we are a juice company for the people. Branding our product as a lifestyle brand, branching out into different avenues has played a huge part in Humble getting noticed globally as well.

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Two years ago, did you think you'd be where you are today? I envisioned it. I didn't know how we were going to get there. You always hope for the best. But being as successful as we are now, it's literally a dream come true. It's cool that this vaping industry has given Millennials a chance to really make something of themselves. Its given the opportunity for younger people to do well for

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themselves without a “traditional” college education. Its provided a lot of jobs for people and made some very successful people

Wheres Humble going to be in 5 years? I 100% see Humble being one of the top 10 juice companies in the world. Its concrete. We're here for the long road. We're here to stay.

Any words for the FDA? DANNY: Don't make it so hard for people to run their business. It is a thriving industry and moving the economy, make it doable. Definitely, Enforce rules, but don't shut everybody down in doing so. DANE: The industry has generated a lot of capital, created new businesses and jobs, and they're still growing and thriving. All these new taxes and regulations are going to force people to go back home without jobs. It's really unfortunate. For instance in Pennsylvania, they have a 40% tax hike and we've had to adjust our pricing so low, just to help them stay in business and keep the juice on the shelf. 60-70% is what California

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is going to have to deal with on the first of July. My thing is, it's going to be around, but it needs to be looked at a little closer and understood by these state officials and the FDA. There are zero nicotine options as well. All we ask is that we get a fair shot. We have to band together. People have to realize that this is a lifestyle. We all want to feed our family off of a completely legal product.

What are your thoughts on the cannabis industry? Cannabis is obviously huge. It’s an awesome industry with a lot of money to be made. Just like the vaping industry cannabis is not going anywhere. If I could get my hands on it and it made sense financially I definitely would try to get involved. It's always good to have a few different irons in the fire!

Any advice to young entrepreneurs out there? Just go for it. Like me before, I was swinging a hammer and decided I wanted to go all-in. Everybody out there can do it. Just believe in yourself, make it happen and always #stayhumble!


KILLING the

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WOR D S BY: R IC K H U NT ER SNAPS BY: TAAD OW6 9K

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ou know the old adage, opposites attract? That seems to define this power couple to the tee. After all, they're from opposite coasts. Onehalf is an alt model/writer blasted from head to toe, while the other is the CEO of a tech company/game developer with a blank canvas. While some people's narrowmindedness would place judgment on the couple and think this shouldn't work. They would have erroneously underestimated them. They're as efficient and successful as the Golden State Warriors. In fact, they're the epitome of a successful couple who both aim to destigmatize that notion.

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“changing people’s perceptions of what they think tattoos are. Tattoos are beautiful, they are art and if they're done well, why can we be models? Why can’t we be the face of a company?”

Kim Slavik is an alternative model, published writer and the owner of modeling agency called Nephilim. The focus of Nephilim is to make tattooed models more mainstream and shifting people's perceptions of what they consider tattoos are. "Tattoos are beautiful, they are art and if they're done well, why can we be models? Why can't we be the face of a company? I want to do ads for Cartier, Tiffany or Louis Vuitton. We're not street trash or gangsters. You can love Louis and have tattoos without being marginalized or shamed.", says Slavik. She is also a mother of two beautiful twins and so happens to use cannabis as part of her daily regimen in addition to operating several companies. "You can also meditate and smoke marijuana and be productive", states the mother of two. "Sean and I are proof positive of that. We both employ people and aren't stuck on the couch being unproductive. I feel we aim to destigmatize the notion of what people think we are.", adds Kim. Sean Slavik is a successful developer, producer, investor, publisher and the owner of Chance 6 Studios which is a tech company for independent game developers. Slavik has amassed his fortune through shrewd investments and his passion for developing

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#18 P 41 and producing titles for the multi-billion dollar industry. His flagship project; Colina: Legacy is rapidly picking up steam and is positioned to take over the horror genre left open by the legendary Hideo Kojima of the Metal Gear and Silent Hill series. Collectively, the duo will also be launching their live streaming channel called G-Centric TV which will feature exclusive interviews with indie developers, artists and a multitude of different and engaging subject matter. Kim is an aficionado of greener pastures and medicates for health reasons due to her debilitating disease - Gastroparesis. "Pot makes me feel better and I no longer take medicine which has terrible side effects especially this one called Reglan which just messed me up. Pot is the only thing that helps me.", says Kim. Sean, on the other hand, is always on the lookout for the next shrewd investment and like many of his Silicon Valley brethren, he has his eye on the burgeoning cannabis game as well.

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“ We're looking it as now we can bring the same kind of concept to the internet. It's a new type of arcade with a social benefit of being able to interact with the developers from all over the world ”

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In conclusion, Never judge a book by its cover. Open it up, read its contents and understand the story. You never know, it could be the next best seller.

Being a successful couple. Tell us what do you both do for a living? S: Chance 6 studios started as me being a solo game developer and some guys that were developing a game that I was really passionate about. We kind of fell in together and built this company around Colina. We find things that are fun and what we are passionate about. K: I'm a tattoo model, entrepreneur, a

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mother and the owner of an alternative modeling agency called Nephilim. The focus is making tattooed models more mainstream and changing people's perceptions of what they think tattoos are. Tattoos are beautiful, they are art and if they're done well, why can’t we be models? Why can't we be the face of a company? I want to do ads for Cartier, Tiffany or Louis Vuitton. We're not street trash. You can love Louis and have tattoos without being marginalized or shamed. You can also meditate, smoke marijuana and be productive. Sean and I are proof positive of that. We both employ people and aren't stuck on the couch being unproductive. I feel we aim to destigmatize the notion of what people think we are.

At first glance, you both come from seemingly different backgrounds. How did you meet? K: We met online back in the day through AOL [laughs], AOL chatrooms were the first eHarmony, Match or Tinder.

That's awesome! Do you remember your handles? K: Yes! Sean was Stryder098 and mine was Gemtears. We are huge nerds. We chatted for a while, then we decided to meet. Video chatting was near impossible because the technology was terrible back then. Sean came to New York from California and we've been together ever since.

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You're blasted from head to toe. Who did your artwork? K: Steve Soto has done 99% of my artwork.

Tell us about the Chance 6 platform. S: Currently, we allow independent developers to post in-progress builds. In a development lifecycle, you do devbuilds, a full release build while testing and ensuring playability and continuous storyline. Big studios can pump a bunch of money in a project and if it fails, its 1 of 50. For your average indie studio, everything is riding on whatever their current project is. With us, it's not just playing a demo. It's actual gameplay that allows you to continue to play and it allows the developer to see if people are actually going to play the game and if so, will they pay to play the game. It helps earn them a little revenue and gives them the data

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whether or not to continue the projects. The arcade model died. We're looking at it as now we can bring the same kind of concept to the internet. It's a new type of arcade with a social benefit of being able to interact with the developers from all over the world and have a vested interest if you will.

Would the user be able to actually play the games as they’re being developed? S: Yes. Think of the monetary exchange like getting tokens at the arcade. They can get tickets with potentially one-off items like when you retrieve your tickets and receive prizes like a poster signed by the developers for instance. Users also can also donate to continue the game development.

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K: I was a writer based out New York. I used to write short stories for a literary magazine overseas.

How does Nephilim aim to destigmatize the altmodel genre? K: Nephilim is not just for inked girls or some typical ones who are spread eagle out there online. I want to make art. You don't have to be traditionally beautiful, but you have to be interesting. You can have a skin disorder and be amazingly beautiful. That's the most important thing about people. Their story and character. That's who I want on my team. People need to love themselves and be comfortable in their skin and once you do that, you shine and everybody can see it.

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Where do you see Chance 6 five years from now? S: Exceedingly different. We really want to be at the forefront of the industry and to be able to help independent developers. We also plan to really grow our live streaming channel called G-Centric TV.

Tell us about your flagship game Colina Legacy. S: It's a survival/psychological horror game like old school Silent Hill which has gotten a lot of traction. We're filling a void especially since Kojima left Konami. We are looking to fully release it by September. The demo is on Steam right now.

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You have quite a collection of pre-rolls around here. Do you use cannabis daily? K: I have a disease called Gastroparesis which basically means I have no motility in my stomach (which I need to digest food). I have a gastric pacemaker which aids me. Pot makes me feel better and I no longer take medicine which has terrible side effects especially this one called Reglan which just messed me up. Pot is the only thing that helps me.

Are you a vape, concentrate or flower type of gal? K: I prefer pre-rolls. It's easy and efficient. I used to like to dab, but I'm not a big fan of the rig and the torch.

union today? K: I'm from New York and the quality of cannabis isn't like it is here in Cali. Now it's legal! Unbelievable. The first time I went to a dispensary and it's like Disneyland for me. It's weed overload! S: The quality is much more potent here. I think it's due to the competition and cultivation experts we have now. I think it's crazy that it's still a schedule 1 drug. It blows my mind that the DEA considers cocaine and oxy worse than weed.

The Green Rush is one of hottest investments in the tech industry. Do you have any thoughts of going in?

K: I'm more of a hybrid person.

S: I'm not opposed to it. It's not something I understand well enough, but I would absolutely be interested.

What are your thoughts on the cannabis state of the

K: I would love to. It would all just run through me [laughs]

Indica or Sativa?

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B.

o.B, one of the first emcees of the double O's to convert internet hype into tangible commercial success, has had a decade that ranks up proper when matched against that of his senior class. It's been a little over 7 years when we first heard the chart-topping "Nothin' on You" featuring two relatively unknown artists at the time B.o.B, and Bruno Mars off of his inaugural single off of his debut album; The Adventures of Bobby Ray. Consequently, that album solidified B.o.B. as a bonafide star as well as his feature counterpart. Pushing millions of units between his first three studio albums,

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B.o.B showed and proved in terms of metrics and an innate ability as a crossover success. In Dec. 2013, the rapper released his Underground Luxury album. Since then, we’ve been clamoring for more. Fast forward to 2017, fresh off his Elements tour which was a collective of his four previously released mixtapes; Water, Fire, Earth, and Air. B.o.B blesses us with his latest classic - Ether In a day and age where the narrative of hip-hop is as subjective and polarizing as the presidential debate (just ask Joe Budden and Lil' Yachty), Ether is a symphony to deaf ears. One of the reasons that Ether showcases 360


degrees of Atlanta's finest is because he’s gone independent, since his last drop. He has much more freedom to be himself – and unapologetically so. He is unleashed and the driver of his own lane. B.o.B. continues to prove his resilience in an industry that never ensures a lasting legacy. His experience—both with a major label and as an indie artist—is something his No Genre signees can not only learn from but can use as a model to navigating the mercurial music business.

“In 5th grade, I always knew I wanted to do music. I was listening to artists like DMX, Eminem. Those two really inspired me and it never stops.”

We rap with B.o.B to get the drop on his new album, the state of the union of hip-hop, and his preference of Sativa over Indica.

When did you realize music was something you wanted to do as a career?

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In 5th grade, I always knew I wanted to do music. I was listening to artists like DMX, Eminem. Those two really inspired me and it never stops. I'm 28 now, and I still get inspired by new shit to this day. It came in different phases for me. It wasn't like, "Oh, I'm going to decide to be an artist and that's it." I think the particulars of it changed over time like I want to be an artist that plays guitar or do an animated album. I'm constantly inspired and evolving.

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As an artist and producer, do you favor one more than the other and how is the approach different? I think it comes in phases, I enjoy being an artist and producing. For instance, I could never make a song like, “I’ll Be in the Sky" again, or a song like "Airplanes" again. It's like taking a picture. Do you how hard it is to recreate a picture? To make it look exactly how it was at that exact same moment? Things evolve and change as time goes.

Are there any artists out there that you would like to collaborate with that you haven't? No. I really can't say that there is, I've collaborated with so many people over the years. I'm just so open to collaborating with

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“I started No Genre because I know what I went through as an artist and I never want anybody else to go through that as an artist.”

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new artists. Artists that nobody has ever heard of. Like they all have music out there and I happen to land on their page and I'm like, "Wow, I gotta work with that person."

You have the uncanny ability to jump from track to track. Is your approach different? It really depends on what I'm in the mood for. Sometimes I'm in the mood to rap, sometimes I'm in the mood to sing. It really depends on the vibe. Honestly, it’s not a decision I even make. Life happens and I adapt.

Tell us about your label No Genre I started No Genre because I know what I went through as an artist and I never want anybody else to go through that as an artist. You know, when I got signed, I didn't put my first album out until four years after. As much success as I've had, I've been through a lot of

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bullshit to get where I am now, and I feel like I went through a lot of unnecessary shit, and I don't want any artist under my watch to have to go through that. I want to give them insight on what to do to succeed. You know Outkast, Goodie Mob and Gnarls Barkley paved the way for me. You know artists who broke new ground. I want to be able to do that for the next generation, I think I'm good at introducing new people to the world and that's why I started No Genre.

Being a veteran of the rap game, what have you learned and how have you evolved? I feel like I've simplified myself. I've gotten to a point where I just know how to create what I'm envisioning in my head. When I first started, I made a song called, "Created a Monster" when I just learned how to play the guitar. If I knew what I know now, I would've gotten somebody to play the guitar [laughs].


On the flipside, that's kind of the beautiful thing about it as well. It wouldn't have sounded the same. Had I known how to really play guitar? It wouldn't have sounded organic. I still try to understand that element and have things come out a certain type of way.

What can your fans expect from Ether? My insight, my perspective, who I am and what makes my brain tick. I feel like my fans could only get that from an interview like this. People that read my interview will be able to listen to my music and get the same vibe. That's the unique thing that I have.

What do you feel is the current State of the Union of hip-hop? I feel like hip hop that I know, is completely different than what is nowadays. What you have to understand is, hip-hop has always

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been rugged. Hip-hop has always been recorded on the best equipment you can find at the time, Hip-hop hasn't always been recorded in a million dollar studio. I think the intention is different now. The intention of hip-hop was always to bring people together, even back when it started in the boroughs of New York. Back when all the gangs were divided, it brought them together. It just brought people together. Now, I feel like the capitalistic agenda has seeped its way into the core of the hip-hop community. Right now, you’re not seeing it's organic, original intention. It's commercialized and saturated. You know anything that is popular gets commercialized and what we're witnessing now, is the birth of a new generation, genre or vibe. It may not be what you and I feel it should be, but it’s going to happen until the next thing pops.

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you're currently feeling? I've always loved all types of music. What's really catching my attention lately, is this trap-metal like Xxxtentacion. He’s not the only one doing it, but he's the frontrunner of this mosh-trap music. When I was a kid, we used to listen to Korn and we would mosh. Black kids moshing bumping Korn. We didn't do that listening to DMX or Jay-Z. Now it's interesting that trap music is making people mosh. I'm curious to see where all of this is going.

Are you a Sativa or Indica guy? Sativa all day. Now, I do have Indicas, but they're more so when I need to go to sleep.

What are your favorite strains? I really like Durban Poison, Blue Dream is always one of my favorites and I would say, XJ-13 is one as well.


“The intention of hip-hop was always to bring people together, even back when it started in the boroughs of New York.”

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t’s no big secret - cannabis is quickly developing a reputation as the wonder drug we’ve all been waiting for. Improvements in quality of life, and disease reversal have been reported for a number of different ailments across the spectrum, from anxiety and insomnia to epilepsy and cancer. As more and more research becomes readily available, people from all walks of life are beginning to join the medicinal marijuana community and accept and appreciate all the wonderful benefits this little plant has to offer, whether in the form of THC or in the form of CBD oils. (Hemp isn't medicinal for serious disease) One still somewhat hotly debated topic is whether or not this amazing treatment should be made available to children suffering from these same diseases. Should we fund research that not only studies an

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illicit plant’s medical benefits, but will be used to treat minors? The better question, surely, should be why not? Surely our most innocent and most vulnerable should be given the same treatment options available to adults suffering similar conditions barring any noticeably negative side effects? And more importantly, both children and adults should have access to clean, quality medicine as well as research and studies pertaining to medicinal cannabis, something that isn’t nearly as easy to come by as it should be. Enter companies like CannaKids and SavingSophie.org, organizations dedicated to creating a space where it’s easy to find lab tested medicine designed for patients in need, and research on all things medicinal cannabis. They provide links to hundreds of different articles and papers published in scientific journals regarding the plant as

well as charities, research studies, dosing guides and so much more. Started by a couple of parents, and a special little girl named Sophie, organizations like CannaKids and SavingSophie.org are at the forefront of helping families in need of a little guidance, and a second opinion. Yes, we’ve all heard the cries of disapproval before: “They’re just kids!”, “Think of the children!” Well, that’s exactly what people like Tracy and Josh Ryan are trying to do. Four years ago, Tracy and Josh were told that their beautiful daughter, eight and a half month old Sophie, had a rare form of brain tumor. They were also told that even with chemotherapy, the tumor would have minimal shrinkage at best. However, a few weeks after Sophie was diagnosed, her parents were put in touch with Ricki Lake and Abby Epstein, who were shooting a documentary called Weed the

People, a film about treating pediatric cancer with cannabis oil. Although skeptical at first when told that weed wasn’t just a recreational drug, but a miracle cancer treatment, Josh and Tracy eventually came around to the idea of using cannabis oil to treat Sophie’s tumor. “We thought, ‘Okay, Ricki and Abby are mothers, they care about kids,’” Tracy says. “They showed us research and anecdotes, stories about other children with brain tumors taking this oil. We did our own research and we couldn’t find anything negative about it, so we move forward.” Sophie received her first dose of cannabis oil on camera at nine months old. Back in 2013, not many people knew about cannabis oil being a treatment for things like cancer, and research available was hard to find at best. The Ryans, along with some fellow parents in similar situations, started a private Facebook group called CannaKids.

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“It was really just for a bunch of parents in a similar situation as ours and experts in the industry to kinda advise and help each other. The next thing we know, it was over a thousand people on this private, invite only group.” - Josh

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Many joined the page after the Ryans came out about their choice of treatment for their daughter. “I got together with a couple of moms and we started a private chat and would go back and forth about what we were doing with cannabis oil and our kids because no one was really public about it at the time; they were fearful,” Tracy tells us. “The conversations just got so overwhelming that we decided to make a private Facebook group where we could all converge and support each other. We can bring in experts that have oils and dosing guidance, we can collaborate.” With her background in social media, Tracy built the page that now hosts around 2000 families from all over the world.

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“It was really just for a bunch of parents in a similar situation as ours and experts in the industry to kinda advise and help each other,” Josh says. “The next thing we know, it was over a thousand people on this private, invite only group.” From there, a business developed. There was a need in the industry for quality medicine and guidance, and there were indeed a few companies who could provide just that. The problem, however, was that no one really knew how to find these companies. “There was this vacuum in the market for parents like us,” Tracy tells us. “There were really only two oil makers in the state that

I trusted at the time, and if they run out of medicine, I won’t have any back up, which does happen.” The Ryans spoke with the staff of their media agency and together they agreed to take the existing company and start transitioning into a cannabis business. And thus, CannaKids was born. At the same time, the design of the SavingSophie.org website began taking shape. SavingSophie.org would serve as a cancer patient resource center. Tracy, a graphic designer before entering the cannabis industry, saw how her daughter was able to cope with her chemotherapy treatments, and she was eager to help

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“She’s had zero negative side effects, she doesn’t get sick anymore, she doesn’t have to get blood draws every week to make sure her immune system is good. She’s growing, she’s learning...she’s amazing.” - Tracy

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others in their situation get the information they needed. She is the one who practically designed the entire online platform you see when you visit the website. “I’ve been a graphic designer for over twenty years of my life… but I’ve always felt like I was supposed to do something a little more with my life, where I was giving back, and I’ve always loved doing charitable, philanthropic work for children. I’m drawn to kids in need,” she says.”And when we started seeing the effects in Sophie and how incredibly it was working, not only on her tumor but on the chemo effects, I really thought to myself that maybe this was the path I was supposed to take.” CannaKids, their oil company, followed along soon after. The Ryans and their team have partnered with the Technion Institute in

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“A lot of times, children who’ve had to have hundred of needles put into them, be held down and put into MRI scanners, have had brain surgery and blood transfusions, and everything else Sophie has had to go through, it affects them emotionally and mentally; they’re scared...I see it more often than not where these kids are shy and recoiled... whereas our child is literally the most outgoing kid I’ve ever known.” - Tracy TOKEWELL MAGAZINE

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Israel, one of the world’s leading research facilities for cannabis research, as well as CURE Pharmaceutical in order to uncover the mysteries behind this plant. The Technion has been studying cancer, autism and epilepsy for over 3 years, and now CannaKids and CURE will be funding their next 4 years of cancer research with the hopes of taking these discoveries all the way through the federal pharmaceutical process with partner hospitals in the US and around the world. And it doesn’t stop there. While CannaKids was started with cancer patients in mind, the staff has also done work with Dr. Bonni Goldstein, author of Cannabis Revealed. In the long run, they hope to add even more personalized medications dedicated to certain diseases like specific pediatric or adult cancers, in addition to their currently available broad line of oils that have targeted terpene profiles.

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All these things are fine and dandy, but now we tackle the really tough part of our initial question: cannabis oil, for kids? Sophie herself is a shining example of properly dosed cannabis oil being a beneficial treatment for children in the same situation as her. Tracy puts it into perspective: “A lot of times, children who’ve had to have hundred of needles put into them, be held down and put into MRI scanners, have had brain surgery and blood transfusions, and everything else Sophie has had to go through, it affects them emotionally and mentally; they’re scared. They’re not as outgoing. It doesn’t always happen, but I see it more often than not where these kids are shy and recoiled, more timid, whereas our child is literally the most outgoing kid I’ve ever known, and I’ve known a lot of children in my life.”

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After all of that, we come back to one of the most important things about this story. How’s little Sophie doing these days? Amazing. That’s the long and short of it, really. She’s an energetic and confident and happy child who’ll run circles around you when you try and keep up and helps her parents network at conferences by asking them to come see her when she goes on stage with her mom. When asked if she suffers any negative effects, whether from the cannabis oil or her treatments, the response from both Tracy and Josh are overwhelmingly positive. “If anything, it’s improved her quality of life,” says Josh. “Certainly when she was on chemo, there was a dramatic difference between how she was and how she could

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have been without cannabis. She wouldn’t have had an appetite, we saw dramatic shrinkage in tumor size that shouldn’t have happened...It definitely helped her and it is continuing to help her be healthy. She’s got a full head of hair, she’s happy, she’s got a great memory, she eats and sleeps well.” “She’s doing MEK 162, a targeted therapy that doesn’t actually affect her blood count,” her mom tells us. “She’s not immunocompromised, she’s as normal as any other child, she just happens to have a tumor in her brain. So far on this medicine, she’s had zero negative side effects, she doesn’t get sick anymore, she doesn’t have to get blood draws every week to make sure her immune system is good. She’s growing, she’s learning...she’s amazing.” Amazing, indeed.

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ealism was an artistic movement that began in France in the 1800s. Realists rejected and revolted against Romanticism along with exaggerated emotionalism and drama of the movement. Rather it sought to portray authentic and contemporary people depicting them with truth and accuracy, whilst not shying away from the abhorrent or vulgar aspects of life. Jean Désiré Gustave Courbet was a French painter who spearheaded the Realism movement in 19th-century. Determined to paint only what he could see, he rejected academic convention and the Romanticism of the previous generation of

artists. His autonomy paved the way that was influential to later artists, such as the Impressionists and the Cubists and a world acclaimed tattoo artist - Steve Butcher. Much like Courbet, Steve rejected the notion of academic convention and opted to illustrate what he felt was art to him. "The thing with art school is, it's not like, teach-youhow-to-paint school. The first year was all about technique, the next year was all about conceptualism and being able to speak about your work. For instance, I would paint Iron Man, and they were like, "What's that? Iron Man, I said. They're like, yeah, but why?

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“When I come down to Cali, I gotta hit the dabs though because they’re badass. The flavor and the cleanliness are so good.” TOKEWELL MAGAZINE

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Because Iron Man is cool!", says Butcher. Fortunately for us, Steve Butcher opted to go for what he believed was art. Fast forward to 2017, Steve Butcher is one of the most sought after realism artists in the world today. Heavily influenced by pop culture and his affinity for the NBA, Steve's works can be seen all over the globe thanks to countless shows in which he has garnered multiple awards and through social media. Consequently, one of his works even caught the attention of NBA superstar James Harden from a client he blasted. "I tattooed an image of James Harden and he


reached out to him and sent him autographed sneakers and other stuff. I like James Harden too!", jokes, Butcher. Steve also happens to be a fan of agriculture by way of cannabis. "Cannabis is huge in New Zealand. People say Cali has the best weed, but I have to contend that. New Zealand has some pretty good stuff.", says Steve. He is a self-proclaimed Sativa connoisseur and like an artist palette, cannabis is part of his creative process. "For me, weed levels me out, relaxes me and puts me in the zone to create.", says the artist. Having said that, we session with this modern day Rembrandt and talk about being one of the world's most revered tattoo artists and why he contends that weed is New Zealand would give California a run for this money.

Being from New Zealand, is there a big tattoo community there?

How long have you been tattooing for?

Yes, that's where tattooing originated from with the Māori people and Tā moko style. We're probably one of the biggest tattooed countries population-wise in the world you know?

Did you ever think you'd be where you're at now? Absolutely not. It all crept up so quickly and blew up seemingly out of nowhere in such a short time. It's nuts trying to fathom this after 7 years.

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You're a well-known basketball fan. Whats is your team?

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What was the catalyst that piqued your interest in tattooing?

I'm a die hard Lakers fan and we haven't been doing too well so, it been hard. For now, I'll go for any team that can beat LeBron and I'm happy [laughs]

I left high school and went straight to art school and graduated with a bachelor's degree in fine arts. Through the end of the third year is when I got interested in tattooing and it from when my Nana passed away, I ended up getting a tattoo of her and that's what got me started.

*Congratulations to the Golden State Warriors 2017 NBA champions. Who's your starting 5? For the PG, Iverson, SG Kobe, SF Jordan, PF Hakeem and C Shaq.

Being classically trained in art school, is that applicable to your realism tattoos?

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For instance, I would paint Iron Man, and they were like, “What's that? Iron Man. They’re like, yeah, but why? Because Iron Man is cool!” The thing with art school is, it's not like, teachyou-how-to-paint school. The first year was all about technique, the next year was all about conceptualism and being able to speak about your work. For instance, I would paint Iron Man, and they were like, "What's that? Iron Man. They're like, yeah, but why? Because Iron Man is cool!" They're like, "it's not cool enough, you need to be able to talk about it." So, it didn't help in that aspect, but I suppose in terms of color theory and all of those sort things, it helped. Art is subjective. It's your own interpretation of what you are doing.

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Did you ever apprentice? I had a friend back home who was scratching at the time, and I just picked up from him how a machine worked. Then I bought my own equipment and started tattooing out of my house on friends and other people. Then, I worked at other shops with other artists, but it wasn't an apprenticeship. I was just feeding off other artists.

When did you realize tattooing was something you were going to pursue as a career? I knew I wanted to tattoo since my first one because I knew I could make money from my art and tattoo cool stuff like Iron Man. The second I realized that, I thought, "this is fucking awesome!"

Do you feel social media is good or bad for the tattoo industry? It can be a bit of both. I think it's one of the

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best tools for an artist, to me. I wouldn't be where I am without Facebook or Instagram. Sometimes you get cavalier tattoo artists who just floss all the time and I suppose it gives it a bad name as well.

Do you have any other art mediums you indulge in? I like to oil paint, but I'm into digital art now. It's less cleanup. Now, it's about time management. I struggle with it. I have less and less time now. Less artwork for myself. Nowadays, it's more emails, more interviews, more travel, and booking flights. I need to have time to chill out and sit and do my own thing.

Do you have any influences in the game? Nikko Hurtado is one of my biggest inspirations and it's been 7 years and he's still killing it. Demetrious Samohin out of the Ukraine, his work is just mind blowing and every time he posts a photo I'm just analyzing it like, "how does he do that?" Carlos Torres is another one. I know he's black and gray but his input and how he creates his pieces are just awesome. The list goes on. There are just so many people.

What are your thoughts on cannabis culture? Cannabis is huge in New Zealand. People say Cali has the best weed, but I have to contend that. New Zealand has some pretty good stuff. For me, weed levels me out, relaxes me and puts me in the zone to create.

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I knew I wanted to tattoo since my first one because I knew I could make money from my art. and tattoo cool stuff like Iron Man. The second I realized that, I thought, “this is fucking awesome!� #18

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Are you a Sativa or Indica guy? Sativa guy 100%. I mean If I smoke before work, I don't need to be tired or passing out [laughs]

Do you prefer flower or dabs? Flower, because here we don't have concentrates here in New Zealand. When I come down to Cali, I gotta hit the dabs though because they're badass. The flavor and the cleanliness are so good. Sometimes it can get you way too high.

“Art is subjective. It’s your own interpretation of what you are doing.” #18

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TOKEWELL MAGAZINE

Tokewell issue 18  

Issue 18 of Tokewell Magazine features none other than ATL's finest, B.o.B along with CannaKids, Humble Juice Co, Chance 6 Studios and iconi...

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