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WINTER 2012/2013

Contents Volume 10 • Number 1

4 Share Your Time By Tiffany White

6 Purposeful Living: Clothes

Choose clothes that fit your lifestyle.

18

By Lucy M. Pritchett

12 Look for the Grace Notes By Bob Mueller

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Linda Hitt Kempf

14 Beat the Burnout

COPY EDITING Lucy M. Pritchett

Caregivers need to take care of themselves, too.

18 Warm Up to Tea and Coffee

Try four delicious and healthy drinks. By Yelena Sapin

32 It’s Never Too Late

Stuart Fink is creating the soundtrack to his life. By Ruby Thomas

24 So, What Now? Caring for Someone with Cancer By Michelle Sherrard

28 Bye-Bye, Back Pain!

15 tips for preventing and reducing back pain. By Sandra Gordon

34 Winter: A Winning Season Finding joy from the chill of the winter season. By Connie Meyer

36 Updates & Happenings

By Tiffany White and Jessica Smith

38 Caregiver Award: Cindy Calahan

40 4 Things Not to Miss This

32

EXECUTIVE EDITOR Anita L. Oldham anita@todayspublications.com EDITOR Tiffany White tiffany@todayspublications.com

Celebrate every moment of your life.

By Kathy Sena

PUBLISHER Cathy S. Zion cathy@todayspublications.com

Winter

By Gioia Patton

44 A Dirty Roof Could Lead to Disaster

An unkept roof could cause you to lose your home insurance. By Gina Roberts-Grey

78 Budgeting for the Big Move Can you afford to move into a retirement community? By Carmen Brown

80 Looking Good: Patsy Allen

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Susan Allen susan@todayspublications.com SALES DIRECTOR Cheryl Suhr cheryl@todayspublications.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Teri Hickerson teri@todayspublications.com Rose Helm rose@todayspublications.com SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER April H. Allman april@todayspublications.com ASSISTANT EDITOR/DESIGNER Jessica Smith jessica@todayspublications.com PHOTOGRAPHY Melissa Donald melissa@todayspublications.com OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR Kaitlyn Tew kaitlyn@todayspublications.com CIRCULATION MANAGER W. Earl Zion COVER ART Silvia Cabib

Today’s Transitions is published by:

Zion Publications LLC 9750 Ormsby Station Road; Suite 307 Louisville, KY 40223 (502) 327-8855 Fax (502) 327-8861 TodaysTransitions.com

46 Adult Day Care Facilities

60 Home Health

The opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the writers and do not necessarily reflect the position of the publisher. The staff has made good-faith efforts to provide comprehensive and accurate listings in all directories. Information included in the directories is based strictly on that supplied by each entity.

48 Aging-in-Place Facilities

68 Nursing/Rehab Facilities

Zion Publications does not endorse or guarantee any advertiser’s product or service.

52 Alzheimer’s Care Facilities

75 Personal Care Facilities

56 Assisted Living Facilities

76 Retirement Homes

Copyright 2012 by Zion Publications LLC with all rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited without permission from Zion Publications LLC.

DIRECTORY CATEGORIES 46 How to Use Directories

SEND LETTERS TO: Letter, Today’s Transitions, 9750 Ormsby Station Rd., Ste. 307, Louisville, KY 40223

MEMBER Greater Louisville, Inc., Metro Chamber of Commerce, Area Chambers of Commerce, Better Business Bureau.


Share

your

Time By Tiffany White

D

o you have some extra time to spare? Maybe you are newly retired or searching for another activity to stimulate your mind. Consider volunteering with an organization that focuses on issues that matter to you. I am an avid cat lover who can’t resist feeding every stray I see in my neighborhood. The mere sight of seeing a litter of homeless kittens tears me up, especially since I know I can’t have them as pets. My frustration about seeing ownerless cats on the street prompted me to volunteer with Alley Cat Advocates, an organization whose mission is to reduce the stray cat population in safe ways that don’t require euthanization. Joining the organization has made me feel like I have more of a purpose, and I am happy to know I am contributing to the welfare of animals. It’s also nice spending time with likeminded people. If you’d like to volunteer but don’t know where to start, here are a few more ideas: • Big Brothers Big Sisters of Kentuckiana — They offer different mentoring programs that give you one-on-one time with a child who needs encouragement. You can take them out to a movie or visit with them at their school. BBBS has also received funding to implement an intergenerational mentoring program that will

focus on building relationships between older adults and kids. Turn to page 36 to find out more. bbsky.org  • Dare to Care — They serve children and families who don’t have access to nutritious food. Volunteers can assist with sorting food in their warehouse or setting up their mobile food pantries in neighborhoods. daretocare.org • American Red Cross — The organization offers free training to volunteers who want to work on their disaster relief team. Volunteers provide physical and emotional support to victims who are coping with loss. redcross.org • Metro United Way — You can search their website for volunteer opportunities targeted toward older adults. metrounitedway.org  • Everyone Reads — Volunteers assist students with reading and class work at school. every1reads.jefferson.kyschools.us  Volunteering is a great way to learn something new, connect with your community, and broaden your perspective. Try it. You might be surprised by the positive effect it could have on your life and those you are helping.

Is there something you want to say? If so, send an email to tiffany@todayspublications.com and put “feedback” in the subject line. We’d love to hear from you. Also, don’t forget to visit our website at TodaysTransitions.com to read current and archived articles or find out about upcoming events. 4

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Purposeful Living:

Clothes By Lucy M. Pritchett Photos by Melissa Donald

A

s we transition from decades of getting dressed for work to getting dressed for our deserved days in retirement, perhaps one of the most daunting tasks is deciding what we want our clothes closet to look like. As we settle into a more casual, relaxed lifestyle, we begin to wonder, “Do I really need these racks of highheeled shoes and hangers full of matching pantsuits?” Or for the guys, “Can I swap out these acres of three-piece suits, ties, and wingtips for soft golf shirts, cotton slacks, and loafers?” No one is advocating anything as drastic as packing up all your clothes in black plastic bags, heading to the closest charity or consignment shop, and starting over (although that might be tempting). With a little thought and perhaps a friend to help, you can weed out the good, the bad, and the ugly. We turned to fashion expert and stylist Wendy Anguiano for some guidelines on turning your clothes closet into a serene and welcoming spot. First of all, she says, “Take a look at your lifestyle at this stage of life. What activities do you enjoy? What special events do you usually attend? If you plan on volunteering in

retirement, depending on what that might be, then one or two pieces from your working wardrobe will come in handy.” If traveling is on your list of activities, put together a basic coordinated travel wardrobe and enjoy the sights and sounds of foreign lands without lugging three huge suitcases with you. For almost every other activity from art class to church to an evening at the ballet, a pared-down closet containing a few key pieces — slacks, jeans, blouses, sweaters, jackets and blazers, and perhaps a skirt and dress or two — will get you where you need to go in style. Keep shoes comfortable. Classic pumps with low heels or flats will see you through any activity without leaving you with pinched toes. And accessories such as scarves and jewelry can take even the simplest outfit to a new level of style. Most of all, Wendy advises, “Don’t buy or keep anything you don’t absolutely love.” continued on page 8

(L) Rita Moore has learned to trust her instincts when it comes to style and comfort.

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continued from page 6

A Few Key Outfits Peggy Silliman has spent time looking at and updating her retirement wardrobe. After she retired from teaching in 2000, Peggy did some traveling — Germany, Italy, and France — but mostly, she was faced with the task of cleaning out the houses of three family members who died about the same time. She had just moved to a townhouse and was still getting settled there. Her business-casual teaching wardrobe consisted of slacks, sweaters, jackets, heels, and boots. “I have been told I am a ‘winter’ as far as my coloring goes,” Peggy says. “I tend to have a closet full of blacks, deep blues, and greens. And red. Red is my favorite.” Peggy worked with Wendy recently to pull together a couple of outfits that would see her through activities from attending Veritas courses to an upcoming Caribbean cruise to an evening at the theater. A plaid Pendleton jacket paired with slacks and boots will keep Peggy warm and fashionable during the winter when she is playing bridge or attending Bible study. For evenings at the Kentucky Center, silky grey pants, a tailored but sparkly jacket, and pearls will garner admiring glances from fellow theater-goers. “I am not a shopper, but I occasionally go on a shopping spree with my daughter, who lives in Manhattan,” Peggy says. “Locally, I have bought some wonderful clothing and jewelry at The Willow Tree. I sometimes shop at Talbots. And I shop online at Bloomingdales, Pendleton, and Soft Surroundings. They all seem to have clothes that are attractive for an older figure.” Peggy also cherishes her go-to accessories: a charm bracelet, a few statement pieces of jewelry, and scarves. 8

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continued from page 6

Stylist Wendy Anguiano created versatile outfits for Peggy Silliman that fit her lifestyle, including this elegant evening outfit.

“I love scarves,” she says. “I bought a couple when I was traveling in Italy. They can really change an outfit.” Petite and Purposeful Rita Moore just retired from Eagle Steel Products, the company she and her husband, Chuck, sold last year. Since then, the Moores have moved into a new home they built. In the process, Rita weeded out her closetful of business outfits. 
 “It was nice to put them aside,” she says. “Really, though, I am

constantly weeding out my wardrobe. My clothing style is pretty traditional, and the pieces will last a long time. But I ask myself: Am I tired of it? Does it look worn? Does this look dated? If the answer is yes, then out it goes.” At 5-feet-2-inches tall, Rita likes to wear shoes and boots with a heel. “Shoe styles are more comfortable now and attractive,” she says. “I remember putting up with shoes that were stylish but uncomfortable. Now I don’t have to.” continued on page 10 T O D A Y ’ S

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Tips from fashion expert and stylist Wendy Anguiano on rejuvenating your retirement wardrobe: Remove all unnecessary items in your closet that don’t fit into your lifestyle. Think chic yet comfortable. Key pieces: pants, jeans, blouses, sweaters, and jackets or blazers. You may or may not want to add a dress or two and a skirt, depending upon your activities. Purchase quality-made items that will last in classic styles. Clothing should fit perfectly. You might need to get some items tailored. Tummies are a problem for many older women. Choose long tops, sweaters, jackets, and shirts that don’t tuck in; fabrics that drape but don’t cling; and flat, front-zip pants and skirts. Stay with monochromatic outfits and add pops of color to your heart’s delight. Look for jackets and tops nipped at the waist or empire waists. If you have slim hips and legs, choose narrow pants. Opt for sheath dresses that skim the body and single-breasted jackets and coats.

Rita avoids trendy fashion and chooses styles that make her feel comfortable.

continued from page 8

In contrast to Peggy’s winter coloring, Rita says she is a summer: “I wear lots of pastels. Blues, greens, and aquas.” As she has gotten older, Rita says it’s been a relief to learn to travel with one suitcase. “The smarter you pack and the less you take, the gentler travel will be on you,” she says. “We have had some wonderful trips. My husband and I took two of our grandsons to South Africa. I had a safari outfit: cargo pants, layers of tops, and a 10

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hat to protect me from the sun.” When she has a day to stay home — a day not filled with bridge, golf, or gatherings with friends — Rita says that to “keep her self respect,” she dresses comfortably in an attractive pantset: soft pants and a jacket or capris and a shirt. No lounging about in pajamas all day for this stylish woman. “I have never really been a clotheshorse,” Rita says. “I did like to shop for clothes, but now I don’t have the same passion for it as I did when I was younger. I wear petites,

Stay away from belted dresses and tops, decorative or bright-colored belts, tops with waistbands, or anything that cinches. Don’t add bulk around your middle with cropped tops and pants or skirts that have waist details or pockets.

and it is sometimes a challenge to find what I want. It’s hit-or-miss.” Rita says she bought some things through catalogs when she was younger but usually ended up being disappointed. She doesn’t shop online now because she likes to touch and feel items before buying them. She’s also learned to trust her instincts. “Women know what looks good on them,” Rita says.” I go with my gut instinct and buy the colors and styles that I feel great in. And comfortable.” T O D A Y ’ S

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Look for the

GRACE NOTES By Bob Mueller

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ll three of us Mueller children were blessed with music lessons and became proficient playing the piano. This was part of our mother’s legacy. She insisted we practice daily. She gave us the gift of music, and we now live our lives in musical terms and analogies. We learned that in music, a grace note is an extra note – a tiny, little note. In life, grace notes are the little touches. The last words of Blackfoot warrior Crowfoot reflect his grace notes when he said, “What is life? It is the flash of a firefly in the night. It is the breath of the buffalo in the wintertime. It is the little shadow which runs across the grass and loses itself in the sunset.” Sometimes a grace note is a kind gesture, or maybe it’s hearing a remembered lullaby. Perhaps it’s seeing a kitten dance with yarn or hearing a child sing the ABCs. To live a long life, to have a chance to sing and dance one more day, is to truly live in grace. Living is not different at the end of life than at the beginning. Light one of the leftover birthday candles from your last celebration. Watch the flame and notice its brightness. Although it gets smaller and smaller, the flame is as bright at the end of the candle’s life as at the beginning. So it is with life – it has no age. It can shine brightly at any and every moment. Human beings are both wise and foolish at any age. We’re filled with optimism or soured by setbacks. We’re alive and kicking or silenced and numb. Some people in their sixties and seventies fear abandonment and loneliness; they’re sure they’ll get sick, and no one will show any interest in them. But look closer: chances are these adults also felt this way as children. Some people feel old at age twenty or eighty, yet others retain their 12

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zest for living at any age. These zestful people have decided, often unconsciously, to capture and treasure every day despite the turbulence life can bring. Most of our fears about aging are really childhood memories we haven’t addressed. Fear is what keeps our character rigid; it’s derived from the past and projected into the future by our thoughts. I believe most of us direct our attention to what the outside world is doing to us instead of what our inner world looks like. Look more deeply within to relinquish your surface in favor of your depth. Remember, your childlike qualities change, hide, and deviate, get crushed and denied, but they never die. Your childhood self is always waiting to come into focus and play again. Being young twice is being able to rewind. What kinds of warnings, predictions, or conclusions about growing up might come from this child you used to know? In the movie The Kid, Bruce Willis stars as a man who confronts his boyhood self and lives with that child for a summer. Meeting himself as an adult, the young Willis releases a tirade about what a loser the older version is. With great disappointment the child moans, “You mean I grow up to be someone who doesn’t even own a dog? What kind of person doesn’t have a dog? I don’t want to grow up to be you!” To discard former selves for shining new ones requires us to be fully aware, sensitive, and flexible. While personal evolution is not an easy process, it doesn’t have to be dreary. “They” can’t teach us or change us; only we can do that. “They” can’t bring us joy, fully actualize us, or help us grow young. Only we can decide upon the path of our lives, the process of our becoming, or the passion of our future. Only we can embrace ourselves, start anew, and play the grace notes. Bob Mueller is senior director of mission and stewardship at Hosparus. You can reach Bob at bobmueller.org. T O D A Y ’ S

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T U O N R U B BEAT the

can s r e v i g re How ca

, too r o f d e r be ca

By Kathy Sena

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arried for more than 50 years, Sandra Fuchs’ parents were used to relying on each other. When her mother developed multiple health problems over the years, “Dad was Mom’s main caregiver,” says Fuchs, a mother of three. But in 2002, her father developed brain cancer, and suddenly Fuchs found herself caring for both parents.

It’s quite a juggling act when you’re a caregiver for an older family member, especially when you’re also a parent, Fuchs says. If you’re caring for a chronically ill older person or someone who is disabled, you’re “on call” 24 hours a day, seven days a week. And if you add children to the equation, it’s enough to put you right over the top. At some point, you’ll need a breather.

A Much-Needed Break Respite provides caregivers a break from their daily responsibilities. It might involve medical or social adult day care, a short-term stay in a nursing home or assisted living facility, a home health aide or home health companion, a privateduty nurse, or adult foster care. You have to “call in the troops” at a certain point, Fuchs says. continued on page 16

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“Caregivers are truly the unsung heroes of today’s family, whether they be a spouse, a child, or even a grandchild.”

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Covering Costs

At various times, she has hired part-time cleaning and cooking help for her parents, asked for help from a cousin, and arranged for short-term convalescent home care for her mother. Respite care can provide a short break for a caregiver to go to a doctor’s appointment or head to the grocery store — or provide time for something as simple as a nap, bath, church service, movie, visit with friends, or brief vacation. For caregivers with children, it means being able to attend a school play or a ballet recital, or just to have some downtime with the family. There are many options, says Judith Diamond, director of community relations for Concepts for Living, a free residential placement service for seniors in southern California. She says adult day care can be particularly helpful for both patient and caregiver. “Options for caregivers during the day can include church-related or city-sponsored senior programs, adult day care centers, and adult day health centers,” Diamond says. At these centers, an older adult can attend a program from four to eight hours a day during the week. Activities include discussions about current events, board games, cards, dancing, and arts and crafts. Some programs also include transportation to and from the centers.

Some of the costs of such care can be covered through Medicaid and some insurance plans, Diamond says. “Also, some insurance plans do cover short-term respite care in skilled nursing facilities while a family is on vacation anywhere from one week to 10 days,” she adds. “The other option is to hire a caregiver who can stay in your home during the time you’re away.” 

 Caregivers can burn out if they’re not given the support they need, Diamond says. Whether it’s a week of respite or attending a caregiver support group (offered through hospitals, adult day care centers, places of worship, senior centers, etc.), people need to know they’re not alone. Some community programs offer caregiver retreats that focus on dealing with stress, using community resources, developing skills to maintain the caregiver’s health and welfare, reducing isolation, and most of all, leaving the caregiving environment for a day or two. 

 If a caregiver’s life is being negatively affected because of his or her role as a caregiver, it might be time to think of alternative living situations. “Older spouses who become caregivers can burn out quite easily if not given support,” Diamond says. “I have had several clients who were spouses to loved ones suffering from dementia. I’ve

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had others who risked their own health attempting to assist a spouse who had fallen. If a caregiver feels isolated in their own home situation, this can adversely affect the relationship between caregiver and loved one. “Caregivers are truly the unsung heroes of today’s family, whether they be a spouse, a child, or even a grandchild.” 

 How to Locate Help Your local agency on aging is one of the first resources to check out. Reach the Louisville Metro Office of Aging at 502.574.6554. You can also check the city or county government sections of your phone book under “Aging” or “Social Services.” The U.S. Administration on Aging supports a nationwide, toll-free information and assistance directory called the Eldercare Locator, which can help you find an appropriate local agency for respite care. Older persons and caregivers can call the Eldercare Locator at 800.677.1116, Monday through Friday, from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. For more information, visit the U.S. Administration on Aging’s website at aoa.gov. Kathy Sena is an award-winning freelance writer who frequently covers health and family issues. Email her at kathy@kathysena.com. T O D A Y ’ S

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Warm Up to TEA & COFFEE

– They’re good for you! By Yelena Sapin Photos by Melissa Donald

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here’s nothing like a hot cup of tea or coffee to ward off the chill of winter. But did you know that the brew is also good for your health? Studies have shown that moderate daily consumption of tea and coffee can lower the risks of getting certain cancers, cardiovascular diseases, and type 2 diabetes, and it might even slow the progression of dementia, Parkinson’s, and Alzheimer’s diseases. But just because they contain antioxidants and other beneficial compounds doesn’t mean you should indulge in teas and coffees with abandon. To reap the most benefit from your favorite beverage, you need to pay attention to what’s in it and how much you consume.

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Use Caffeine Wisely... The naturally occurring caffeine found in tea and coffee stimulates the central nervous system, making you feel more awake and alert. Coffee has the most amount of caffeine, followed by black tea, then oolong tea, green tea, and white tea. Antioxidant amounts follow the reverse order, with the least-processed white tea offering the highest levels. That caffeine boost can be harnessed to enhance many aspects of your day. continued on page 20 T O D A Y ’ S

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continued from page 18

A cup of coffee or tea prior to exercising, for example, can help you work harder and get more out of your routine according to Donna Giovenco, a registered dietitian at Baptist East/Milestone Wellness Center. Unless you have high blood pressure or a heart condition, which can be made worse by caffeine, you can safely enjoy up to three cups of coffee or tea a day, Giovenco says. ...Or Opt for Decaf If you’re sensitive to caffeine and find that too much upsets your stomach or makes you jittery, you can opt for less-caffeinated or decaffeinated beverages. Coffee houses will happily customize your drink to take the edge off. You can also choose a decaffeinated version when drinking tea or enjoy your regular variety by using fewer leaves, brewing for a shorter time, or discarding the first brew to get a less potent cup. Naturally caffeine-free because they don’t actually contain any leaves of the tea plant, herbal and fruit “teas” can be enjoyed any time of day. But it’s a good idea to practice caution when choosing more exotic blends of herbal teas. Some of them might contain ingredients that can interfere with your medication or make a chronic health condition worse. “Make sure you do some research, or talk to your doctor, to understand what those herbs can do to you,” Giovenco says. “A cup a day should be okay, but I’d be concerned about consuming more when you don’t really know what you’re getting.” Mind the Add-Ins Sugary concoctions topped with whipped cream may be fine as an occasional treat, but those extra fats and calories can add up quickly and undo the health benefits of your beverage. continued on page 22 20

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“Do your homework and find out what’s in that drink before you order it,” Giovenco suggests. Ask for skim milk, or experiment with almond, soy, or rice milks. And sweeten the drink yourself, preferably with natural honey rather than processed sugar, to control the amount. The healthiest way to enhance the flavor of your beverage is by infusing it with spices, herbs, fruits, and berries. Cinnamon, ginger, and peppermint, for example, are known to have myriad health benefits and are the most popular drink additives. Many other ingredients can be incorporated into healthy and refreshing brews. However you enjoy it, a nice cup of coffee or tea can be just what the doctor ordered. 22

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So, What Now? Caring for Someone With Cancer

By Michelle Sherrard

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orty-nine-year-old caregiver Patty Lewis-Sanders is no stranger to hospitals and illness, not with an aging mother at home and her own medical problems. But when her husband, Terry, was diagnosed with inoperative stage three lung cancer in June 2012, nothing prepared her for the emotions that followed. “The first two weeks or so after Terry’s diagnosis, we were in — I don’t even know the word,” Patty says. “I did things and didn’t even know that I was doing them, like I was going through the motions. I would sit and cry and worry and pray. I thought, ‘I love this man, and I’m scared because he might die.’” Oncology social worker Shelley Nally, LCSW, ACSW, says that when patients first receive their cancer diagnosis, emotions and reactions run the gamut. She’s worked at the James Graham Brown Cancer Center for seven years, and she’s seen the full range of emotional responses. “There’s shock, anxiety, anger, fear, depression, and worry,” she says. “A lot of patients have a sense of a

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loss of control, too.” Shelley says caregivers experience these same out-of-control thoughts and feelings. It is important that patients and caregivers seek support for their cancer journey. According to Shelley, her role as a social worker is about removing barriers to care, helping patients and caregivers be as stress-free as possible, and helping them get the two kinds of support they need: physical and emotional. Physical support Shelley says physical support might include supportive counseling, linking to resources, addressing any financial concerns, transportation (through the American Cancer Society’s Road to Recovery program, for example), work, insurance, and other needs. As if cancer weren’t stressful enough, many patients and their caregivers must contend with loss of income and the frustration that results from trying to procure the right financial resources. “It’s hard to find out all of the resources that are available to us,” Terry says. “That’s the problem.” Shelley acknowledges that financial resources are extremely limited. continued on page 26 T O D A Y ’ S

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One way to offset costs is to ask family and friends who wish to help for a grocery or fuel gift card. That way, they know exactly how their donated money is helping you, Shelley says. Food distribution or assistance programs such as Dare to Care or the federal government’s SNAP might be able to help as well. Friends or relatives can also run errands, prepare meals, provide transportation, or help around the house to give patients and caregivers precious time to reflect on what they’re thinking and feeling. Emotional Support Carolyn Humphrey, 65, was diagnosed with salivary gland cancer in September 2010. She explains that head and neck cancers are rare, but they affect everything, from eating and vision to hearing, facial features, and appearance. “We wear our cancer every day,” she says. Carolyn’s husband of 27 years, Fred Gross, feels his role as the caregiver is to hold Carolyn up. “I encouraged her; I supported her, held her hand, hugged her many times, especially during the times when she had a meltdown,” Fred says of the time after Carolyn was diagnosed. “I couldn’t melt down with her… We’re strong, though. We’re survivors.” Throughout Carolyn’s cancer journey, a few organizations have helped the couple cope. While Carolyn was receiving treatment in a different city, she and Fred stayed at the nearby American Cancer Society Hope Lodge, a place where patients with any kind of cancer and their caregivers can stay for free. There are 31 Hope Lodge locations across the country that can be found at www.cancer.org. Staying at the lodge was especially helpful for Fred, who had other caregivers to talk to, learn from, and eat with when Carolyn wasn’t feeling well. 26

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Since the couple had such a great community experience at the Hope Lodge, they immediately sought out Louisville Gilda’s Club when they returned home to continue that support. Carolyn and Fred say interactions with Gilda’s Club members and interactions with friends who have never battled cancer are very different. Fred says, “My caregivers’ group is very intimate. There are things that I wouldn’t share with people on the outside — that’s how close we’ve become.” Carolyn adds, “When I talk to friends and family who haven’t had cancer, I feel like they’re very uncomfortable… They’re not doing anything wrong, but it makes you know that you can’t go any further with them.” People at Gilda’s Club already understand because they’ve gone through it themselves, Carolyn says. “At first I thought that I would need to talk only to people who had my type of cancer, but what I’ve learned is that just being with patients who have experienced cancer of any kind is helpful,” she says. “I love being able to my share thoughts, fears, and hopes.” The emotional support has gotten Carolyn through some rough times. She says the club is like a big family, where patients, caregivers, family, and friends come together for informational seminars, exercise classes, social events, and food — lots of food. Patty and Terry haven’t found a community support group just yet, but Patty receives emotional support from her immediate family, a best friend who’s like a sister, and her aunt, who is a seven-year lung cancer survivor. “My aunt wrote me a little verse that I look at every day called, ‘What Cancer Cannot Do,’” Patty says. “It basically says that cancer can’t cripple your love, your hope, your faith, your peace, or your friendship, courage, or spirit. Reading it gives me inspiration. You just fight and you don’t give up. You look forward.”

Practical Tips for Cancer Patients and Caregivers Get organized. Shelley frequently witnesses patients and caregivers writing information down on the backs of their appointment paper, which they later lose. Use a spiral notebook. Write down the day and time, the person you spoke with, and what you were told.

Find organized friends. Carolyn suggests you ask someone to organize friends and family to provide and deliver meals. Make sure you mention any dietary restrictions. A friend could also organize a communication tree, making sure information gets relayed to your loved ones.

Get technology on your team. Many websites such as lotsahelpinghands.com are used to coordinate care of a loved one and include features such as a group calendar and tasks. Caringbridge.com allows patients and caregivers to post updates and provides family and friends the opportunity to leave encouraging comments.

Communicate. Patty advises caregivers and their loved ones to be open with how they feel. Terry says cancer patients need to express love and appreciation to their caregivers. “Praise them and let them know how important they are in your life, and make sure they get out of the house so they don’t feel stuck,” he says. Shelley knows the importance of communicating with social workers, doctors, family, and friends. “Asking for help is part of being a grown-up. If you don’t tell [us],…[we] can’t help,” she says.

Set short-term goals. Finding out too much information in advance is overwhelming and scary, Carolyn says. Get a general overview, but don’t worry about specifics until it’s time. “Find out what’s going to happen in the first week or two. If it’s your first week of treatments, look at only that week, and focus on how you’re going to get through it,” she says.


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, e y B e By ! n i a P Back er spine p u s a r o f s 15 strategie don By Sandra Gor

C

ount yourself lucky if you’ve never groaned about your back. Fact is, the majority of us (80%) will deal with back pain at some point. It’s one of the most common reasons for a doctor visit.

Deciding how to treat it, though, can be tricky. There’s simply no gold standard. “We have a long history of medical interventions that didn’t work,” says Roger Chou, M.D., a back pain expert at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland. But today we know more than ever. Check out the latest ways to avoid and deal with pain — from easy-to-implement prevention moves to the most effective cutting-edge surgical cures. 1. Don’t coddle yourself. Whether your back pain is excruciating or merely annoying, you probably won’t feel like doing much. But don’t take it easy for more than a day or two. Doing so can prolong and worsen pain. Instead, take a prescription or over-thecounter pain reliever (acetaminophen or ibuprofen) and start moving, says Daniel J. Mazanec, M.D., associate director of the Center for Spine Health at the Cleveland Clinic. “Lowimpact activities, like walking or swimming, boost blood flow to your back muscles and help loosen them up.” 2. Avoid the urge to be a weekend warrior. “In general, people who exercise regularly have less back pain than those who don’t,” says Dr. Mazanec. But bingeing on exercise over the weekend — to make up for everything you missed during the week — can backfire because your muscles aren’t primed for the activity. Ideally, you should go on a power walk daily. It’s the best prescription for a strong, problem-resistant spine. 3. Take a break. Get up from the computer or couch and stretch every 30 minutes. Put your hands on your hips, look 28

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up at the ceiling and arch backward. Sitting for long periods without a break compresses your back’s disks, which are meant to cushion vertebrae. 4. Stay slim. Maintaining a body mass index (BMI) in the normal range of 18.5 to 24.9 reduces your risk of back pain. “Being overweight causes wear and tear on your ankles, knees, and hips that gets transferred to your spine because you limp or favor one side,” says Perry G. Fine, M.D., of the Pain Research Center at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City. It can also put excess stress on disks, ligaments, and back joints, causing osteoarthritis of the spine. 5. Do Kegels. Toning your pelvic-floor muscles does more than just prevent urinary incontinence. It strengthens your entire “inner cylinder,” starting with the floor; you’ll be supporting your uterus, bladder, bowel, and on up to your abs and spinal muscles, says Kevin Carneiro, D.O., a physician at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine in Chapel Hill. To perform Kegels: Locate the targeted muscles by trying to stop the flow when urinating. Once you know how to flex and contract, hold those muscles for five-second intervals five times in a row anytime during your day. Work up to 10-second contraction and relaxation intervals. 6. Get out of bed and onto a ball. Sitting on a stability ball for 30 seconds or more each morning helps align ligaments around your disks, says Dr. Fine. 7. Quit it. In case you need yet another reason to stop smoking, consider this: Nicotine constricts blood flow to spinal disks, causing them to age faster than normal. Visit cancer.org/smokeout or call the national tobacco quit line at 800.784.8669. continued on page 30 T O D A Y ’ S

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continued from page 28

8. Get fitted. Women with large breasts are more prone to back issues. Be sure you’re wearing the right size bra, which can help distribute chest weight and prevent you from hunching over. In severe cases, breast reduction surgery, which typically removes 1 to 6 pounds from each side, might be beneficial. 9. Reconfigure your computer setup. Looking down at a screen, what people often do when working on laptops, puts strain on neck and back muscles, says Dr. Carneiro. Your monitor should be at eye level, elbows and shoulders at 90 degrees. If you use a laptop, consider getting a separate keyboard to make these ergonomic adjustments. 10. Find pressure points. Studies indicate that acupuncture (the Chinese medicine technique of inserting thin needles into the skin) can help reduce back pain. If you shy away from needles, try shiatsu, which uses massage at acupuncture points. “I typically recommend massage or acupuncture to patients with muscles that won’t relax, even with physical therapy,” says Heidi Prather, D.O., associate professor of orthopedic surgery at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Find an acupuncturist or shiatsu therapist from the National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine at nccaom.org. 11. Stress less. The neurochemicals that flood your system when you’re dealing with tough times can lead to emotional and physical pain. Reduce anxiety with regular exercise, a healthy diet, psychotherapy and, if necessary, antianxiety/antidepressant prescription medication. 12. Consider steroids. When other attempts at relieving pain fail, especially if you have a herniated disc and sciatica (leg pain), steroid injections may provide relief. “A shot of dexamethasone or methylprednisolone in the back can decrease inflammation and keep you moving,” says Wellington Hsu, M.D., an orthopedic surgeon in Chicago. These medications can ease discomfort for months. 13. Give your spine support. Your lower back naturally curves inward, but most chairs cause it to round out, throwing off alignment. “Cushioning your lumbar is the key to maintaining your spine’s neutral curvature,” says Mary Ann Wilmarth, chief of physical therapy at Harvard University Health Services in Boston. Scoot all the way back in your chair with a roll of paper towels or a lumbar pillow wedged behind your waist. In a car or a public place, stuff your coat behind you. “Once your low back is supported, your neck and upper back will stay in proper position,” Wilmarth says. 30

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Surgical Solutions You should try a variety of treatments for at least six months before considering surgery, says Eeric Truumees, M.D., of the North American Spine Society, a spine surgeon in Austin, Texas. Even if your doctor sees something telling early on with an MRI or X-ray, your pain may get better in time without going under the knife. If eventually you and your doctor come to the conclusion that surgery is the only option, the newest techniques are much less invasive. Minimally invasive lumbar fusion This MRI-guided surgery involves carefully inserting bone-growing protein (produced in the lab) between painful spinal disks. The disks are then fused with titanium rods and screws to form a single bone. The best fusion candidates have degenerative disk disease or spinal stenosis, which is a narrowing of the spinal canal from chronic pinching of the nerve roots. Interspinous spacers With this technique, up to two titanium spacers are wedged between degenerated vertebrae under local anesthesia to keep them from rubbing together. The ideal patient has spinal stenosis or the following symptoms: pain in the back, in the buttocks, and down the back of the legs, which gets better with sitting. Microdiskectomy This surgery removes a small amount of tissue from a disk that’s impinging on nerve roots (because it’s out of its socket) under the guidance of an operating microscope, which minimizes the size of the incision. Microdiskectomy is intended for people who have a herniated (aka slipped or ruptured) disk.

14. See the right doctor. A trip to your internist can reassure you that your pain is nothing serious, such as a malignancy, infection, or fracture. Next step: “See a spine specialist to pinpoint the problem and get the best treatment,” says Jared Greenberg, M.D., an interventional spine physician at Meriter Medical Group in Madison, Wisconsin. “If in the end surgery is indeed necessary, you want to be able to look back and say ‘I did everything I could to avoid this.’” To find a nonoperative spine specialist, visit the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at aapmr.org. 15. Work your core. Strong abs are vital for a stable body, and conversely, weak stomach muscles are often linked to back issues. The best exercise to practice regularly is the plank. Lie face down on the ground and push yourself up on your forearms and toes to form a straight line with your back. Hold for 30 to 60 seconds. To make this move more difficult, push up onto your hands and straighten (but don’t lock) your arms. If possible, shift your weight to the right and raise your left arm to the sky, stacking your left foot on top of your right. Keep your hips up so your body forms a straight line from your ankles to shoulders. Switch sides after 30 to 60 seconds. T O D A Y ’ S

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PHOTO: MELISSA DONALD

It’s Never Too Late To...

Hit a High Note By Ruby Thomas

S

tuart Fink remembers the days when the city of Louisville’s fire engines were drawn by horses. He has lived through World Wars I and II. He has seen 75 Kentucky Derby races. But he claims to be no expert on longevity.

In a time when people seem willing to pay any price for products and procedures that might add a few years to their lives, Stuart, who turned 100 years old last May, simply credits his faith in God and the love of his large family for his long and healthy life. “You just make the best of whatever the good Lord gives to you for your life and take it one day at a time,” he says. “If He lets you live the next day, then that adds one more to it, and I’ve been doing that for a while.” Stuart was born in 1912, the youngest of four children. When his father passed away only three months later, his mother struggled to raise the family. She found work taking care of children at Ormsby Village Orphanage, where her young family also lived for nine years. Stuart remembers those days as happy times – making scooters out of old skates, playing marbles, and riding the inter-urban trolley car to school. “Although we did not have a lot of money, we never felt underprivileged or deprived,” Stuart says. “We made the best of what we had.” That attitude carried Stuart and his family through some of the most difficult times in our country’s history, including the Great Depression and the famous flood of 1937. Stuart says music has always been an important part of his life, and he fondly recalls times when he and his two brothers gathered around the old piano to make music for the family. He also fell in love with playing the banjo as a child and went on to play in the St. Xavier High School orchestra. He only gave it up about three years ago when he developed arthritis in his fingers. At 100 years old, Stuart still loves music and is the lead singer of the award-winning group the Silver Notes. The group is made up of 50 senior citizens (at one point their combined age totaled 4,000) who travel all over Kentucky and Indiana performing at different events and venues including the State Capitol, the state fair, and various nursing homes. Stuart’s smooth voice has earned him many standing 32

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ovations. “The director of the group usually introduces him as ‘our Bing Crosby,’” says Stuart’s wife, Estelle, with a laugh. Music may have kept Stuart’s heart Performing with his musical group, the Silver Notes, keeps Stuart Fink excited about life. young, but his affinity for sports couldn’t have hurt his chances of living for a century. Stuart played basketball, football, and baseball at St. X High School, where his performance in the 1930 National Catholic Basketball Championship earned him a place in the school’s Hall of Honors. He’s now the oldest living member of that hall. Upon graduation from high school, Stuart says he remained active by keeping up with the exercise routines he’d learned at St. X. Later in life, he took up bowling and golfing, and he coached his children’s and grandchildren’s school and YMCA sports teams for nearly 50 years. Stuart gave up coaching at age 86 only after macular degeneration diminished his eyesight, but he kept bowling until age 92. Stuart’s son Tony says there’s no doubt his dad’s outlook on life has contributed to his longevity. “He’s never really thought of himself as old,” Tony says. Thirty-five years ago when Stuart retired from his management position at Colgate Palmolive, his family was concerned about how he’d adjust to life after retirement. “We all were trying to get him involved in senior golf and bowling leagues, but he said he didn’t want to hang out with old people,” Tony “He said recalls with a laugh. didn’t w he a Says Stuart: “A doctor once told hang ou nt to t wi t h me that the secret to my longevity is ‘old peop le.’” eating Krispy Kreme doughnuts and drinking milk.” This young 100-year-old, as Stuart’s doctor calls him, looks forward to every day and has a busy season with the Silver Notes coming up. He has no plans of leaving the stage anytime soon. T O D A Y ’ S

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er Mey e i n n o C y B

I

look forward to the different sensations each change of season brings. I know the Ohio Valley is infamous for allergies and humidity, but it also has the definitive change of seasons I love.

Fall has always been my favorite, but each season has its own special offering and responses from our human senses. That’s why you often hear, “I can smell winter in the air,” or references to the tastes of spring or summer when gardens give forth their bounty. I know I am not alone in my love for fall. Who doesn’t love the cool, crisp air that brings the artist’s palette to the trees? Often I have heard people remark they do not like fall because it is a reminder that winter is coming soon. I think winter gets a bad rap. I could understand if we lived in those northern states where winter means you are snowed in for weeks or months, but for the most part, our snows are few and far between. That’s what makes them so special. Seeing that first snowflake brings back childhood memories of snow days spent at home from school, snowball fights, sledding, and settling in by a cozy fire with a good book and a cup of hot chocolate. There is nothing like snowflakes before Christmas to 34

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get you in the holiday spirit. I will never forget visiting Florida in December for the first time. I felt like I was trapped in a bizarre version of the season with people wearing shorts while Christmas music played in the background at the mall. Warm weather will never be Christmassy to me. No other season offers the possibility of waking up to an unexpected blanket of pure white that momentarily stops everything. Unexpected winter snow forces us to slow down and interact in ways we did in days gone by. I cherish the memories I have of winters with huge snows that kept everyone inside for days. I love the fact that everyone had to do things differently. The normal routine was interrupted in rare ways as we were forced to be together and find new ideas to entertain that did not always include television. I remember dragging out games to pass the time and calling friends and visiting neighbors as we had never done before. We never had time before, or never took the time. Being snowed in made us find a

new perspective on family, friendship, and time spent alone. Winter gives us our most special holidays where people seem to be kinder, more loving, and more generous. Christmas and Hanukkah are the most popular examples, followed by Valentine’s Day. All of these holidays are reminders of love and the joy of giving that comes during the glorious winter season. Winter reminds us to slow down. For me, it is a season of introspection. I always do more reading and writing during this season. Winter foods bring comfort and warmth to contrast the cold weather. Hot soups and hearty casseroles along with baked bread and fresh-out-of-theoven desserts give us the comforting feeling that comes with the season. Winter brings a different style of dress because of the cold. I love the beautiful coats and sweaters with matching boots for style as well as protection against the weather. This season brings an array of dazzling scarves and colorful gloves and mittens to ward off the coldest winter winds. The layered look of winter clothing brings creativity in style not unlike Project Runway designs. I am not trying to change the minds of the multitudes who hate cold weather and the treacherous driving that comes with the frozen white stuff. I am merely pointing out that each season has its own beauty. Each season brings its own smells and tastes and special landscapes. One season is not better than another. Each is merely different. As humans with different tastes and different responses, it is normal to prefer one season over another. It is also OK to embrace the differences in all four. If you prefer to escape instead of embrace winter, I applaud your choice to spend this season in a totally warm climate. I will also envy your tan and see you next spring. Connie Meyer writes regularly for Today’s Transitions. You can reach Connie at ConnieL605@aol.com. T O D A Y ’ S

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[news you can use]

RESOURCES (continued)

Updates Happenings

&

By Jessica Smith and Tiffany White

New book lends caregivers inspiration Lori Hogan, author and co-founder of Home Instead Senior Care, wants to provide a source of comfort for caregivers. Her newest book, Strength for the Moment, includes inspirational messages to help caregivers cope with the stress and anxiety of caregiving.

Signs seniors need help this holiday

FUN

Make a Caregiver Feel Good Nominate someone for our Care Package for the Caregiver winner. We’re giving away a great package that includes prizes from Right at Home, Premier Home Care, A Taste of Kentucky, and Derby Dinner Playhouse! Go to TodaysTransitions.com to enter.

NEW ADDITIONS

Accelerated Care Plus therapy offered Lincoln Hills Health Center, a Service of Floyd Memorial Hospital and Health Services, is pleased to announce the addition of Accelerated Care Plus (ACP) therapy. Lincoln Hills is currently the only facility in Southern Indiana that provides this type of therapy. ACP uses virtual integration to treat a broader range of patients and those with medically complex conditions.  Contact: 812.948.1311

In-home senior care company Senior Helpers advises adult children returning home for the holidays to watch for these warning signs that their parents or loved ones need extra care: Poor eating habits, neglected hygiene, neglected home, inappropriate behavior, changed relationship patterns, burns or injuries, decreased participation in social activities, scorched pots and pans showing forgetfulness in preparing meals, unopened mail, missed appointments, and mishandled finances. For more information, go to seniorhelpers.com. Contact: seniorhelpers.com

Social media for grandparents Grandparents.com is a social media site specifically for folks over 50, and it now has more than one million members. Explore ideas for family activities, expert advice on a multitude of topics, recipes, and deals and giveaways. You can sign up for free and also receive a free email newsletter. Contact: grandparents.com

Dementia unit expanded Autumn Woods Health Campus in New Albany is adding six private suites to Legacy Lane, a special unit for dementia patients. The new unit is also expanding living space to better serve its 32 residents. In addition to the six added rooms, there will be a living room, a separate dining room, and space for activities. Anticipated completion date is the end of the year. Contact: 812.941.9893

Tell Your War Story Are you a veteran who has a war story to tell? Each month, veteran residents of Ponder Creek Estate come together to share memories about their experiences serving in the war. People who live outside the community are invited to attend the monthly event and tell their story or listen to the discussion. For more details on upcoming dates, contact. Contact: 502.995.4010

Mentoring program starting up Big Brothers Big Sisters of Kentuckiana has received $170,000 from the Humana Foundation to fund an intergenerational mentoring program that will pair older adult mentors with kids. Implementation of the program will begin over an 18-month period and could be adopted nationally if the pilot program is successful.

RESOURCES

An online forum for caregivers Have your roles shifted from raising kids to caring for your parents? Norma Rosenthal and Toby Donner can relate. Their blog is a forum for people to discuss the challenges of caring for elderly parents while maintaining their careers and other responsibilities. Contact: girlfriendswithagingparents.com 36

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WORKSHOPS

Dementia expert will share knowledge Learn how to take care of a loved one with dementia. Senior Helpers and the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America are hosting a free seminar featuring dementia care expert Teepa Snow. Teepa, a certified occupational therapist, will be showing families and caregivers strategies for reducing conflict and improving interactions with loved ones. Her knowledge in dementia care and education helps others understand how dementia affects the brain at different stages. The morning seminar is for professionals, and a seminar for families is in the evening. When: Jan. 23, 8 a.m.-noon (professionals) & 5-8 p.m. (families) Where: The Olmsted on Masonic Homes of Kentucky campus Contact: Register at seniorhelpers.com/louisville T O D A Y ’ S

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Caregive r winner T O D AY ’ S T R A N S I T I O N S

Meet our “Care Package for the Caregiver” contest winner! Cindy Cahalan is the winner of our Care Package for the Caregiver Award, which includes four hours of sitter service from Right at Home, two passes to Derby Dinner Playhouse, a $100 gift certificate to Premier Home Care, and a $25 gift certificate to A Taste of Kentucky.

Meet our “Care Package for the aregiver” Contest Winner! ongratulations to Wanda Ferrell for for being the winner et our “Care Package the our Care Package for the Caregiver Award. She has won o tickets to Derby Dinner Playhouse, a $20 gift certificate to regiver” Contest Winner!

Why She Won: Cindy is juggling the responsibilities of caring for a family and being the primary caregiver to her father, who moved in with her two years ago. She also took care of her mother prior to her death in 2000. Her sister, Becky, says Cindy quickly assumed the role of caregiver without complaining and has remained consistent. “She’s had to rush [our father] to the emergency room on numerous occasions and then be at his bedside through all of his stays, which have been up to a week at a time. She hasn’t had a day off in years with having to care for my father.” — Becky Raley, nominator

ste of Kentucky, and four hours of sitter service from Right ratulations to Wanda Ferrell for being the winner Home. Care Package for the Caregiver Award. She has won ckets DerbyWanda—an Dinner Playhouse, a $20 gift certificate only child—takes care of herto hy ShetoWon: of and four hours sitter service from Rightand herKentucky, who has dementia while of managing her household me. rking. Her friend, Brenda Hart, describes Wanda’s perseAttend GuardiaCare’s Chocolate Dreams event on February 11 to find ance and devotion to her father in her nomination letter: Wanda—an onlythere child—takes care to of aher Shespends Won: every he nightPHOTO: over before going full-time, MELISSAhousehold DONALDand out who will be the winner of our Caregiver of the Year Award! who has while She managing essful jobdementia each morning. seldomher complains because ng. Herher friend, Hart,but describes Wanda’s perseloves dad Brenda very much, it hurts when he no longer Meet ourin“Care Package for the e and devotion her father her nomination letter: ows who she is. to Wanda is a wonderful person, and she is Caregiver” Contest pends night there before going toWinner! a full-time, ng theevery best she canover under very difficult circumstances.” Congratulations Wanda Ferrell for being the winner ul job each morning. She seldomtocomplains because of our Care Package for the Caregiver Award. She has won ves her dad very much, but it hurts when he no longer two tickets to Derby Dinner Playhouse, a $20 gift certificate to rves pampering andwonderful recognition for all sitter theyservice do? TasteisofaKentucky, and four hours of and whosome she is. Wanda person, she isfrom Right othe submit your nomination now. DEADLINE: July 18. at Home. best she can under very difficult Nominate him orcircumstances.” her for our Care Package for the Caregiver contest and tell us what makes this person stand

Cindy Calahan

Do you know a caregiver who deserves some pampering and recognition for all they do? Why She Won: Wanda—an only child—takes care of her

father who has dementia while managing her household and from our sponsors and be featured in our next issue. Deadline: Jan. 17. out. The winner will receive gifts

some pampering working. and recognition for all they do? Wanda’s perseHer friend, Brenda Hart, describes verancenow. and devotion to her father in her nomination letter: ubmit your nomination DEADLINE: July 18. “She spends every night over there before going to a full-time,

Nominate him or her for our MailCare form to:Package for the Today’s Transitions Caregiver contest andfor tell us Nominate him or Rd. her 9750makes Ormsby Station Suite 307 nda Ferrell what this person stand out. ourLouisville, Care Package KY 40223 for the ns, The will receive from Faxwinner to 502-327-8861 or gogifts online to Caregiver contest and tell us stressful job each morning. She seldom complains because she loves her dad very much, but it hurts when he no longer knows who she is. Wanda is a wonderful person, and she is doing the best she can under very difficult circumstances.”

Nominator’s name: ________________________ Phone number: _____________

know a caregiver who deserves some pampering and recognition for all they do? www.todaystransitions.com to submit your nomination now. DEADLINE: July 18.

Email: ____________________________________________________________

our sponsors and behim featured in todaystransitions.com what makes this person stand out. Nominate or her for our next issue. our Care Package for the The The winner will receive gifts and from care package willcontest include: Caregiver tell us The care package will include: our •sponsors and be featured makes this person in stand out. Four hourswhat of sitter oRM To: Today’s Transitions, ◆ Four hours of sitter The winner will receive gifts from Ormsby Station Rd.next our issue. service donated by 307, Louisville, KY 40223. service donated

Caregiver’s name: ___________________________________________________

ne

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City: _____________________ State: _______ Zip: ________________________

at Home. Right atRight Home The care package will include: our next issue.

Phone number: __________________ Email: ______________________________

care package will include: ◆ Four hours of The sitter • $100 gift certificate

He/She is an exceptional caregiver because: ______________________________

o 502.327.8861 or go online by ww.todaystransitions.com.

8. To

our sponsors and be featured in

Address: __________________________________________________________

◆ Four hours of sitter service donated ◆ $25 gift certificate service donated from Premier by to Right at of Home. Taste Kentucky. by Right at Home.

_________________________________________________________________

Home Care

_________________________________________________________________

$25 gift certificate

◆ $25 $25 gift certificate ◆ Two to ato of Kentucky. • gifttickets certificate to Taste ◆

to Taste of Kentucky. Derby Dinner Playhouse production. Taste of Kentucky ◆

Two tickets to a

• Two tickets to a Derby Dinner Playhouse production. ◆ Two tickets to a

Derby Dinner Dinner Playhouse production. Derby

_________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________

Playhouse production

ENTER iS JUlY 18.

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Don Giovanni Kentucky Opera

#2

First performed in October 1787 at the National Theatre in Prague and last performed by Kentucky Opera in February 2003, the setting is Seville, Spain, in the 17th century, and Don Giovanni’s womanizing ways come to a bad end when he invites the wrong guest to dinner. Set in two acts, the opera is sung in Italian with English translations above the stage.

#1

WHEN: February 15 @ 8pm and February 17th @ 2pm WHERE: Brown Theatre, 315 West Broadway TICKETS: $30-$91 Contact: 502.584.7777 or kentuckycenter.org or kyopera.org

Romeo & Juliet Louisville Ballet

“Choreographer Alun Jones’ sumptuous, epic-breadth treatment…is a piece in which every element fuses the dual notions of dance and drama,” wrote (then) Courier Journal arts critic Andrew Adler about Louisville Ballet’s 2002 production of Shakespeare’s timeless tale about two star-crossed young lovers torn apart by a bitter feud between their families. This production of Romeo & Juliet premiered in 1986 and was co-choreographed by Helen Starr, who also played the role of Juliet. 2002 marks the last time the Company (now in its 65th season) performed this ballet. WHEN: March 1 @ 8pm and March 2 @ 2pm and 8pm WHERE: Kentucky Center, 501 West Main St. TICKETS: $30-$97 Contact: 502.584.7777, or the box office walk up in person or drive thru, or louisvilleballet.org

#4

#3

Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto in D Major Louisville Orchestra’s Classics Series

Written in 1878 in a Swiss resort on the shores of Lake Geneva, where Tchaikovsky had gone to recover from the depression brought on by a disastrous marriage, this composition ultimately became not only one of the best-known of all violin concertos but is also considered to be among the most technically difficult works for violin. Acclaimed violinist Adele Anthony is the guest artist with the Louisville Orchestra for this piece, and Andrew Grams is the guest conductor. WHEN: January 31 @ 10:30am and February 2 @ 8pm WHERE: Kentucky Center, 501 West Main St. TICKETS: $17-$35 (10:30am concert), $25-$75 (Saturday evening concert) Contact: 502.584.7777 or box office walk-up or drive thru, or kentuckycenter.org

Love Letters Bunbury Theatre This Pulitzer Prize for Drama-nominated play by A.R. Gurney was first performed in 1988 at the Long Wharf Theatre in New Haven, Conn. Consisting of two characters, Melissa Gardner and Andrew Makepeace Ladd III, the play uses the epistolary form sometimes used in novels. Melissa and Andrew sit side-by-side at tables and read the notes, letters and cards — in which over nearly 50 years, the two discuss their hopes and ambitions, dreams and disappointments, victories and defeats — that have passed between them through their separate lives. WHEN: February 7-17, various performances WHERE:The Henry Clay Building, 604 South Third St. *Theater is fully handicapped accessible. TICKETS: $21 General Admission, $18 Senior (62 or older) Contact: 502.585.5306 or bunburytheatre.org

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By Gina Roberts-Grey

G

ot a moldy or stained roof? If so, your home insurance could be in jeopardy because home insurance companies frown on roofs that don’t sparkle and shine.

“The condition of a roof can lead to a homeowner needing to file home insurance claims,” says Brian P. Boak, a personal insurance specialist and broker in the greater New York City area. “It can also tell the quality of upkeep of the home, which may lead to other claims.” Boak says insurance companies normally conduct the inspection of a home when they issue a new policy. “Some companies will request inspections down the road to confirm the replacement cost of a home if that type of policy is in effect or if a renovation was done,” he says. And while Boak says a home insurance company might not automatically cancel a policy for a dirty roof, if the roof is moldy or mossy, homeowners can expect a notice to show up in their mailbox stating they need to correct the problem or risk cancelation of their home insurance policy. 44

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What’s the big deal? Over time, many roofs develop black or brown discoloration and streaks. Those streaks are usually algae, says Ron X. Gumucio, communications director for the Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA). Algae spores are transported through the air and deposited on roofs by the wind. They’re also on animals such as birds and squirrels that might be on your roof. “Algae forms where moisture dwells on roof surfaces,” Gumucio says. “Algae discoloration typically begins as small spots, then quickly transforms into streaks on the roof.” In addition to algae, shingles can become discolored or stained by soot, dirt, moss, or tree droppings. In order for moss to survive, it needs a moist environment. Gumucio says it’s common for moss to grow on north-facing roofs because they see less direct sunlight and stay damp longer than south-facing roofs. Overhanging tree branches provide additional shade and drop debris that acts as a food source for moss. Mold and moss that develop on a roof do more than hinder a home’s appearance. “The mold or moss can get under the shingles and raise them, allowing water to get under them,” Boak says. That water can lead to leaks, which Boak says in turn often become a claim for water damage caused to walls, ceilings, insulation in attics, and more. Keeping your roof clean Gumucio says homeowners should conduct annual inspections of their roof to evaluate its general condition and detect any potential leakage problems. He advises homeowners to be on the lookout for these issues when conducting a roof audit: • Keep gutters and roofs clear of fallen leaves, pine needles, twigs, etc. so water will drain freely. • Keep ivy, climbing roses, and trees trimmed to prevent branches from scuffing the roof surface and to keep the surface drier, helping to inhibit growths such as algae, mold, or fungus. • Never allow water from a downspout to pour directly onto a roof. This causes additional wear to the shingle surface. Connect all upper-story downspouts to a lower-level gutter with drains installed on the lower roof. • Inspect the underside of the roof from the attic to detect evidence of leakage, such as water stains. If your roof is discolored or has visible moss or mold, it might need a professional cleaning. The cost to clean your roof will vary based on your location, the size of your roof, and the extent of moss or mold. You can also try cleaning your roof yourself. “Algae discoloration may be lightened by applying a solution of chlorine bleach, trisodium phosphate (found at hardware and home improvement stores), and water,” Gumucio says. “Solutions for these ingredients vary between shingle manufacturers and depend on the amount of discoloration.” T O D A Y ’ S

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How to Use These Directories Directories are listed in alphabetical order. In each directory, the facilities/services are listed in alphabetical order and contain information specific to that category.

CONTENTS Adult Day Care............................46 Home Health...................... 60 Aging-in-Place Communities.....48 Nursing/Rehab..................... 68 Alzheimer’s Care.....................52 Personal Care..................... 75 Assisted Living.........................56 Retirement Facilities............ 76

Larger color Enhanced listings are paid for by the facility. Those interested in Enhanced listings can call (502) 327-8855, ext.14.

Some facilities/services are not listed because information was not provided at printing time. If you feel your facility or service should be listed in the next directory, email directories@todaystransitions.com, or call (502) 327-8855, ext. 14.

Payment Options: The payment options in each directory differ, but these definitions can help you navigate: Private – consumer pays out-of-pocket. Private Ins. – could include Medicare supplements or HMOs/ health insurance. Medicare – federal health insurance program designed to provide health care for the elderly and disabled. People who qualify for Social Security benefits are automatically eligible for Medicare. Medicaid – state health insurance program designed to provide access to health services for persons below a certain income level. KIPDA – Kentuckiana Regional Planning and Development Agency, which offers subsidies and Medicaid waivers.

LifeSpan Resources (LSR) – the Area Agency on Aging for Clark, Floyd, Harrison, and Scott Counties in Indiana, which provides a variety of home and community based services. LTCi – long-term care insurance; helps cover the cost of services for people who have an extended physical illness, extended disability, or cognitive impairment. VA – Veterans Administration, a benefits program that provides financial assistance to retired veterans needing medical, surgical, and rehabilitative care. Hospice – a facility or service that provides supportive care for terminally ill patients and their families.

Adult Day Care Directory Day program for adults who need to be monitored for safety reasons and/or need nursing care, treatments, incontinence care, and other health services. There are medical Adult Day Care facilities which must be licensed. Adult Day Care facilities that are social cannot provide nursing care. Some offer pickup and delivery services within a radius.

ElderClub

631 S. 28th Street Louisville, KY 40211 (502) 776-3066 • www.elderserveinc.org

Type: medical Hours open: M-F 8-4:30 Cost per day: $30-$62 Transportation available: $3 each way or bus route Showers available: yes Therapy offered: physical, speech Special services: Medically supervised by professional staff. Each day filled with a variety of activities specially designed to meet the physical, social, emotional and intellectual needs of elderly who are frail, disabled or experiencing memory loss. Owners: ElderServe, Inc. Payment Accepted: private, Medicaid, LTCi, VA, KIPDA

Larger color Enhanced listings are paid for by the facility. If you are interested in an Enhanced listing, call 502-327-8855. Spring issue deadline: February 10, 2012

Active Day of Louisville - Hikes Point 3403 Breckenridge Lane, Louisville, KY 40220 (502) 896-1444 • Cost per day: $61-$65

Active Day of Louisville - Third Street 4028 S Third St, Louisville, KY 40214 (502) 366-5777 • Cost per day: $75 or $13.50/hr

Alternative Adult Day Health Care Center 147 Wilma Ave, Louisville, KY 40229 (502) 955-1750 • Cost per day: $50 (varies)

Christian Care Adult Day Center 1015 W Magazine St, Louisville, KY 40203 (502) 815-6465 • Cost per day: $60

DayBreak at Mercy Sacred Heart 2120 Payne St, Louisville, KY 40206 (502) 895-9425 • Cost per day: $66

Exceptional Teens & Adults 724 W Breckinridge St, Louisville, KY 40203 (502) 290-1585 • Cost per day: $60-$65

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Adult Day Care Directory continued from page 46 Fern Creek/Highview United Ministries Adult Day 9300 Beulah Church Road Louisville, KY 40291 (502) 762-9612 • Cost per day: $55

GuardiaCare Adult Day Center 215 W Breckinridge St, Louisville, KY 40203 (502) 584-0454 • Cost per day: $62

Heartsong Memory Care Adult Day Health Center 9300 Stonestreet Rd Suite 500, Louisville, KY 40272 (502) 935-3300 • Cost per day: $58-$62

Highlands Community Ministries, Inc. 2000 Douglass Blvd, Louisville, KY 40205 (502) 459-4887 • Cost per day: $66 discounts avail.

Ideal Care, Inc. Day Party 1702 Gardiner Ln Louisville, KY 40205 (502) 456-0811 • Cost per day: $75

Just Family Adult Day Center 127 Lees Valley Rd, Shepherdsville, KY 40165 (502) 543-1265 • Cost per day: $61.60

Lifestyle Adult Care Home 1610 Blackiston View Dr, Clarksville, IN 47129 (812) 258-0818 • Cost per day: $55-$60 (10 hrs)

Mercy Providence 4915 Charlestown Rd New Albany, IN 47150 (812) 945-5350 • Cost per day: $53-$134

New Beginnings Adult Day Care 207 Washington St, Shelbyville, KY 40065 (502) 633-2218 • Cost per day: $34.80-$57.60

South Louisville Community Ministries Adult Day Center 4100 Southern Parkway, Louisville, KY 40214 (502) 368-7989 • Cost per day: $45

YMCA Adult Day Health Center 2800 Fordhaven Rd, Louisville, KY 40214 (502) 933-9622 • Cost per day: $60

Aging-in-Place Communities Directory An Aging-in-Place community offers several levels of care on one campus. A resident could move into a retirement facility or assisted living facility, then utilize higher levels of nursing care when needed through personal care or nursing/rehab care. A resident’s room might change, but not his or her address.

Episcopal Church Home

The Forum at Brookside

Levels of care: retirement, personal care, skilled nursing/rehab, Alz. unit Capacity: retirement-62, personal care-75, nursing/rehab-139, Alz. unit-52 Special services: A Faith-Filled Senior Neighborhood. Award-winning small neighbordhood living design, very caring professional staff, gourmet dining, on-site religious services, secure green spaces, daily activities, beauty shop, and rehab services. Open to persons of all faith traditions. Free tours. Owners: Episcopal Church Home

Levels of care: retirement, personal care, nursing facility Capacity: retirement-240, personal care-24, nursing facility-60 Special services: A beautiful gated community, 24-hr security, chef prepared meals, flexible dining plan, indoor heated pool, new exercise room, recreational activities, pet friendly, a great staff and management team, gorgeous patio homes and apartment, continuum of care. Owners: Five Star Senior Living, Inc.

7504 Westport Rd, Louisville, KY 40222 (502) 736-7800 • www.echky.org

200 Brookside Dr, Louisville, KY 40243 (502) 245-3048 • www.theforumatbrookside.com

Masonic Homes of Kentucky-Louisville

Masonic Homes of Kentucky-Shelbyville Campus

Levels of care: retirement, personal care, nursing facility, Alzheimer’s household Capacity: retirement-149 apts, personal care-84, nursing facility-136, Alzheimer’s household-24 Special services: Personal, dementia, memory care and skilled care. All therapies available short-stay or outpatient. Variety of independent living opportunities. Successful aging through Masterpiece Living. Owners: Masonic Homes of Kentucky, Inc.

Levels of care: assisted living, personal care, nursing facility Capacity: assisted living-21 apts., personal care-27, nursing facility-112 Special services: Award-winning staff provides nursing care, short stay and outpatient rehab, activities, dining, transportation and physician services. Also available: assisted living at The Pillars. Easy access from I-64 on U.S. 60. Owners: Masonic Homes of Kentucky, Inc.

3701 Frankfort Ave, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 259-9627 • www.masonichomesky.com

711 Frankfort Rd, Shelbyville, KY 40065 (502) 633-3486 • www.masonichomesky.com

Brownsboro Hills Plaza 220 N Clifton Ave, Louisville, KY 40206 (502) 895-3154

Christian Care Communities 960 S 4th St, Louisville, KY 40203 (502) 585-5656

Franciscan Health Care Center 3625 Fern Valley Rd, Louisville, KY 40219 (502) 964-3381

Green Valley Care Center 3118 Green Valley Rd, New Albany, IN 47150 (812) 945-2341

Jefferson Place 1705 Herr Lane, Louisville, KY 40222 (502) 426-5600

Lifestyle Adult Care Home 1610 Blackiston View Dr, Clarksville, IN 47129 (812) 258-0818

Magnolia Springs Senior Living 8225 Whipps Mill Rd, Louisville, KY 40222 (502) 716-5160

Mercy Providence 4915 Charlestown Rd, New Albany, IN 47150 (812) 945-5221

Mercy Sacred Heart 2120 Payne St, Louisville, KY 40206 (502) 895-9425

Miralea Active Lifestyle Community 3701 Frankfort Ave, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 897-8727

Nazareth Home 2000 Newburg Rd, Louisville, KY 40205 (502) 459-9681

Robert E. Lee, A Full Continuum of Care 201 E Elm St, New Albany, IN 47150 (812) 945-9517

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Aging in Place Communities Directory continued from page 48

Presbyterian Homes of Louisville

Rose Anna Hughes & Westminster Terrace 2120 & 2116 Buechel Bank Rd, Louisville, KY 40218 (502) 499-9383 • www.PHSK.org

Levels of care: assisted living, personal care, skilled nursing, outpatient rehab Capacity: retirement-96, assisted living-96, personal care-17, nursing/rehab-112 Special services: Three communities on 11 wooded acres. Restaurant-style dining, daily activities, on-site beauty shops, chapels w/services, gardens, library & exercise center. Committed to providing compassionate care and superior service to seniors since 1947. Owners: Presbyterian Homes & Services of Kentucky

Springhurst Pines

3101 N Hurstbourne Parkway, Louisville, KY 40241 (502) 412-3775 • www.springhurstpines.org

Levels of care: retirement, personal care, health and rehab center Capacity: patio homes-58 units, personal care-79 apts., nursing rooms-90 Special services: Springhurst Pines has 3 distinctive senior communities, one great campus: Cornell Trace for independent living, Parr’s at Springhurst for personal care needs and Springhurst Health and Rehab for skilled nursing and rehabilitation. Owners: Baptist Homes, Inc.

Treyton Oak Towers

Wesley Manor Retirement Community

Levels of care: skilled, retirement, personal care Capacity: retirement-165, skilled-60, personal care-40 Special services: Celebrating over 25 yrs of gracious retirement living. An elegant yet affordable continuum of care community in Old Louisville. Spacious apartments, beautiful dining room, valet parking, spa services, onsite therapy, dentist, bank, and more. Access to the arts and medical community. Owners: Third & Oak Corporation

Levels of care: retirement (patio homes), assisted living, personal care, nursing facility, Alzheimer’s care Capacity: retirement-60, assisted living-44, Alzheimer’s/personal care units-39, nursing-68 Special services: We are committed to providing nurturing, enriching care in all areas of our community: Patio homes for retirees, Assisted living Memory support - all stages Intermediate and skilled nursing. Owners: Methodist Retirement Homes of Kentucky

211 W Oak St, Louisville, KY 40203 (502) 589-3211 • www.treytonoaktowers.com

Sunrise of Louisville 6700 Overlook Dr, Louisville, KY 40241 (502) 425-0820

Caring for

5012 E Manslick Rd, Louisville, KY 40219 (502) 964-3959 • www.WesMan.org

Twinbrook Nursing Home and Rehabilitation Center 3526 Dutchmans Lane, Louisville, KY 40205 (502) 452-6331

}

AGING LOVED ONES By Linda Hitt Kempf, RN LNHA

Q A

Westminster Village 2200 Greentree Blvd N, Clarksville, IN 47129 (812) 282-9691

Planning Successful Aging

I am a male, age 70. What health care decisions and actions do I need to take to be certain I stay healthy and have my end-of-life affairs in order? — Bob

Preparation breeds confidence. That said, be proactive. Get your affairs in order this month, specifically organizing these documents: Living Will — This documents your wishes regarding medical care, life support, and end-oflife care interventions. Health Care Surrogate (HCS) — This appoints a person of your choice to make health care decisions for you when you are unable to do so yourself. Durable Power of Attorney (DPOA) — This appoints a person of your choice to make financial and health care decisions for you when you no longer can. The appointment is more permanent than Power of Attorney (POA), which allows someone to make only financial or legal decisions for you when needed. Last Will & Testament — This details your final wishes regarding estate settlement, asset distribution, funeral wishes, burial, and more. Disposition of Property — This lists who is to inherit your belongings after your death. continued on page 66

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Alzheimer’s Care Directory Alzheimer’s care is provided at different levels, from assisted living to the skilled care of nursing/rehab. Some facilities accept Alzheimer’s patients into their general care, and others have separate units designed to meet the specific needs of patients with this disease.

The Altenheim

Arden Courts

Number of beds: 63 Separate unit: no Cost per day: private $252, semiprivate $187 Level of care: Nursing/ rehab, personal care Special services: At the Altenheim, we offer a secure Alzheimer’s unit. The Altenheim’s one to six average staff to resident ratio provides our residents with the highest quality of care by our skilled team of experts. Owners: The Altenheim Payment Accepted: private, LTCi

Number of beds: 64 Separate unit: yes Cost per day: $163 Level of care: Personal care Special services: Arden Courts is a personal care residence that is 100% dedicated to caring for those in the early to middle stages of Alzheimer’s disease & related dementias. We focus on preferences, abilities & independence. Call today to schedule your personalized tour. Owners: HCR Manor Care Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

936 Barret Ave, Louisville, KY 40204 (502) 584-7417 • www.thealtenheim.org

10451 Linn Station Rd, Louisville, KY 40223 (502) 423-8776 • www.arden-courts.com

Atria (Springdale)

Atria (Stony Brook)

Number of beds: 20 Separate unit: yes Cost per day: $150-$200 Level of care: Memory care Special services: A warm community in Springdale with a beautiful courtyard, secure memory care neighborhood, three restaurant-style meals daily, transportation, 200 monthly events, a beauty salon and 24-hour staff – call for a visit. Owners: Atria Senior Living Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

Number of beds: 20 Separate unit: yes Cost per day: $250 Level of care: Assisted living Special services: Just seconds away from the Rave Motion Pictures Stonybrook theatre, offering restaurant-style dining, a full calendar of events, friendly 24-hour staff and a secure memory care neighborhood — call for a personalized visit. Owners: Atria Senior Living Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

4501 Springdale Rd, Louisville, KY 40223 (502) 412-0222 • www.atriaspringdale.com

3451 South Hurstbourne Parkway, Louisville, KY 40299 (502) 499-1393 • www.atriastonybrook.com

Belmont Village Senior Living Communities

Barton House

6830 Overlook Dr, Louisville, KY 40241 (502) 423-7177 • www.bartonlouisville.com

4600 Bowling Blvd, St. Matthews, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 721-7500 • www.belmontvillage.com

Christopher East Health Care Center

Elmcroft at Oaklawn

Number of beds: 20 Separate unit: yes (freestanding) Cost per day: $150 (avg.) Level of care: Personal care Special services: Barton House, a secure home-like residence, is designed exclusively for seniors with Alzheimer’s disease and other related memory impairments. We provide a specialized program that enhances quality of life. Owners: Goodworks Payment Accepted: private, LTCi

4200 Browns Lane, Louisville, KY 40220 (502) 459-8900 • www.hcr-manorcare.com/HCRManorCare/

ChristopherEast Number of beds: 28 Separate unit: yes Cost per day: $241 Level of care: Personal care, nursing/rehab Special services: The Arcadia Unit at Christopher East combines individualized attention from specially trained professionals, personalized care plans, structured programming, and comfortable amenities in a caring and safe environment. Owners: HCR ManorCare Payment Accepted: Medicare, private, Medicaid, health ins., LTCi, VA

Number of beds: 24 Separate unit: yes Cost per day: $157-$161 Level of care: Personal care Special services: “Like home” private apts. w/ full baths; researchbased program promotes brain function; care, services & activities by specially trained staff; nurses 24 hours/day, health services & med admin; chef-prepared meals. Owners: Belmont Village, L.P. Payment Accepted: private, LTCi

100 Shelby Station Dr, Louisville, KY 40245 (502) 632-5500 • www.elmcroft.com

Number of beds: 24 Separate unit: yes Cost per day: $138-$209 Level of care: Personal care Special services: Open Now, Elmcroft at Oaklawn offers 56 Personal Care apartments and 22 specialized Memory Care apartments, designed to provide elegance and promote safety for the residents. Contact (502) 632-5500. Owners: Elmcroft Senior Living Payment Accepted: private, private ins.

Atria Elizabethtown Senior Assisted Living 133 Heartland Dr, Elizabethtown, KY 42701 (270) 360-8001 • Cost per day: short term-$150; long term-$4,500/mo.

Auguste’s Cottage and Memory Care Center 2715 Charlestown Pike, Jeffersonville, IN 47130 (812) 280-0965 • Cost per day: $114 or $92

Autumn Woods Health Campus 2911 Green Valley Rd, New Albany, IN 47150 (812) 941-9893 • Cost per day: $226-$259

Bashford East Health Care 3535 Bardstown Rd, Louisville, KY 40218 (502) 459-1400 • Cost per day: $142

Brownsboro Hills Nursing Center 2141 Sycamore Ave, Louisville, KY 40206 (502) 895-5417 • Cost per day: $214-$248

Christian Care Communities-Christian Health Center 920 S 4th St, Louisville, KY 40203 (502) 583-6533 • Cost per day: $218 or $234

Elmcroft of Mount Washington 520 Woodlake Dr, Mt. Washington, KY 40047 (502) 538-3172 • Cost per day: $120

Essex Nursing and Rehabilitation Center 9600 Lamborne Blvd, Louisville, KY 40272 (502) 935-7284 • Cost per day: $187

Garden Terrace at Green Valley Care Center 3118 Green Valley Rd, New Albany, IN 47150 (812) 945-2341 • Cost per day: $260 or $216

Hillcrest Centre for Health and Rehabilitation 203 Sparks Ave, Jeffersonville, IN 41130 (812) 283-7918 • Cost per day: $200

Ideal Care, Inc. 1702 Gardiner Lane, Louisville, KY 40205 (502) 456-0811 • Cost per day: day care-$75; residential-$130-$180

Indian Creek Health and Rehabilitation Center 240 Beechmont Dr, Corydon, IN 47112 (812) 738-8127 • Cost per day: $155

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Episcopal Church Home Memory Care Center

Elmcroft of Valley Farms

10201 Valley Farms Blvd, Louisville, KY 40272 (502) 937-3028 • www.elmcroft.com

Number of beds: 16 Separate unit: yes Cost per day: $130-$180 Level of care: Assisted living Special services: Opened September 2012, Elmcroft of Valley Farms offers 49 Assisted Living apartments and 16 specialized memory care units all on one level. Includes fine dining, theatre and exercise room, planned outings and much more. Contact (502) 937-3028. Owners: Elmcroft Senior Living Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

7504 Westport Rd, Louisville, KY 40222 (502) 736-7800 • www.echky.org

Number of beds: 52 Separate unit: yes Cost per day: $216 Level of care: Personal care Special services: A faith-filled senior neighborhood. Award-winning small neighborhood living design, very caring professional staff, gourmet dining, on-site religious services, secure green spaces, daily activities, beauty shop, and rehab services. Open to persons of all faith traditions. Free tours.

Owners: Episcopal Church Home Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, Medicare, Medicaid

Heartsong Memory Care

Golden LivingCenter - Camelot

1101 Lyndon Lane, Louisville, KY 40222 (502) 425-0331 • www.goldenlivingcenters.com

9260 Stonestreet Rd, Louisville, KY 40272 (502) 935-3300 • www.heartsong-mc.com

Number of beds: 36 Separate unit: yes Cost: $6789 per month Level of care: Nursing/rehab Special services: Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Speech Therapy Owners: Golden Living Center - Camelot, LLC Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, LTCi, Hospice, private ins.

Number of beds: 36 Separate unit: yes Cost: $3915-$4430/month Level of care: Personal care Special services: Private studios w/ private showers; companion apts avail; secure courtyards; transp; meals & snacks; therapies (PT/OT/ ST) & physician visits on site; Best Friends™ Environment; med mgmt & admin; health services coordinated by licensed nurses. Owners: Heartsong Memory Care, LLC Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA Aid & Attendance

Horizon Bay Retirement Living

Lincoln Hills Health Center

Number of beds: 32 Separate unit: yes Cost per day: $175-$185 Level of care: Personal care Special services: Home-like setting encouraging “Daily Moments of Success.” Pvt apts. with full baths, 24-hour nursing care, medication administration, chef-prepared meals. Dedicated Clare Bridge Program Coordinator. Owners: Brookdale Senior Living Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

Number of beds: 25 Separate unit: yes Cost per day: semiprivate $162, private $192 Level of care: Nursing/rehab Special services: Secured unit with specialty trained staff, fenced courtyard area with covered sitting area. Raised planting areas and activities suited to this unit. Owners: Oasis Healthcare Management Payment Accepted: private, Medicaid, Medicare, LTCi

901 Blankenbaker Parkway Louisville, KY 40243 (502) 244-4244 • www.horizonbay.com

A service of Floyd Memorial Hospital & Health Services 326 Country Club Dr, New Albany, IN 47150 (812) 948-1311 • www.lincolnhillshealthcare.com

Magnolia Springs East Senior Living

Magnolia Springs Senior Living

Number of beds: 20 Separate unit: yes Cost: $4795-$5195 monthly rates Level of care: Memory care Special services: Home-like setting w/ all private apts. Safety, security & comfort for your loved one with dementia. Assistance with transition from home to Magnolia Springs East can be arranged. Our specialized program enhances the lives of our residents and families. Please see our ad on page 59. Owners: Grandview Care Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

Number of beds: 20 Separate unit: yes Cost: $4995-$5195 per month only Level of care: Memory care Special services: Home-like setting w/ all private apts. Safety, security & comfort for your loved ones with dementia. Assistance with transition from home to Magnolia Springs can be arranged. Our specialized program enhances the lives of our residents and families. Please see our ad on page 59. Owners: Grandview Care Payment Accepted: LTCi, VA

13600 LaGrange Rd, Louisville, KY 40245 (502) 716-5160 • www.magnolia-springs.net

8225 Whipps Mill Rd, Louisville, KY 40222 (502) 716-5160 • www.magnolia-springs.net

Kindred Transitional Care & Rehabilitation-Rolling Hills 3625 St. Joseph Rd, New Albany, IN 47150 (812) 948-0670 • Cost per day: $212

Lincoln Hills Health Center 326 Country Club Dr, New Albany, IN 47150 (812) 948-1311 • Cost per day: semi priv.-$157; priv.-$182

Meadowview Health and Rehabilitation 9701 Whipps Mill Rd, Louisville, KY 40223 (502) 426-2778 • Cost per day: $189-$204

Mercy Providence 4915 Charlestown Rd, New Albany, IN 47150 (812) 945-5221 • Cost per day: $196

Oaklawn Health and Rehabilitation 13914 Shelbyville Rd, Louisville, KY 40245 (502) 254-0009 • Cost per day: $269

Regis Woods Care and Rehabilitation Center 4604 Lowe Rd, Louisville, KY 40220 (502) 451-1401 • Cost per day: $177-$230

Riverbend Independent & Assisted Living Community 2715 Charlestown Rd, Jeffersonville, IN 47130 (812) 280-0965 • Cost: $3500-$4500/month

Rivers Edge Nursing & Rehabilitation Center (formerly Britthaven of Prospect) 6301 Bass Rd, Louisville, KY 40059 (502) 228-8359 • Cost per day: priv. $208, semi priv. $202

Sellersburg Health and Rehabilitation Center 7823 Old State Rd 60, Sellersburg, IN 47172 (812) 246-4272 • Cost per day: $143-$155

Sunrise of Louisville 6700 Overlook Dr, Louisville, KY 40241 (502) 425-0820 • Cost per day: $120-$237

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Nazareth Home

Sally’s Garden - A Memory Care Neighborhood

Number of beds: 52 Separate unit: yes Cost per day: $208 Level of care: Personal care, Nursing/rehab Special services: A faith-filled senior neighborhood. Award-winning small neighborhood living design, very caring professional staff, gourmet dining, on-site religious services, secure green spaces, daily activities, beauty shop, and rehab services. Open to persons of all faith traditions. Free tours. Owners: Sisters of Charity of Nazareth Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, Medicare, Medicaid

Number of beds: 20 Separate unit: yes Cost per day: $190 Level of care: Personal care Special services: Residents find fulfilling lives in our memory care neighborhood with trained staff providing 24/7 support. Private rooms/baths combine with social activities/fitness programs for comfortable and secure environments. Owners: Masonic Homes of Kentucky, Inc. Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, Hospice, private ins.

2000 Newburg Rd, Louisville, KY 40205 (502) 459-9681 • www.nazhome.org

Sam Swope Care Center at Masonic Homes of Louisville 3701 Frankfort Ave, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 897-4907 • www.masonichomesky.com

Number of beds: 24 Separate unit: yes Cost per day: $320 and $360 Level of care: Nursing/rehab Special services: Advanced memory care household accommodates 24 residents, offering Snoezelen room, secured courtyard, residential kitchen, and Home Free monitoring. Owners: Masonic Homes of Kentucky, Inc. Payment Accepted: Medicare, private, LTCi, Hospice, private ins.

3701 Frankfort Ave, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 897-4907 • www.masonichomesky.com

Wesley Manor Retirement Community 5012 E Manslick Rd, Louisville, KY 40219 (502) 969-3277 • www.WesMan.org

Number of beds: 59 Separate unit: yes Cost per day: Personal Care-$151-$237, Nursing-Intermediate $225, Skilled $237 Level of care: Personal Care, Intermediate, Skilled Special services: Serving needs of Alzheimer’s residents from onset of illness to life’s end both personal care and nursing care – 39 personal care beds and 20 nursing care beds. Owners: Methodist Retirement Homes of Kentucky Payment Accepted: private, LTCi (Medicare, Medicaid for nursing rehab level)

Assisted Living Directory Assisted living offers minimal assistance in care, such as providing meals, helping with baths, and offering reminders to take medications. While some residents drive, scheduled transportation may be provided. Daily activities are organized, and there is around-the-clock supervision. No health care is provided, and these facilities are not licensed, but certification is required.

Atria (Springdale)

Atria (St. Matthews)

Number of units: 59 Cost per month: Starting at: Studio-$2775, Alcove-$2995, 1 BR-$3995, 2 BR-$4350 Transportation available: free scheduled transportation Special services: A warm community in Springdale with a beautiful courtyard, secure memory care neighborhood, three restaurantstyle meals daily, transportation, 200 monthly events, a beauty salon and 24-hour staff – call for a visit. Owners: Atria Senior Living Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

Number of units: 70 Cost per month: Starting at: Studio-$2725, 1 BR-$3800, 2 BR-$4350 Transportation available: free local transportation M-F Special services: Located in the heart of St. Matthews, with some of the largest assisted living apartments in the area, 24-hour staff, scheduled transportation, restaurant-style dining and more than 200 monthly events – call for a visit. Owners: Atria Senior Living Payment Accepted: private, LTCi

4501 Springdale Rd, Louisville, KY 40241 (502) 412-0222 • www.atriaspringdale.com

120 S Hubbards Lane, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 896-1759 • www.atriastmatthews.com

Atria (Stony Brook)

Beehive Homes of Lyndon

Number of units: 87 Cost per month: Starting at: Alcove-$2995, 1 BR-$3900, 2 BR-$4450 Transportation available: free local transportation available M-F w/24 hrs. adv. notice Special services: Just seconds away from the Rave Motion Pictures Stonybrook theatre, offering restaurant-style dining, a full calendar of events, friendly 24-hour staff and a secure memory care neighborhood – call for a visit. Owners: Atria Senior Living Payment Accepted: private

Number of units: 14 Cost per month: $3450 (all inclusive) Transportation available: free scheduled transportation Special services: Friendly home-like atmosphere. Home cooked meals, housekeeping/laundry/linen service, variety of activities, free cable TV. Caring and friendly staff. Call today for a tour. Owners: Michael & Michele Allen Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

3451 South Hurstbourne Parkway, Louisville, KY 40299 (502) 499-1393 • www.atriastonybrook.com

8401 LaGrange Rd, Louisville, KY 40222 (502) 541-4719 • www.bhivehomes.com

Amber Oaks Assisted Living 156 Haven Hill Rd, Shelbyville, KY 40065 (502) 647-4546 • Cost per month: Studio $1950-$2200, 1BR $2475, 2BR $2900

Atria Elizabethtown Senior Living 133 Heartland Dr, Elizabethtown, KY 42701 (270) 360-8001 • Cost per month: Alcove $2900, 1BR $3150, 2BR $3950

Beehive Homes of Smyrna Parkway 8800 Smyrna Parkway, Louisville, KY 40228 (502) 966-9771 • Cost per month: 1BR $3300-$3500

Bennett House Assisted Living Residence 3928 Horne Ave, New Albany, IN 47150 (812) 948-1960 • Cost per month: Studio $2400, 1BR $3000 (prices may vary)

Azalea Hills Assisted Living 3700 Lafayette Parkway, Floyds Knobs, IN 47119 (812) 923-4888 • Cost per month: 1BR $3250-3500, 2BR $3750-4000, Studio $2500-2750, Patio Home $1750

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Christian Care Communities

Christian Care Communities

Number of units: 63 Cost per month: Studio $581, 1BR $727-$751 (lower rates avail. based on income) Transportation available: free for campus, planned outings 2-3 times per wk. Special services: Beautifully landscaped gardens with walking paths. On-site hair salon, grocery, restaurant-style dining, scheduled transportation, social events, pastoral care services, assisted living services such as medication reminders, bathing assistance and much more! Owners: Christian Care Communities Payment Accepted: private, Sec 8 & HUD 236 subsidies avail.

Number of units: 40 Cost per month: Studio $789, 1BR $907 (lower rates avail. based on income) Transportation available: $30 monthly fee for campus/planned outings 2-3 times per wk. Special services: Beautifully landscaped gardens with walking paths. On-site hair salon, grocery, restaurant-style dining, scheduled transportation, social events, pastoral care services, assisted living services such as medication reminders, bathing assistance and much more! Owners: Christian Care Communities Payment Accepted: private, HUD section 8 subsidies avail.

Chapel House: 945 S 5th St, Louisville, KY 40203 (502) 585-5656 • www.ChristianCareCommunities.org

Friendship House: 960 S 4th St, Louisville, KY 40203 (502) 585-5656 • www.ChristianCareCommunities.org

Elmcroft at Oaklawn

Elmcroft of Valley Farms

Number of units: 24 Cost per month: Studio starting at $3810, 1BR $4410, 2BR $5130 Transportation available: Free physician and planned community outings on scheduled days Special services: Open Now, Elmcroft at Oaklawn offers 56 Personal Care apartments and 22 specialized Memory Care apartments, designed to provide elegance and promote safety for the residents. Contact (502) 632-5500. Owners: Elmcroft Senior Living Payment Accepted: private, private ins., VA

Number of units: 49 Cost per month: Alcove starting at $3000, 1BR $3600 Transportation available: Free physician and planned community outings on scheduled days. Special services: Opened September 2012, gracious living all on one level. Includes fine dining, theatre and exercise room, planned outings and much more. Coming soon, 16 specialized memory care apartments. Contact (502) 937-3028. Owners: Elmcroft Senior Living Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

100 Shelby Station Dr, Louisville, KY 40245 (502) 632-5500 • www.elmcroft.com

Magnolia Springs East Senior Living 13600 LaGrange Rd, Louisville, KY 40245 (502) 716-5160 • www.magnolia-springs.net

Number of units: 75 Cost per month: Studio $2995-$3795, 1BR $3895$4795, 2BR $5695-$5795 Transportation available: Yes, medical appts., shopping and community outings Special services: 11-acre campus w/ walking trail and gazebo. This new location opens October 2012. Luxury senior living w/ country charm and affordable prices. Built by nonprofit organization, with commitment to local community. Please see our ad on page 59.

Owners: Grandview Care Payment Accepted: private, private ins., VA, LTCi, AL ins.

The Pillars Assisted Living Community 711 Frankfort Rd, Shelbyville, KY 40065 (502) 633-3486 • www.masonichomesky.com

Number of units: 21 Cost per month: Studio $2174, 1BR $2282-$2500, 2BR $2717-$3043 Transportation available: $30/hour, $5/in-town, $1/mile Special services: Spacious new apartments with 24-hour staff attendants, emergency assistance and security call system. Meals, activities, salon and housekeeping. Laundry located on each floor. Spiritual support from staff chaplain. Owners: Masonic Homes of KY, Inc. Payment Accepted: private

10201 Valley Farms Blvd, Louisville, KY 40272 (502) 937-3028 • www.elmcroft.com

Magnolia Springs Senior Living

8225 Whipps Mill Rd, Louisville, KY 40222 (502) 716-5160 • www.magnolia-springs.net

Number of units: 71 Cost per month: Studio $2895-$3695, 1BR $4295$4695, 2BR $5595 Transportation available: $25-$50 for unscheduled transportation Special services: A new level of excellence, quality and distinction in luxury senior living. Magnolia Springs is built by a nonprofit organization, with the goal “To give back to the community.” Please see our ad on page 59. Owners: Grandview Care Payment Accepted: private, private ins., VA, LTCi, AL ins.

Presbyterian Homes of Louisville –

Westminster Terrace & Rose Anna Hughes Home 2116 Buechel Bank Rd, Louisville, KY 40218 (502) 499-9383 • www.PHSK.org

Number of units: 96 Cost per month: Studio $1850, up to 2BR Suites $4300 Transportation available: Community Group van trips, free; Free physician apts. on scheduled days, community outings. Special services: Independence you desire, the services you need. Three daily meals served restaurant-style, activities, transportation, housekeeping, utilities & more. Assistance available 24/7. On-site exercise center. Since 1947, one of Louisville’s originals. Owners: Presbyterian Homes & Services of KY Payment Accepted: private, LTCi

Crescent Place 148 Allen Dr, Shelbyville, KY 40065 (502) 633-6622 • Cost per month: Studio $2150, Alcove $2300, 1BR $2475, 2BR $2750

Elmcroft of Mount Washington 520 Woodlake Dr, Mt. Washington, KY 40047 (502) 538-3172 • Cost per month: Studio $2195, Alcove $2595, 1BR $2995, 2BR $3495

Elmcroft of Valley Farms 10201 Valley Farms Blvd, Valley Station, KY 40272 (502) 937-3028 • Cost per month: Efficiency $3000, 1BR $3600, 2BR $3900

Emeritus at Stonecreek Lodge 9251 Stonestreet Rd, Louisville, KY 40272 (502) 935-5884 • Cost per month: Studio $2835, Alcove $3060, 1BR $3400 (all inclusive)

Franciscan Health Care Center 3625 Fern Valley Rd, Louisville, KY 40219 (502) 964-3381 • Cost per month: Studio $3360, 1BR $3930, 2BR $4410

Hampton Oaks 966 N Wilson Rd, Scottsburg, IN 47170 (812) 752-2694 • Cost per month: $2880-$3900

Hometown Manor Assisted Living 74 Mack Walters Rd, Shelbyville, KY 40065 (502) 437-0814 • Cost per month: $1950-$2600

Ideal Care Inc. 1702 Gardiner Lane, Louisville, KY 40205 (502) 456-0811 • Cost per month: 1BR $3900-$5400

Lifestyle Adult Care Home 1610 Blackiston View Dr, Clarksville, IN 47129 (812) 258-0818 • Cost per month: $2250-$3750

Lifting Lives 2204 W Chestnut, Louisville, KY 40211 (502) 235-6733 • Cost per month: $2600

Mercy Providence 4915 Charlestown Rd, New Albany, IN 47150 (812) 945-5221 • Cost per month: Efficiency $3627

Oaks Assisted Living 1010 Richwood Way, LaGrange, KY 40031 (502) 222-3552 • Cost per month: 1BR $2153, 2BR $2482

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Wesley Manor Retirement Community 5012 E Manslick Rd, Louisville, KY 40219 (502) 969-3277 • www.WesMan.org

Number of units: 44 Cost per month: $2228-$6243 Transportation available: Free transportation to doctor/medical appts., planned shopping and errands trip once a week Special services: Private, spacious apartments, three specialized levels of service, activities, transportation, complete dining, linen, houskeeping. Six floor plans. We offer a full continuum of care community. Fee based on care level and style of accomodations.

Owners: Methodist Retirement Homes of KY Payment Accepted: private, some LTCi

Larger color Enhanced listings are paid for by the facility. If you are interested in an Enhanced listing, call 502-327-8855. Spring issue deadline: February 10, 2012

Riverbend Independent & Assisted Living Community 2715 Charlestown Pike, Jeffersonville, IN 47130 (812) 280-0965 • Cost per month: $2650-$3690

Robert E. Lee – A Full Continuum of Care 201 E Elm St, New Albany, IN 47150 (812) 945-9517 • Cost per month: $1500-$2400

Twin Oaks Assisted Living 98 Adams St, New Castle, KY 40050 (502) 845-4136 • Cost per month: Studio $2260; 1BR $2580, $2800, $2860, $3150

Twinbrook Hotel Apartments 3525 Ephraim McDowell Dr, Louisville, KY 40205 (502) 452-6331 • Cost per month: Efficiency $1800, 1BR $2200

Villas of Guerin Woods 8037 Unruh Dr, Georgetown, IN 47122 (812) 951-1878 • Cost per month: $2790-$3270

Village East Inc. 11530 Herrick Lane, Louisville, KY 40243 (502) 643-8248 • Cost per month: Studio $3240

Westminster Village 2200 Greentree Blvd N, Clarksville, IN 47129 (812) 282-9691 • Cost per month: Studio $2021, 1BR $2581, 2BR $2869

Windsor Ridge Assisted Living 2700 Waters Edge Parkway, Jeffersonville, IN 47130 (812) 284-4336 • Cost per month: Studio $2850, 1BR $3250

Home Health Directory Home Health Care refers to care provided in a person’s home. Medical Home Health Care is a licensed level of care that provides nursing care and personal care. (These agencies also provide non-medical care.) Non-medical Home Health Care agencies in Kentucky must be certified. Agencies in Indiana must be licensed. They can assist with the self-administration of medications or treatments, provide limited personal care, serve as companions who prepare light meals and tidy homes, and may offer transportation or errand services.

Almost Family In-Home Care Program

Always Best Care Senior Services

Type: non-medical Services: personal care, homemaking, errands, community-based waiver services Cost per hour: $16-$18 Employees’ status: bonded, liability ins., background check, direct hires, withhold taxes, worker’s comp., drug testing Min. time required: 4 hours Special services: Personal care services, homemaking, meal prep, companion/sitter services, med mgmt, in-depth RN assessment, caregiver respite, home supervisory visits and social workers. Provider for the home & community-based waiver program. See our ad on page 61. Owners: Almost Family, Inc. Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

Type: non-medical Services: personal care, homemaking, transportation, errands, FREE senior navigation service Cost per hour: starting at $16 Employees’ status: bonded, liability ins., drugtested, Red Cross trained, background check, direct hires, withhold taxes Min. time required: 1-3 hours at a higher rate Special services: FREE senior living navigation, Rx discounts. Certified geriatric nurse case manager assessment. From 1 hr. to 24/7, from companionship & homemaking to transfers, bathing, dressing, turning, incontinence care & more.

4545 Bishop Lane, Ste 201, Louisville, KY 40218 (502) 893-1661 • www.almostfamily.com

Louisville Downtown and East End: 710 Jarvis Woods Terrace, Louisville, KY 40206 (502) 272-4400 • www.abc-loudowneast.com

Owners: Robin Helfers Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

Amedisys Home Health Care

BrightStar Care

Type: medical Services: nursing, physical & occupational therapy, social services, behavioral health Cost per hour: nursing/therapy $120-$150/ visit, personal care $70/visit Employees’ status: bonded, liability ins., background check, direct hires, withhold taxes Min. time required: N/A Special services: Provider of Medicare approved services for skilled nursing, physical, occupational and speech therapy, medical social services and home health aide assistance. We help provide an independent living situation in a safe home environment. Owners: Amedisys Home Health Care Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, Medicare replacement plan, private, selected private ins.

Type: non-medical Services: personal care, homemaker, transportation, errands, Alz./dementia, respite, med reminders Cost per hour: $17.50$20 Employees’ status: bonded, liability ins., background check, direct hires, withhold taxes, drug testing Min. time required: 1 hour Special services: Joint Commission Accredited. Compassionate care, excellent service. Non-medical care by skilled and attentive professionals. All care is overseen by a Registered Nurse and is available 1-24 hours/day with Guaranteed Caregiver Compatibility. Owners: Christian & Leslie McCutcheon Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA, worker’s comp

9000 Wessex Place, Suite 100, Louisville, KY 40222 (502) 429-4550 • www.amedisys.com

Accurate Healthcare Professionals 2200 Buechel Ave, Ste 101, Louisville, KY 40218 (502) 671-0996 • Cost per hour: $14-$17

400 Blakenbaker Pkwy., Ste 301, Louisville, KY 40243 (502) 893-4700 • www.louisvillehomecare.org

Affiliated Nursing 1941 Bishop Lane, Suite 102 Louisville, KY 40218 (502) 634-0918 • Cost per day: $16

Allam Senior Care 811 S 2nd St, Louisville, KY 40203 (502) 553-1848 • Cost per day: $16.50-$19

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Capacity Care

Caretenders

Type: non-medical Services: personal care, respite, errands, med. reminders Cost per hour: $16-$18 Employees’ status: background check, drug testing, liability ins., worker’s comp., withhold taxes Min. time required: N/A Special services: Locally Owned Non-Medical Home Care for those living independently in home and persons with disabilities. Our companions must have continuing education. Thank you for considering us. Owners: Theresa Hinton, CEO Payment Accepted: private, LTCi

Type: medical Services: nursing care, therapy, personal care, homemaking Cost per hour: $56-$186/visit Employees’ status: bonded, liability ins., background check, direct hires, withhold taxes Min. time required: N/A Special services: Certified Medicare & Medicaid home health agencies. See below for additional Caretenders locations. Specialty care programs in geriatrics, orthopedics, cardiology, urology wound care, psychiatric nursing, wound care, & social workers. See our ad on page 61. Owners: Almost Family, Inc. Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private ins., private

4010 Dupont Circle, Suite 406, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 893-8414 • www.capacitycare.com

4545 Bishop Lane, Ste 200, Louisville, KY 40218 (502) 238-5150 • www.caretenders.com

Commonwealth Nursing Solutions

ElderServe Homecare

Type: non-medical Services: personal care, homemaking, errands, med. reminders, respite, Alzheimers & dementia care Cost per hour: starting at $15 Employees’ status: bonded, liability ins., background check, drug testing, direct hires, withhold taxes Min. time required: 1 hr. Special services: Assisting clients with independent and dignified living 24/7. Care Log keeping loved ones connected on a secure online network. Our Pharmacist provides medication reviews. Also provide SCL & MPW services. All care overseen by case mgr. See our ad on page 35. Owners: Greg Ciliberti, MD; Alex Moore, MD; Barbara Newton; Tom Samuels Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, Medicaid

Type: non-medical Services: personal care, homemaking, transportation, errands, respite, Alz. care Cost per hour: $17 Employees’ status: bonded, liability ins., background check, drug testing, direct hires, withhold taxes Min. time required: 3 hours Special services: Non-medical services for individuals who want to continue living in their home but need assistance with daily activity. Services include Personal Care, Home Mgmt, Respite, Concierge, Financial Helper & Guardian Medical Monitoring. Owners: Elderserve, Inc. Payment Accepted: private, KIPDA, VA, LTCi

2301 River Road, Suite 302, Louisville, KY 40206 (502) 814-3111 • www.cnursingsolutions.com

411 E. Muhammad Ali Blvd, Louisville, KY 40202 (502) 583-8012 • www.elderservehomecare.org

FirstLight HomeCare

Floyd Memorial Home HealthCare

Type: non-medical Services: personal care, Alzheimer’s care, homemaking, transportation, errands Cost per hour: $13.50-$18.50 Employees’ status: bonded, liability insurance, background check, direct hires, withhold taxes Min. time required: 2 hours Special services: Personalized, engaging care for Alzheimer’s/Dementia, Parkinson’s, and Multiple Sclerosis Caregivers receive extensive training. Compassionate plan of care with each client’s individual needs. Call for a free consultation. Owners: Walter W. Newell Payment Accepted: private pay, LTCi

Type: medical Services: personal care, Alz/dementia care, nursing care, physical, occupational and speech therapy Cost per hour: $80-$275/ visit Employees’ status: bonded, liability ins., background check, direct hires, withhold taxes Min. time required: 1 hour Special services: Award winning services available in 6 Indiana counties. All aspects of skilled nursing services by caring registered nurses and certified aides brought to your home. Ask your doctor for Floyd Memorial Home Health. Owners: Floyd Memorial Hospital and Health Services Payment Accepted: private, Medicaid, Medicare, health ins., LTCi

1017 Dupont Rd, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 632-0448 • www.firstlighthomecare.com

Helping Hands Companion Care Services

Gentiva Health Services

710 Executive Park, Louisville KY 40207 (502) 895-4213 • www.gentiva.com

1915 Bono Rd, New Albany, IN 47150 (812) 948-7447 • www.floydmemorial.com/home-health

2301 Hurstbourne Village Dr. #100, Louisville, KY 40299 (502) 426-9783 • www.home-companions.com

Type: medical Services: nursing care, physical, occupational, and speech therapy Cost per hour: $70-$185/visit Employees’ status: bonded, liability ins., background check Min. time required: N/A Special services: Certified Medicare Home Health Agency specializing in geriatric care. Our services include specialty programs for Orthopedics, Safe Strides (fall prevention), and Cardiopulmonary. Great healthcare has come home. Owners: Gentiva Health Services Payment Accepted: Medicare, private ins.

Type: non-medical Services: personal care, homemaking, transportation, errands, respite, med. reminders Cost per hour: $14.50-$17.75 Employees’ status: bonded, liability ins., background check, direct hires, withhold taxes, drug testing Min. time required: 2 hours Special services: *Personalized loving care available in home, assisted living, nursing home or hospital *Scheduling up to 24 hours 7 days a week *Experienced caregivers, CNAs, LPNs & RNs *Free assessments Owners: Terry Graham, RN; Dawn Smithwick, BSW Payment Accepted: private, LTCi

Amedisys Home Health Care 13101 Magisterial Dr, Ste. 101 Louisville, KY 40223 (502) 244-5441 • Cost per day: nursing/therapy $120-$150/visit, personal care $70/visit

Amedisys Home Health Care 833 Valley College Dr, Suite 5 Louisville, KY 40272 (502) 933-1311 • Cost per day: nursing/therapy $120-$150/visit, personal care $70/visit

Amedisys Home Health Care 1609 N Dixie Highway, Ste. 114, Louisville, KY 40271 (800) 647-0775 • Cost per day: nursing/therapy $120-$150/visit, personal care $70/visit

Amedisys Home Health Care 77 Mack Walter’s Rd, Shelbyville, KY 40065 (502) 633-3007 • Cost per day: nursing/therapy $120-$150/visit, personal care $70/visit

Amedisys Home Health Care 1707 Cedar Grove Rd Ste. 8, Shepherdsville, KY 40165 (502) 543-2371 • Cost per hour: nursing/therapy $120-$150/visit, personal care $70/visit

Amedisys Home Health Care 2866 Charlestown Rd Ste. 105, New Albany, IN 47150 (812) 944-8404 • Cost per hour: nursing/therapy $120-$150/visit, personal care $70/visit

Amedisys Home Health Care 303 Quartermaster Ct, Jeffersonville, IN 47130 (812) 284-3030 • Cost per hour: nursing/therapy $120-$150/visit, personal care $70/visit

Assurance Home & Convalescent Care 3004 Taylorsville Rd, Louisville, KY 40205 (502) 479-1906 • Cost per hour: $16-$18 or $28/bath visit

Baptist Hospital East Home Health Agency 6420 Dutchmans Pkwy Ste. 360, Louisville, KY 40205 (502) 454-5656 • Cost per hour: rehab $180/visit, nursing $180/visit

Best Choice Home Health 2871 Charlestown Rd, New Albany, IN 47150 (502) 727-0085 • Cost per hour: nursing $150/ visit, PT eval $200, PT visit $250

Care Network-Eva Spaid 161 Chenoweth Lane, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 719-6600 • Cost per hour: $17 (M-Sun.)

Caretenders - Elizabethtown 1105 Juliana Ct, Suite 3, Elizabethtown, KY 42701 (270) 234-2273 • Cost per hour: $56-$186/visit

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Home Instead Senior Care

Hosparus

Type: non-medical Services: personal care, homemaking, transportation, errands, respite, Alzheimer’s care Cost per hour: $15-$17.50 Employees’ status: bonded, liability ins., background check, direct hires, withhold taxes, drug testing Min. time required: Flexible Special services: Employee-owned & State Certified, Home Instead invests in its CAREGivers to focus on delivering great care. Thorough screening. Top-notch training. CAREGiver matching. In business since 1999. See why so many people choose Home Instead. To us, it’s personal. Owners: Employee-owned, Becky Beanblossom, President Payment Accepted: private, LTCi

Type: medical Services: nursing & physician services, pain mgt, social workers, spiritual care, CNA’s, Bereavement & Volunteer Programs Cost per hour: per day Employees’ status: bonded, liability ins., background check, direct hires, withhold taxes Min. time required: N/A Special services: Offering quality end-of-life care and bereavement services. Hosparus offers care, comfort and counseling for those who need it most regardless of their ability to pay. Owners: Hosparus Inc. Payment Accepted: per days fees under Medicaid, Medicare, other ins., private pay (income adj.)

4610 Taylorsville Rd, Louisville, KY 40220 (502) 515-9515 • www.seniorcarelouisville.net

3532 Ephraim McDowell Dr, Louisville, KY 40205 (502) 456-6200 • www.hosparus.org

Lifeline Homecare Solutions

North Central District Home Health Agency

Type: non-medical Services: Special programs for Alzheimer’s/dementia: Best Friends program, palliative care, Parkinson’s, Transitioning to Home, companionship, personal hygiene, dining assistance, meal preparation, transportation, errands, medication reminders Cost per hour: $15-$20 Employees’ status: direct hires, liability insured, bonded, background check, taxes withheld Min. time required: 1 hr Special services: Caregivers receive ongoing training & matched to client needs. Overseen by Certified Geriatric Care Manager. Services provided in private residence, nursing home, assisted living, hospital, rehab center Owners: Lifeline Homecare, Inc. Payment Accepted: Private, LTCi, VA

Type: medical Services: nursing care, therapy, personal care, homemaking Cost per hour: $53-$130/visit Employees’ status: bonded, liability insurance, background check, withhold taxes Min. time required: N/A Special services: Non-profit health department home health agency in operation since 1976. Certified agency providing in-home care to qualified recipients. Participating in EPSDT, HCBW and Michelle P. Waiver program. Serving Henry, Oldham, Shelby, & Trimble counties. Owners: North Central District Health Department Payment Accepted: Medicaid, Medicare, private, private ins., LTCi

125 Fairfax Ave #2, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 895-7481, toll free (855) 860-3255 • www.LLHCS.com

30 Main St, Shelbyville, KY 40065 (502) 845-2761 • www.ncdhd.com

Premier Caring Hands

Right at Home

Type: non-medical Services: personal care, homemaking, transportation, errands Cost per hour: $15-$22 Employees’ status: bonded, liability ins., background check, direct hires, withhold taxes Min. time required: 3 hours Special services: Hygiene, Ambulation, Transportation, Cooking, Cleaning, Shopping, Respite/Attendant Care. Accepts LTC insurance and Medicaid. Medical Equipment and Home Modification available. Dedicated Caregiver matched to client needs. Free Assessment. Owners: CareAssist, LLC Payment Accepted: Medicaid, private, private ins., LTCi

Type: non-medical Services: personal care, homemaking, errands, respite, Alz. care Cost per hour: $14.50-$18.50 Employees’ status: bonded, liability ins., background check, direct hires, withhold taxes, worker’s comp. Min. time required: 3 hours Special services: Private, LTCi, worker’s compensation. Let us help your loved one with homemaking/companionship/respite/sitter/personal and Alzheimer’s care services. Owners: Jean Locy Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, worker’s comp

9750 Ormsby Station Rd, #105, Louisville, KY 40223 (502) 384-1840 • www.premiercaringhands.com

221 Executive Park, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 897-0580 • www.louisville.rightathome.net

Caretenders of Jeffersonville 63 Quartermaster Ct, Jeffersonville, IN 47130 (812) 206-2006 • Cost per hour: $56-$186/visit

Caretenders - Louisville Southwest 9702 Stonestreet Rd Bldg.1 Ste.330, Louisville, KY 40272 (502) 933-2785 • Cost per hour: $56-$186/visit

Caretenders of Kentuckiana 1724 State St, New Albany, IN 47150 (812) 941-8125 • Cost per hour: $56-$186/visit

Caretenders - Shelbyville 197 Alpine Dr, Shelbyville, KY 40065 (502) 647-0450 • Cost per hour: $56-$186/visit

Caretenders - Shepherdsville 1553 Hwy. 44 E, Suite 1 Shepherdsville, KY 40165 (502) 543-2433 • Cost per hour: $56-$186/visit

Caring For You, Inc. 4010 Dupont Circle, Suite 223, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 893-2790 • Cost per hour: $15

Comfort Keepers 4113 Oechsli Ave, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 721-0101 • Cost per hour: $15-$18

Comfort Keepers 1417 State St, New Albany, IN 47150 (812) 944-5006 • Cost per hour: $14-$17

ElderCare 4 Families 13806 Lake Point Circle, Suite 201, Louisville, KY 40223 (502) 244-8446 • Cost per hour: $12-$18

ElderCare 4 Families Indiana 2315 Green Valley Rd #200, New Albany, IN 47150 502-244-8446 • Cost per hour: $12-$18

Granny Nannies of Kentucky 3703 Taylorsville Rd, Suite 122, Louisville, Ky 40220 (502) 454-9134 • Cost per hour: $13-$16.50

Hearts to Homes-A Service of VNA Nazareth Home Care 4912 U.S. Hwy 42, Suite 106, Louisville, KY 40222 (502) 412-7732 • Cost per hour: $16-$18

HomeCAREConnections 4010 Dupont Circle, Suite 581, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 721-1090 • Cost per hour: $13-$18

Home Instead Senior Care 1401 State St, New Albany, IN 47150 (812) 948-9770 • Cost per hour: $10-$16

Home Instead Senior Care 1512 Crums Lane, Suite 103, Louisville, KY 40216 (502) 448-1511 • Cost per hour: $12.50-$16.50

Home Instead Senior Care 2225 Lawerenceburg Rd, Bldg. A Ste. 4, Frankfort, KY 40601 (502) 352-7272 • Cost per hour: $15-$17.50

MD2U 140 Whittington Pkwy, Suite 100, Louisville, KY 40222 (502) 327-9100 • Cost per hour: $170-$250/visit

ResCare 10140 Linn Station Rd, Louisville, KY 40223 (502) 423-4336 • Cost per hour: $18, non-medical

Right at Home 639 Eastern Blvd, Suite E, Clarksville, IN 47129 (812) 285-9100 • Cost per hour: $11-$17.25

SilverTree Home Care 2610 Dawson Ridge Rd, LaGrange, KY 40031 (502) 222-0018 • Cost per hour: $11-$17

Sonblest Elder Care Inc. 916 E 8th St, Jeffersonville, IN 47130 (812) 283-7015 • Cost per hour: $13-$16.50

VISTACARE hospice 391 Quartermaster Ct, Jeffersonville, IN 47130 (812) 284-2600 • Cost per hour: per day

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SeniorCare Experts

Senior Helpers of Louisville

145 Thierman Lane, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 896-2316 • www.srcareexperts.org

200 Breckenridge Lane, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 690-2648 • www.seniorhelpers.com

Type: non-medical Services: personal care, homemaking, errands, transportation Cost per hour: $17-$18 (bath only $30) Employees’ status: bonded, liability ins., multi-state background check, direct hires, withhold taxes, drug screening Min. time required: 3 hours Special services: Non-profit since 1974. Mission: help seniors remain independent in their homes. Free assessments. Lifeline Medical Alert, Home Delivered Meals, Transp., Home Caregivers, and Medication Dispensing Service. Financial assistance for some services. Owners: SeniorCare Experts, Inc. Payment Accepted: private, LTCi

Type: non-medical Services: personal care, homemaking, transportation, errands, respite, Alz. care, med reminders Cost per hour: $16-$20 Employees’ status: bonded, liability ins., background check, direct hires, withhold taxes Min. time required: Flexible Special services: Senior Helpers provides quality care by thoroughly screening and training all staff. Customer service is a priority with caregiver/ client match, continued communication and schedule flexibility. We can provide care and comfort at a moment’s notice! See our ad on page 67. Owners: Nancy Galloway Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, EFT, VA, Medicaid Waivers

SilverTree Home Care

Spaid Nursing Services

Type: non-medical Services: personal care, respite, Alz. care, homemaker, transportation, errands Cost per hour: $11-$17 Employees’ status: bonded, liability ins., drug testing, background check, direct hires, withhold taxes Min. time required: 1 hour at higher rate Special services: Affordable, customized home care. Services include med reminders, meal prep, transportation and more. Caregivers are carefully matched, thoroughly screened, tested, and trained. Free Assessments. Owners: Pam S. Jeseo Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

Type: medical & non-medical Services: nursing care, personal care, homemaker, transportation, errands, therapy Cost per hour: $16$19 Employees’ status: bonded, liability ins., background check, drug testing, direct hires, withhold taxes Min. time required: 4 hours Special services: Providing quality in-home care since 1975; 1 of only 4 licensed providers of in-home skilled nursing care as well as nonmedical needs of companionship, personal assistance, home help. Competitive rates. Owners: Tim & Terry Malone Payment Accepted: private, private ins., LTCi

1941 Bishop Lane, Suite 102, Louisville, KY 40218 (502) 637-5474 • www.spaidnursing.com

1900 Plantside Dr, Suite 200, Louisville, KY 40299 (502) 744-4420 • www.homecarelouisville.net

VNA Nazareth Home Care

539 S 4th St, Louisville, KY 40202 (502) 584-2456/(800) 346-4577 • www.vnanazareth.org

Type: medical & non-medical Services: skilled nursing, therapy, home infusion, private duty Cost per hour: $17.50 Employees’ status: bonded, liability ins., background check, direct hires, withhold taxes Min. time required: 3 hours Special services: Skilled Nursing, Physical, Occupational, and Speech Therapy, Home Infusion Services, Private Duty, and Chronic Disease Management Programs Owners: KentuckyOne Health Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, private ins., LTCi

Caring for

Larger color Enhanced listings are paid for by the facility. If you are interested in an Enhanced listing, call 502-327-8855. Spring issue deadline: February 10, 2012

}

AGING LOVED ONES By Linda Hitt Kempf, RN LNHA

Planning Successful Aging

continued from page 50

A

You should also take these steps regarding your health: Proactive physician visits: After the age of 55, schedule primary physician visits every six months for a physical exam and labs to evaluate: bladder, breasts, blood count, cholesterol, gall bladder, heart, kidneys, lungs, lymph system, liver, pelvic area, prostate, spleen, thyroid, or more per physician’s orders. Stay active: Exercise per your physician’s advice. Eat nutritious foods such as fish, lean meats, vegetables, and fruits. Drink adequate liquids and limit alcohol consumption. If need be, meet with a dietician regarding nutrition. Be proactive about wellness: Whenever possible,

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avoid sick people and hospitals. Avoid touching handles on bathroom stalls, toilets, faucets, and doors. Germs can transfer onto hands, entering your body via mouth, nose, cracked skin, cuts, or hangnails. Keep hands away from your face and any scratches or wounds. Use hand sanitizer. Put pocket dispensers on key rings and purses. Keep a pump container in your car cup-holder and near sinks, bathrooms, kids’ rooms, etc. Protect yourself on planes, while shopping, and anywhere crowds congregate. Lastly, write down your life story for your children and grandchildren. Tell each one, by name, how much he or she means to you. They will cherish that. t o d a y ’ s

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Nursing/Rehab Directory Nursing homes are facilities that provide beds for around-the-clock intermediate, skilled, and/or rehabilitative care.

The Altenheim

Autumn Woods Health Campus

Number of beds: 24 Cost per day: private $252, semiprivate $187 Special services: A small non-profit community located in the Highlands. Our one to six average staff to resident ratio provides our residents with the highest quality of care by our skilled team of experts. Owners: The Altenheim Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, Hospice, private ins.

Number of beds: 61 Cost per day: $205-$236 Special services: Offers long-term care, short-term rehabilitation, 24-hour skilled nursing care, outpatient therapy, specialized memory care, and respite care. Private suites, state-of-the-art therapy gym, fine dining, cable, TV, and phone. Owners: Trilogy Health Services, LLC Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, Hospice, LTCi

936 Barrett Ave, Louisville, KY 40204 (502) 584-7417 • www.thealtenheim.org

Baptist Hospital Northeast Short-Term Rehabilitation 1025 New Moody Lane, LaGrange, KY 40031 (502) 222-3376 • www.baptistnortheast.com

2911 Green Valley Rd, New Albany, IN 47150 (812) 941-9893 • www.autumnwoodshc.com

Christopher East Health Care Center

4200 Browns Lane, Louisville, KY 40220 (502) 459-8900 • http://www.hcr-manorcare.com/HCRManorCare/

Number of beds: 24 Cost per day: $210 Special services: Registered nurses 24 hours; full-time physical, occupational and speech therapists, personalized treatment plans, remodeled gym, private rooms, laundry service, daily admissions, cable TV, family teaching. Near I-71. Owners: Baptist Hospital Northeast Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, private ins.

ChristopherEast Number of beds: 178 Cost per day: private $276-$341, semiprivate $234-$299 Special services: Christopher East combines the efforts of physical, occupational, & speech therapies to help our patients reach their highest level of independence. Treatment is offered for many of the most complex medical conditions. Owners: HCR-Manor Care Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, health ins., LTCi, VA

Episcopal Church Home

The Forum at Brookside

Number of beds: 139 Cost per day: private $288 or $305, semiprivate $210 Special services: A faith filled senior neighborhood. Superior quality nursing care, highly exp. licensed rehab therapists, newly furnished rooms, gourmet dining, on-site religious services, daily activities, and beauty shop. Open to persons of all faith traditions. Free tours. Owners: Episcopal Church Home Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, LTCi, private

Number of beds: 60 Cost per day: private $267, semiprivate $219 Special services: Heartfelt care and skilled staff provide short & long term nursing care and rehab-physical, occupational, and speech for your loved one’s comfort, quality, and engaged lifestyle. Beautifully located in eastern Jefferson County. Owners: Five Star Senior Living, Inc. Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, Hospice, LTCi, private ins.

7504 Westport Rd, Louisville, KY 40222 (502) 736-7800 • www.echky.org

200 Brookside Dr, Louisville, KY 40243 (502) 245-3048 • www.theforumbrookside.com

Four Courts at Cherokee Park

Franciscan Health Care Center

Number of beds: 71 Cost per day: private $250, semiprivate $215 Special services: Dedicated to providing the best in rehab and comprehensive nursing care while respecting the quality of life of those entrusted to our care. Our mission is TransitionalCARE, planning from hospital, to rehab, to home. Owners: Signature HealthCARE, LLC Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, private ins.

Number of beds: 85 Cost per day: $239-$359 Special services: Located off I-65 on Fern Valley Road offering longterm care, short-term rehab, assisted living, 24-hour skilled nursing care, physical, occupational, and speech therapy. Private suites, state-of-the-art therapy gym, fine dining, cable, and phone. Owners: Trilogy Health Services, LLC Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, LTCi, private ins., VA

2100 Millvale Rd, Louisville, KY 40205 (502) 451-0990 • www.fourcourtsatcherokeepark.com

3625 Fern Valley Rd, Louisville, KY 40219 (502) 964-3381 ext. 202 • www.franciscanhc.com

Bashford East Health Care 3535 Bardstown Rd, Louisville, KY 40218 (502) 459-1400 • Cost per day: private $198, semiprivate $183

Brownsboro Hills Healthcare 2141 Sycamore Ave, Louisville, KY 40206 (502) 895-5417 • Cost per day: private $223$248, semiprivate $214

Christian Care Communities-Christian Health Center 920 S. 4th St, Louisville, KY 40203 (502) 583-6533 • Cost per day: private $234, semiprivate $218

Christian Care Communities-Christian Health Center West 1015 West Magazine St, Louisville, KY 40203 (502) 815-6460 • Cost per day: private $220, semiprivate $206

Clark Rehabilitation & Skilled Nursing Facility 517 North Little League Blvd., Clarksville, IN 47129 (812) 282-8406 • Cost per day: private $275, semiprivate $170 Crestview Care Rehabilitation & Nursing Center 1871 Midland Trail, Shelbyville, KY 40065 (502) 589-3573 • Cost per day: private $218$220, semiprivate $198

Colonial Health & Rehabilitation 708 Bartley Ave, Bardstown, KY 40004 (502) 348-9260 • Cost per day: private $200, semiprivate $177 Eastern Star Home in Kentucky 923 Eastern Star Ct, Louisville, KY 40204 (502) 451-3535 • Cost per day: private $110$115, semiprivate $105 Friendship Manor 7400 Lagrange Rd, Pewee Valley, KY 40056 (502) 241-8821, ext. 16 • Cost per day: private $189, semiprivate $159-$169 Good Samaritan Center 3500 Good Samaritan Way, Louisville, KY 40299 (502) 267-7403 • Cost per day: private $225, semiprivate $197

Corydon Nursing & Rehab 315 Country Club Rd, Corydon, IN 47112 (812) 738-2190 • Cost per day: private $160 Essex Nursing & Rehabilitation Center 9600 Lamborne Blvd, Louisville, KY 40272 (502) 935-7284 • Cost per day: semiprivate $187

Frazier Rehab Institute, a part of Kentucky One Health 220 Abraham Flexner Way, Louisville, KY 40202 502-582-7400 • Cost per day: $600

Georgetown Manor Nursing and Rehab 900 Gagel Ave, Louisville, KY 40216 (502) 368-5827 • Cost per day: private $206, semiprivate $189

Golden LivingCenter-Camelot 1101 Lyndon Lane, Louisville, KY 40222 (502) 425-0331 • Cost per day: private $227, semiprivate $207

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Glen Ridge Health Campus

Golden LivingCenter - Hillcreek

Number of beds: 68 Cost per day: private $226-$339 Special services: Located off Billtown Road offering long-term care, short-term rehab, 24-hour skilled nursing care, physical, occupational, and speech therapy, as well as outpatient therapy. Private suites, state-of-the-art therapy gym, fine dining, cable, and phone. Owners: Trilogy Health Services, LLC Payment Accepted: Medicare, private, LTCi, private ins., VA

Number of beds: 172 Cost per day: private $240, semiprivate $231 Special services: Hillcreek offers a dedicated orthopedic care unit for short-term therapy patients with special entry, common area, and therapy gym. Also available are newly renovated private rooms with private baths and a modern up-to-date feel. Owners: Golden Living Center Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, VA, Hospice, LTCi, private ins.

6415 Calm River Way, Louisville, Ky 40299 (502) 297-8590 • www.glenridgehc.com

3116 Breckenridge Lane, Louisville, KY 40220 (502) 459-9120 • www.goldenlivingcenters.com

Golden LivingCenter - Mt. Holly

Golden LivingCenter - St. Matthews

Number of beds: 110 Cost per day: private $239, semiprivate $215 Special services: Pulmonary Program led by a Pulmonologist. Wound program with a wound care physician rounding weekly. Spacious private rooms on our rehab unit with a separate entrance. Phones, Satellite TV, 24 Hour Snack Center. Owners: Golden Living Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, VA, LTCi, health ins.

Number of beds: 125 Cost per day: private $254, semiprivate $214 Special services: Television, cable, phone, Speech therapy, Physical therapy, Occupational Therapy, private rooms, Enhanced Dining, Complimentary Wifi Internet. Owners: Golden Living Center Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, LTCi, VA, Hospice, private ins.

446 Mt. Holly Ave, Louisville, KY 40206 (502) 897-1646 • www.goldenlivingcenters.com

227 Browns Lane, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 893-2595 • www.goldenlivingcenters.com

Hampton Oaks Health Campus

Jefferson Manor Health & Rehabilitation

Number of beds: 69 Cost per day: $173-$260 Special services: Offers assisted living, long-term care, short-term rehabilitation, 24-hour skilled nursing care, outpatient therapies, as well as transitional care, and respite care. Private suites, stateof-the-art therapy gym, fine dining, cable, TV, and phone. Owners: Trilogy Health Services, LLC Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, VA, private, LTCi, private ins.

Number of beds: 100 Cost per day: private $204-$215, semiprivate $185-$196 Special services: The place Louisville prefers. Offering all private accommodations and baths with the elegance of a fine hotel; Full range of therapy services to ensure your highest level of recuperation; Formal dining room with chef-prepared meals. Owners: Elmcroft Senior Living Payment Accepted: Medicare, private, private ins., LTCi, Hospice

966 North Wilson Rd, Scottsburg, IN 47170 (812) 752-2694 • www.hamptonoakshc.com

1801 Lynn Way, Louisville, KY 40222 (502) 426-4513 • www.elmcroftseniorliving.com/skillednursing

Jefferson Place Health & Rehabilitation

Lincoln Hills Health Center

1705 Herr Lane, Louisville, KY 40222 (502) 426-5600 • www.elmcroftseniorliving.com/skillednursing Number of beds: 95 Cost per day: private $245 Special services: The place Louisville prefers. Offering all private accommodations and baths with the elegance of a fine hotel; Full range of therapy services to ensure your highest level of recuperation; Formal dining room with chef-prepared meals. Owners: Elmcroft Senior Living Payment Accepted: Medicare, private, private ins.

A service of Floyd Memorial Hospital & Health Services 326 Country Club Dr, New Albany, IN 47150 (812) 948-1311 • www.lincolnhillshealthcare.com

Number of beds: 152 Cost per day: private $192, semiprivate $162 Special services: Excellent survey scores, separate Medicare entrance, private rehab suites with phone, TV, and cable included. 100% of discharged patients stated they would recommend Lincoln Hills for healthcare needs. Owners: Oasis Healthcare Management Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, VA, LTCi, Hospice, private ins.

Green Valley Care Center 3118 Green Valley Rd, New Albany, IN 47150 (812) 945-2341 • Cost per day: private $229, semiprivate $190

Hillcrest Centre for Health and Rehab 203 Sparks Ave, Jeffersonville, IN 47130 (812) 283-7918 • Cost per day: private $189 or $250, semiprivate $159 or $200

Homestead Nursing Center 50 Adams St, New Castle, KY 40050 (502) 845-2861 • Cost per day: private $178, semiprivate $164

Hurstbourne Care and Rehabilitation Centre 2200 Stony Brook Dr, Louisville, KY 40220 (502) 495-6240 • Cost per day: private $315, semiprivate $201-$281

Indian Creek Health and Rehab Center 240 Beechmont Dr, Corydon, IN 47112 (812) 738-8127 • Cost per day: $160

Kindred Transitional Care and Rehabilitation–Harrison 150 Beechmont Dr, Corydon, IN 47112 (812) 738-0550 • Cost per day: $198

Kindred Transitional Care–Wedgewood 101 Potters Lane, Clarksville, IN 47129 (812) 948-0808 • Cost per day: private $229, semiprivate $188-$207

Kindred Transitional Care and Rehabilitation–Rolling Hills 3625 St. Joseph Rd, New Albany, IN 47150 (812) 948-0670 • Cost per day: private $218, semiprivate $179-$197

Kindred Transitional Care and Rehabilitation–Sellersburg 7823 Old Highway 60, Sellersburg, IN 47150 (812) 246-4272 • Cost per day: private $217, semiprivate $234

Klondike Manor Rehabilitation and Nursing Center 3802 Klondike Lane, Louisville, KY 40218 (502) 452-1579 • Cost per day: private $224, semiprivate $187

Life Care Center of Bardstown 120 Life Care Way, Bardstown, KY 40004 (502) 348-4220 • Cost per day: private $213, semiprivate $178

Maple Manor Christian Homes, Inc. 643 West Utica St, Sellersburg, IN 47172 (812) 246-4866 • Cost per day: private $180

Mercy Providence 4915 Charlestown Rd, New Albany, IN 47150 (812) 945-5221 • Cost per day: private $196$279, semiprivate $173

Mercy Sacred Heart 2120 Payne St, Louisville, KY 40206 (502) 895-9425 • Cost per day: private $251 or $340, semiprivate $203 or $299

Northfield Centre for Health & Rehab 6000 Hunting Rd, Louisville, KY 40222 (502) 426-1425 • Cost per day: private $226, semiprivate $210

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Masonic Homes of Kentucky-Shelbyville Campus 711 Frankfort Rd, Shelbyville, KY 40065 (502) 633-3486 • www.masonichomesky.com

Meadowview Health and Rehab

Number of beds: 112 Cost per day: private $265, semiprivate $225 Special services: Award-winning staff provides short-stay, long-term and outpatient rehab featuring Nautilus equipment. Physical, occupational, speech and respiratory therapies offered 7 days a week. Five-star rated, first-class home. Owners: Masonic Homes of Kentucky, Inc. Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, private ins., Hospice, LTCi

9701 Whipps Mill Rd, Louisville, KY 40223 (502) 426-2778 • www.elmcroftseniorliving.com/skillednursing Number of beds: 95 Cost per day: private $204, semiprivate $189 Special services: In the residential neighborhood of Lyndon, offering top-quality medical care for over 30 yrs. Newly remodeled therapy gym provides for a full range of therapy services & custom care plans. New rehabilitation unit with private rooms, cable, phone all included. Owners: Elmcroft Senior Living Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, LTCi, Hospice, private ins.

Nazareth Home

Oaklawn Health and Rehabilitation

Number of beds: 70 Cost per day: $229 and $239 Special services: Skilled & long-term nursing care, all private rooms, exercise, social activities and massage & holistic therapy. Fine dining and award winning activity programs. Short stay Medicare recovery program bridging hospital to home. Owners: The Sisters of Charity of Nazareth Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, LTCi

Number of beds: 128 Cost per day: private $269 Special services: Located in Middletown offering all private accommodations and baths. Oaklawn is the only one in Kentucky that has a rehabilitation physician on staff to consult on patients’ rehabilitation care in an atmosphere of elegance and privacy. Owners: Elmcroft Senior Living Payment Accepted: Medicare, private, private ins., LTCi

2000 Newburg Rd, Louisville, KY 40205 (502) 459-9681 • www.nazhome.org

Park Terrace Health Campus

9700 Stonestreet Rd, Louisville, KY 40272 (502) 995-6600 • www.parkterracehc.com

Number of beds: 88 Cost per day: $192-$238 Special services: Offering long-term care, short-term rehabilitation, 24-hour skilled nursing care, physical, occupational and speech therapies, as well as respite care. Private resident suites, state-ofthe-art therapy gym, fine dining, cable, TV and phone. Owners: Trilogy Health Services, LLC Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, VA, private, LTCi, private ins.

Rockford Health and Rehabilitation

4700 Quinn Dr, Louisville, KY 40216 (502) 448-5850 • www.elmcroftseniorliving.com/skillednursing Number of beds: 110 Cost per day: private $213, semiprivate $196 Special services: Located in Southwest Jefferson County, Rockford Health & Rehabilitation has been providing quality rehabilitation and nursing care for over 30 years. Our passionate and tenured staff takes great pride in making this facility a happy home. Owners: Elmcroft Senior Living Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, Anthem

300 Shelby Station Dr, Louisville, KY 40245 (502) 254-0009 • www.elmcroftseniorliving.com/skillednursing

Presbyterian Homes of Louisville– Westminster Health Care Centre 2116 Buechel Bank Rd, Louisville, KY 40218 (502) 499-9383 • www.PHSK.org

Number of beds: 112 Cost per day: private suite $341, private $277, semiprivate $247 Special services: Skilled nursing, long/short term rehabili­tation, assistance 24/7. Speech therapy, orthopedic & neurological rehab. Rehab also available on out-patient basis. Restaurant-style dining, cable TV & phone. Caring for Louisville’s Seniors since 1947. Owners: Presbyterian Homes & Services of Kentucky Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, LTCi

Sam Swope Care Center at Masonic Home of Louisville 3701 Frankfort Ave, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 897-4907 • www.masonichomesky.com

Number of beds: 136 Cost per day: private $320, semiprivate $280 Special services: The future of senior care is here. 6,000 sq. ft. rehab center and onsite dialysis clinic. Main Street offers hair salon, café, gift shop, and library. Six residential households promote healing and recovery.Owners: Masonic Homes of Kentucky, Inc. Payment Accepted: Medicare, private, LTCi, Hospice, private ins.

North Hardin Health and Rehabilitation 599 Rogersville Rd, Radcliff, KY 40160 (270) 351-2999 • Cost per day: private $196, semiprivate $182

Parkway Rehabilitation and Nursing Center 1155 Eastern Pkwy, Louisville, KY 40217 (502) 636-5241 • Cost per day: private $195, semiprivate $175

Regis Woods Care & Rehabilitation Center 4604 Lowe Rd, Louisville, KY 40220 (502) 451-1401 • Cost per day: private $222$344, semiprivate $177-$294 Riverview Village 586 Eastern Blvd, Clarksville, IN 47129 (812) 282-6663 • Cost per day: private $160, semiprivate $135

The Richwood 1012 Richwood Way, LaGrange, KY 40031 (502) 222-3186 • Cost per day: private $170, semiprivate $138-$150

Signature HealthCARE South of Louisville 1120 Cristland Rd, Louisville, KY 40214 (502) 367-0104 • Cost per day: $190 Treyton Oak Towers 211 W. Oak St, Louisville, KY 40203 (502) 589-3211 • Cost per day: private $239$286, semiprivate $175

Robert E. Lee, A Full Continuum of Care 201 E. Elm St, New Albany, IN 47150 (812) 945-9517 • Cost per day: private $170, $250; semiprivate $140, $175 Southern Indiana Rehab Hospital Progressive Care Unit 3104 Blackiston Blvd, New Albany, IN 47150 (812) 941-8300 • Cost per day: semiprivate $295 Twinbrook Nursing Home and Rehab Center 3526 Dutchman’s Lane, Louisville, KY 40205 (502) 452-6331 • Cost per day: private $230$260, semiprivate $220

Regency Rehabilitation and Nursing Center 1550 Raydale Dr, Louisville, KY 40219 (502) 968-6600 • Cost per day: private $210, semiprivate $188-$190 Rivers Edge Nursing & Rehabilitation Center Formerly known as Britthaven of Prospect

6301 Bass Rd, Prospect, KY 40059 (502) 228-8359 • Cost per day: private $208, semiprivate $202 Signature HealthCARE of East Louisville 2529 Six MIle Lane, Louisville, KY 40220 (502) 491-5560 • Cost per day: private $240, semiprivate $208 SpringBridge at Green Valley Care Center 3118 Green Valley Rd, New Albany, IN 47150 (812) 945-2341 • Cost per day: $229 Villas of Guerin Woods 8037 Unruh Dr, Georgetown, IN 47122 (812) 951-1878 • Cost per day: private $196

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Personal Care Directory Personal Care offers residents minimal assistance for bathing, grooming, toileting, and dressing. The resident must be able to move around (even if in a wheelchair or scooter). Some health care is provided and medications are given. These facilities are licensed.

The Altenheim

Belmont Village Senior Living Community

Number of beds: 37 Cost per day: $126 or $144 Special services: A deficiency-free retirement community located in the Highlands. Providing the independence of home living with all the services you need: 24-hour nursing, housekeeping and laundry service; 3 meals served, daily activities. Owners: The Altenheim Payment Accepted: private

Number of beds: 128 Cost per day: $95-$205 Special services: St. Matthews Private Apt; Licensed nurses 24 hrs/ day for Health Services & Med Admin; ADL Assistance, researchbased Brain Health & Life-long Learning programs, Fitness Room, Activities, Transportation., 24-item Menu. Owners: Belmont Village, L.P. Payment Accepted: private, private ins., LTCi

936 Barret Ave, Louisville, KY 40204 (502) 584-7417 • www.thealtenheim.org

4600 Bowling Blvd, St. Matthews, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 721-7500 • www.belmontvillage.com

Elmcroft at Oaklawn

Episcopal Church Home

Number of beds: 56 Cost per day: studio starting at $127, 1BR starting at $147, 2BR starting at $185 Special services: Open Now, Elmcroft at Oaklawn offers 56 Personal Care apartments and 22 specialized Memory Care apartments, designed to provide elegance and promote safety for the residents. Contact (502) 632-5500. Owners: Elmcroft Senior Living Payment Accepted: private, private ins.

Number of beds: 75 Cost per day: $153-$213 Special services: A faith filled senior neighborhood. Very caring professional staff, gourmet dining, on-site religious services, secure green spaces, daily activities, beauty shop, and rehabilitation services. Open to persons of all faith traditions. Free tours. Owners: Episcopal Church Home Payment Accepted: private, private ins., LTCi

100 Shelby Station Dr, Louisville, KY 40245 (502) 632-5500 • www.elmcroftseniorliving.com

7504 Westport Rd, Louisville, KY 40222 (502) 736-7800 • www.echky.org

The Forum at Brookside

Horizon Bay Retirement Living

Number of beds: 24 Cost per day: $190, $220, $267 Special services: Heartfelt care and skilled staff provide personal care for your loved one’s comfort, quality, and engaged lifestyle. Beautiful campus conveniently located in eastern Jefferson County. Owners: Five Star Senior Living, Inc. Payment Accepted: private, private ins., LTCi

Number of beds: 55 Cost per day: $95-$204 Special services: Newly updated community boasting several pvt apt floor plans; 24-hour nursing staff for medication administration; chef-prepared meals; scheduled transportation; full calendar of events and activities. Come see us! Owners: Brookdale Senior Living Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

200 Brookside Dr, Louisville, KY 40243 (502) 245-3048 • www.theforumatbrookside.com

903 Blankenbaker Pkwy, Louisville, KY 40243 (502) 244-4244 • www.brookdaleliving.com

Nazareth Home

Parr’s at Springhurst

Number of beds: 50 Cost per day: $140 and $149 Special services: Personal Care program includes apartments and activities designed for independence and choice. All rooms are spacious to promote recovery, privacy and family involvement. Owners: The Sisters of Charity of Nazareth Payment Accepted: private

Number of beds: 79 apts. Cost per day: $133-$182 Special services: Offers licensed personal care in a beautiful apartment setting. Studio, 1 BR and 2 BR floor plans. Three restaurant-style meals, daily housekeeping, transportation, beauty salon, ice cream parlor, Bistro, daily activities and Nurses 24 hours/7 days per week. Owners: Baptist Homes, Inc. Payment Accepted: private, LTCi

2000 Newburg Rd, Louisville, KY 40205 (502) 459-9681 • www.nazhome.org

3101 N. Hurstbourne Pkwy, Louisville, KY 40241 (502) 412-3775 • www.springhurstpines.org

Arden Courts 10451 Linn Station Rd, Louisville, KY 40223 (502) 423-8776 • Cost per day: $163

Colonial Health and Rehabilitation Center 708 Bartley Ave, Bardstown, Ky. 40004 (502) 348-9260 • Cost per day: $80

Country Villa, LMA Senior Care 1720 E 8th St, Jeffersonville, IN 47130 (812) 218-9510 • Cost per day: $50-$75

Eastern Star Home 923 Eastern Star Ct, Louisville, KY 40204 (502) 451-3535 • Cost per day: $80

Hurstbourne Care and Rehabilitation Centre 2200 Stony Brook Dr, Louisville KY 40291 (502) 495-6240 • Cost per day: $104

Lifestyle Private Adult Care Home 1610 Blackiston View Dr, Clarksville, IN 47129 (812) 258-0818 • Cost per day: $75-$125

Masonic Home of Shelbyville 711 Frankfort Rd, Shelbyville, KY 40065 (502) 633-3486 • Cost per day: $65-$90

Mercy Sacred Heart 2120 Payne St, Louisville, KY 40206 (502) 895-9425 • Cost per day: $101-$162

Regis Woods Care and Rehabilitation Center 4604 Lowe Rd, Louisville, KY 40220 (502) 451-1401 • Cost per day: $75-$152

Signature Healthcare of East Louisville 2529 Six Mile Lane, Louisville, KY 40220 (502) 491-5560 • Cost per day: $74-$97

Treyton Oaks Towers 211 W. Oak St, Louisville, KY 40203 (502) 589-3211 • Cost per day: $122-$170

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Personal Care Directory continued from page 76

The Pillars Assisted Care Community at Masonic Home of Louisville

Presbyterian Homes of Louisville– Rose Anna Hughes Home

Number of beds: 84 Cost per day: $140-$160 Special services: Kentucky’s 2011-12 Personal Care Facility of the Year offers private rooms with private baths, and couples suites. Resident directed activities, gift boutique, transportation, hair salon and U.S. Post Office. Owners: Masonic Homes of Kentucky, Inc. Payment Accepted: private, private ins.

Number of beds: 17 Cost per day: $90-$112 Special services: The tradition of gracious living continues on our Buechel campus—restaurant-style dining, daily activities, light housekeeping, linen service, utilities. Beauty shop, chapel & exercise center on-site. Caring for Louisville’s Seniors since 1947. Owners: Presbyterian Homes and Services of Kentucky Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, private ins.

3701 Frankfort Ave, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 897-4907 • www.masonichomesky.com

2120 Buechel Bank Rd, Louisville, KY 40218 (502) 499-9383 • www.PHSK.org

Sunrise of Louisville

6700 Overlook Dr, Louisville, KY 40241 (502) 425-0820 • www.sunriseseniorliving.com

Number of beds: 32 Cost per day: $90-$175 Special services: Licensed Personal & Memory Care. RN managed care plans, wellness visits & medi­cation administration. Private studios, 1-2 bdrm & Companion Care. Person centered care, restaurant-style dining, housekeeping, activities, transportation, cable/laundry inc. Owners: Sunrise Louisville KY Senior Living, LLC Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

Larger color Enhanced listings are paid for by the facility. If you are interested in an Enhanced listing, call 502-327-8855. Spring issue deadline: February 10, 2012

Retirement Facilities Directory Retirement facilities are for those who are totally independent. Special services are provided, such as meals in a central dining area. Most people drive, but some transportation is usually offered. These facilities offer no health care services and are not required to be licensed or certified.

The Altenheim

Brownsboro Park Retirement Community

Units in facility: 63 Cost per person per month: 1BR $1890 Minimum age: no Special services: Located in the Highlands, spacious apartment, housekeeping, laundry and linen service at no additional charge, 3 meals served, daily activities, social outings and religious services, beauty and barbershop, deficiency-free. Owners: The Altenheim Payment Accepted: private, LTCi

Units in facility: 134 Cost per person per month: studio $1604, 1BR $1915-$2312, 2BR $2284-$2516 Minimum age: 62 Special services: Family owned & operated since 1986, several spacious floor plans, located on 14 beautiful acres. Warm, friendly residents, spacious apartments, activities, housekeeping, transportation and excellent chef-prepared meals. Owners: Bunker Hill Assoc. III, LLC Payment Accepted: private

Cornell Trace

Dudley Square Townhouses at Episcopal Church Home

936 Barret Ave, Louisville, KY 40204 (502) 584-7417 • www.thealtenheim.org

9729 Cornell Trace Rd, Louisville, KY 40241 (502) 326-9838 • www.springhurstpines.org

Units in facility: 58 Cost: Entrance fee $180,000-$250,000; 2 & 3BR patio homes plus monthly maintenance fee Minimum age: 62 Special services: Exquisite patio homes with enclosed porches and attached garages. All appliances included, security system, no property taxes, no homeowner’s insurance, spacious floor plans, all maintenance inside and out, exercise room and a beautiful clubhouse. Owners: Baptist Homes, Inc. Payment Accepted: private

2960 Goose Creek Rd, Louisville, KY 40241 (502) 429-7700 • www.brownsboropark.net

7504 Westport Rd, Louisville, KY 40222 (502) 736-7800 • www.echky.org

Units in facility: 62 Cost: Entrance fee $159,000-$329,900; varies by size of patio home plus monthly service fee Minimum age: 65 Special services: Dudley Square is a community of spacious, welldesigned patio homes adjacent to The Episcopal Church Home. Sizes range from 1,100-3,226 sq.ft. Live independently and access supportive services as needs change. For pricing info, call JoAnn Bach, 736-7807. Owners: Episcopal Church Home Payment Accepted: private

American Village Apartments 3700 West Wheatmore Dr, Louisville, KY 40215 (502) 368-1674 • Cost per person/month: $665 (lower rates available based on income)

Beehive Homes of Smyrna Parkway 8800 Smyrna Pkwy, Louisville, KY 40228 (502) 966-9771 • Cost per person/month: 1BR $3300

Brownsboro Plaza 220 N. Clifton St, Louisville, KY 40206 (502) 895-3154 • Cost per person/month: efficiency $1300-$1525

Christian Care Communities 960 S. 4th St, Louisville, KY 40203 (502) 585-5656 • Cost per person/month: studio $581$789, 1BR $727-$907 (lower rates available based on income)

Country Villa, LMA Senior Care 1720 E. 8th St, Jeffersonville, IN 47130 (812) 218-9510 • Cost per person/month: 1BR $1300-$1500, 2BR $2050-$2550

Elmcroft at Mt. Washington 520 Woodlake Dr, Mt. Washington, KY 40047 (502) 538-3172 • Cost per person/month: $2695-$3495

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Retirement Facilities Directory continued from page 77

The Forum at Brookside

Horizon Bay Retirement Living

Units in facility: 240 Cost per person per month: Studio $2580, 1BR $3425, 2BR $4285, Villa/Patio homes $3915-$5250 Minimum age: 60 Special services: Gorgeous patio homes and apartments, gated community, 24 hr security, indoor heated pool, exercise room, chef prepared meals, flexible dining plan, recreational activities, pet friendly, a great staff and management team, full continuum of care. Owners: Five Star Senior Living, Inc. Payment Accepted: private

Units in facility: 120 Cost per person per month: $1810-$3540 Minimum age: 65 Special services: Newly updated community located centrally at I-64 and Blankenbaker Pkwy. Wide variety of apartment homes boasting chef-prepared meals, 24-hour security, scheduled transportation and full calendar of events/activities. Owners: Brookdale Senior Living Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

Masonic Home Village

Miralea Active Lifestyle Community

Units in facility: 149 Cost per person per month: 1BR $744-$1056, 2BR $1071$1530; Affordable housing: Studio $539-$595, 1BR $568-$637, 2BR $673 Minimum age: mature adult, 55 (market rate) and 62 (affordable housing) Special services: Club Olmsted features dining at The Bistro restaurant, movie theater, card and game room, and craft studio. Housekeeping, transportation, hair salon, library, wireless Internet; some carports available. Owners: Masonic Homes Properties, Inc. Payment Accepted: private, affordable housing options

Units in facility: 90 apartment homes, 12 cottages Cost per person per month: 1BR $2295-$2895, 2BR $3295-$3495, Cottage $3495-$3970. Second person fee for all units: $995/month Minimum age: 62 Special services: New apartment and cottage residences, restaurantstyle dining, concierge service and upscale amenities on 83-acre campus. Life care provides services at Sam Swope Care Center when you need them. 24/7 security. Owners: Masonic Homes of Kentucky, Inc. Payment Accepted: private

200 Brookside Dr, Louisville, KY 40243 (502) 245-3048 • www.theforumatbrookside.com

3701 Frankfort Ave, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 894-0195 • www.masonichomesky.com

901 Blankenbaker Pkwy, Louisville, KY 40243 (502) 244-4244 • www.brookdaleliving.com

3701 Frankfort Ave, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 897-8727 • www.miralea.com

Wesley Manor Retirement Community 5012 E. Manslick Rd, Louisville, KY 40219 (502) 969-3277 • www.WesMan.org

Units in facility: 60 Cost: Entrance fee $109,080-$121,320; 1 and 2BR patio homes plus monthly service fee Minimum age: 60 Special services: Three patio-home floor plans, attached garages and porches, interior and exterior maintenance, paid property insurance. We offer a full continuum of care community. Short term lease option now available. Owners: Methodist Retirement Homes of Kentucky Payment Accepted: private, entrance fee paid prior to move-in

Larger color Enhanced listings are paid for by the facility. If you are interested in an Enhanced listing, call 502-327-8855. Spring issue deadline: February 10, 2012

Guerin Woods Apartments 8037 Unruh Dr, Georgetown, IN 47122 (812) 951-1878 • Cost per person/month: $425 (lower rates based on adjusted gross income)

H. Temple Spears Retirement Community 1515 Cypress St, Louisville, KY 40210 (502) 776-7000 • Cost per person/month: 1BR $539-$630

Lifting Lives 2204 W. Chestnut St, Louisville, KY 40211 (502) 235-6733 • Cost per person/month: $2600

Meadows of Guerin Woods 8037 Unruh Dr, Georgetown, IN 47122 (812) 951-1878 • Cost per person/month: $200-$425

Mercy Sacred Heart 2120 Payne St, Louisville, KY 40206 (502) 895-9425 • Cost per person/month: 1BR $2130, suite $2340 Ponder Creek Estates 620 Valley College Dr, Louisville, KY 40272 (502) 995-4010 • Cost per person/month: studio $1675, 1BR $1900, 2BR $2300 Twinbrook Hotel Apartments 3525 Ephraim McDowell Dr, Louisville, KY 40205 (502) 452-6331 • Cost per person/month: efficiency $1800, 1BR $2200

Mt. Lebanon Cedars of Lebanon Homes 2223 Magazine St, Louisville, KY 40211 (502) 778-6616 • Cost per person/month: market rent $432, subsidized housing available Riverbend Independent and Assisted Living Community 2715 Charlestown Pike, Jeffersonville, IN 47130 (812) 282-9707 • Cost per person/month: apts $2260-$3150, suite $2700-$3750 Village East, Inc. 11530 Herrick Lane, Louisville, KY 40243 (502) 643-8248 • Cost per person/month: Apt. homes $900-$1100, Patio homes $129,900-$220,000

Oxmoor Lodge Retirement Residence 8021 Christian Ct, Louisville, KY 40222 (502) 425-2402 • Cost per person/month: studio $2195, 1BR $1875, 2BR $2700 Treyton Oak Towers 211 W. Oak St, Louisville, KY 40203 (502) 589-3211 • Cost per person/month: $2421$3119 Westminster Village 2200 Greentree Blvd North, Clarksville, IN 47129 (812) 282-9691 • Cost per person/month: studio $1202, 1BR $1421, 2BR $1781

One kind word can warm three winter months. — Ja pa n e s e P r ov e r b

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Budgeting for

the BIG Move

Moving into a retirement community can be a convenient option. But you need to make sure you’re financially prepared. In recent years, more people have looked to retirement communities to fulfill social and medical needs. These communities have branched out from nursing homes to vibrant areas that provide care, planned activities, and on-site amenities. If you are thinking about living in a retirement community, you should start a financial plan early to ensure your move goes smoothly. As you look into retirement communities, research the options and ask for resources such as a checklist or an affordability calculator that will help you compare your current cost of living with the community. Usually found on the Internet, an affordability calculator will allow you to input your current cost for utilities, lawn care, property taxes, food, and other living expenses to see how much you would save by moving to a retirement community. Many of those expenses are included in the base rate of each community. One such community is Atria St. Matthews in Louisville. Lynn Welch, Atria’s community sales director, says, “We try to be that place where people know they will have a better way of life.” The apartment complex offers assisted living and independent living options in its 70 units. On average, the base rate for an apartment is $4,100 a month. The base rate includes the following: rent all meals and snacks daily, light housekeeping utilities local transportation Monday through Friday any required home maintenance on-site special activities and wellness programs an emergency call system similar to Lifeline.

Other amenities include multiple apartment floor plans to choose from, a library, computer room, fitness center, and theater area. There are some amenities, such as the on-site hair salon and massage therapy, that require an additional charge. Also, some off-site activities might require an entry ticket fee. Assisted living needs at Atria require extra fees. For example, an additional fee will be charged if you need assistance managing medications or grooming. “We conduct an assessment prior to a person moving in,” Welch says. “On average, these fees can be an addi78

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Compare current cost of living to retirement community costs.

Use an affordability calculator to take figure costs for social activities as well as all home maintenance, food, and insurance expenses. To compare retirement facilities in the Louisville area, see our directory on page 76. If you need assisted living capabilities, account for that in your calculation. Remember that assisted living costs are projected to rise by about five percent a year.

2

By Carmen Brown

• • • • • • • •

Can I afford to live in a retirement community?

Plan and save.

Many retirement communities take only private payment. What savings or investments can you draw from? Consider: • • • • • •

Personal savings and investments 401K or IRA plans Annuities Social Security income Whole life insurance Long-term care insurance

Your house is also a crucial asset. Will selling your home bring in the funds you need? Will you be able to sell your home?

3

Account for any inheritance you wish to leave.

You might opt for a whole or premium life insurance policy that returns funds to your loved ones in case of your death. Or, some continuing-care retirement facilities offer a buy-in option that makes a percentage of the entrance fee refundable once the unit is re-sold to the next occupant. By Jessica Smith and Carmen Brown | Sources: Genworth Cost of Care Survey 2012, chicagotribune.com, selfgrowth.com, seniorresource.com

tional $350 a month; however, that fee changes based on the level of care that is necessary for the client.” A financial pitfall Welch sees in planning for retirement living is when people cannot sell their homes and end up exhausting their savings. If a person has financial problems while living at Atria, Welch says the facility will work with families to find the best alternative. “There is income-based living available through HUD, and it may also be possible for a person to move into a nursing facility,” she says. “We work with people and help them make the transition to another facility for the best care possible.” Rhoda Faller, an attorney at Kentucky ElderLaw PLLC, says people should also be aware of how Medicaid laws can affect their financial situation when deciding to move into a retirement community. If you are married and move from your house into a retirement community, but your spouse lives in a nursing home facility, Medicare will require you to sell the house and use the money to pay for the nursing home expenses. It is important to research and begin a financial plan early if you are considering moving into a retirement community. Even adult children can talk with their parents about the pros and cons of doing so, remembering to encourage their parents through the process. Planning ensures needs and wants are met and that loved ones will live comfortably and enjoy retirement. T O D A Y ’ S

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Helpful R e s o u r c e s Director y

If you would like to advertise in the Helpful Resources Directory, call 502.327.8855 or email advertising@todayspublications.com. ESTATE LIQUIDATION

A.D. Estates Corporation

A.D. Estates Corporation offers a personalized, dignified and practical approach to assisting with property content liquidations. We purchase Estate Contents for CA$H and then pick up the items for FREE. We are always interested in buying – one item or a house full of estate items. We can handle all of your Personal Property Estate needs, including Coins, Odd Collections, Antiques, Collectibles, Old Clocks, Old Books, Old MILITARY Items (Helmets, Knives, Photos, Swords, etc.) Old Cameras, Old Radios, and much more. Please call us today at 502-558-4239 so you can move forward with your tomorrows.

Alex Dwoskin, President A.D. Estates Corporation Louisville, KY 40059 • 502.558.4239 REAL ESTATE

Avoid Medicaid Penalties • A Realtor who knows the Medicaid requirements is essential • Selling a home without the proper procedures can lead to severe penalties • Medicaid can look back as far as 5 years from time of application • I sell under Guardianships • I sell under Probate • I will work with your attorney • I can help you! • Ask to speak to my references

CALL Daniel Grossberg 502.930.0039 Dgrossberg@semonin.com

FREE HOUSING ADVOCATE

Senior Home Transitions After hospitalization and/or rehab, what’s next for your loved one? Having personally gone through the process of placing a loved one after rehab, I know how confusing the options can be. Particularly if you only have a short time to find that new home! I have personally visited each community and will help you find the perfect new home based on your financial situation and personal needs. I can also help connect you with resources to help financially.

SeniorHomeTransitions.com 502.396.9228

INSURANCE

Robin Brown, 21 years with State Farm says she likes to help people plan a good life. “We help people protect the things they can least afford to lose: their home, their car, their income when they’re sick or hurt, and their earning capability. The unexpected happens often in life. I want my clients to be prepared for it. We’re also here to help clients assemble and preserve wealth in the most tax efficient ways possible. We educate clients to help them take care of the people who are special to them and to plan for retirement.” Let Robin help you plan for your dreams and manage risk to protect what is yours now and in the future.

Robin Brown, CLU, ChFC, CASL Agent State Farm 4209 Shelbyville Road Louisville, KY • 40207 • 502.897.6476 www.robinbrowninsurance.com

TRANSPORTATION

Able Care, Inc.

Providing non-emergency, ambulatory and wheelchair accessible transportation in Louisville, Kentucky since 2001; the door through door service is available for physician appointments, medical procedures, therapy, dialysis, radiation, and chemotherapy; as well as social functions and daily errands. Evenings and weekends with advance notice. Caregivers or family members are welcome to ride at no additional charge. Pre-paid voucher packages are available. Payment is requested at the time of service. BBB Accredited Business.

P. O. Box 99381 Louisville, Kentucky 40269-0381 (502) 267-1911 • FAX: (502) 267-3004 www.ablecareinc.com

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Good LOOKING

Patsy Allen

Age: 63 • Job: Retired consignment store owner and Immediate Past President of The Fillies Inc. BY RUBY THOMAS

Patsy Allen likes looking good. She is that lady

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MELISSA DONALD

who is able to make even the most mundane task an occasion for a cute outfit. “I am not a girl who goes out in a warm-up suit unless I am going to the gym. Even when I go grocery shopping, I like to wear a cute pair of jeans,” she says.

Personal Style “I like classic looks, straight lines, and pieces I can have in my wardrobe for years. I am a petite person, so I like well-fitted clothes. I like black and jerseys, but I also like fun stuff, too, like leather pants and boots.”

Her Most Favorite Outfit “A beautiful black dress with pearls and a pretty pair of shoes is my very favorite thing.”

Where She Shops “In Louisville I like shopping at Olivia & Co. Boutique. It’s a new store and it’s upbeat. You can either go bling or natural. I also love Von Maur, Cache, and White House Black Market here in Louisville. I love shopping in Florida because there’s such a large selection. In Florida, I love Bloomingdale’s and Neiman Marcus, which is a wonderful store. I like Tory Burch and shop wherever I can find her styles.”

Changing Style “My style has gotten more classic as I’ve gotten older. When I was younger, I liked a little more bling than I do now. I am more casual because I am not working like I used to. I used to love dressing up. I loved dresses, high heels, jackets, and suits. I’ve become more selective with my clothing, and I’ve become a smarter shopper.”

Staying Fit “I have a routine every morning. I have my family to take care of — my husband, my home, my mother, and my grandkids. My 3-year-old granddaughter also keeps me very fit. My goal used to be two days a week at the gym, but my schedule has changed this year. I’ve always worked out because it keeps my mind going. When you put your clothes on and you feel good in them, that makes you feel good overall.”

How She Relaxes “I like to sit and meditate. Time and space by myself relaxes me. Being outside, shopping, reading, and spending time with my older granddaughter relaxes me. Sitting by the ocean is my very favorite thing in the world to do.”

Outlook on Life “My family and my faith in God are very important to me. I believe there is a reason for the things we go through in life, even if we don’t realize it at the time.” 80

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Today's Transitions Winter 2013  

Source for Later Living