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CONTENTS: FALL 2017

6

80

6 42 36

20 Directories

48 How to Use

4

Directories & Facilities by Location

50 Adult Day Care Facilities

6

51 Aging-in-Place Facilities

16

56 Assisted Living

Facilities

By Tiffany White

34

WISE AND WELL

LEARN SOMETHING NEW

IT’S HECK GETTING OLD

18

CAREGIVER CIRCLE

20

SHAKE YOUR FAMILY TREE

76 Personal Care

28

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36

By Judy Lambeth

By Mark Kaelin

LUNCH PLUS ONE By Lucy Pritchett

44

50

HAVE YOU READ THIS? By Patti Hartog

40

WHAT I KNOW NOW

42

BALANCING ACT

By Lucy Pritchett

By Megan Willman

UPDATES AND HAPPENINGS By Anna Oldham and Gioia Patton

By Erin Fust

38

IS YOUR LOVED ONE LOSING HIS MEMORY? By Brittani Dick

FEEL GOOD FASHION

By Torie Temple

By Marie Bradby

Facilities

79 Helpful Resources

DEAR ME

By Yelena Sapin

Facilities

60 Home Health 68 Independent Living 70 Nursing/Rehab

32

By Carrie Vittitoe

Communities

52 Alzheimer’s Care

YOU CAN TEACH AN OLD DOG NEW TRICKS

69

QUARTERLY CAREGIVER WINNER

80

MORE PRECIOUS THAN JEWELS By Connie Meyer


Fall 2017 | todaystransitionsnow.com

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From the Editor

You Can Teach an Old Dog New Tricks

W

hen was the last time you tried something new? Following the same routine daily might seem like the logical thing to do if you believe it’s too late to make a change. But if you’re not opening yourself up to self exploration, you could be missing out on valuable experiences. In this issue, we’re giving you some ideas on how to break out of your rut, expand your knowledge, and gain a different perspective on your life. You can use our Learn Something New feature (p.6) to develop a fun skill or talent. If you’ve recently become a caregiver, you can use our Caregiver Circle feature (p.18) as a guide for alleviating stress and giving your loved one the best care. Or you can learn something new about yourself through exploring your family history (p.20). It’s never too late to create a better version of yourself, and we’re looking forward to helping you do it.

FALL 2017 • VOL. 14 / NO. 3

PUBLISHER Cathy S. Zion publisher@todayspublications.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Anita Oldham editor@todayspublications.com EDITOR Tiffany White tiffany@todayspublications.com CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Lucy M. Pritchett COPY EDITOR/SENIOR DESIGNER April H. Allman april@todayspublications.com DESIGNER/PRODUCTION COORDINATOR Jill Cobb jill@todayspublications.com DIGITAL DESIGNER/EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Aubrey Hillis aubrey@todayspublications.com PHOTOGRAPHER/PHOTO EDITOR Melissa Donald melissa@todayspublications.com OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR Scheri Stewart Mullins officeadmin@todayspublications.com ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Susan Allen susan@todayspublications.com SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Teri Hickerson teri@todayspublications.com Ann Hurst ann@todayspublications.com Joyce Inman joyce@todayspublications.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Kaitlyn English kaitlyn@todayspublications.com CIRCULATION MANAGER W. Earl Zion Today’s Transitions is published semi-annually by: Zion Publications, LLC 9750 Ormsby Station Road, Suite 307 Louisville, KY 40223 Phone: 502.327.8855 todayswomannow.com The opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the writers and do not necessarily reflect the position of the publisher. Today’s Transitions magazine does not endorse or guarantee any advertiser’s product or service. Copyright 2017 by Zion Publications LLC, all rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited without permission from Zion Publications LLC.

ADVERTISE: Call 502.327.8855 or email advertising@todayspublications.com. REPRINTS: Call 502.327.8855 or email reprints@todayspublications.com.

Got something to say? We’d love to hear from you! Send an email to tiffany@todayspublications.com and put “feedback” in the subject line. Also, don’t forget to visit TodaysTransitionsNow.com to read current and archived articles or find out about upcoming events.

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SUBSCRIBE: Send $10 to the above address for 4 quarterly issues of Today’s Transitions.

BBB RATING


Fall 2017 | todaystransitionsnow.com

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LEARN SOMETHING

BY CARRIE VITTITOE

New !

ILLUSTRATION SIVIA CABIB PHOTOS PATTI HARTOG

T

HE ADAGE “YOU CAN’T TEACH AN OLD DOG NEW TRICKS” IS BUNKUS, IN MY HUMBLE OPINION. WHAT THAT DOG LACKS IS MOTIVATION AND A CLEARLY DETAILED EXPLANATION OF HOW TO ACCOMPLISH THOSE FEATS. The people I know who are 60 and older are more eager and have more energy to learn new things than many of their much younger acquaintances. With that in mind, we’re providing some simple steps for trying something new: starting a Neighborhood Watch program, baking a pie from scratch, writing a book, and hosting a holiday party.

PAGE 8>>

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New ! LEARN SOMETHING

Host a holiday party. 2

Invitation information.

4

Sallie Plass says a written invitation is still preferred over a social media event invitation.

3

Food and beverage logistics. It is important to have food and beverage options for guests, such as both alcoholic and nonalcoholic beverages and some vegetarian options, so that everyone’s needs and preferences are considered. Plass recommends that serving dishes be labeled so that guests can easily figure out food options. There is no shame in using disposable products for holiday parties, and it helps the host not worry as much about cleanup, especially if there are plenty of trash receptacles throughout the party space. 8 todaystransitionsnow.com | Fall 2017

Speaking of invitations, there are certain pieces of information that need to be shared with guests in addition to date and time. Plass says a GPS-friendly address for the event is important, as is the dress code, the purpose of the event, and when and how guests should respond to the invitation. “The more details you can include at the outset, the more clear the expectations to your guests,” she says.

Masterful mingling. All of the food and drink preparation should be done in advance so that the host can spend his or her time mingling with guests and ensuring they are having a good time. “Hosts should be aware of their guests and their comfort,” says Plass, which means being attuned to the music level, the temperature, and potentially awkward conversations. Hosts may need to guide conversations away from politics to keep an argument from breaking out.

PHOTO MELISSA DONALD

1

Use technology wisely. Sallie Plass, owner of Etiquette Enrichment, says using social media to extend a party invitation is not a good idea. “There is nothing better than a written or printed invitation that says ‘I value your attendance at my event,’” she says. A general invitation on social media doesn’t show as much effort, and they often get lost in the white noise of Facebook or email. When it comes to social media, it is a good idea to not post pictures of parties and to ask guests not to, either. Friends and acquaintances who were not invited but see photos online may get their feelings hurt. Some hosts also simply don’t want their private events publicized, and some guests may not want photos of themselves posted. This information can be shared on the invitation, and it may be necessary for a host to remind guests at the event.


New ! LEARN SOMETHING

2

Pecan pie ingredients To make a pecan pie, Dorothy mixes together the following ingredients: 3/4 cup white corn syrup 3/4 cup brown sugar 1/3 teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons melted butter 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon vanilla 3 whole eggs (beaten) 1 cup pecans She puts all of the ingredients in a bowl, mixes well, and pours the mixture into the crust. She says the pecans stay on the top of the mixture and don’t sink to the bottom.

3

Bake a pie.

Two-crust apple pie ingredients

1

Take time to make the crust

Dorothy McGinty of Brooks, Kentucky, shares her recipes for two tasty homemade pies.

4

Dorothy McGinty of Brooks, Kentucky, is able to make two pie crusts from scratch using 4 cups of all-purpose flour, 3/4 cup ice water, 1-1/2 cups Crisco, and 1-1/2 teaspoons salt. She says it is important to use ice water and not tepid or warm water for the crust to keep the crust flaky. She mixes the ingredients together by cutting in the Crisco using a handheld pastry blender until it is the size of small peas. She then slowly adds ice water to the mixture with a fork until it can be rolled in a ball. When she rolls out the crust, she makes it about 1/8-inch thick and wide enough to set in her pie pan. When she lays the crust in the pie pan, she spreads a bit of flour over it to keep it from turning too brown while baking.

Both of these pies bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes.

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To make an apple pie, which is another of Dorothy’s favorites, she mixes together the following ingredients: 1 cup white sugar 2 tablespoons flour 1 teaspoon vanilla 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon 1/8 teaspoon nutmeg 1/8 teaspoon all-spice 1/8 teaspoon ginger 6 or more peeled and thinly sliced apples Dorothy is a big fan of Winesap or Red Jonathan apples in her pie, but she says they are difficult to find unless you go to an orchard. “I find them in the fall and then store them,” she says. Dorothy has used Granny Smith and Gala when she’s been unable to find the others. She mixes the ingredients together and puts them in the bottom crust. The second crust is set on top. Sometimes she cuts the second crust in strips and forms a lattice pattern on top of the apple mixture. The hard part is the waiting.


Fall 2017 | todaystransitionsnow.com

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New ! LEARN SOMETHING

Write a book. 2 1

PHOTO MELISSA DONALD

Do your research. Writing a book requires research. When Popham was writing her novel, Back Home in Landing Run, she utilized the public library in Louisville, the genealogy library in Nelson County, Kentucky, and the library at Nazareth College. She also made good use of boxes of family letters that her grandmother had sent to her great aunt, which provided details on what life was like in Nelson County in the early 1900s. Doing research ensures that the details in a fictional story are accurate and believable.

Organize the ideas.

Mary Popham of Clifton, Kentucky, has written novels such as Back Home in Landing Run and Love is a Fireplace.

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Mary Popham of Clifton, Kentucky, says the first step in writing a book is to organize your ideas by creating an outline. She admits that she is a “pantster,” who writes by the seat of her pants: “I write my outline in retrospect,” she says. Whether you create your outline before, during, or after writing, it is essential to create a web of ideas to ensure all plot points come to a successful conclusion by the end.

4

3

Write freely.

“I’m giving advice I don’t take myself,” Popham admits when she instructs others to write freely and not stop every couple of minutes to edit. She says, “You’ll get yourself stuck because you’re trying to be perfect. Put the images on the paper, and come back to it later to edit.”

Revise. Revision is a multi-step process that Popham says involves reviewing word choice, crossing out adverbs, adding more action verbs, using concrete language, purging sentimental dialogue, and deleting scenes that don’t contribute to the plot. After a serious whole-book revision, she recommends going through each chapter.


New ! LEARN SOMETHING

Start a Neighborhood Watch. 2 Develop relationships.

1

Call the local police station or MetroCall (311) to notify the police that a Neighborhood Watch is being formed and to request a liaison. This liaison has multiple functions, including being the source of pertinent information that may impact the neighborhood such as how many car thefts have been reported in the surrounding area. Brimm says, “You have to establish a working relationship with the police department.”

Meet like-minded neighbors and utilize technology.

Former LMPD Sergeant Todd Brimm says social media is a good way to promote interest in a neighborhood watch program.

4

Make contact with neighbors to see if there is interest in starting a Neighborhood Watch program. Once that has been done, former LMPD sergeant Todd Brimm suggests that neighbors “build a foundation fast using social media such as nextdoor.com." Neighbors can quickly and easily share pertinent information online. “Information is the lifeblood of a neighborhood watch,” Brimm says. Some Neighborhood Watch groups utilize closed Facebook groups to share information.

Rotate leadership. Because Neighborhood Watch groups can take a long time to develop, Brimm says volunteers have to get help. He suggests rotating leadership every six months to a year to keep volunteers from getting burnt out. For more information and tips, check out Metro Louisville’s website: https://louisvilleky.gov/government/police/start-neighborhood-watch-program.

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3

Have a meeting. The police liaison will help you set up a meeting to bring together interested neighbors. At the meeting, the officer will provide information on crime statistics for the area and answer neighbors’ questions. Neighbors can then begin the work of organizing the neighborhood into sections, naming section captains and co-captains, and determining what issues the neighbors would like to address in the Neighborhood Watch program. Brimm says neighbors who are developing a program need to “set their goals high, but keep their expectations low.” It can take years for a Neighborhood Watch to develop and flourish, but persistence is the key.


It’s

! d l O g n i t t e G k Hec

PROBLEM: Sagging

BY YELENA SAPIN

used to es don’t work the way they di bo r ou en wh r fo s ion lut So

Breasts

According to Louisville Plastic Surgeon Dr. Martin Fox of Plastic and Aesthetic Surgery Specialists, there are two age-related phenomena that contribute to loss of breast perkiness over time. The first is the overall loss of skin elasticity, a natural consequence of getting older that makes it increasingly difficult for our skin to combat the downward pull of gravity. Another is deflation, or loss of volume. “In the breast, this combination results in various degrees of sagging or drooping, which in medical terminology is called ptosis,” Fox says.

PROBLEM: Loss

of Nighttime Vision Trouble seeing at night, especially while driving, is most often the first symptom of age-related eye diseases like cataracts, macular degeneration, and glaucoma, says Louisville ophthalmologist Rishi Kumar, MD, of Kumar Eye Institute. The problem can also be caused by dry eyes, a condition that tends to become worse toward the end of the day. Changes in the eye’s ability to focus as we age can also make it more difficult to see in dim lighting. “The pupil dilates when it’s dark,” says Kumar, “and that can induce a bit of nearsightedness at night.” 16 todaystransitionsnow.com | Fall 2017

SOLUTION:

SOLUTION:

Surgical Options

Non-surgical Options

Plastic surgery is the most effective method of returning sagging breasts to a perkier, more youthful appearance. Breast implants are used to restore volume. Mastopexy, or breast lift, is a surgical procedure that results in a tighter, lifted look. Depending on her circumstances and desired results, a woman can choose to have just one of these procedures or both simultaneously, Fox says.

While they don’t produce the type of dramatic results that are achieved with surgery, laser treatments can offer some skin tightening effects and overall improvement in skin quality. Another option for restoring volume and improving skin elasticity is bioidentical hormone replacement. “We don’t have a magic bullet to prevent the changes in our skin and body due to aging,” says Fox, “but hormone replacement can turn back the clock to a certain extent.”

SOLUTION:

SOLUTION:

Get Your Eyes Checked

Practice Healthy Eye Habits

In addition to making sure your vision correction prescription is up to date, regular eye exams and screenings can help detect early signs of eye disease and get you started on treatment. Your doctor can also prescribe medication for dry eye or suggest overthe-counter lubricating drops to help maintain the film of tears that protects and lubricates the surface of the eye.

Ask your eye doctor about daily multivitamins or supplements that can benefit eye health. To prevent or alleviate dry eye symptoms, limit your screen time and take frequent breaks. “Blinking is our natural tear pump,” says Kumar, “but we don’t blink as much when we’re sitting in front of the computer or staring at a screen.” Finally, don’t smoke, and avoid secondhand smoke as it has been shown to accelerate the formation of cataracts and the progression of macular degeneration.


Fall 2017 | todaystransitionsnow.com

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Caregiver

CIRCLE BY TORIE TEMPL

E

Wake Up Call For a better sleep pattern, try maintaining the same daily routine. If your loved one is used to getting up early for work, then continue this schedule and add meaningful tasks throughout the day. A normal routine can be the most effective way to ensure proper sleep. — Amy Southworth, director of nursing and case management at Home Instead Senior Care

Movement Therapy Physical activity may be a challenge when mobility is limited; however, Amy Southworth, director of nursing and case management at Home Instead Senior Care, has provided practical tips to overcome inactivity in your loved one. “Things as simple as participating in their own personal care and meal preparation can work on range of motion,” she says. “More specialized exercise programs can be followed as well, but in my experience, the participation in day-to-day tasks makes the individual feel more useful and in control of their care and environment. Just a few things that I incorporate into my client’s plan of care are: walking to the mailbox/newspaper box every day; accompanying the caregiver to the grocery store and walking while pushing the cart; and supervising or helping with cooking — standing at the counter enhances endurance.”

Clockwork Sleep Mode If achy muscles are a problem when sleeping, try a recliner or lift chair that offers more positions for a comfortable night’s sleep. — Cheryl Hepp Basham, retired project manager/specialist at Jefferson County Public Schools

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According to Kayla Cook, registered nurse and owner of Caring Excellence Personalized Home Care Service, the elderly don’t feel thirst strongly and can become dehydrated easily since their total body water decreases with age. If swallowing water is a problem for your loved one, try ice cream, puddings, yogurt, soups, or jello, which also count toward their daily fluids. “Set a timer every hour to remind the caregiver to offer a beverage,” says Cheryl Hepp Basham, retired project manager/specialist at Jefferson County Public Schools. “Use whatever beverage your loved one prefers — water, flavored water, Kool-Aid, tea (hot or cold), and lemonade are favorites. Popsicles are an alternative way to offer fluids.”


Fall 2017 | todaystransitionsnow.com

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Shake Your Family Tree and see what falls out

Start researching and you may get hooked on digging into your ancestral past

BY MARIE BRADBY PHOTOS MELISSA DONALD

U

ncovering your family history is one of the most priceless legacies that you can leave your descendants.

Louisville has some of the best resources in the state and in some cases, in the nation, for tracing your ancestry, including: The Filson Historical Society, the Genealogy Library at the Church of Latter Day Saints, the History and Genealogy section of the Louisville Free Public Library, as PAGE 22>>

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How do you get started? Carrie Bratcher, librarian at the Filson, and Joe Hardesty, the Kentucky History and Genealogy librarian with the Louisville Free Public Library, have been helping people with their family history research for decades. Here are their tips to get you started: • Talk with your oldest living relative to capture as much oral information as possible. Get a young relative to help with making an audio or video recording of the session to get them involved. • Ask about the birth, marriage, and death dates of relatives. “When was grandma mar-

ried? Where is she buried? What did she do for a living? Where did she live?” Ask these type of questions for all aunts, uncles, cousins, grandparents, etc. • Have a scrapbook or photo album on hand to spark memories. Capture family stories and yarns. • Fill out a Family Pedigree (Ancestral) Chart, typically a four-generation compilation that starts with you and goes back to your eight sets of great grandparents with birth and death dates and locations and residences. This is the nucleus of your family tree. (Free printable charts are

available online at many sites, including http://www.genealogicalstudies.com/eng/forms.asp) • Fill out a Family Group Record on each set of parents, grandparents, etc., which allows for detailed information about each person such as religion, occupation, other spouses, wives, and children. • Visit a local genealogy library and search through documents, microfilm, and online databases such as ancestry.com and familysearch.com to gather more family information. • Mine vital statistics records, such as birth and death certificates and U.S. Census data.

• Fill out a Resource Entry/ Source Form as you go along to document your research. If you are seeking admission to a society such as the Daughters of the American Revolution, you will need proof of your findings. If you find some information in a book, photocopy the title page to save the title, author, publisher, and publication date.

<< PAGE 20

“THE INTERNET HAS REVOLUTIONIZED RESEARCH. RESEARCH USED TO BE GOING TO A LIBRARY AND GOING THROUGH BOOKS AND MICROFILM. THAT’S CRUCIAL, BECAUSE NOT EVERYTHING IS ONLINE. BUT THE INTERNET AND DIGITIZATION OF DOCUMENTS HAS CHANGED HOW WE CAN CONDUCT OUR RESEARCH.” Heather Stone Potter, Filson Historical Society

well as the national headquarters of the Sons of the American Revolution.

Hooked on Family It’s like slowly uncovering a mystery in a good book. That’s the joy and intrigue of digging into your ancestral past, and it keeps many people hooked on researching their family histories for decades. Betty Rolwing Darnell of Taylorsville, Kentucky, got interested in her family history in the 1960s when her aunt visited Hengeler, Germany, the ancestral home of the Rolwing family. Betty, now 75, was a student at Nazareth College in Bardstown then, and after some research, she not only found her original immigrant family members — the parents and their nine children — but the ship that they traveled on in 1844. It was a sailing ship called the Albers. “It intrigued me,” she says. “I was determined to find those names. These were third great grandparents. I actually lucked out. Years before, my cousin had found out that this family had a copy of the original records when they came over — the parish records with names and ages of the kids. And the name of the ship. So, a lot of stuff that people desperately look for, I already had.” How did she find other information? PAGE 24>>

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<< PAGE 22

She went to Salt Lake City. “The Louisville Genealogical Society makes a trip to Salt Lake every year, and that’s how I found the records in Germany, the actual baptismal records of the kids and the parents and the marriage records. They had been microfilmed.” Why did the Rolwings immigrate? “Basically they were draft dodgers,” Betty says. “Though there was no war at the time, the eldest son didn’t want to serve in the Prussian army (Germany wasn’t formed until 1871), so they came over. The family settled near Charleston, Missouri, on the Mississippi River, raising corn, potatoes, and livestock on farms. Her cousins still live on the land today. By 1981, Betty had enough information to publish a book on the Rolwings, a narrative about the family and vital statistics on the descendants. She’s found new cousins and plans to publish a new edition of the book. She’s found other stories, too. Through her Elder family branch, she is related to Mother Catherine Spalding, the founder of the Sisters of Charity of Nazareth in Bardstown and the namesake of Spalding University. And her husband, Carl, is related to the notorious Henry Magruder, a Confederate guerrilla soldier during the Civil War. He was convicted and hanged in Louisville at age 21. “He was standing on a public stage and suddenly the floor gave way beneath him,” Betty said.

Recognizing Your Past Heather Stone Potter, the curator of Photographs and Print Collection with the Filson Historical Society, has found several PAGE 26>>

How to Preserve Your Family Heirlooms • Scan and digitize documents, newspaper clippings, and photos. Store the digital information in several places, such as on a flash drive and a DVD. • Upload family data and photos to a cloud server as another avenue to preserve and share the information (you can set who can access the information.) • Remove photos from old photo albums

— especially black paper ones and those with the ‘magnetic’ plastic sheets — if it can be done safely. Place the photos in acid-free albums in plastic sleeves. If you think removal will damage an item, leave it. You can put acid-free paper between the black paper pages. • Don’t write on photos. Write on file folder labels and place them on the outside of the plastic sleeve. If

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you must write on the photos, use pencil rather than pen, which will leave an indentation. • Print as many photos as you can as another safeguard. Prints can last hundreds of years. • Store photos on DVDs and flash drives as another safeguard, though digital files last less time and need maintenance to keep from corrupting. Also,

digital formats change, hampering accessibility. It takes a lot of time to go through and decide what you want to keep. • Store documents and letters in acid-free archival boxes. You want to keep them from getting smudged and handled too much. • Wedding dresses can be stored in archival boxes and quilts in pillowcases. • Some family

documents, photos, and art might qualify to be donated to a historical society or museum. They will be maintained and preserved so future generations can have access to them. • Distribute mementos to relatives instead of storing them, so they can be enjoyed and make you and other family members feel closer to the relative who owned them.


Fall 2017 | todaystransitionsnow.com

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For more information: << PAGE 24

intriguing stories through her and her husband’s family lines. “Through my grandfather’s line, the Days, my family actually traces back to 1639, coming over from England on a ship after the Mayflower,” says Heather, 31. “The name of the ship was the Whale. They landed in Rhode Island. And were definitely Puritans. “I’ve had trouble finding the primary document sources,” she says. “The secondary sources are strong, and I feel confident. But, if you want to get into First Families of Rhode Island, you need primary sources.” Her husband Brendan Potter had better luck finding a patriot in his family line. “In the past year, my husband found he is a descendant of a patriot, Thomas Potter. It goes back through his immediate paternal line. Brendan was admitted into the Sons of the American Revolution. “From what I can remember, his ancestor enlisted in Virginia with a group of men. They fought for a while, but not very long. He furloughed a few times in the winters, then after that, the whole group actually moved down to the Bowling Green area. We haven’t found records that they got land for

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their service. But a handful of these soldiers all ended up in the same area. They migrated to Kentucky with their families. When you go back that far, the records are sparse. “A map from the 1880s shows the family homestead and property. The University of Kentucky had it. You could see adjacent areas of land that the other men had. We were super excited. But the sad story is, with Google Maps, we realized his family’s land is now part of Interstate 65, actually an exit ramp. My husband was going to go walking on the family property. We were very disappointed.” Heather also found that her great grandparents, Ethelwyn Brownell Day and Clarence Burton Day, were missionaries in China. They lived in Hangzhou (Hangchow), married there, had their children there, and Clarence, a Presbyterian minister, taught at the University. “The Day line is super cool,” Heather says. “My grandfather was born in China along with two siblings. I knew that growing up. My great grandmother Ethelwyn actually got her passport in 1916 and traveled to China to be a missionary and married my great grandfather in China. Her passport was digitized in the National Archives. I found it through Ancestry.com. I found her passport photo and the reason she was going over there. I found their marriage license showing when they got married in China. “My (late) grandfather went back over once or twice, to where he grew up. He was at this school with other missionary kids. My mom is going to travel over there with my uncle to do the same kind of journey as her father and grandparents. They want to see the family home, which I think is still standing, and the university. The internet has made research faster and easier, Heather says. “I found the marriage certificate of my great grandmother and her passport application at the Louisville Free Public Library on Ancestry.com. The public library has a subscription that you access for free.” Online, she also quickly found some paternal data. “My dad came into town. He’s the Stone line.

Filson Historical Society 1310 S. 3rd St. Louisville, KY 40208 502.635.5083 http://filsonhistorical.org/about-us/

For a daily fee of $10 or a basic annual membership fee of $25 to $70, researchers can have access to all documents, photos, and databases, including ancestry.com. The History and Genealogy Collection of the Louisville Free Public Library 301 York St. Louisville, KY 40203 502.574.1611 http://www.lfpl.org

There are no fees. The physical collection of books, newspapers, birth and death indexes, microfilm and more, is only available at the main library downtown, but free access to all digital information, including ancestry.com, is available at all branches. Some databases are accessible for free online at home. Sons of the American Revolution 809 W. Main St. Louisville, KY 40202 502.589.1776 https://www.sar.org

The largest male lineage organization in the U.S. is headquartered in Louisville. Admission for use of the library is $5 a day for non-SAR members and free for SAR members. 2017 Family History Seminar & Book Fair Sponsored by the Louisville Genealogical Society https://kylgs.org

Featuring Cyndi Ingle, founder of Cyndi’s List of Genealogy Sites on the Internet. October 21 8:30am to 4pm Holiday Inn Louisville East - Hurstbourne

We got to talking about genealogy, and in three hours we had traced back four lines just sitting on our couch. That’s further than he had gone in all those years. We searched through census records and city directories and marriage licenses. It’s incredible to find that access for free online.”


2268

SHELBYVILLE

BY LUCY M. PRITCHETT

Boone St ation Rd

Jail Hill Rd

Lunch Plus One

THE LUNCH:

Shelbyville, KY

558

n Mt Ede

60

Rd

3rd St

5th St

Midland Trail 7th St

Midland Trail

53

3 28 todaystransitionsnow.com | Fall 2017

Lunch Plus One

is something to do with a friend or two or a relative for a simple outing. For Fall, the Lunch Plus One combines a Christmas extravaganza and, because youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll need to keep your strength up, a hearty Southern-style lunch.

TIP: For this excursion,

I recommend doing your browsing and shopping before lunch. After lunch, you will be ready for a nap.

Unfortunately, the Inn at Science Hill located in the Wakefield-Scearce property is temporarily closed. Plans are in the works, however, to re-open the renovated space as The Georgian Room at Science Hill, according to manager Patti Wilson. Until then, there are restaurants in Shelbyville where you can refresh and revive yourself after your shopping extravaganza. Try La Cocina de Mama Mexican Cuisine (535 Main Street) located right across the street from Wakefield-Scearce. I can attest to the tasty, fresh, and abundant lunches served there. Also Bell House Restaurant (721 Main Street) and McKinleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bread Shop & Deli (715 Main Street) are popular.


Fall 2017 | todaystransitionsnow.com

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Lunch Plus One

Each room at Wakefield Scearce has a different holiday décor theme.

THE PLUS ONE:

Wakefield-Scearce Galleries

525 Washington Street Shelbyville, KY

Distance: The galleries and the inn are located in the same building, making it the perfect fall/winter excursion.

If you haven’t yet made it a Christmas holiday tradition to take the short drive to Shelbyville to visit Wakefield-Scearce Galleries, this is the year to begin. A trip to the galleries is a pleasant excursion at any time, but during the holidays the twinkling lights and elegant decor are especially attractive. Located in a former girls’ college preparatory school, the rooms in the main gallery and the courtyard shops are filled with English antique furniture, silver, fine oil paintings, jewelry, and accessories. There is also a garden shop and a children’s boutique. And, beginning Wednesday, November 8, all the rooms will bedazzle with fully decorated, themed Christmas trees that will appeal to everyone. Whether your interest is in musical instruments, nature, or horses, there is bound to be at least one tree of the more than 30 to inspire. Hours: Mon-Sat 10am-5pm, Closed Sunday 502.633.4382

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<< PAGE 28


DEAR ME:

Advice you’d give your younger self

PHOTO ADELE REDING PHOTOGRAPHY

Dear 22-year-old Judy, So, you just finished college, and now you’re heading to work in the inner city of Indianapolis before you start a graduate program in social work. If you’ll let me, I’d like to share some advice from a more “experienced” version of you.

LOOKING BACK AT YOUR TEEN YEARS AND EARLY ADULTHOOD, YOU REGULARLY BASED YOUR IDENTITY AND SELF-WORTH ON YOUR PERFORMANCE. YOU THOUGHT PEOPLE WOULD LIKE YOU MORE IF YOU WERE A STAR IN EVERYTHING YOU DID, BUT TRUST ME, YOU’LL LEARN MUCH MORE ABOUT YOUR CHARACTER FROM CHALLENGES AND FAILURES THAN YOU EVER WILL FROM THE DAYS WHEN THINGS SEEM EASY. Make it your goal to always tell the truth. It’s too exhausting not to be honest, and in the long run, the truth usually comes out one way or another. Have integrity. Follow through on your word. Be someone others can trust. You’ll need more help along the way than you can even imagine at this point, so build solid relationships. 32 todaystransitionsnow.com | Fall 2017

Judy Lambeth

Own up to your mistakes and learn from them. It doesn’t feel good to fail or let someone down, but every misstep can be an opportunity to improve. Surround yourself with friends and associates who will give you honest feedback, and then listen to them. We all have blind spots we need help with. Always try to learn new things. Find mentors you can turn to for advice. Embrace change. Challenge yourself. You can’t lead if you’re fearful all the time. And once you’ve learned a few things, be a mentor to someone else.

Two last thoughts . . . First — be generous and kind. You’ll never regret acting this way toward people, and I promise you, generosity and kindness will come back to you. Finally — be positive. There will be a thousand things in your life you can’t control, but you can always control your own attitudes and reactions. I’ve had people accuse me of being too optimistic, but I firmly believe it is more helpful to look at situations through a positive lens than to assume failure. Enjoy the ride. Trust me — everything turns out great!

Sincerely, Judy Lambeth President and CEO of Maryhurst


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Wise&Well

Tidbits, news, and tips to help you live your healthiest years yet

BY MARK KAELIN

Functional Fitness “Our goal is to help members become better at life,” says Erin Stimac, coach and manager at Iron Tribe Fitness in Louisville. New members can expect individualized programming, intensive coaching in all aspects of health and fitness, and workouts that are fun. “What you do in the gym should improve what happens outside the gym,” adds Stimac. To see if Iron Tribe is a good fit for you contact Stimac at 502.619.5232 or estimac@irontribefitness.com.

Watch Your Step “Falls are the result of a combination of environmental factors like a wet floor or poor lighting and intrinsic factors like changes in vision and decreases in strength and balance as we age,” says Beth Quinn, physical therapist and assistant professor at Bellarmine University. “The good thing is that falls are preventable,” adds Patty Gillette, physical therapist and professor emeritus at Bellarmine University. “Scheduling a yearly vision exam, reviewing your medications with your primary care physician every six to 12 months to discuss any unwanted side effects, regularly exercising, and performing a home safety assessment are four ways older adults can dramatically reduce their risk of falling,” Gillette says. Assessment forms are available at the Centers for Disease Control and National Council on Aging’s websites.

Neighborhood Health Checkups TLC for Your Memory Regularly engaging in lifestyle enrichment activities like playing games, reading, and crafting can help delay the onset of some of the symptoms associated with Alzheimer’s, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s, and dementia. Norton Healthcare’s Brain Games Café provides a stimulating and comfortable environment for individuals with neurological conditions to engage in these activities. The Café is held every third Wednesday of the month from 10am to noon at Norton Healthcare-St. Matthews. For more information call 502.629.1234. 34 todaystransitionsnow.com | Fall 2017

Routine checkups and screenings can help you avoid serious health problems. Norton Healthcare’s Mobile Prevention Center regularly visits sites around Metro Louisville providing breast, cervical, prostate, and colorectal cancer screenings; digital mammograms; individual comprehensive cancer risk assessments; and risk reduction education. Check https://nortonhealthcare.com or call 502.899.6842 to find out when the mobile center will be near you.

An Easy Way to Feel Better

Tamp Down Tremors

Arthritis, joint pain, difficulty walking, muscle weakness or pain, balance issues, and a myriad of other health conditions can all be improved with physical therapy. To address this, Bellarmine University and the Catholic Enrichment Center at 32nd Street and West Broadway have partnered to provide free physical therapy services to Metro Louisville residents. For more information or to schedule an appointment call 502.776.0262 or 502.272.8353.

Essential tremors is a disorder that causes involuntary, rhythmic shaking of the body with movement. “Yoga, meditation, and progressive relaxation techniques can reduce the impact of essential tremors,” says Natalie Vance, physical therapist at Norton Healthcare. Vance leads a weekly exercise class for individuals with essential tremors at Norton Brownsboro Hospital on Mondays from 5-6pm. To find out more about the class call 502.559.3230 or email Natalie at natalie.elliott@ nortonhealthcare.org


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What to Wear

BY ERIN FUST / PHOTO MELISSA DONALD

Feel Good Fashion

SCARF

Eileen Fisher scarf, $158

If you have limited mobility, try an outfit that looks chic yet is comfortable and easy to put on and take off.

Why It Works

Leggings are a trend that are sticking around. You can wear them under dresses or with a longer tunic, but even better, finding a structured pant with a flexible waist band will give you the ease of slipping them on and not having to fool with a zipper or button. These Eileen Fisher pants are the epitome of chic and can be worn several ways. The tailored legs make them the perfect match to a less structured top. Add on an easy-to-layer scarf and slip-on loafer, and you’re ready to head out the door with ease.

TOP

Eileen Fisher top, $148

SHOES

Jack Rogers shoes, $99

All items available at Dillard’s 5000 Shelbyville Road, 502.893.4400

LEGGINGS Eileen Fisher pant, $168

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BOOK CLUB: THE MONDAY NIGHT BOOK CLUB

Catching Up Here’s what other area clubs are reading next:

From the book:

“The central question posed by Gestalt psychologists was the question the behaviorists had elected to ignore: How does the brain create meaning?,” and Lewis also writes, “he suggested a new definition of nerd: a person who knows his own mind well enough to mistrust it.”

THE MONDAY NIGHT BOOK CLUB WHEN: Once a month WHERE: Member's houses CONTACT:

Marilyn Schorin, mschorin@ gmail.com

Have you read this?

THE PAGE TURNERS: WINE, WOMEN, AND WORDS The Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles Contact: Susan Ryan, susanryan94@yahoo.com

STORY & PHOTOS BY PATTI HARTOG

The Monday Night Book Group, with 13 members (including one virtual member who moved to Amsterdam for work) has been together since 2004. The club meets monthly, with hostess responsibilities rotating among the members. The hostess selects the book, which can be either fiction or nonfiction, and the group enjoys light refreshments and wine as they have their monthly discussions. Creative hostesses sometimes choose to prepare book-themed snacks. Founding member Marilyn Schorin shared her insights on the group’s conversation about a recent selection, The Undoing Project by Michael Lewis. This nonfiction book is about the collaboration and rivalry between two psychologists, Amos Tversky and Daniel Kahneman. What did you learn from this book? The book is about the characters, but highlights the importance of their work, which forms the basis for our widespread use of algorithms in such diverse areas as medicine, investments, advertising, and self-driving cars. Kahneman, if fact, won the Nobel Prize in economics. The scientists would likely have shared the prize but for Tversky’s untimely death. How did the book change your thinking? I became far more aware of the impact of programmed behaviors in our lives, including evaluation of medical treatments (in contrast to a physician’s ‘clinical judgement’), stock picking and stock trading, and emotional manipulation by media and social media. What was extraordinary was that the work of these 38 todaystransitionsnow.com | Fall 2017

two psychologists has such a pervasive and all-encompassing effect on our daily lives. What did the book bring to mind? Michael Lewis wrote several books that our members had read, including Moneyball and The Big Short. The Undoing Project in many ways expands on the themes of those books. I had previously read Daniel Kahneman’s book (one of the two scientists) called Thinking Fast And Slow, which shows how our attitudes and behaviors can be manipulated. What is a favorite book you’ve read? My favorite book of all time — what a tough question that is — is probably John Irving’s A Prayer for Owen Meany. Irving pulls you into the unlikely friendship of two boys and creates amazing tension and beauty in the story.

THE CHURCH LADIES The Zookeeper’s Wife by Diane Ackerman Contact Jean Jones, jeantozerjones@gmail.com

STRATHMOOR BOOK CLUB Into the Water by Paula Hawkins Contact Stephanie Lewis, facebook.com/strathmoorBC


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WHAT I KNOW NOW PHOTO COURTESY OF MERRILY ORSINI

Merrily Orsini

Merrily Orsini is 70 “and proud of it.” She founded Eldercare Solutions in 1981, sold it in 1996, and in 1998 founded Corecubed, which specializes in marketing for aging care companies. She continues to serve as president and CEO of the company and is a well-known conference speaker on aging care. BY LUCY M. PRITCHETT What was a defining moment in your career?

What should a woman taste at least once?

In 1981 when I started my first business Eldercare Solutions. I was asked to provide homecare for a woman who had Alzheimer's. That first client inspired me to learn about Alzheimer's and dementia and how to provide a better place for people to age in place.

Indian food. Turmeric, a spice often used in Indian cooking, is currently popular in terms of longevity and mental clarity.

What drives you now?

I still get up and go to work every day. I still have that passion for providing solutions to aging care. Also my grandchildren are reasons to stay healthy and stay active. What advice would you give the younger you?

I would have put a little more balance in work and family. I was a single mom, and I didn't take much time to smell the roses. How can a woman make her point without raising her voice?

Lower her tone. Women's voices tend to get a little screechy. But if you repeat your message calmly and in a lower tone, you can get your point across.

What book has influenced you?

Being Mortal: Medicine and What Happens in the End by Atul Gawande. The author is a surgeon, and the book discusses that although medicine has extended our lives, the end goal should be quality of life for patients and families. What were your plans for yourself?

I was supposed to be a lawyer, and I was heavily involved in politics. I attended the 1968 Democratic National Convention as a delegate from Arkansas. That's when I lost my respect for politics. What was your greatest loss, and how did you get through it?

The death of my mother. She was so instrumental in my life. I used to talk to her every day. I got through the loss by staying busy and loving more intensely those around me.

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Merrily Orsini

What did you learn from your mom?

She was an attorney and a very wise woman. She taught me to love travel and to respect people of all kinds. She taught me to be self-sufficient. I was never hampered by the fact that I was a woman. Who was a role model when you were young?

Federal Judge Florence Allen. I met her when I was 8 at a luncheon that I attended with my mom. We got into a conversation that continued for many years. From the time we met until I was 14 or so we wrote to each other. She mentored me in so many ways.

Pet peeve?

People not listening and formulating a defensive response before they've heard the question. Mantra?

For a long time I have used “Onward and Upward.” Pick yourself up and keep going. Biggest issue in aging today?

Demographics. Our population is aging so rapidly. We are trying to cut costs in a system in which the usage of that system is increasing. It is like the pig and the python. This year, 2017, is the first year in the U.S. when there are more people over 65 than under 5.


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PHOTOS PATTI HARTOG Sue Schonberger demonstrates the split stance. Without moving your feet and legs, rotate at the hips and look around from side to side. This exercise also benefits your hips.

BY MEGAN S. WILLMAN

T

o maintain a healthy lifestyle, we are encouraged to exercise moderation in our eating, drinking, and spending habits.

This guidance sounds simple in principle, but we know it can be easier said than done. The same is true for our relationship with gravity. Some of us may take our good balance for granted; others may be worried about the possibility of a fall. Maintaining our physical balance is much like other areas of our lives: good practice brings good results. Margie Jones, yoga instructor at Baptist Health/Milestone Wellness Center, believes that staying steady on our feet is a critical component to both emotional and physical health. “The feeling of balance will allow you to really live your life in the best way possible, to feel calm and confident, so that you can deal with the things that life throws at you. Having good balance will allow you to move about the world safely, to continue to enjoy your activities fully.” Chad Garvey, doctor of Physical Therapy at KORT Physical Therapy in downtown Louisville, says, “Our feet and ankles give our brains all the information we have about the earth.” Maintaining good balance, he suggests, requires focusing on three factors: strength, balance, and flexibility.

BALANCING ACT

Build-Your-Balance Exercises

Below are some exercises recommended by Chad and Margie, in conjunction with her Milestone Wellness Center colleagues Sue Schonberger (group exercise director) and Martha Thomas (Tai Chi/Qi Gong teacher):

You can do the ankle point and flex exercise while sitting or standing.

42 todaystransitionsnow.com | Fall 2017

• Stand in a doorway. Rock back and forth and then side to side without touching the door frame. • Ankle Point & Flex. Sitting in a chair, point your toes and then flex your foot. Do this 10 times per foot. This can also be done standing as a more challenging test. • Ankle rotation. Sit in a chair and extend your leg. Move your foot to the left, then to the right, then pull your foot toward your shin, and then point downward. Do this 10 times per foot. • Bend & Reach. Take a sticky note and reach up to affix it high up on your wall. Reach high enough that you’re on your toes. Next, move that same sticky note to a low point on the same wall so that you have to bend down. Repeat eight to 15 times. • Obstacle course. Put a few small objects on the floor of a room. Pick up something to carry (i.e., a laundry basket) and carry it while stepping over the small obstacles.


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BY BRITTANI DICK

DEFINITIONS: Alzheimer’s (n.) — An irreversible disease diagnosed with a diagnostic workup.

Vascular dementia (n.) —

W

e are taught many lessons in life, but an important one seems to fall through the cracks — how to deal with a loved one suffering from memory issues. So, what steps should you take when your loved one is developing memory problems? Who do you turn to? Courtney Martin, life enrichment director of programs at Masonic Homes of Louisville, offers professional advice on steps to take to effectively maneuver one of life’s toughest tasks.

An irreversible disease diagnosed with a diagnostic workup.

Encephalopathy (n.) — In most cases, diagnosed with clinical trials. Usually diagnosis occurs when the altered mental status accompanies another primary diagnosis such as kidney failure, liver disease, anoxia, or other conditions.

“First and foremost, make an appointment with a physician who specializes in Alzheimer’s and other dementias,” she states. During the initial appointments, your loved one will need a diagnostic workup that includes a clinical exam, medical history, an assessment of multiple cognitive domains, lab tests, and if necessary, a scan of the brain such as an MRI or CT scan. “The physician will also help you navigate the different choices you will have to make concerning therapies and medications. Clinical trials are an effective way to receive expert care, often free of cost while participating in important medical research. These trials grant your loved one access to potential treatments before they are widely available,” Courtney says. Once a physician is established, Courtney recommends that the family get connected with a local support group such as the one offered at Masonic Homes. The group meets every third Tuesday at 6:30pm in the Olmsted Bistro, and can be a great support system and source of education for the family. Some other helpful support groups include the Clarity Pointe Louisville group, which meets the third Friday of every month at 11:30am. Contact 502.337.3088. Or you can go to the Jewish Family and Career Services support group which meets on the second Friday of each month at 2pm. Contact 502.452.6341 ext. 103. PAGE 46>>

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According to Courtney Martin, Masonic Homes of Louisville. . . Alzheimer’s is not the sole cause of memory loss. There are other health issues that can play a devastating role. According to Courtney, these can include: • Cerebral vasculitis • Severe depression • Urinary tract infections • Metabolic problems and endocrine abnormalities such as thyroid problems, low blood sugar levels, low or high levels of sodium, low or high levels of calcium • Normal pressure hydrocephalus • Nutritional deficiencies

<< PAGE 44

“After the diagnosis, you must now explore the immediate safety of your loved one in his present environment,” Courtney states. Important questions to consider are: Can he still drive safely? Are his surroundings safe? Is there a firearm in the home? Can he care for himself? “If your loved one is in the mid to late stages of dementia, it is time to start exploring outside help,” she adds.

Courtney suggests hiring an attorney who specializes in elder care to get all legal and financial affairs in order. With the help of the attorney, begin working on the VA Aid and Attendance Benefit, which Courtney states can be a very lengthy process.

According to Benjamin Mast, a board-certified physician in geropsychology. . . the most common causes of memory impairment among the elderly that he treats are Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia. “Cognitive screening tests are often the first steps in evaluating these conditions and are followed up with a series of steps by a physician, including full history and physical exam, lab tests to rule out reversible causes of memory changes, and a brain scan,” he states. 46 todaystransitionsnow.com | Fall 2017

Courtney adds that many banks and financial institutions will no longer recognize a Power of Attorney, so completing the necessary steps to become a co-signer or co-owner on all financial accounts is imperative. “Also, don’t try to hide money,” she states. “If you apply for Medicaid help later on down the road, they will research five years of financial records to determine your eligibility.”

“At some point you will not be able to do this alone,” Courtney states. “In the later stages of Alzheimer’s, a patient must be supervised closely 24/7.


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How to Use These Directories CONTENTS

These directories are organized first by this location chart. On the following pages, you’ll find descriptive listings of local facilities in each of the eight categories listed under Contents at right. Larger enhanced listings are listed first and are paid for by the facility. Regular listings follow.

Payment Options: These definitions can help you navigate the payment options in each directory:

Adult Day Care............................50 Home Health.....................60 Aging in Place Communities.....51 Independent Living............. 68 Alzheimer’s Care....................52 Nursing/Rehab..................... 70 Assisted Living.........................56 Personal Care..................... 76

of services for people who have an extended physical illness, extended disability, or cognitive impairment. VA – Veterans Administration; provides financial assistance to retired veterans needing medical, surgical, and rehabilitative care. Hospice – a facility or service that provides supportive care for terminally ill patients and their families.

Private – consumer pays out-of-pocket. Private Ins. – could include Medicare supplements or HMOs/health insurance. KIPDA – Kentuckiana Regional Planning and Development Agency, which offers subsidies and Medicaid waivers. LTCi – long-term care insurance; helps cover the cost

Facilities by Location Use this chart and the map at left to quickly view facilities by location. Facilities are organized by zone letters and colors that coordinate with the map.

Christian Care Communities (Chapel House, Christian Health Center, Friendship House) Treyton Oak Towers The Altenheim Eastern Star Home HCM Adult Day Center Nazareth Home Twinbrook Assisted Living Apartments Clifton Oaks Care Center Nazareth Home – Clifton Sacred Heart Village Apartments I & II ElderClub Sacred Heart Village Apartments III Landmark of Louisville (Formerly Parkway)

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Zip Code

Zone

g Ag in

Facility Name

Ad u

lt D

ay

Ca re

in Pl ac Al e zh eim er ’s C As ar e sis te d Liv In in de g Liv p e in nd g e nt Nu rs in g/ Re ha Pe b rs on al Ca re

If you are interested in a listing, call 502.327.8855 or email advertising@todayspublications.com.

40203

A

X

X

X

X

X

40203 40204 40204 40204 40205 40205 40206 40206 40206 40211 40216 40217

A X X X X A X X X X X X A X X A X A X X X X X A X A X A X X X A X A X A X A X


in

g

in

Pl ac Al e zh eim er ’s C As ar e sis te d L iv in In g d L iv e p e in n d g e nt Nu rs in g/ Re Pe ha rs b on al Ca re

re Ca ay Ag

tD Belmont Village Masonic Homes of Kentucky - Louisville (Sally’s Garden, Sam Swope Care Center, Masonic Home Village, Miralea, The Meadow Active Lifestyle Community The Pillars Assisted Care Center) St. Matthews Care Center Westport Place Health Campus Hillcreek Rehabilitation and Care Center Bee Hive Homes of Lyndon Episcopal Church Home Magnolia Springs Senior Living Westport Care Center Brookdale Blankenbaker The Forum at Brookside Village East, Inc. Clarity Pointe Louisville Forest Springs Health Campus Magnolia Springs East Senior Living Symphony at Oaklawn Franciscan Health Care Center Wesley Manor Retirement Community (The Aldersgate, Hoskinson House and The Village) Bee Hive Homes of Smyrna Parkway Barton House Brownsboro Park Retirement Community Springhurst Pines - (Cornell Trace, Parr’s at Springhurst, Springhurst Health and Rehab) Morning Pointe Forest Hills Commons Glen Ridge Health Campus Good Samaritan Society Brookdale Stonestreet Heartsong Memory Care Park Terrace Health Campus Symphony at Valley Farms Green Valley Care Center Bee Hive Homes of Goshen Friendship Health & Rehab Exceptional Senior Living Masonic Homes of Kentucky - Shelbyville Green Meadows Health Care Center Elmcroft of Mt. Washington Bee Hive Homes of Grayson County

Zone

ul

Zip Code

Ad

Facility Name

40207 40207

B X X B X X X X X

40207 40207 40220 40222 40222 40222 40222 40243 40243 40243 40245 40245 40245 40245 40219 40219

B X B X X B X B X B X X X X B X X B X X B X X B X X X B X X B X B X X B X X B X X C X X C X X X X X

40228 40241 40241 40241

C X C X X C X C X X X X

40291 40299 40299 40299 40272 40272 40272 40272 47150 40026 40056 40059 40065 40047 40047 42754

C X X C X C X C X D X D X X D X D X X E X G X G X G X H X X X I X I X K X

X

X

X X X X X X

X X

X

X

X

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Adult Day Care Directory

Day program for adults who need to be monitored for safety reasons and/or need nursing care, treatments, incontinence care, and other health services. There are medical Adult Day Care facilities which must be licensed. Adult Day Care facilities that are social cannot provide nursing care. Some offer pickup and delivery services within a radius.

Christian Care Communities

ElderClub

Type: medical Hours open: M-F 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Cost per day: $60 Transportation available: yes Showers available: yes Therapy offered: Physical, occupational, speech, special arrangement Special services: Personal care, nurse on duty, medication administration, enrichment activities tailored to fit the individual’s needs, based on the internationally known “Best Friends” approach to care. Meals, home-like setting, safety. Owner: Christian Care Communities, Inc. (since 1884) Payment Accepted: private, Medicaid waiver, VA

Type: medical Hours open: M-F 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Cost per day: $60 Transportation available: $10 each way Showers available: yes Therapy offered: Special arrangement Special services: Medically supervised by professional staff. Each day filled with a variety of activities specially designed to meet the physical, social, emotional and intellectual needs of elderly who are frail, disabled or experiencing memory loss. Owner: ElderServe, Inc. Payment Accepted: private, Medicaid waiver, VA

1015 W Magazine St, Louisville, KY 40203 (502) 815-6465 • ChristianCareCommunities.org

631 S. 28th Street, Louisville, KY 40211 (502) 776-3066 • elderserveinc.org

HCM Adult Day Center

Heartsong Memory Care Adult Day Health Center

Type: Medical Hours open: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Cost per day: $66 Transportation available: no Showers available: no Therapy offered: Physical, occupational & speech by special arrangement Special services: Specializing in memory care, disability & families in need of respite. Geriatric psychiatric nurse on duty, medication administration. Experienced & caring staff. Daily exercise, stimulating activities for both mind & body. Lunch & snacks. Owner: Highlands Community Ministries Payment Accepted: Private, Medicaid, LTCi, VA

Type: medical Hours open: 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Cost per day: $60-$125 Transportation available: yes Showers available: yes Therapy offered: PT, OT, ST by arrangement Special services: Activities to promote cognitive, physical, social, and spiritual well-being. Secure indoor and outdoor space to move about freely. Assessments, medication administration, and health care by licensed nurses. Owner: Heartsong Memory Care LLC Payment Accepted: private, Medicaid Waiver, VA Contract

936 Barret Avenue, Louisville, KY 40204 (502) 459-4887 • hcmlouisville.org/adultday

9260 Stonestreet Road, Louisville, KY 40272 (502) 935-3300 • heartsong-mc.com

Click Here to Read These Listings On Our Website

Updates & Happenings | news you can use + events not to miss |

Winged Beauties

Experience the magical annual migration of monarch butterflies at the Louisville Zoo’s Flutter Fest. On September 23, Louisville’s Idlewild Butterfly Farm will be tagging and releasing 1,000 50 todaystransitionsnow.com | Fall 2017

BY GIOIA PATTON AND ANNA PATTERSON

butterflies into the wild as part of the grand finale of the Louisville Zoo’s “Butterflies n’ Blooms” Butterfly Exhibit, which is open for viewing through September 24.


Aging in Place Communities Directory

An Aging-in-Place community offers several levels of care on one campus. A resident could move into a retirement facility or assisted living facility, then utilize higher levels of nursing care when needed through personal care or nursing/rehab care. A resident’s room might change, but not his or her address.

The Forum at Brookside

Masonic Homes of Kentucky — Louisville Campus

Levels of care: retirement, personal care, nursing facility Capacity: retirement-240, personal care-24, nursing facility-60 Special services: A beautiful gated community, 24-hr security, chef prepared meals, flexible dining plan, indoor heated pool, new exercise room, recreational activities, pet friendly, a great staff and management team, gorgeous patio homes and apartment, continuum of care. Owner: Five Star Senior Living, Inc.

Levels of care: Independent living, personal care, skilled nursing, memory care Capacity: independent living-269 apts/12 patio homes; personal care-84; skilled nursing-136; memory care-56 Special services: Short-stay and outpatient rehab available for all levels of care. On-site dialysis clinic. Region’s only Life Care and Life Plan programs provide discounts on health care services to entry fee residents. Owner: Masonic Homes of Kentucky, Inc.

200 Brookside Dr, Louisville, KY 40243 (502) 245-3048 • theforumatbrookside.com

3701 Frankfort Ave, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 259-9627 • masonichomesky.com

Masonic Home of Shelbyville

Miralea and Meadow Active Lifestyle Community

Levels of care: assisted living, personal care, nursing facility Capacity: assisted living-21 apts., personal care-27, nursing facility-108 Special services: Award-winning staff provides nursing care, short stay and outpatient rehab, activities, dining and transportation. Easy access from I-64 on U.S. 60. Owner: Masonic Homes of Kentucky, Inc.

Capacity: 242 apts Special services: Coming in 2018. Upscale apartments with amenities including restaurant-style dining, concierge service, fitness and center, art studio and gallery, movie theater, spa, underground parking and more. Includes Life Care and a full continuum of care on campus, including assisted living, personal care, memory care and skilled nursing when you need it. 24/7 security. Owner: Masonic Homes of Kentucky, Inc.

711 Frankfort Rd, Shelbyville, KY 40065 (502) 633-3486 • masonichomesky.com

3701 Frankfort Ave, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 897-8727 • themeadowlifestyle.com

Nazareth Home

Nazareth Home – Clifton

Levels of care: Alzheimer’s, nursing/rehab, personal care Capacity: Alzheimer’s-48, nursing/rehab-118, personal-50 Special services: Nazareth Home is designed to offer rehab and restorative therapy, specialized in dementia care, personal care services and winning therapeutic recreation and exercise program. Mass celebrated on-site. Owner: Sisters of Charity of Nazareth

Levels of care: Alzheimer’s, nursing/rehab, personal care, independent Capacity: nursing/rehab-108, personal care-31, independent-16 Special services: Award-winning staff provides nursing care, short stay and outpatient rehab, activities, dining and transportation. Easy access from I-64 on U.S. 60. Therapeutic recreation and exercise programs. Mass celebrated on-site. Owner: Nazareth Home, Inc.

2000 Newburg Road, Louisville, KY 40205 (502) 459-9681 • nazhome.org

2120 Payne Street, Louisville, KY 40206 (502) 895-9425 • sacredheartlou.org

Springhurst Pines

Treyton Oak Towers

Levels of care: retirement, personal care, health and rehab center Capacity: patio homes-58 units, personal care-79 apts., nursing beds-90 Special services: Springhurst Pines has 3 distinctive senior communities, one great campus: Cornell Trace for independent living, Parr’s at Springhurst for personal care needs and Springhurst Health and Rehab for skilled nursing and rehabilitation. Owner: Baptist Homes, Inc.

Levels of care: skilled, retirement, personal care Capacity: retirement-165, skilled-60, personal care-40 Special services: Celebrating over 33 years of gracious retirement living. An elegant yet affordable continuum of care community in Old Louisville. Spacious apartments, beautiful dining room, valet parking, spa services, onsite therapy, dentist, bank, and more. Access to the arts and medical community. Owner: Third & Oak Corporation

3101 N Hurstbourne Parkway, Louisville, KY 40241 (502) 412-3775 • springhurstpines.org

211 W Oak St, Louisville, KY 40203 (502) 589-3211 • treytonoaktowers.com

Click Here to Read These Listings On Our Website Fall 2017 | todaystransitionsnow.com

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Alzheimer’s Care Directory

Alzheimer’s care is provided at different levels, from assisted living to the skilled care of nursing/rehab. Some facilities accept Alzheimer’s patients into their general care, and others have separate units designed to meet the specific needs of patients with this disease.

The Aldersgate at Wesley Manor

The Altenheim

Number of beds: 27 Separate unit: yes Cost per month: $4390-5900 Special services: Personal Care, including full medication management, licensed nurse on site 24/7, rehab and physician services, geriatric psychiatrist, secure memory garden, daily activities, chapel, beauty salon, satellite TV package, long-tenured staff. Priority placement for short-term rehab and skilled nursing. No long-term contracts, entrance fees or deposits. See Nursing/Rehab directory for advanced Alzheimer’s/dementia care. Owner: Methodist Retirement Homes of Kentucky Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

Number of beds: 32 Separate unit: no Cost per day: private: $292, semiprivate: $216 Level of care: Nursing/rehab, independent living, personal care Special services: Small, non-profit senior health care community located in the Highlands offering a secure Alzheimer’s unit. Our above average staff to resident ratio provides our residents with the highest quality of care by our skilled team of experts. Owner: The Altenheim Payment Accepted: private, LTCi

5012 E Manslick Rd, Louisville, KY 40219 (502) 969-3277 • WesMan.org

936 Barret Ave, Louisville, KY 40204 (502) 584-7417 • thealtenheim.org

Barton House

Belmont Village Senior Living St. Matthews

Number of beds: 20 Separate unit: yes (freestanding) Cost per month: $5790 Level of care: Personal care Special services: Barton House, a secure home-like residence, is designed exclusively for seniors with Alzheimer’s disease and other related memory impairments. We provide a specialized program that enhances quality of life. Owner: Goodworks Payment Accepted: private, LTCi

Number of beds: 28 Separate unit: yes Cost per day: $105 to $224 Level of care: Personal care Special services: Range of research-based, award winning programs for early to later stage memory loss. Programs identify interests and abilities, provide structured routine, and help maintain a sense of purpose. Memory care residents supported by specially trained staff in private, custom-designed area within the community. Owner: Belmont Village, L.P. Payment Accepted: private, LTCi

6830 Overlook Dr, Louisville, KY 40241 (502) 423-7177 • bartonlouisville.com

4600 Bowling Blvd, St. Matthews, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 721-7500 • belmontvillage.com

Clarity Pointe of Louisville

Episcopal Church Home Memory Care Center

Number of beds: 60 Separate unit: yes (freestanding) Cost per month: $5800-$6200 Level of care: Personal care Special services: Built with Purpose, staffed with Compassion because Memory Care is all we do. Licensed nursing staff available 24/7. 20 apartments each in 3 neighborhoods. Each neighborhood has its own dining room, living room, and engagement area. Transportation, Spa and salon services available. Our community opens to a secured outdoor park with covered walking area and beautifully landscaped walkways. Owner: Clarity Pointe Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

Number of beds: 52 Separate unit: yes Cost per day: $235 Level of care: Personal care Special services: Using a small, home-like neighborhood living design and very caring professional staff, we enhance wellness and encourage socialization. Wide variety of activities, open to persons of all faith traditions. Owner: Episcopal Church Home Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

Forest Hills Commons

Heartsong Memory Care

Number of beds: 28 Separate unit: yes Cost per day: call for details Level of care: Personal care Special services: •P  ersonalized support services by licensed nursing staff around the clock • Wide range of specialized social and recreational programs • Enclosed courtyard for outside activities and independence Owner: American Senior Communities Payment Accepted: private

Number of beds: 36 Separate unit: yes Cost per month: $4750-$5050 Level of care: Personal care Special services: Private rooms w/private showers; companion rooms avail; secure courtyards; meals & snacks; therapies (PT/OT/ST) & physician visits on site; med mgmt & admin health services coordinated by licensed nurses 24 hours/day. Owner: Heartsong Memory Care, LLC Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA Aid & Attendance

13700 English Villa Drive, Louisville, KY 40245 (502) 309-2190 •ClarityPointeLouisville.com

9107 Taylorsville Rd, Louisville, KY 40299 (502) 499-5533 • ascseniorcare.com/location/forest-hills-commons/

7504 Westport Rd, Louisville, KY 40222 (502) 736-7800 • echky.org

9260 Stonestreet Rd, Louisville, KY 40272 (502) 935-3300 • heartsong-mc.com

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Magnolia Springs Louisville Senior Living

Magnolia Springs East Louisville Senior Living

Number of beds: 20 Separate unit: yes Cost per month: $5750-$6450 Level of care: Memory care Special services: Home-like setting w/ all private apts. Our specialized program, Heartfelt Connections, enhances the lives of our residents by providing a safe, secure, and comfortable environment for your loved one with dementia. See our display ad in this issue. Owner: Grandview Care Payment Accepted: LTCi, VA

Number of beds: 20 Separate unit: yes Cost per month: $5495-$6295 Level of care: Memory care Special services: Home-like setting w/all private apts. Our specialized program, Heartfelt Connections, enhances the lives of our residents by providing a safe, secure, and comfortable environment for your loved one with dementia. See our display ad in this issue. Owner: Grandview Care Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

8225 Whipps Mill Rd, Louisville, KY 40222 (502) 716-5160 • Louisville.Magnolia-Springs.net

Masonic Home of Louisville — Memory Care 3701 Frankfort Ave, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 897-4907 • masonichomesky.com

Number of beds: 32 Separate unit: yes Cost per day: $194-$235 Level of care: Personal care Special services: Residents find fulfilling lives in our memory care neighborhood with trained staff providing 24/7 support. Private rooms/baths, social activities/fitness programs, comfortable and secure environment. New Beginnings and Inspirations programs offer holistic and personalized life enrichment. Owner: Masonic Homes of Kentucky, Inc. Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, Hospice, private ins.

13600 LaGrange Rd, Louisville, KY 40245 (502) 855-7500 • EastLouisville.Magnolia-Springs.net

Masonic Home of Louisville — Sam Swope Care Center 3701 Frankfort Ave, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 897-4907 • masonichomesky.com

Number of beds: 24 Separate unit: yes Cost per day: $320-$360 Level of care: Nursing/rehab Special services: Advanced memory care household offers Snoezelen room, secured courtyard, residential kitchen, salon services and community and campus security and monitoring. New Beginnings and Inspirations programs offer holistic and personalized life enrichment. Owner: Masonic Homes of Kentucky, Inc. Payment Accepted: Medicare, private, LTCi, Hospice, private ins.

Nazareth Home

Symphony at Oaklawn

Number of beds: 48 Separate unit: yes Cost per day: $278 Level of care: personal care, nursing/rehab Special services: A faith-filled senior neighborhood. Award-winning small neighborhood living design, very caring professional staff, gourmet dining, on-site religious services, secure green spaces, daily activities, beauty shop, rehab services. Open to persons of all faith traditions. Free tours. Owner: Sisters of Charity of Nazareth Payment Accepted: Private, LTCi, Medicare, Medicaid

Number of beds: 34 Separate unit: yes Cost per day: $147-$233 Level of care: personal care Special services: Intimate secured memory care neighborhood with private apartments and bathrooms, beautiful landscaped courtyard, enclosed sun-room, and activities rooms. Nurses and caregivers 24 hours/day, medication management. Owner: Compass Pointe Healthcare Payment Accepted: LTCi, VA

2000 Newburg Rd, Louisville, KY 40205 (502) 459-9681 • nazhome.org

100 Shelby Station Drive, Louisville, KY 40245 (502) 632-5500 • symphonyofoaklawn.com

Symphony at Valley Farms

10201 Valley Farms Blvd. Way, Louisville, KY 40272 (502) 937-3028 • symphonyatvalleyfarms.com

Number of beds: 34 Separate unit: yes Cost per day: $129-$152 Level of care: assisted living Special services: Our Memory Care offers a unique program called In The Moment, this focuses on the individual person instead of pre-determined activities, this approach engages your loved one in the moment they are experiencing right now and provides a compassionate and meaningful interaction. Owner: Compass Pointe Healthcare Payment Accepted: LTCi, VA

Enhanced Listings Providing more descriptive, larger and color information about your location. Four-issue rate is very reasonable $270 each or $90/month. Call 502.327.8855 or email Advertising@TodaysTransitionsNow.com.

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Click Here to Read These Listings On Our Website Assisted Living Directory Assisted living offers minimal assistance in care, such as providing meals, helping with baths, and offering reminders to take medications. While some residents drive, scheduled transportation may be provided. Daily activities are organized, and there is around-the-clock supervision. No health care is provided, and these facilities are not licensed, but certification is required.

Bee Hive Homes of Goshen

Bee Hive Homes of Grayson County

Number of units: 16 Cost per month: $3800-$4800 (all inclusive) Transportation available: No Special services: Assisted living with scenic views and easy access to primary roadways. Relax with compassionate caregivers and generous staffing. Enjoy fireplaces, a sunroom, gardens, and a chalet-style porch. Monthly rates and short-term stays. Owner: Eric and Catherine Sherrard Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

Number of units: 16 Cost per month: $3500 (all inclusive) Transportation available: free scheduled transportation Special services: Small homelike community. Staff provides personalized care 24 hours/day. Home cooked meals, house keeping/laundry/linen service, activities, free cable tv and wifi. Use our furniture or bring your own. Owner: John & Mary Nell Bouvier Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

12336 US Hwy 42, Goshen, KY 40026 (502) 292-3200 • beehivehomes.com

1417 Brandenburg Road, Leitchfield, KY 42754 (270) 668-4392 • beehivehomes.com

Bee Hive Homes of Lyndon

Bee Hive Homes of Smyrna Parkway

Number of units: 14 Cost per month: $3950 (all inclusive) Transportation available: free scheduled transportation Special services: Friendly home-like atmosphere. Home cooked meals, housekeeping/laundry/linen service, variety of activities, free cable TV. Caring and friendly staff. When it comes to care, small is huge! Call today for a tour. Owner: Michael & Michele Allen Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

Number of units: 15 Cost per month: $3300-3500 (all inclusive) Transportation available: free scheduled transportation Special services: Friendly home-like atmosphere. Home cooked meals, housekeeping/laundry services, variety of activities, cable TV — all included at no extra cost. Compassionate and friendly staff. Call today for a tour! Owners: Mark & Wilma Hegele Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

8401 LaGrange Rd, Louisville, KY 40222 (502) 541-4719 • beehivehomes.com

8800 Smyrna Parkway, Louisville, KY 40228 (502) 345-2634 • beehivehomes.com

Brookdale Stonestreet

Christian Care Communities’ Chapel House

Number of units: 60 Cost per month: Efficiency - $2420; 1BR-$3190; 2BR; $3930 Transportation available: Planned outings 2-3 times per week Special services: Located in a park like setting, residents enjoy home cooked meals, housekeeping/laundry services, cable/internet, transportation, recreational/social events, and safety pendants. All included at no additional costs. Our compassionate care staff is available 24/7. Respite stays available. Please call us today. Owner: Brookdale Senior Living, Inc. Payment Accepted: private, private ins., LTCi, VA

Number of units: 203 Cost per month: Studio starting at $665-$790 plus services (a la carte). Lower rates based on income. Transportation available: Planned outings 2-3 times per week Special services: Beautifully landscaped gardens with walking paths, outdoor pavilion. Nurse practitioner, on-site hair salon, grocery, fine dining, social events, medication reminders, bathing assistance, chaplains. Owner: Christian Care Communities Payment Accepted: private, Sec 8 & HUD

9521 Stonestreet Rd, Louisville 40272 (502) 935-5884 • www.Brookdale.com

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945 S 5th St, Louisville, KY 40203 (502) 585-5656 • ChristianCareCommunities.org

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Christian Care Communities’ Friendship House

Elmcroft of Mt. Washington

Number of units: 184 Cost per month: Studio and 1BR apts. $816-938 plus services (a la carte). Lower rates based on income. Transportation available: planned outings 2-3 times per wk. Special services: Beautifully landscaped gardens with walking paths, outdoor pavilion. On-site hair salon, grocery, restaurant-style dining, scheduled transportation, social events, medication reminders, bathing assistance, Chaplains. Owner: Christian Care Communities Payment Accepted: private, Sec 8 & HUD

Number of units: 75 Cost per month: call for rates Transportation available: Yes Special services: Elmcroft is a charming, home-like community designed to provide optimal comfort, care and privacy. Our trained staff assist residents with dressing, bathing, and management of medications. We offer common areas for socializing, dining and entertaining, and a feeling of security knowing that we’re always there to provide support. Owner: Elmcroft Senior Living Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

960 S 4th St, Louisville, KY 40203 (502) 585-5656 • ChristianCareCommunities.org

520 Woodlake Drive, Mt. Washington, KY 40047 (502) 538-3172 elmcroft.com/community/elmcroft-of-mount-washington/

Hoskinson House at Wesley Manor

Magnolia Springs East Louisville Senior Living

Number of units: 40 Cost per month: Studio: $2630, 1 BR: $3510, 2 BR: $4670 Transportation available: Free for shopping, medical appointments, and outings Special services: Three specialized levels of service, activities, salon, spa, outpatient rehab, chapel, library, ice cream parlor, Wi-Fi, satellite TV package, medication reminders. 5 floor plans, pets welcome. No longterm contracts, entrance fees or deposits. Owner: Methodist Retirement Homes of KY Payment Accepted: private, some LTCi, VA

Number of units: 75 Cost per month: Studio $3195-$4195, 1BR $4895-$5395, 2BR $6095-$6395 Transportation available: Yes, medical appts., shopping and community outings Special services: More than a place to live, Magnolia Springs represents a place to celebrate life with purpose. Specializing in food, family and fun, this 11 acre campus offers a walking trail, gazebo & country charm at affordable pricing. Location convenient to shopping and medical community w/transportation provided at no extra cost. See our display ad in this issue. Owner: Grandview Care Payment Accepted: private, VA, LTCi, AL ins.

5012 E Manslick Rd, Louisville, KY 40219 (502) 969-3277 • WesMan.org

Magnolia Springs Louisville Senior Living 8225 Whipps Mill Rd, Louisville, KY 40222 (502) 716-5160 • Louisville.Magnolia-Springs.net

Number of units: 71 Cost per month: Studio $3195-$4195, 1BR $4895-$5395, 2BR $6095-$6395 Transportation available: Yes, medical appts, shopping and community outings Special services: More than a place to live, Magnolia Springs represents a place to celebrate life with purpose. Specializing in food, family and fun, this campus offers all of the benefits of city living with amenities onsite. See our display ad in this issue. Owner: Grandview Care Payment Accepted: private, VA, LTCi, AL ins.

13600 LaGrange Rd, Louisville, KY 40245 (502) 855-7500 • EastLouisville.Magnolia-Springs.net

Masonic Home of Shelbyville — The Pillars Assisted Living Community 711 Frankfort Rd, Shelbyville, KY 40065 (502) 633-3486 • masonichomesky.com

Number of units: 21 Cost per month: Studio $2174, 1BR $2282-$2500, 2BR $2717-$3043 Transportation available: $30/hour, $5/in-town, $1/mile Special services: Spacious new apartments with 24-hour staff attendants, emergency assistance and security call system. Meals, activities, salon and housekeeping. Laundry located on each floor. Spiritual support from staff chaplain. Owner: Masonic Homes of KY, Inc. Payment Accepted: private

Symphony at Valley Farms

Village East, Inc.

Number of units: 31 Cost per day: alcolve $114; 1BR $122, 2BR $140 Transportation available: Free Special services: Symphony at Valley Farms, located in the south end of Louisville, with a wide range of care for your loved ones. Our residents and their families are at ease knowing they have the care they need. Owners: Compass Pointe Healthcare Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, AL ins., VA

Number of units: 19 Cost per month: Suite - $2795-$3995 Transportation available: Yes Special services: Building is one floor no step no elevators. Fee includes suite utilities, TV, cable, phone call system, meals, laundry, housekeeping, activities, 24/7 staff services discounted, supportive living plan. Owners: Village East, Inc. Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

10201 Valley Farms Blvd, Louisville, KY 40272 (502) 937-3028 • symphonyatvalleyfarms.com

Add This to Your Reading List For 30 years, Louisvillian Tom Holloway, 69, had a story brewing in his mind about an alien who comes to Earth in human form — finally he turned the idea into his first book titled The Sword of Gabriel. Published through Amazon, the novel which made its debut in April blends sci-fi with romance and has attracted a different group of readers than expected. The main character, Henry Johnson, who is 94 years old, died while fighting 58 todaystransitionsnow.com | Fall 2017

11530 Herrick Lane, Louisville, KY 40243 (502) 643-8248 • villageeastcommunity.org

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in World War II at 22 but regained his life with the help of aliens. “I thought young sci-fi guys would be reading my book, but the my real audience are women 50 to 95 years old. They recognize and identify with Henry,” Tom says. You can buy the book through Amazon or attend his book signing at Barnes & Noble in the Paddock Shoppes on September 23 at 1pm.


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Click Here to Read These Listings On Our Website

Home Health Directory

Home Health Care refers to care provided in a person’s home. Medical Home Health Care is a licensed level of care that provides nursing care and personal care. (These agencies also provide non-medical care.) Non-medical Home Health Care agencies in Kentucky must be certified. Agencies in Indiana must be licensed. They can assist with the self-administration of medications or treatments, provide limited personal care, serve as companions who prepare light meals and tidy homes, and may offer transportation or errand services.

AccessiCare Elder Home Care

Always Best Care Senior Services

Type: non-medical Services: Personal care, homemaking, transportation, errands Cost per hour: $11.25-$20 Employees’ status: drug tested, bonded, liability ins., background check, direct hires, withhold taxes, worker’s comp. Min. time required: 3 hrs. Special services: AccessiCare is locally owned/operated by a proud Navy Veteran and a Registered Nurse licensed and serving Southern Indiana on call 24/7. We provide drug tested, trained, experienced, certified caregivers to assist those in need of help with daily activities of living. Better Business Bureau Rated A+ Owners: Jon and Debra Baker, RN Payment Accepted: private, Medicaid, LTCi, VA

Type: Non-medical, R.N. care management Services: In home or in facility personal care, homemaking, errands, companionship Cost per hour: Starting at $18 Employees’ status: Direct hires, drug tested, bonded, thoroughly background checked, skills tested, taxes withheld, workers comp, Institute for Professional Care Education training Min. time required: 1-3 hrs @ higher rate Special services: Strive for long term caregiver/client matches, make personal intros, tailor care plans. Alz. ALS, COPD, Diabetes, MS, Parkinson’s, Posthospital/rehab & stroke care. Bathe, groom, dress, transfer, feed, incontinence care. Free care assessment & home safety evaluation. Help w/VA benefits. Discounts: Rx & fall alert products. Owner: Robin and Ken Helfers, Certified Senior Advisors Payment Accepted: Private, LTCi, VA, Medicaid Waiver, CDO

Serving Kentucky and Indiana (812) 725-3843 • accessicare.com

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4965 U.S. Hwy 42, Ste. 1000, Louisville, KY 40222 (502) 272-4400 • abc-loudowneast.com

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BrightStar Care

Capacity Care

Type: non-medical Services: personal care, homemaker, transportation,errands, Alzheimer’s/dementia care, Parkinson’s, ALS, respite, med reminders, meal prep, end of life care, RN/geriatric case management. Cost per hour: $19-$24 Employees’ status: bonded, liability ins., background check, direct hires,withhold taxes, CPR certified, drug testing Min. time required: 1 hr Special services: Joint Commission Accredited. Compassionate care, excellent service. Non-medical care by skilled and attentive professionals. All care is overseen by a Registered Nurse and is available 1-24 hours/day with Guaranteed Caregiver Compatibility. Owner: Christian & Leslie McCutcheon Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA, worker’s comp

Type: non-medical Services: personal care, respite, errands, med. reminders Cost per hour: $16-$18 Employees’ status: background check, drug testing, liability ins., worker’s comp., withhold taxes Min. time required: N/A Special services: Locally Owned Non-Medical Home Care for those living independently in home and persons with disabilities. Our companions must have continuing education. Thank you for considering us. Owner: Theresa Hinton, CEO Payment Accepted: private, LTCi

406 Blankenbaker Parkway, Suite G, Louisville, KY 40243 (502) 893-4700 • louisvillehomecare.org

4033 Taylorsville Road, Louisville, KY 40220 (502) 893-8414 • capacitycare.com

Caregivers Health Network

Caretenders

Type: medical Services: nursing care, therapy, personal care, homemaking Cost per hour: $56-$186/visit Employees’ status: bonded, liability ins., background check, direct hires, withhold taxes Min. time required: N/A Special services: Certified Medicare and Medicaid home health agency. Specialty care programs in geriatrics, medication management, orthopedics, cardiology, urology, wound care, psychiatric nursing telehealth monitoring, and social workers. Owner: Almost Family, Inc. Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private ins.

Type: medical Services: nursing care, therapy, personal care, homemaking Cost per hour: $56-$186/visit Employees’ status: bonded, liability ins., background check, direct hires, withhold taxes Min. time required: N/A Special services: Certified Medicare and Medicaid home health agencies. Multiple Kentuckiana locations (see directory). Specialize in geriatrics, orthopedics, cardiology, urology, wound care, psychiatric nursing and social workers. Owner: Almost Family, Inc. Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private ins., private

9510 Ormsby Station Road, Suite 100, Louisville, KY 40223 (502) 423-4336 • caregivershn.com

4545 Bishop Lane, Suite 200, Louisville, KY 40218 (502) 238-5150 • almostfamilycaretenders.com

Caring Excellence Personalized Home Care Services

ComForcare Louisville East

Type: non-medical Services: Personal care, homemaking, medication reminders, exercise assistance transportation, respite Cost per hour: $18-$20 Employees’ status: Exceptionally trained, bonded, liability ins., background check, direct hires, withhold taxes Min. time required: Flexible up to 24/7 Special services: Locally owned, Consistent Caregivers, Caregiver Matching and RN Case Management. Senior Care, Parkinson’s Care, Alzheimer’s Care and After-Hospital Care in your home. All care directed by Registered Nurse and Master Level Social Worker. Owner: Kayla Cook, RN, Elisabeth Knight, MSSW Payment Accepted: Private, LTCI, VA, Medicaid Waiver

Type: non-medical Services: personal care, dementia care certified, homemaking, transportation, errands Cost per hour: $19-$24 Employees’ status: bonded, liability ins., background check, direct hires, worker’s comp, withhold taxes Min. time required: flexible Special services: Available 24/7. Provide free RN assessment to develop best care plan for client’s needs. Provides care in home, hospital, assisted living, and nursing homes. Our quality caregivers go through a 10-step hiring process and continuous training. Owners are very much hands on and in tune with families and caregivers. See our ad on page 67. Owner: Chris and Julie Prentice Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, workman’s comp.

2225 Emerson Avenue, Louisville, KY 40205 (502) 208-9424 • caringexcellenceathome.com

308 N. Evergreen Road, Louisville, Ky 40243 (502) 254-0850 • LouisvilleEast.ComForCare.com

Commonwealth Nursing Solutions

ElderServe Homecare

Type: non-medical Services: personal care, companionship, light housekeeping, meal prep, transportation, errands, medication reminders, Alzheimer’s and dementia care, respite, end of life care at home or in facility setting Cost per hour: starts at $20 Employees’ status: Direct hires, bonded, liability insurance, background check, drug tested, CPR and First Aid Certified Min. time required: 1 hour Special services: Locally owned, State Certified as Personal Service Agency providing non-medical compassionate and excellent service. Convenient on-line scheduling access. 24/7 staff supervision. Owner: Greg Ciliberti, M.D., Alex Moore, M.D., Barbara Newton, Thomas Samuels Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, Veterans, Medicaid (Michelle P. and SCL Waivers)

Type: non-medical Services: personal care, homemaking, transportation, errands, respite, Alz. care, Parkinson’s MS, stroke recovery Cost per hour: $20-$22 Employees’ status: bonded, liability ins., background check, drug testing, direct hires, withhold taxes Min. time required: 3 hrs Special services: Non-medical services for individuals who want to continue living in their home but need assistance with daily activity. Services include Personal Care, Home Mgmt, and Respite. Owner: Elderserve, Inc. Payment Accepted: private, KIPDA, VA, LTCi

2301 River Rd, Suite 302, Louisville, KY 40206 (502) 814-3111 • cnursingsolutions.com

215 W. Breckinridge Street, Louisville, KY 40203 (502) 583-8012 • elderservehomecare.org

Helping Hands Companion Care Services

Home Instead Senior Care

Type: non-medical Services: personal care, homemaking, transportation, errands, respite, med. reminders Cost per hour: $19.75 Employees’ status: bonded, liability ins., background check, direct hires, withhold taxes, drug testing Min. time required: Flexible Special services: *Personalized loving care available in home, assisted living, nursing home or hospital *Scheduling up to 24 hours 7 days a week *Trained and experience caregivers *Free assessments *Serving Kentucky and Southern Indiana since 1996. Owner: Terry Graham, RN; Dawn Smithwick, BSW Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

Type: non-medical Services: personal care, post-rehab care, transportation, med. reminders, errands, meal prep, respite care, CAREGiver consistency, complementary RN/nurse case management for every client, Alzheimer's and dementia care, certified in Hospital Readmission Prevention, case management, Alzheimer’s and dementia care, certified in Hospital Readmission Prevention, RN oversight for every client Cost per hour: $20-$24 Employees’ status: bonded, liability ins., background checks, direct hires, withhold taxes, annual drug and alcohol screens. Min. time required: Flexible Special services: Nationally Certified Readmissions Professionals, Alzheimer's/Dementia training for every CAREGiver. Emergency services to start within one hour. Owner: Employeeowned, Becky Beanblossom, President Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

2301 Hurstbourne Village Dr. #100, Louisville, KY 40299 (502) 426-9783 • home-companions.com

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4101 Taylorsville Rd, Louisville, KY 40220 (502) 515-9515 • louisvillehomecare.com

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Homewatch CareGivers

Hosparus Health

Type: non-medical Services: personal care, homemaker, transportation, errands Cost per hour: $20-23 Employees’ status: bonded, liability ins., background check, direct hires, withhold taxes Min. time required: flexible Special services: Fully trained and experienced CNA’s, on-staff nurse, complimentary evaluations, customized care plan, company with 30 years of home care experience, Alzheimer’s/Dementia expertise, “Let our family care for yours.” Owner: Steve and Trish Kochersperger Payment Accepted: private, LTCi

Type: medical Services: nursing & physician services, pain mgt, social workers, spiritual care, CNA’s, Grief Counseling Services and Volunteer Programs Cost: per day Employees’ status: bonded, liability ins., background check, direct hires, withhold taxes Min. time required: N/A Special services: Offering quality hospice and palliative care and grief counseling services to people living with serious and life-limiting illnesses. A nonprofit hospice organization providing compassionate care to any patient, regardless of their ability to pay. See our ad on back cover. Owner: Hosparus Inc. Payment Accepted: per days fees under Medicaid, Medicare, other ins., private pay (income adj.)

13117 Eastpoint Park Blvd, Suite G, Louisville, KY 40223 (502) 244-1212 • homewatchcaregivers.com/Louisville

3532 Ephraim McDowell Dr, Louisville, KY 40205 (502) 456-6200 • hosparus.org

KentuckyOne Health-VNA Health at Home

Malone Home Care

Type: medical Services: nursing care, therapy, personal care Cost per visit: $100-$250 Employees’ status: bonded, liability ins., background check Min. time required: 3 hrs Special services: Kentucky branch offices in Louisville, Bardstown, Elizabethtown, and Campbellsville Serve adult and geriatric population primarily (occasionally pediatrics). Please see our ad on page 27. Owner: Catholic Health Initiatives Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, private ins.

Type: Non-Medical and Medical Services: State Licensed Private Duty, Initial Free Assessment by RN, Concierge Services, Assist in ADL’s (housekeeping, meals, medication reminders), Newborn to Geriatric care Cost per hour: Non-Medical $19-$25; Medical $36$44 Employees’ status: Background Check, Drug Screen, Liability Insurance, Workers Comp, Ongoing Education and Training provided, Skills reviewed annually. Min. time required: Flexible Special services: Capable of transitioning care from Non-Medical to Medical without switching agencies, Concierge Services (Shopping, Errands, Family Events) Transportation provided by a private car service. Owner: Tim and Terry Malone Payment Accepted: Private, LTCi, Worker's Comp

200 High Rise Drive, Suite 373, Louisville, KY 40213 (502) 584-2456 • kentuckyonehealth.org/vnahealthathome

1866 Campus Place Louisville, KY 40299 (502) 637-5474 • malonehomecare.com

Right at Home

Senior Helpers - Louisville/Southern Indiana

Type: non-medical Services: geriatric care management, transportation, companionship Cost per hour: $17-$20 Employees’ status: bonded, insurance, background & drug screened and competency tested pre-hire & annually, TB tested, direct hires, taxes withheld. Min. time required: 3 hrs Special services: We understand that aging isn’t easy & know that caregiving for your aging loved one can be hard on you. We’d be honored to help lighten your caregiving load. Let us help you spend your time caring, not caregiving. Owner: Terry Rogers Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, worker’s comp

Type: non-medical Services: personal care, homemaking, transportation, errands, respite, Alz. care, med reminders, Live Ins Cost per hour: $13.50-$21 Employees’ status: bonded, liability insurance, background check, drug tested, direct hires, withhold taxes Min. time required: Flexible Special services: Senior Helpers provides quality care by screening and training all staff. Customer service is a priority with caregiver/client match, continued communication and schedule flexibility. Med reminders, Live Ins. Call us for help filing your VA Aid and Attendance Pension. Owner: Nancy Galloway Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, EFT, Medicaid Waivers, VA Aid and Attendance Pension

221 Executive Park, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 897-0580 • louisville.rightathome.net

200 Breckenridge Lane, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 690-2648 • seniorhelpers.com

Silver Tree Home Care

Visiting Angels

Type: non-medical Services: personal care, homemaking, dementia care, errands, transportation, geriatric case management Cost per hour: $16-$21.50 Employees’ status: bonded, liability insurance, background check, drug testing, direct hires, withhold taxes Min. time required: Flexible Special services: Home Care Pulse Certified Provider of Choice. Affordable, customized home care. Caregivers are matched, screened, and trained. Services include med reminders, meal prep, lt. housekeeping, transportation and more. Also, serving Oldham County (La Grange, Crestwood): (502) 222-0018. Owner: Pam S. Jeseo Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA, worker’s comp

Type: non-medical Services: personal care, housekeeping, meal prep, laundry, errands & transportation, Alzheimer’s care, fall prevention, med reminders, respite, 24-hour care Cost per hour: $16-20 Employees’ status: bonded, liability & worker’s comp insurance, background checked, drug tested, direct hires, state licensed Min. time required: Flexible Special services: Customized Care by reliable, experienced caregivers. Visiting Angels allows you to select your own caregiver and conducts an in-home assessment prior to starting care. Client feedback and family communication are an integral part of our customer service. Over 500 locations nationwide. Owner: Andrew Block, locally owned & operated Payment Accepted: Private, LTCi, Veterans, Medicaid

10608 Watterson Center Ct, Unit 102, Louisville, KY 40299 (502) 240-6464 • homecarelouisville.net

126 S. Sherrin Avenue, Louisville 40207 (502) 897-6547 • VisitingAngels.com

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Updates & Happenings An Evening with Poe – Frazier History Museum “All that we see or seem is but a dream within a dream.” – Edgar Allan Poe. Be swept up in a dream as the works of Edgar Allan Poe are brought to life at the Frazier History Museum’s event “An Evening with Poe.” From October 20 through November 2, experience the mystery and macabre of literary works such as

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The Raven, The Tell-Tale Heart, and more. The Tamerlane Trio will be providing musical accompaniment to the live readings of Poe’s works. Tickets are $20 for general admission, $15 for museum members.


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Home Health Directory continued from page 64

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Independent Living Directory

Independent Living communities are for those who need no services and are totally independent. Special services are provided, such as meals in a central dining area. Most people drive, but some transportation is usually offered. These communities offer no health care services and are not required to be licensed or certified.

The Altenheim

Brownsboro Park Retirement Community

Units in facility: 20 Cost per person per month: 1BR $1620 Minimum age: no Special services: Located in the Highlands, spacious apartment, housekeeping, laundry and linen service at no additional charge, 3 meals served, daily activities, social outings and religious services, beauty and barbershop. Part of a continuing care retirement community. Owner: The Altenheim Payment Accepted: private, LTCi

Units in facility: 134 Cost per person per month: Studio $1975; 1BR $2325-$2725; 2BR $2825-$3195 Minimum age: 62 Special services: Family owned & operated since 1986, several spacious floor plans, located on 14 beautiful acres. Warm, friendly residents, spacious apartments, activities, housekeeping, transportation and excellent chef-prepared meals. Owner: Bunker Hill Assoc. III, LLC Payment Accepted: private

936 Barret Ave, Louisville, KY 40204 (502) 584-7417 • thealtenheim.org

2960 Goose Creek, Louisville, KY 40241 (502) 429-7700 • brownsboropark.com

Cornell Trace

The Forum at Brookside

Units in facility: 58 Cost: entrance fee $200,000-$250,000; 2 & 3BR patio homes plus monthly maintenance fee Minimum age: 62 Special services: Exquisite patio homes with enclosed porches and attached garages. All appliances included, security system, no property taxes, no homeowner’s insurance, spacious floor plans, all maintenance inside and out, exercise room and a beautiful clubhouse with a lunch café. Owner: Baptist Homes, Inc. Payment Accepted: private

Units in facility: 240 Cost per person per month: Studio $2920; 1BR $3870; 2BR $4850 Minimum age: 60 Special services: Gorgeous patio homes and apartments, gated community, 24 hr security, indoor heated pool, exercise room, chef prepared meals, flexible dining plan, recreational activities, pet friendly, a great staff and management team, full continuum of care. Owner: Five Star Senior Living, Inc. Payment Accepted: private

9729 Cornell Trace Rd, Louisville, KY 40241 (502) 326-9838 • springhurstpines.org

200 Brookside Dr, Louisville, KY 40243 (502) 245-3048 • theforumatbrookside.com

Miralea and Meadow Active Lifestyle Community

Sacred Heart Village Apartments

Units in facility: 242 apts, 12 patio homes Cost per person per month: 1BR $2569+; 2BR $3688+; Patio home $4024+ Second person fee for all units: $1076+/mo. Minimum age: 62 Special services: Offers restaurant-style dining, concierge, fitness and aquatic center with upscale amenities. Includes Life Care and a full continuum of care on campus (personal care, memory care, skilled nursing). 24/7 security. New apartments at The Meadow opening 2018. Owner: Masonic Homes of Kentucky, Inc. Payment Accepted: private

Units in facility: 150 Cost per person per month: $0-$618 Minimum age: 62 Special services: Secured 540 sq. ft. 1 BR efficiency units located in both the Clifton & Cane Run Road areas. Dining room, meeting rooms, library and sitting areas and on-site laundry, appliances, walk-in shower, individually controlled heat and A/C, pets accepted with restrictions. Handicapped accessible units if available. Water & electric included. Income limitations apply. Call for details. Owner: Mercy Housing Payment Accepted: Private

3701 Frankfort Ave, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 897-8727 • miralea.com

2110 Payne St, Louisville, KY 40206 (502) 895-6409 • facebook.com/SacredHeartVillage

Treyton Oak Towers

The Village Active Lifestyle Community

Units in facility: 160 Cost per person per month: $3045-$6019 Minimum age: 62 Special services: Serving Louisvillians for 33 years. Spacious 1 and 2 bedroom apartments. Rooftop deck, greenhouse, art studio, fitness center, masseuse; Fleur de Lis dining room. On site dentist, bank, and salon. All in a safe secure continuum of care community. Owner: Third and Oak Corporation Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, private ins., LTCi

Units in facility: 149 Cost per person per month: Market rate: 1 BR $713-$1294, 2 BR $1298-$2187; Affordable housing: Studio $611$703, 1 BR $628-$753, 2BR $753; Life Plan monthly fees: $1464-$2887 Minimum age: mature adult, 55 (market rate) and 62 (Life Plan) Special services: Remodeled entry fee apartments on 83-acre campus. Offers Life Plan discount on full continuum of care on campus, including personal care, memory care and skilled nursing should you require the additional care. 24/7 security. Payment Accepted: private, affordable housing options

211 W. Oak St, Louisville, KY 40203 (502) 589-3211 • treytonoaktowers.com

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3701 Frankfort Ave, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 894-0195 • masonichomesky.com

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Independent Living Directory

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Click Here to Read These Listings On Our Website

Meet Our Quarterly

Caregiver Winner

PHOTO MELISSA DONALD

Lynda Benningfield is our quarterly caregiver winner. Her prize includes tickets to a Derby Dinner Playhouse performance and four hours of sitter service from Home Instead Senior Care. Why she won: When Lynda Benningfield’s mom Joyce Denton had a brain stem stroke a year and a half ago, Lynda devoted a significant amount of time to helping her mother recover. As a full-time caregiver for her mom, Lynda handles her food preparation, grooming, medications, and takes her to therapy appointments. Her sister Kara Schnaus says Lynda has handled the responsibility of caregiving with grace. “She moved into the hospital with mom and then onto Frazier Rehab with her. She has taken care of our mom day and night everyday for the past year. She never complains and always has a smile on her face,” she says.

Do you know of a caregiver who deserves some special recognition? Go to TodaysTransitionsNow.com to nominate him or her by October 12.

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Nursing/Rehab Directory Nursing homes are facilities that provide beds for around-the-clock intermediate, skilled, and/or rehabilitative care.

The Altenheim

936 Barrett Ave, Louisville, KY 40204 (502) 584-7417 • thealtenheim.org

Number of beds: 32 Cost per day: private $292, semiprivate $216 Special services: Small, non-profit senior health care community located in the Highlands, Our above average staff to resident ratio provides our residents with the highest quality of care by our skilled team of experts. Owner: The Altenheim Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, Hospice, private ins.

Christian Care Communities’ Christian Health Center Louisville West 1015 West Magazine St, Louisville, KY 40203 (502) 815-6460 • ChristianCareCommunities.org

Number of beds: 92 Cost per day: private $235, semiprivate $220 Special services: Short/long term rehab therapy, and hospital to home care, rm service, licensed nurses 24/7, all rehab therapies in-house. Chaplain, fine dining, hair salon, snacks, activities. Chapel, memory care and long term care. Owner: Christian Care Communities, Inc. Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, private ins., LTCi

Christian Care Communities’ Christian Health Center Louisville

920 S 4th St, Louisville, KY 40203 (502) 583-6533 • ChristianCareCommunities.org

Number of beds: 117 Cost per day: private $256, semiprivate $239 Special services: Transitional care, short term rehabilitative hospital to home care, room service, spa, licensed nurses 24/7, all rehab therapies in-house. Advanced gym equipment, hair salon. Memory care and long term care, wellness. Owner: Christian Care Communities, Inc. Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, private ins., LTCi

Clifton Oaks Care Center

446 Mt. Holly Ave, Louisville, KY 40206 (502) 897-1646 • CliftonOaksCenter.com

Number of beds: 110 Cost per day: private $239, semiprivate $215 Special services: Pulmonary Program led by a Pulmonologist. Wound program with a wound care physician rounding weekly. Spacious private rooms on our rehab unit with a separate entrance. Phones, Satellite TV, 24 Hour Snack Center. Owner: Providence Healthcare Management Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, VA, LTCi, private ins.

Forest Springs Health Campus

The Forum at Brookside

Number of beds: 58 Cost per day: $244-$290 Special services: Now Open! Personal care, independent living, long-term care, short-term rehabilitation, 24-hour skilled nursing care, outpatient therapy and respite services. Private suites, state-of-the-art therapy gym and fine dining. Owner: Trilogy Health Services, LLC Payment Accepted: Medicare, private, LTCi, LTCi, VA

Number of beds: 60 Cost per day: private $288; semiprivate $237 Special services: Heartfelt care and skilled staff provide short & long term nursing care and rehab-physical, occupational, and speech for your loved one’s comfort, quality, and engaged lifestyle. Beautifully located in eastern Jefferson County. Owner: Five Star Senior Living, Inc. Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, Hospice, LTCi, private ins.

4120 Wooded Acre Lane, Louisville, KY 40245 (502) 243-1643 • forestspringshc.com

200 Brookside Dr, Louisville, KY 40243 (502) 245-3048 • theforumbrookside.com

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Updates & Happenings The Simon & Garfunkel Story

> THE KENTUCKY CENTER This immersive concert-style theater show chronicles the amazing journey shared by the folk-rock duo of Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel, telling their story from the duo’s humble beginnings as Tom & Jerry to their success as one of the best-selling music groups of the ’60s to their dramatic split in 1970. It culminates with the famous “The Concert in Central Park” reunion in 1981, with more than half million fans in attendance. Using huge projection photos and original film footage, this 50th anniversary celebration also features a full live band performing all of their hits, including “Mrs. Robinson” (featured in the 1967 film The Graduate), “Cecilia,” “Bridge Over Troubled Water,” and “Homeward Bound.”In 2003, Simon and Garfunkel were awarded a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. WHEN: October 8, 7pm | WHERE: The Kentucky Center | TICKETS: $35/$35 CONTACT: kentuckycenter.org/presents, 502.584.7777, 800.775.7777. Contact 502.566.1111

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Franciscan Health Care Center

Friendship Health & Rehab

Number of beds: 85 Cost per day: $283 Special services: Located off I-65 on Fern Valley Road offering long-term care, short-term rehab, assisted living, 24-hour skilled nursing care, physical, occupational, and speech therapy. Private suites, state-of-the-art therapy gym, fine dining, cable, and phone. Owner: Trilogy Health Services, LLC Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, LTCi, private ins., VA, Humana contract

Number of beds: 128 Cost per day: private $270-$285; semiprivate $225-$238 Special services: Renovated private rehab suites w/ smart televisions, sleeper sofas, free WIFI, 24 hour nursing care, physical, occupational, and speech therapies, remodeled therapy gym with state-of-the-art equipment, physiatrist and wound care physician, long term care, chaplain or spiritual services, personalized treatment plans, activities, hair salon, cable TV, free laundry, and transportation. Owners: Kevin Badger & Robert Young Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, private ins, LTCi

3625 Fern Valley Rd, Louisville, KY 40219 (502) 964-3381 • franciscanhc.com

7400 Friendship Drive, Peewee Valley, KY 40056 (502) 241-8821 • friendshipky.com

Glen Ridge Health Campus

Good Samaritan Society

Number of beds: 68 Cost per day: private $288 Special services: Offering long-term care, short-term rehab, 24-hour skilled nursing care, physical, occupational, and speech therapy, as well as outpatient therapy. Private suites, state-of-the-art therapy gym, fine dining, cable, and phone. Owner: Trilogy Health Services, LLC Payment Accepted: Medicare, private, LTCi, private ins., VA

Number of beds: 98 Cost per day: private $253; semi-private $218 Special services: NEW Short-term Rehab to Home Center, 22 Private Suites, Separate Entrance, 16 Scenic Acres, Virtual Therapy Room & Therapy Gym; 7 days/wk; RN 24/7 on site. GSS has provided Long-Term Skilled Care since 1926. GSS seeks to,”provide an environment where people are loved, valued, and at peace.” GSS is faith-based and it is also the largest non-profit serving seniors in the United States. Owner: Good Samaritan Society Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, private ins., LTCi, Hospice

6415 Calm River Way, Louisville, KY 40299 (502) 297-8590 • glenridgehc.com

3500 Good Samaritan Way, Jeffersontown, KY 40299 (502) 267-7403 • good-sam.com/Jeffersontown

Green Meadows Health Care Center

Green Valley Care Center

Number of beds: 122 Special services: Our physical, occupational and speech therapists work closely with our award-winning nursing staff to personalize a therapy regimen designed to regain your highest level of independence and mobility. Owner: Aspen Healthcare, LLC Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, LTCi, VA, private ins., health ins.

Number of beds: 125 Cost per day: private-$258; semiprivate-$214 Special services: All rooms include free basic cable, free phone line for local phone calls, and free Wi-Fi. We provide short-term rehab to home, longterm care and have a secured memory care unit. Owner: Life Care Centers of America Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, private ins., LTCi

310 Boxwood Run, Mt Washington, KY 40047 (502) 955-7600 • greenmeadowshealthcare.com

3118 Green Valley Rd, New Albany IN 47150 (812) 945-2341 • lcca.com/19/

Hillcreek Rehabilitation and Care Center

Landmark of Louisville (formerly Parkway)

Number of beds: 172 Cost per day: Private- $280; Semi-private- $255 Special services: Ortho Rehab, Pulmonary Rehab, Semi and Private rooms, Specialty Bistro Menu's, onsite transportation for activities, beautiful outside courtyard. Owner: Redwood Healthcare/Providence Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, private ins., LTCi, VA

Number of beds: 252 Cost per day: private $215, semiprivate $195 Special services: Stimulating and fun recreational activities. Spacious private and semi-private rooms. TV’s, cable and phones available in all rooms. Weekly Catholic and Interdenominational Services. On site cafe open 7 days a week. Owner: Infinity Healthcare Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, private ins., LTCi

3116 Breckinridge Lane Louisville, KY 40220 (502) 459-9120 • hillcreek.com

Masonic Home of Louisville — Sam Swope Care Center 3701 Frankfort Ave, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 897-4907 • masonichomesky.com

Number of beds: 136 Cost per day: $295-330 Special services: Area’s largest on-site rehabilitation center and on-site dialysis clinic. Offers hair salon, cafe, library and specialized activities through Inspirations program. Six residential houses promote healing and recovery. Owner: Masonic Homes of Kentucky, Inc. Payment Accepted: Medicare, private, LTCi, Hospice, private ins.

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1155 Eastern Pkwy, Louisville, KY 40217 (502) 636-5241 • parkwayrehabandnursing.com

Masonic Home of Shelbyville

711 Frankfort Rd, Shelbyville, KY 40065 (502) 633-3486 • masonichomesky.com

Number of beds: 117 Cost per day: private $248-$295, semiprivate $236-$250 Special services: Award-winning staff provides short-stay, long-term and outpatient rehab featuring Nautilus equipment. Physical, occupational, speech and respiratory therapies offered 7 days a week. Five-star rated. Owner: Masonic Homes of Kentucky, Inc. Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, private ins., Hospice, LTCi

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Nazareth Home

Nazareth Home – Clifton

Number of beds: 87 Cost per day: $268-$278 Special services: Skilled and long term nursing care, all private rooms, exercise, social activities, massage and holistic therapy. Fine dining and award winning activity programs. Short stay Medicare recovery program bridging hospital to home. Owner: The Sisters of Charity of Nazareth Payment Accepted: LTCi, Medicare, Medicaid

Number of beds: 121 Cost per day: $323-$367 Special services: Skilled and long term nursing care, private and semi-private rooms, exercise, social activities, massage and holistic therapy. Fine dining and activity programs. Short stay Medicare recovery program bridging hospital to home. Owner: Nazareth Home, Inc. Payment Accepted: LTCi, Medicare, Medicaid

2000 Newburg Rd, Louisville, KY 40205 (502) 459-9681 • nazhome.org

2120 Payne Street, Louisville, KY 40206 (502) 895-9425 • sacredheartlou.org

Park Terrace Health Campus

St. Matthews Care Center

Number of beds: 88 Cost per day: $227-$275, $353 private deluxe Special services: Offering long-term care, short-term rehabilitation, 24-hour skilled nursing care, physical, occupational and speech therapies, as well as respite care. Private resident suites, state-of-the-art therapy gym, fine dining, cable, TV and phone. Owner: Trilogy Health Services, LLC Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, LTCi, private ins.

Number of beds: 125 Cost per day: private $254, semi-private $214 Special services: Short-term rehabilitation, which includes 42 private rooms with a separate entrance. Focus on complex disease management including TPN, wound care and tracheostomy care. Offering physical, occupation and speech therapy 7 days a week and a RN 24/7 onsite. Enhanced dining services including restorative dining. Owner: St. Matthews Care Center Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, LTCi, VA, Hospice, private ins.

Springhurst Health and Rehab

Treyton Oak Towers

Number of beds: 90 Cost per day: private $310 Special services: All private rooms with $5.3 million rehab expansion now open. Short-term rehab, long-term care, 24-hour skilled nursing and outpatient therapy. Cable, phone, comprehensive program for individual needs, private dining rooms, in-room dining, bistro, activities room, daily housekeeping, extensive therapy and restorative care. Owner: Baptist Homes, Inc. Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, LTCi

Number of beds: 60 Cost per day: private $290-$344; semiprivate $246 Special services: Serving Louisvillians for 33 years; rendering superior nursing care and a wide range of rehabilitative services. Caring, friendly staff providing skilled nursing, short and long term rehabilitation. Coming Fall 2017 – 8 new short term rehab suites. We are a continuum of care community. Owner: Third and Oak Corporation Payment Accepted: Private, LTCi, Medicare

9700 Stonestreet Rd, Louisville, KY 40272 (502) 995-6600 • parkterracehc.com

3001 Hurstbourne Pkwy, Louisville, KY 40241 (502) 426-5531 • springhurstpines.org

227 Browns Lane, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 893-2595 • stmatthewscare.com

211 W. Oak St, Louisville, KY 40203 (502) 589-3211 • treytonoaktowers.com

Westport Care Center

Westport Place Health Campus

Number of beds: 144 Cost per day: private $7436, semiprivate $6772/ACU $7787 Special services: Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care and Programming Pain Management Therapy; including Physical, Occupational and Speech Diabetic care; Pharmacy Services Owner: Westport Care Center Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, private ins., LTCi, VA, Hospice

Number of beds: 59 Cost per day: $249-$288 Special services: Offering personal care, long-term care, short-term rehabilitation, 24-hour skilled nursing, outpatient therapy and respite services. Private suites, state-of-the-art therapy gym and fine dining. Owner: Trilogy Health Services, LLC Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, LTCi, private ins.

1101 Lyndon Lane, Louisville, KY 40222 (502) 425-0331 • westportcare.com

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4247 Westport Rd, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 893-3033 • westportplacehc.com

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Personal Care Directory

Personal Care offers residents minimal assistance for bathing, grooming, toileting, and dressing. The resident must be able to move around (even if in a wheelchair or scooter). Some health care is provided and medications are given. These facilities are licensed.

The Aldersgate at Wesley Manor

The Altenheim

Number of beds: 27 Cost per day: $146-$197 Special services: Full medication management, licensed nurse on site 24/7, rehab and physician services, geriatric psychiatrist, secure memory garden, daily activities. Priority placement for short-term rehab and skilled nursing. Chapel, satellite TV, beauty salon, longtenured staff. Located on 35 beautiful acres. No long-term contracts, entrance fees or deposits. See Nursing/Rehab directory for advanced Alzheimer’s/dementia care. Owner: Methodist Retirement Homes of KY Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

Number of beds: 30 Cost per day: $136-$144 Special services: Senior health care community located in the Highlands. Providing the independence of home living with all the services you need: 24-hour nursing, housekeeping and laundry service; 3 meals served; daily activities; social outings; religious services; beauty and barbershop. Part of a continuing care retirement community. Owner: The Altenheim Payment Accepted: private

5012 E. Manslick Rd, Louisville, KY 40219 (502) 969-3277 • WesMan.org

936 Barret Ave, Louisville, KY 40204 (502) 584-7417 • thealtenheim.org

Belmont Village Senior Living Community

Brookdale Blankenbaker

Number of beds: 128 Cost per day: $105-$224 Special services: Supported by specially-trained staff and licensed nurse onsite 24/7. Residents enjoy chef-prepared meals, fitness center, therapy services, vibrant social calendar and range of enrichment programs for brain health. Award winning Circle of Friends program available for early stage memory loss. Owner: Belmont Village, L.P. Payment Accepted: private, private ins., LTCi

Number of beds: 99 Cost per day: $99-212 Special services: An exclusive community offering Independent Living, Memory Care and Personal Care services. Situated on a lovely, wooded acreage and surrounded by banks, restaurants, churches and hospitals, our community is a wonderful place to call home. Owner: Brookdale Payment Accepted: private, private ins., LTCi, VA

4600 Bowling Blvd, St. Matthews, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 721-7500 • belmontvillage.com

903 Blankenbaker Pkwy, Louisville, KY 40243 (502) 244-4244 • brookdale.com

Exceptional Senior Living

Forest Hills Commons

Number of beds: 65 Cost per month: Personal Care Studio: $3500 (plus levels of care) 1 Bedroom: $4600 plus levels of care 2 Bedroom: $5000 plus levels of care Memory Care: $5800 Special services: 24-Hour Onsite Nurses, Restaurant-Style Dining, Movie Theater, Salon, Fitness Center, Outdoor Courtyard, Anytime Bistro, Wireless Internet. Owner: Exceptional Senior Living Payment Accepted: private

Number of beds: 120 PC, 30 PC Memory Care Cost per day: $204, $236, $284 Special services: Variety of floor plans with patio or balcony options: studio, 1 bedroom, 2 bedroom; Personalized support services by licensed nursing staff around the clock; Wide range of engrossing social and recreational programs. Also offering a specialized memory care neighborhood catering to all resident needs. Owner: American Senior Communities Payment Accepted: private

6901 Carslaw Court Prospect, KY 40059 (502) 415-8663 • ExceptionalSeniors.com

The Forum at Brookside

200 Brookside Dr, Louisville, KY 40243 (502) 245-3048 • theforumatbrookside.com

Number of beds: 24 Cost per day: $204, $236, $284 Special services: Heartfelt care and skilled staff provide personal care for your loved one’s comfort, quality, and engaged lifestyle. Beautiful campus conveniently located in eastern Jefferson County. Owner: Five Star Senior Living, Inc. Payment Accepted: private, private ins., LTCi

9107 Taylorsville Rd Louisville, KY 40299 (502) 499-5533 • ascseniorcare.com/location/forest-hills-commons/

Masonic Home of Louisville — The Pillars Assisted Care Center 3701 Frankfort Ave, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 897-4907 • masonichomesky.com

Number of beds: 84 Cost per day: $155-204 Special services: 2011-12 Personal Care Facility of the Year. Private rooms and couples suites. On-site podiatry, dentistry and optometry. Activities through Inspirations program. 24/7 security. Rehab and dialysis clinic. Salon, theater and restaurants on campus. Owner: Masonic Homes of Kentucky, Inc. Payment Accepted: private, private ins.

Morning Pointe of Louisville

Nazareth Home

Number of beds: 73 Cost per day: $106 & up Special services: Conveniently located near Watterson Trail, a new, single level, state-of-the-art Senior Living/Personal Care community on nine acres. Comfortable home-like environment. Medical component with 24-hour licensed nursing and staff. Owner: Morning Pointe Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

Number of beds: 33 Cost per day: $161 Special services: Personal Care program includes apartments and activities designed for independence and choice. All rooms are spacious to promote recovery, privacy and family involvement. Owner: The Sisters of Charity of Nazareth Payment Accepted: private

4711 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy, Louisville, KY 40291 (502) 873-3800 • morningpointe.com

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2000 Newburg Rd, Louisville, KY 40205 (502) 459-9681 • nazhome.org

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Nazareth Home – Clifton

Parr’s at Springhurst

Number of beds: 31 Cost per day: $147-$165 Special services: Personal Care program includes apartments and activities designed for independence and choice. All rooms are spacious to promote privacy and family involvement. Owner: Nazareth Home, Inc. Payment Accepted: private

Number of beds: 79 apts. Cost per day: $137-$209 Special services: All-inclusive pricing structure. Offers licensed personal care in a beautiful apartment setting. Studio, 1 BR and 2 BR floor plans. Three restaurant-style meals, daily housekeeping, transportation, beauty salon, ice cream parlor, Bistro, engaging activities and Nurses 24 hours/7 days per week. Owner: Baptist Homes, Inc. Payment Accepted: private, LTCi

2120 Payne Street Louisville, KY 40206 (502) 895-9425 • sacredheartlou.org

3101 N. Hurstbourne Pkwy, Louisville, KY 40241 (502) 412-3775 • springhurstpines.org

Symphony at Oaklawn

Treyton Oak Towers

Number of beds: 56 Cost per day: $146-$242 Special services: Studio, 1 bedroom & 2 bedroom apartments with support from nurses and caregivers 24/7. Beautiful courtyards, salon, wellness center, community vehicle & van transportation, social & recreational activities, and meals. Owner: Compass Pointe Healthcare Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

Number of beds: 40 Cost per day: $154-$203 Special services: Serving Louisvillians for 33 years; Spacious private apartments; restaurant style dining; daily activities; on site therapy, wellness center, dentist; salon and more; devoted staff uniquely equipped to enhance every stage of life. We are a continuum of care community. Owner: Third and Oak Corporation Payment Accepted: private, LTCi

100 Shelby Station Drive, Louisville, Ky 40245 (502) 632-5500 • symphonyatoaklawn.com

211 W. Oak St, Louisville, KY 40203 (502) 589-3211 • treytonoaktowers.com

Click Here to Read These Listings On Our Website Updates & Happenings Agatha Christie's A Murder Is Announced

> DERBY DINNER PLAYHOUSE An announcement in the local paper states the time and place when a murder is to occur in Miss Blacklock's Victorian house. What follows is a classic Christie puzzle full of mixed motives, concealed identities, and a couple of murders! A determined inspector grimly follows the twists and turns, but Miss Marple is on hand to provide the final solution, at some risk to herself, in the dramatic conclusion. WHEN: October 4 – November 12, various times WHERE: Derby Dinner Playhouse, Clarksville, Indiana TICKETS: $34-$47 CONTACT: 812.288.8281 or derbydinner.com *Senior discounts available for

Wednesday and Sunday evening shows.

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Helpful Resources AGING ADVISOR

Alee Solutions

Is your aging loved one experiencing recent accidents, worsening chronic health condition, slow recovery from a recent illness, or increasing difficulty managing their activities of daily living (ADLs)? Call today and get advice on what options are available for your loved one whether they want to age-in-place or it is time to explore senior living options. Over 14 years healthcare experience, as a Social Worker I am the one-stop shop for your aging related questions. Before you make any calls, see what NO COST services are available to your loved one with a FREE phone consultation today. If you are feeling overwhelmed, simply pick up the phone and call for a FREE consultation. Alisha Duvall, MSW/MFT aleesolutions.org • alisha@aleesolutions.org • 502.242.7691

FREE SENIOR HOUSING REFERRAL/ADVOCATE

Senior Home Transitions

After hospitalization and/or rehab what’s next for your loved one? Having personally gone through the process of placing a loved one after rehab, I know how confusing the options can be. Particularly if you only have a short time to find that new home! I have personally vetted and visited each community and will help you find the perfect new home based on your financial situation and personal needs, whether assisted living, memory care or skilled care. I can also assist with Veteran’s Benefits. All at NO COST to you! Trusted by more physicians and healthcare professionals than any other referral service. Patti Naiser • SeniorHomeTransitions.com • 502.396.9228

FREE SENIOR HOUSING ADVOCATE

Heartfelt Senior Transitions

"I don’t know what to do. We need to find a new home in senior living, independent living, assisted living, maybe memory care, and what is personal care? There are so many choices. Please help!” With over 12 years experience in senior living, I can help you find the best fit. This may be a short stay for a few weeks, long-term stay, immediate need if there is a crisis, or you may just want to plan for the future. There is NO COST to you for this help! Call for more information, guidance, referrals, education or additional resources. You are not alone! Amy Elzy, MSGC heartfeltsenior.com • amy@heartfeltsenior.com • 502.338.3658

TRANSPORTATION

Able Care, Inc., since 2001 Providing non-emergency, ambulatory and wheelchair accessible transportation. Our service is available for: • Physician appointments, medical procedures, therapy, dialysis, radiation, and chemotherapy • Social functions and daily errands • Evenings and weekends with advance notice Caregivers or family members are welcome to ride at no additional charge. Pre-paid voucher packages are available. Payment is requested at the time of service. BBB Accredited Business. Louisville, Kentucky 40269-0381 • 502.267.1911 • ablecareinc.com

Updates & Happenings Try a Pickle Tasting

Pickling is a great way to preserve the summer’s harvest, and Mint Julep Tours wants to take you on the perfect pickle food experience. On September 20, visit three of Louisville’s finest restaurants on your downtown tour: Proof on Main, Eiderdown, and Varanese. Each restaurant will provide three varieties of pickle-oriented dishes (not just cucumbers), each paired with a special cocktail unique to each restaurant. Tickets are $119 per person. Contact: mintjuleptours.com/culinary-tours/

Take a Twilight Tour

Dive deeper into Louisville’s history and discover the people who paved the way for our growing, modern city at a special Twilight Tour of the historic Conrad-Caldwell House on September 21. As the sun sets, the museum’s beauty is highlighted, accenting the property’s colors and grandeur. Along with a tour, guests will have the opportunity to hear a lecture given by Linda Morris, Conrad descendant and docent, detailing the house’s first occupant. Tickets are $10 for adults, $8 for seniors and active military. Contact: conrad-caldwell.org

Candle Glow Gala

Break out your tuxedo November 4 for

an elegant evening as Hosparus Health hosts its 12th annual Candle Glow Gala at the Louisville Marriott Downtown. Last year’s gala raised over $200,000 for the continuing care of hospice patients and their families in the Louisville area. Tickets available at HosparusHealth.org

Straight No Chaser: The Speakeasy Tour > THE KENTUCKY CENTER Straight No Chaser is a 10-member, allmale acapella group founded in 1996 at Indiana University. The group maintains a large online following, with more than 25 million views on YouTube. Known widely for their holiday music, the original Straight No Chaser crew disbanded as the members graduated from IU in 1999 but have since reemerged with a contemporary repertoire and a fresh dynamic approach to the acapella world. WHEN: November 26, 7pm WHERE: The Kentucky Center TICKETS: $24.50/$49.50/$59.50 CONTACT: kentuckycenter.org/presents, 502.584.7777,

800.775.7777, and in-person at The Kentucky Center box office and drive-thru. Contact 502.566.1111 for information about the range of accessibility options offered. Fall 2017 | todaystransitionsnow.com 79


Connie’s World Connie Meyer writes regularly for Today’s Transitions. You can reach Connie at ConnieL605@aol.com.

More Precious than Jewels W omen love jewelry. My first piece of jewelry came at birth in 1950 when Sears gave a tiny gold baby ring as a promotional gift. When I think of this clever advertising ploy I picture a scene from “Mad Men” where they pitch the idea over afternoon cocktails. Growing up in the era of the popular show, I enjoy recognizing the jewelry worn at the time. Rhinestone brooches and gemstone rings along with colorful beads enhance the beauty of characters like Betty and Joan. You can see the jewelry in stores today along with the ’50s-style clothing that has reappeared since the success of the show. Jewelry comes with memories attached. Wealthy families have jewelry that is passed down from generation to generation. Nowhere is this more evident than with the crown jewels of England. These precious jewels have historical memories associated with kings and queens throughout England’s rich history. Most of us do not come from royalty, but the richness of our memories is worth no less. The closest thing to royalty in our country comes from famous celebrities. Elizabeth Taylor was known not just for her acting, but also for her love of jewelry. In 1968, Richard Burton gave Elizabeth Taylor a diamond ring known then as the “Krupp Diamond.” She loved it so much she purportedly wore it almost every day. By the time it was sold in 2011, it had become known as “The Elizabeth Taylor Diamond” and brought $8,818,500 from auction at Christie’s. I certainly do not have jewelry that will be sold at a prestigious auction, but to me it is no less precious. I still have the first piece of jewelry my husband gave me when we first started dating at 16. It is a simple “gold” necklace with a pearl prominently displayed. I’m sure there is no real gold to be found in this treasure, but it means the world to me. My husband’s thoughtfulness has continued throughout our 40-plus year marriage with jewelry of much more monetary value. I cherish each piece and the

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memory it brings of special anniversaries or birthdays and particularly the jewelry given for no occasion at all. I can tell you the significance of every piece of jewelry my husband has given me, but none means more than that first pearl necklace. I still have a heart necklace my dad gave my mother when they were dating. They died after 47 years of marriage, and that was 20 years ago. I also have a tiny heart necklace my dad gave me when I was small. When my husband Jon proposed on Christmas Eve 40 years ago, I thought my engagement ring was the most beautiful piece of jewelry imaginable. After so many years of wear, the gold band that holds the modest marquise cut diamond has become so thin and fragile that I have put it away until I can get it re-set. As a child I remember making bracelets and necklaces from clover found in the yard. Not long after adorning myself with these creations, I would break out in a rash that quickly moved to my eyes causing them to swell and tear. At that time no one talked about allergies, but my mother’s common sense quickly made the connection, and I was no longer allowed to play in the grass. This meant my early attempts at jewelry design were put on permanent hold. In grade school my best friend Patty gave me a bracelet that had my name engraved on it. I wore it constantly, and I have kept it all these years. I have also kept the friendship that has survived along with the gift. Both have brought love and joy. I remember a few girls having pierced ears in high school, but the trend started to really pick up when I was in college. I always loved earrings, but not being one to suffer for beauty I could not stand the painful “clip-on” earrings for any length of time. Finally a group of close girlfriends decided we would go together to have our ears

pierced at the mall. A couple of us, me included, were engaged at the time, and I still remember how scared we were when our turns drew near. We tried to laugh off the fear by joking about it. We finally decided if we were going to eventually face childbirth, we’d better not wimp out at a little sharp ear piercing pain. We all survived to display earlobes that would be adequately adorned for years to come. I know some of my friends had their ears pierced at least two or three more times, but tongues, noses, and more delicate areas I cannot even imagine did not become popular until we were all older and definitely wise enough to know better. When my husband surprised me with my engagement ring, gold was the “in” thing. When my boys were growing up, silver/platinum became popular. I can remember my oldest son telling me, “Mom, nobody wears gold jewelry anymore.” I also remember my response. “Really? Well, I will just trade my wedding rings in right now for the more appropriate trend.” Trends come and go, but sentiment remains cemented in the heart of the receiver. I will never forget how my father-inlaw refused to remove his wedding band even for surgery. He certainly knew the value of his $11 gold band, and it was as priceless as his love for Mom. Dad proved that it isn’t just women who love jewelry. He also proved that it isn’t just the jewelry, but more importantly, the love and sentiment that it represents.


Today's Transitions Fall 2017  
Today's Transitions Fall 2017