Page 1


CONTENTS: SPRING 2017

42

6

28

18

6

24

34

Directories

4

48 How to Use

Directories & Facilities by Location

50 Adult Day Care Facilities

52 Aging-in-Place Facilities

6 10

62 Home Health 69 Independent Living 70 Nursing/Rehab Facilities

76 Personal Care

LUNCH PLUS ONE By Lucy Pritchett

HAVE YOU READ THIS? By Patti Hartog

12

INNOVATION AWARDS

14

IT’S HECK GETTING OLD

58 Assisted Living Facilities

By Tiffany White

18

36

DEAR ME

40

HER FITNESS FIX

42

EASY GARDENING

46

WISE AND WELL

By Carrie Vittitoe

68

3 SMART WAYS TO MANAGE YOUR MEDS

QUARTERLY CAREGIVER WINNER

80

FIRST DATE

14 WAYS TO END CLUTTER By Marie Bradby

Communities

54 Alzheimer’s Care

INTRO

By Yelena Sapin

16

24

DON’T WEAR THIS!

28

WHAT I KNOW NOW

30

WHO WILL WATCH OUT FOR YOU?

34

CAREGIVER CIRCLE

By Tiffany White

By Megan M. Seckman

36

79 Helpful Resources

UPDATES AND HAPPENINGS By Anna Oldham and Gioia Patton

For advertising information, call 502.327.8855 or email advertising@todayspublications.com.

2 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2017

By Brigid Morrissey

By Mary Ellen Bianco

By Lucy Pritchett

By Torie Temple

Facilities

By Elizabeth Schaaf

By Mark Kaelin

By Connie Meyer


Spring 2017 | todaystransitionsnow.com

3


From the Editor

SPRING 2017 • VOL. 14 / NO. 1

PUBLISHER Cathy S. Zion publisher@todayspublications.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Anita Oldham editor@todayspublications.com EDITOR Tiffany White tiffany@todayspublications.com CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Lucy M. Pritchett COPY EDITOR/DESIGNER April H. Allman april@todayspublications.com

Averting

Clutter Storm I

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Jessica Alyea jessica@todayspublications.com Kathy Bolger kathyb@todayspublications.com Jennifer Wilham jennifer@todayspublications.com PHOTOGRAPHER/PHOTO EDITOR Melissa Donald melissa@todayspublications.com

have been in my current home for just over a year, but I already see the warning signs of a potential clutter calamity. I keep a stack of billing statements and receipts in one of the kitchen drawers along with a box of envelopes and various items that don’t belong there. I have had mail on the kitchen table for the past week. My other kitchen drawer has turned into a dumping ground. Here’s what I found: four instruction manuals, five batteries that I cannot even fi d a need for, a package of wall hooks, matches, a smattering of nails, and, even a broken light bulb.

OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR Amanda Peyton offi eadmin@todayspublications.com

Right now, I am in the pre-clutter stage and wouldn’t need to devote too much time to fi ding a logical, more permanent location for my bills and random items. However, I realize if I continue to procrastinate, I could be devoting a full weekend to reorganizing a home instead of enjoying lovely spring days. If you take a look at your space — and attack it in small doses — maybe you can protect yourself from a full-blown clutter tornado. You’ll save time looking for things and enjoy a beautiful, clutter-free space. For tips on starting the process, read Marie Bradby’s 14 Ways to End Kitchen Clutter feature on page 18.

Joyce Inman joyce@todayspublications.com

Happy spring!

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Susan Allen susan@todayspublications.com SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Teri Hickerson teri@todayspublications.com Ann Hurst ann@todayspublications.com

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Kaitlyn English kaitlyn@todayspublications.com Donna Piercy donna@todayspublications.com CIRCULATION MANAGER W. Earl Zion Today’s Transitions is published semi-annually by: Zion Publications, LLC 9750 Ormsby Station Road, Suite 307 Louisville, KY 40223 Phone: 502.327.8855 todayswomannow.com The opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the writers and do not necessarily reflect the position of the publisher. Today’s Transitions magazine does not endorse or guarantee any advertiser’s product or service. Copyright 2017 by Zion Publications LLC, all rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited without permission from Zion Publications LLC.

ADVERTISE: Call 502.327.8855 or email advertising@todayspublications.com.

Got something to say?

REPRINTS: Call 502.327.8855 or email

We’d love to hear from you! Send an email to tiffany@todayspublications.com and put “feedback” in the subject line. Also, don’t forget to visit TodaysTransitionsNow.com to read current and archived articles or find out about upcoming events.

SUBSCRIBE: Send $10 to the above

reprints@todayspublications.com.

address for 4 quarterly issues of Today’s Transitions.

BBB RATING

4 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2017


Spring 2017 | todaystransitionsnow.com

5


PHOTOS MELISSA DONALD

Lunch Plus One

The Lunch Plus One adventure is an easy outing to enjoy with a friend or visiting relative. For Spring, the Lunch Plus One combines the contemporary with the historic.

BY LUCY M. PRITCHETT

THE LUNCH:

Mesh

3608 Brownsboro Road Settle in for an early lunch at Mesh on Brownsboro Road. The restaurant rests atop the rubble created when the old Bauer’s Restaurant was torn down, and its interior couldn’t be a bigger change from that venerable landmark. Sleek granite-topped tables, glassed-in fi eplace, lots of natural light, and fresh cuisine make for a splendid outing. There is plenty of parking in the lot, you can make reservations, and the portion sizes are reasonable. Depending on your appetite and entree choice, you might even have leftovers to take home for another meal. And it features the most sparkling wine glasses I have ever seen! Hours: Mon-Thurs 11am-10pm, Fri and Sat 11am-11pm, Sunday 10am-9pm Prices: Entree prices average $15. Save room to split a dessert. PAGE 8>>

The Salmon Tartine includes salmon, pea shoots, avocado, red onion, a soft-poached farm egg, olive mayo, and olive oil, all served on a crostini. The sandwich is $12 and is served with sweet potato chips.

3

TIP: Request a booth. Very comfortable and private. I always ask for a cocktail napkin to set under my water glass. I hate little puddles of moisture from the glass dripping on the granite table top.

6 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2017

Save room to share the Double Chocolate Stout Terrine.


Lunch Plus One

<< PAGE 6

PHOTO COURTNEY NOVACK

THE PLUS ONE:

Locust Grove

561 Blankenbaker Lane Distance from Mesh to Locust Grove: 3 miles Travel time: 6 minutes

Th s Georgian brick mansion was the last home of General George Rogers Clark from 1809 until his death in 1818. It was the estate of his sister Lucy Clark Croghan and her husband William and family. A tour of the circa 1792 house gives visitors a glimpse into life before Louisville became the metropolis it is today. The outbuildings and grounds of Locust Grove stand as examples of early 19th-century frontier America.

Hours: Mon-Sat 10am-4:30pm, Sunday 1pm-4:30pm Prices: Adults: $9, Seniors $8 Discounts for AAA members

PHOTO JOHN NATION

3

TIP: On the first Wednesday of the month, a lecture or presentation on an historic topic is given at 1pm. Upcoming April 5: Distilling Traditions with Woodford Reserveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s master distiller Chris Morris. Cookies and coffee are served before the lecture. $5 for non-members; $3 for Friends of Historic Locust Grove.

An introductory 15-minute film runs on the quarter hour, and the tour of the house takes about 45 minutes. If itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a pleasant day, take time to stroll about the grounds and enjoy the quiet. The small gift hop is just the size for a little retail therapy, too.

This Georgian mansion, built in the 1790s and recently re-restored to near its original appearance, is the centerpiece to the rolling fields, woodlands, gardens, and farm buildings at Locust Grove

8 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2017


BOOK CLUB: STRATHMOOR BOOK CLUB

Catching Up Here’s what other area clubs are reading next:

From the book:

"We talk about the value of hard work but tell ourselves that the reason we're not working is some perceived unfairness... These are the lies we tell ourselves to solve the cognitive dissonance — the broken connection between the world we see and the values we preach."

STRATHMOOR BOOK CLUB WHEN: Once a month WHERE: Member's houses CONTACT: Stephanie Lewis, facebook.com/ strathmoorBC

THE CHURCH LADIES The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion Contact: Jean Jones, jeantozerjones@gmail.com

Have you read this? STORY & PHOTOS BY PATTI HARTOG

When Stephanie Lewis and her husband moved to Fort Knox, she soon started a book club and invited her co-worker Vonnie Dunmars to join. Later, when Stephanie’s husband retired and the couple moved to Louisville, Vonnie encouraged her friend to start a new group. Now Strathmoor Book Club has about 16 active members. It meets once a month, rotating among members’ homes. The group recently discussed Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis by J.D. Vance, a factual accounting of the family of the author, who was born in the poor Appalachian town of Jackson, Kentucky, and who, along with thousands of other “hillbillies” as he affectionately calls “his people,” migrated to the Ohio steel town of Middletown in search of better jobs and the American dream. We caught up with Stephanie to hear about the book club’s discussion. What did you learn from this book? I am from Ashland, Kentucky, home of AK (Armco) Steel’s second steel mill (AK/Armco is the Middletown, OH steel mill in the book that enticed many from the Appalachia population to migrate from their homes.) The consensus of our group is that the decline of “hillbilly” culture probably isn’t unique. We felt like the shift w s more generational than geographical. How did the book change your thinking? I recognized a lot of the types of characters and situations that he described, and I’m obviously aware of the drug and poverty crisis “back home,” but I hadn’t invested a lot of time thinking about “why” things happened. Our book club had a very deep 10 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2017

and critical discussion about the long-term effects of government effort to combat poverty and the mindset of dependence. What did the book bring to mind? I was reminded of a lot of great memories growing up, playing with my cousins in rural Eastern Kentucky. Unfortunately, I was also reminded of the drug epidemic, unemployment, and the exodus of talent that is hollowing out the place where I grew up. Vance does a great job identifying the problem, but doesn’t offer any answers of how to make things better. What is a favorite book you've read? My favorite book of all time is F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby.

MONDAY NIGHT BOOK CLUB The Daughter of Time by Josephine Tey Contact: Mary Ellen Harned, harneds@twc.com

WINE, WOMEN AND WORDS The Underground Railroad by Colin Whitehead Contact: Susan Ryan, susanryan94@yahoo.com


N O M I N AT E A B U S I N E S S

Today’s Transitions

Innovation Awards Today’s Transitions wants to recognize local services and communities who are being innovative to issues related to quality of living for seniors and caregivers.

Do you know a business or organization whose innovative ideas are making the aging process easier? Nominate a person, business, senior living community, or a nonprofit organization in one of these categories. Complete the entry form at TodaysTransitionsNow.com by May 1, 2017. The winners in each category will be featured in the Fall issue of Today’s Transitions magazine and the November issue of Today’s Woman.

Categories: INNOVATIVE HEALTHCARE SERVICES Awarded for enhancements/techniques to improve the overall care of patients physically or mentally; or to provide better care to their patients or to specifically support a certain type of illness.

INNOVATIVE SUPPORT SERVICES Awarded for innovations or outstanding outreach/ programs to help those suffering from specific diseases and/or aging issues.

INNOVATIVE STRUCTURAL DESIGN Awarded for structural improvements to ease mobility or adaptability.

INNOVATIVE THERAPEUTIC/ MOBILITY SERVICES Awarded for special treatments/rehab advances or activities that help improve ease of mobility.

Complete the entry form at TodaysTransitionsNow.com by May 1, 2017. 12 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2017


Spring 2017 | todaystransitionsnow.com

13


It’s

! d l O g n i t t e G k Hec BY YELENA SAPIN

used to es don’t work the way they di bo r ou en wh r fo ns tio lu So

PROBLEM:

Hot Flashes

A

s women approach the end of their reproductive years, many experience sudden bursts of heat, either all over or just from the neck up. According to Dr. Rebecca Booth, OB/ GYN and director of Women First of Louisville and author of The Venus Week, hot flashes are thought to be cause by adrenaline surges that occur as the body struggles to cope with loss of estrogen, a hormone the brain has become accustomed to since puberty and that plummets when the ovaries enter retirement. Night sweats, heart palpitations, racing thoughts, and feelings of anxiety can be accompanying symptoms.

PROBLEM:

Loss of Strength

W

hen it comes to having the physical strength to take care of yourself and perform the daily tasks of life, the “use it or lose it” adage rings true. But even the most dedicated athletes aren’t immune to age-related muscle loss that begins in our 30s. “We lose 2 to 5 percent of muscle mass per decade as we age,” says Dee Fairfield, senior healthy living director of Northeast Family YMCA. A sedentary lifestyle or an immobilizing injury speeds up the rate of muscle loss, but it’s never too late to start working out to regain and maintain your strength.

14 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2017

SOLUTION:

SOLUTION:

Seek Balance Naturally

Consider Medication

Minimize or lessen adrenaline surges by lowering stress levels through meditative practices, regular exercise, and adequate sleep, Dr. Booth says. Reducing alcohol, caffeine, and other stimulants also helps. Increase your consumption of plantbased proteins that contain phytoestrogens. “Plant proteins almost always come from the reproductive part of the plant — the nut, the seed, sometimes the tuber — and contain compounds that are chemically similar to our reproductive hormones,” Dr. Booth explains. Flax seeds and soybeans top the list of foods high in these compounds.

Schedule a special visit to discuss your symptoms with your doctor. “A lot of patients just mention it as I’m about to walk out the door,” says Dr. Booth, “but it’s not that straightforward.” Hormone therapy remains an option, but there are also effective non-hormonal alternatives. Antidepressants can help with hot flashes as well a with palpitations and racing thoughts, says Dr. Booth, and low-dose beta blockers can lessen racing thoughts and palpitations. Over-the-counter phytoestrogen supplements seem to offer some relief as well, but don't forget to firs check with your doctor.

SOLUTION:

SOLUTION:

Work Up to It

Pump Up Your Routine

Anybody can exercise, no matter your age and fitness level, Fairfield says Chair-based routines let you ease into fitness and graduate to standing as you get stronger. Waterbased exercises take pressure off achy joints while improving your strength and endurance. As always, it’s best to check with your doctor before starting a new exercise program if you have any health concerns. “You have to be smart about it and make sure you’re not overdoing it too early,” Fairfield says.

If physical activity is already a part of your life, make sure your regimen includes both strength and balance exercises to not only reduce the risk of falls but to also lessen the severity of injury if a fall does occur, Fairfield says. “ oga can assist with that, but you can also use balance boards, do one-legged stands — use a chair for support if you need to — and a variety of other techniques to challenge your body to stay upright and not tip to the side.” Find more tips at https://www. nia.nih.gov/health/publication/ exercise-physical-activity/ introduction


Spring 2017 | todaystransitionsnow.com

15


Caregiver

CIRCLE BY TORIE TEMPL

E

Happy Bathing Easy Rider “A combination wheelchair and transport chair is a must-have,” says Dan Heins, director of IT at Humana Inc. “It’s a regular wheelchair that can be converted to a transport chair with big wheels that can easily be removed. The lighter weight transport chair is so much easier to store in the back of your vehicle, and it’s sturdy enough to handle most patients. I’ve demonstrated ours to various members in our caregiver support group and several have since then purchased one.” A lightweight transport chair can be purchased at Amazon for around $235.

PLANNING AHEAD Medical receptionist Helen Smith suggests the best way to make mealtime easier and full of healthy choices is to make several meals at a time and freeze them. This will cut down on prep time, making each meal more enjoyable. 16 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2017

Sheila Carter, owner of Heartsong Memory Care, shares her top five secrets to success when it comes to bath time refusals.

1

Find out why the person refuses to bathe. Is it fear of water? Fear of falling? Too cold?

2

Don’t ask “Do you want to…” Instead, get their help doing something in the bathroom, engage them in positive conversation, and subtly move into “let’s clean up while we’re here.”

3

Avoid words that trigger negative responses such as bath. Clean up may be a better phrase.

4

If they refuse, try again later using a different approach or have a different person take on the task.

5

Use an outside resource if you can. Let someone else take over with bathing so you can retain your caregiving/family relationship without that battle.

“When giving a bath, make sure the room has been warmed and the towels are warm. Heated towel bars are fairly inexpensive and make bath time a comfortable experience." — Connie Ray, owner of A Trusting Touch Cleaning Services


Spring 2017 | todaystransitionsnow.com

17


14

WAYS TO END KITCHEN CLUTTER

Determine which items you use the most and those you use occasionally. Then take the items you never use and get rid of them. You CAN have kitchen counters that are clutter-free!

STORY BY MARIE BRADBY PHOTOS BY MELISSA DONALD

I

f you want an organized kitchen where the counters are free of mail, food, rarely used appliances, and the drawers and cabinets aren’t packed to the gills, get picky. Cheryl Meyer, president of Cardinal Closets and Jennifer Barber, a professional organizer who owns Cut the Chaos, gives you a plan for turning your kitchen into a neat and functional space. “You need to be very selective about what you allow in your kitchen,” says Jennifer. “Then plan out a place for everything.” Cheryl has a simple motto for her home: “If I can’t fit it all on one shelf, I’ve got too much stuff,” she says. Organization is all about determining which items you use the most, those you use occasionally, and those you never use. And then letting go. PAGE 20>>

18 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2017


Spring 2017 | todaystransitionsnow.com

19


<< PAGE 18

Here’s a powerful process to help you tackle your cluttered kitchen, whether you do one drawer at a time, or take a weekend and do the whole room: Categorize. Pull out and sort all like items, such as pots, pans, and lids.

Edit. Divide them into three piles: Use daily, use occasionally, use rarely, never use. Purge. Toss all cookware that is worn, damaged, missing handles or knobs, scorched, or flaking. Donate or sell duplicates and rarely used pots (or store them in a box to see if you pull them out again). You have to be really tough and let go of as many items as possible. Th s keeps you from wasting time searching through a huge jumble of pots. “If you haven’t used it in a year, you can get rid of it,” Cheryl advises. Store. Designate a space for what’s left nd put the pots and pans that you love and use regularly in one place, either a cabinet, drawer, or shelf. Arrange them so that the most used ones are in front. Use a lid rack to keep lids organized. If you have grandchildren who visit, label that shelf or drawer so they can help put things away from the dishwasher. Edit again. The idea is to have a storage place for every item for your size kitchen (not the kitchen of your dreams. . .that’s another story), and to eliminate visual clutter. So put up a shelf or pegboard in the pantry, basement, or back hallway to store seldom-used essentials.

Professional organizer Jennifer Barber advises to be selective about what sits on your counters.

“Less is always more,” Jennifer says. If you can go in your kitchen and cook a meal without having to search for things or clear a space on the counter, “it’s much more relaxing than fi hting to fi d the pan that you want to use or moving stuff. The benefit will be well worth the pain of letting go.” Use this same process for all kitchen items, including utensils, dishes, mugs, glasses, canned goods, appliances, glass cookware, baking pans, gadgets (such as meat thermometers and tea infusers), linens, cookbooks, etc. Th s process also works for food, so set aside time to declutter and organize the pantry and the refrigerator. If you’ve got tons of good stuff, avoid going to the grocery store for a few weeks and use what you have.

20 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2017

Put It All Away. Aft r

you have sorted and purged, pay special attention to what you store where. “Items that aren’t used daily can be stored further away from the cooking area,” Cheryl says.

Clear the Counters. If an item is used weekly, then it can be on the counter. Otherwise, the goal is to free up counter space for food preparation, cooking, and clean up. Appliances, like electric can openers, take up counter space when manual ones work just as well, unless you have arthritis. Remove food and beverages from counters and store them in cupboards or the pantry. To free up more space, Jennifer suggests putting essentials such as dish soap, counter spray, and hand cream in small decanters and refill every two weeks.

“You have to be very selective about what you allow on your counters,” Jennifer says. “Every gadget that you want is not a gadget that you should have.” Her exception is her large KitchenAid mixer. “It’s too heavy and cumbersome to bring it out when I need it,” she says. “I do use it often enough. If I used it only once a year, I would put it away.” For essential utensils, “I use a wine carafe on the counter to make it attractive and keep things handy,” Jennifer adds.

Create More Cabinet Space. Sort dishes and

glassware, purging worn, cracked, chipped ones. Donate usable ones that you don’t need. Store the keepers near the dishwasher. PAGE 22>>


<< PAGE 20

Move extra dishes to storage shelves in the pantry or the basement. Plastic storage containers breed like rabbits. Sort food storage containers, tossing ones that have lost their bottoms or tops, overused plastic ones, and damaged ones. If you’re concerned about the chemicals used in plastic containers, invest in new glass containers, which are more attractive and should last a lifetime. Two-tiered Lazy Susans work well for organizing spices. In-drawer spice organizers and liners are even better. (Spices typically go stale after a year. Here’s another area to pare down.) Set aside a cabinet shelf for coffee and tea items, such as the coffee press, filters, grinder, tea pots, tea bags, etc., near where the coffee and tea are made.

Tidy Drawers. Sort uten-

sils, giving away duplicates and rarely used items. Purge cracked, worn plastic utensils. Put only essential utensils that you use everyday in a container on the counter. The rest should go in a drawer. Use drawer dividers to keep items sorted so you don’t have to rummage around. An in-drawer knife slot organizer will provide smart, safe storage for knives that is out of sight. “I keep a certain amount of silverware in the drawer and keep extra in another container,” Cheryl says. “We have an abundance of extra knives and spoons for when guests come. After the silverware gets cleaned, it goes back to the container.” Use one drawer for plastic wrap, aluminum foil, storage bags, etc. Store a collapsible step ladder beside the refrigerator to use to reach items in upper cabinets.

Keep it Small Under the Sink. Don’t keep an

industrial-sized bag of dog food or dishwashing cubes or other bulk items under the sink. Put small quantities in containers with lids. (Child-proof, if that’s a concern.) Use a small container (a cute bucket works well) to hold a few extra sponges, dish brushes, dishwashing gloves, counter spray, garbage bags, etc. Put a rack on the inside door of the sink cabinet to hang dish towels and sponges.

Perfect the Pantry. Sort

pantry items into categories, such as baking supplies, pasta, cereals, cereal bars, snacks, canned goods, paper products. Toss expired items. Donate duplicates to a food pantry. Use clear containers, metal canisters, or wicker baskets to store like items. Label the containers, and even put labels on the edge of the shelf. Paper bags and gift ags mushroom. Fold up a half dozen and store them in a box on the fl or. Recycle the rest. Hang up aprons. Purchase or make one of those cloth plastic bag holders. Here’s a tutorial for making one. http://www. craftinessisnotoptional.com/ 2011/05/20-minute-grocerybag-holder-tutorial.html “I’ve had people turn a coat closet into a pantry,” Cheryl says. “The pantry was more

22 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2017

Using clear containers, metal canisters, or wicker baskets to store like items will help keep your pantry organized.

important to them than the coat closet.” Also, “a short dresser can be repurposed in the kitchen to store linens.” A rolling cart will provide more prep and storage space.

Cookbooks Get Outdated. Cookbooks

and recipes go out of style. Except for general information ones, like The Joy of Cooking, let go of outdated cookbooks. House the rest together on a shelf or small bookcase. Purge old recipe clippings you’ve been saving for dishes you “might make.” The internet is full of recipes, which makes clipping obsolete. If you must save a few (like Aunt Anna’s huckleberry cake recipe), put them in a ring binder.

Master the Mail.

Most kitchens are only big enough for cooking. Some have room for eating, as well as an office d k, or even a mud room. But any kitchen looks cluttered with mail. Get the mail out of the kitchen and fi d a nook in the dining room, den, or on a hallway table. Before putting new mail in its designated place, immediately toss all junk into the recycling bin.

Jot it on a Calendar.

Instead of hanging on to lots of slips of paper, hang a white dry-erase board to jot down schedules, such as when to pick up grandchildren, birthdays, soccer games, etc. Have a calendar nearby.


Spring 2017 | todaystransitionsnow.com

23


What to Wear

BY TIFFANY WHITE / PHOTOS BY MELISSA DONALD

Cheryl Franck

Don’t Wear It! For some, parting with a beloved outfit can be difficult — even if the clothing is no longer fashionable or fits improperl . If you’re suffering from fashion blindness, Chris Fulkerson, stylist and owner of VIP Studio-Visual Impact & Presence, will open your eyes to a way of reinvigorating your wardrobe.

1 2

Jacket

“It would be a lovely jacket if she got rid of the shoulder pads. Also, the jacket is too tight.”

Embellishments on jacket

Chris says pearls on clothing gain and lose relevance in fashion, but believes the embellishment on this jacket doesn’t make it a timeless piece.

Culotte pants

3 24 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2017

“These pants are dated and way too short for someone who is almost 60 to be wearing. When you reach the 55 and older range, let it be a mystery. You don’t have to show it all.”


Wear This! 1

Top

“When you wear a classic, timeless top, you can’t go wrong and you can add pearl jewelry for elegance.”

Striped trench lightweight jacket

2

“You can mix a print top with this stripe or mix stripes with stripes. But whatever a woman puts together, she needs to feel comfortable in it. If she questions the mix, she is going to carry it with her throughout the day.”

Pants

3

“A classic trouser in navy is an awesome basic to wear in place in black.” Navy is also one of the popular colors for spring.

Cheryl is wearing: Clothing from Cabi. For information on the clothing, contact Chris Fulkerson at chris.fulkerson59 @gmail.com

Spring 2017 | todaystransitionsnow.com

25


6 Things to Know

About Long-Term Insurance BY MEGAN S. WILLMAN

Question 1:

Will long-term care insurance pay for a person to stay at home, or do they have to be in a facility?

“People tend to only think about nursing homes, but a good policy will consider in-home care, adult day care, and assisted living as well. Nursing homes cost an average of $74,208 per year. More people today are staying at home or in assisted living. None of us knows what we’ll need when the time comes, so our plans should be inclusive.”

Question 2:

How long does the policy pay?

“It depends on the policy. Some may have a lifetime benefit, but that is becoming more rare.” There are two types of long-term care plans: (1) Individuals pay an annual premium depending on age and medical qualifi ation. The benefit will pay out based on that premium. Th s traditional long-term care policy pays according to its listed guidelines. (2) Individuals can set aside a portion of their assets to be used for long-term care. For example, a person who can set aside a lump sum of $50,000 will see a death benefit of $75,000, but that $50,000 will pay $150,000 for long-term care services. Those benefits will pay for either a 4- or 6-year period.

26 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2017

S

tudies by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (at longtermcare.gov) show that 70 percent of people will need some form of long-term care services in their lifetime. With that statistic in mind, we need to resist the urge to bury our heads in the sand. It isn’t wise to count on family, Medicaid, or Medicare to take care of these needs. “If you love your family, talk to a professional and put a plan in place that fits your needs. It will ease the burden during an already difficult time,” says David Laughlin, senior financial advisor and Chartered Advisor for Senior Living® with First Investment Professionals in Clarksville, Indiana. Here he answers questions about long-term planning.

Question 3:

What conditions initiate long-term care benefits?

“Typically, if the individual can no longer do two Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) independently, a benefit will be paid. The insurance company will send someone out to do an assessment. If the person can no longer perform two of the ADLs, the benefit will be approved. There is often a 90-day waiting period before those benefits begin.” Activities of Daily Living: • Personal hygiene — bathing, grooming, and oral care • Dressing — the ability to make appropriate clothing decisions and physically dress oneself • Eating — the ability to feed oneself though not not necessarily prepare food • Maintaining continence — both the mental and physical ability to use a restroom • Transferring — moving oneself from seated to standing and getting in and out of bed

Question 4:

How much does a policy cost?

“That’s difficult to answer because each person is different, and the cost is based on age and medical qualifi ations. I tell my clients to apply and fi d out. If it doesn’t fit their budget, we work on other options. With some plans, I have found that health qualifi ations aren’t as intense as they used to be. If you’re in good health, it’s a great time to pursue a policy.”

Question 5:

Do the premiums go up, or are they locked in?

“It depends on the program, but it’s important to clearly understand your policy. Some plans state that the premium may go up under certain circumstances but guarantee the benefit will hold. The key is to customize your plan to your own needs based on your age, health, and the benefits you want.”

Question 6:

What is the best age to start?

“I had one client begin in her 40s, but generally the late 50s and 60s are more common. I tell my clients that if they’re not allocating some of their assets toward long-term care, they are essentially allocating all of their assets toward it. Many people want to be able to give to their families, churches, or charities at the end of life. Without a long-term plan, that may not be possible.”


Spring 2017 | todaystransitionsnow.com

27


WHAT I KNOW NOW

Etta Rae Hirsch

As a family service advisor with Cave Hill Cemetery since 1979, Etta Rae Hirsch serves the families she helps with her grace and her serene spirit. BY LUCY M. PRITCHETT / PHOTO MELISSA DONALD

What makes you happy now?

Being able to work and doing the kind of work that I do. I work with families and help them select a fi al resting place for their loved ones and help with the choice and design of monuments. I know that my efforts are helping others on what is perhaps their worst day. How do you keep your spirits up?

Just knowing that I have this job keeps my spirits up. I look forward to meeting the families, and I have to be ready to answer any of their questions. What's the one skill every woman should have?

The strength and knowledge to make decisions for herself. What were your plans for yourself?

I was pre-med in college and earned a degree in biology. I got married instead of going to medical school, but I went on to run the blood bank at the old Louisville General Hospital. What class would you like to take?

I would like to learn how to paint.

What music stirs you?

The Blue Danube Waltz by Johann Strauss. The other day I was pulling in my driveway, and it came on the radio. I turned the volume up full blast and sat in the car and listened to it to the end. When I got into the house I played it again. It makes me want to move and relaxes me and gives me sweet thoughts. I love classical music. The ringtone on my phone is the Waltz of the Flowers from The Nutcracker.

"I know that my efforts are helping others on what is perhaps their worst day." What is your attitude toward aging?

Do whatever it takes to keep going and stay strong and healthy. What is your greatest accomplishment?

Being able to do my job. It's what has kept me going and why I'm still working at my age. Working with the families has given me so much satisfaction over the years.

28 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2017

Etta Rae Hirsch

The world would be a better place if...

People could just get along and accept differences and allow more love in their lives for their fellow humans. What did you learn from your parents?

From my mom I learned to treat people like I want to be treated and from my father, patience and kindness. What do you have too many of?

Plants. I have tropical plants in the garden in the summer, and then I have them dug up every year and brought inside for the winter.

What is your passion right now?

I propagate starfish cactus. The blooms can be 14 inches in diameter. I started with a $1 cutting. I have about 10 of the plants sitting in the bay window in my kitchen. The bloom has a pungent odor when it fi st opens, but that soon dissipates. The blooms last about a week. What have you not been able to get the knack of?

My grandmother tried to teach me to knit. I could never keep the stitches on the needle. I can do a lot of creative things, but I never have been able to get the knack of the knitting needles.


Spring 2017 | todaystransitionsnow.com

29


No policy sold now should be limited to nursing home care but should cover care wherever you are.” ­— Eileen Walsh, Elder Law of Louisville

Who Will Take Care of

YOU? BY CARRIE VITTITOE

N

o one likes to think that one day he may need nursing home care or be unable to make his own financial or medical decisions. Thinking about these topics can be especially confusing if you don’t have children or nearby relatives. Whom do you trust to care for you as you become a much older adult? What choices would you make for your life, and how do you ensure that your wishes are followed?

Sabine Stovall, a wealth and estate planner and owner of The Wealth Planning Company, says the fi st step in planning for older age is to understand what assets you have. “Most of us underestimate the value of what we have,” she says. It is important to sit down periodically to look at your assets, both large and small, and decide how you would like those assets to be used. Parents often want to ensure that any assets they have be protected as a legacy for their children, but it is important to consider how your assets can be PAGE 32>>

30 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2017


Spring 2017 | todaystransitionsnow.com

31


<< PAGE 30

used for your own protection and quality of life in much older age, especially if staying in your own home is a priority. For some single, childless individuals, the plan is to go into a nursing home, use up their assets, and then apply for Medicaid, and that is certainly one option. However, attorney Eileen Walsh of Elder Law of Louisville, says protecting one’s assets can mean that other care options open up. Protecting one’s assets could mean being able to hire an in-home care provider and avoid a nursing home for a number of years or indefin tely. If a nursing home is the next step, protected assets such as a 401K or IRA savings can pay for a geriatric care manager to visit you in the nursing home twice a month to review care, or it could mean having a private room supplement. Eileen strongly advises people to at least look into long-term care insurance. Some people think that long-term care insurance only pays for nursing home care, but, she says, “it can be helpful for staying at home. No policy sold now should be limited to nursing home care but should cover care wherever you are.” In planning for advanced age, especially as it concerns assisted care, Eileen says veterans and/ or their surviving spouses are a special population that should get information about the VA’s Aid and Attendance pension benefit. “It can bring cash to them when they need care,” she says. For some older adults, planning may involve moving out of their long-time homes and into a home

that allows them greater access to doctors and shopping without the need for a vehicle. Another plan might involve moving in with a friend and sharing expenses. It is critical to envision how you want your advanced senior years to be and what support network you are able to access or create. Once you’ve tabulated your assets and considered your vision for much older age, the next step is to have documents drawn up. When it comes to an individual’s protection, Eileen says, “Power of attorney is a critically important document.” It is a document that gives another person the power to act on your wishes when you are unable to do so, and it is only valid during one’s lifetime. She says individuals can draw up separate medical and fi ancial powers of attorney if they wish. Some people worry that assigning power of attorney gives someone else total control over their lives, but Sabine says it is possible to draw up a document that gives another person power of attorney only as a result of a triggering event. Losing your sight, being unable to speak or walk can be triggering events. “Power of attorney is your individual power to

Don't leave your care up to

chance.

32 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2017

give under the conditions that you set forth,” she says. For someone without children or close living relatives, it might be a difficult choice to determine whom they would grant power of attorney. Eileen is a board member of Elder Serve/Guardia Care (the entities merged in July 2016) and says it offers a program whereby the nonprofit itself can be named as power of attorney for those without suitable family members. “I see it as a very positive presence in the community,” she says. There are other important documents that older adults should have in planning for advanced age, but these differ in that they go into effect at the very end of life or after death. A living will, for example, is a legal instrument in which an individual communicates her wishes if unable to make her own end-of-life medical decisions, such as whether to be resuscitated or whether to be given a feeding tube. In this document, a person can select a health-care surrogate, who is granted responsibility for acting on one’s wishes as described in the Living Will. Th Last Will and Testament document “communicates where you want to be buried and under what conditions and where you want your stuff o go and under what conditions,” Sabine says. For individuals without children or close living relatives, it may make sense for an attorney to be the executor of the estate.


Spring 2017 | todaystransitionsnow.com

33


TECH TALK

BY MEGAN M. SECKMAN

3 Smart Ways to Manage Meds

M

onitoring medications for yourself or a loved one can be an enigmatic puzzle. Take the green in the morning before coffee, the big white one with a meal, the two pinks before bed, and the brown ones as needed. It can be exhausting trying to remember the regimen and remains a sensitive beacon of independence. My motherin-law was sincerely hurt when her son took over the dispensation of her meds. Even though her deteriorating memory warranted this decision, perhaps a high-tech pill box would have been the compromise most fitting for a senior attempting to age in place — a compromise that gives the family peace of mind and everyone involved a little more autonomy.

sounds to remind the user to take her medicine. Reviews suggest this device is easy to use (in comparison to other pill dispensers) and has a long battery life (batteries with AC adaptor back-up). Cost ranges between $200-$700. Best for: Seniors who will remember what the alarm calls for, will take the pill right away without forgetting, and do not tend to over-medicate or tamper with the device (reviews suggest it is relatively easy to pry open the compartments). Some suggest putting a sign above the machine to remind the patient what the alarm signals.

from his favorite granddaughter). Cost ranges between $40-$65 a month. Best for: Seniors who do not take more than four pills per day and/or take all medication at once, unless the patient can manage his allotment of meds throughout the day without forgetting. The device does offer replacement trays and various scheduled alerts to combat this issue (i.e. “Time to take your evening pill, Poppa”).

Medisafe Medication Reminder App for smartphones

The Device

Many devices on the market such as medSmart E-Pill Automatic Pill Dispenser are made up of 28 active compartments that can be programmed to dispense pills for 4-30 days (depending on the amount of daily doses). The compartments are locked to deter overdosing and open after an alarm medSmart E-Pill Automatic Pill Dispenser

MedMinder Automatic Pill Dispenser

The Device + App

MedMinder Automatic Pill Dispenser works like other pill dispensers with a calendar-like grid that holds up to four pills in 28 compartments.

Using the device’s own internal cellular modem, when meds are not taken on time the device flashes, then beeps, then sends a text message, at 30-minute intervals, and fi ally alerts caregivers. The device also features a medical alert feature and allows for voice recording (so the message “Take your medicine, grandpa” could be

34 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2017

The App

Medisafe Medication Reminder is a completely free service offered on most smartphones. Ranked #1 by pharmacists, this app gives alerts with images of the pill when it is time to dispense medication. The home screen can be accessed from your phone, tablet, or smartwatch and displays morning, midday, and evening medicine regimens. The user places a “check” by each pill after taken. Best for: Users who are competent with a smartphone, tablet, or smartwatch and don’t have any issues with over-medicating. Although some reviews indicate initial setup is challenging, the day-to-day usage is simple and effective.


Updates & Happenings | news you can use + events not to miss |

BY GIOIA PATTON AND ANITA OLDHAM

What Would You Tell Yourself?

Elizabeth Schaaf, owner of Elizabeth’s Timeless Attire shares the best advice she’d give to her younger self. It’s a quick dance; enjoy every minute. You look as good as you’re ever going to look. Regret, fear and worry are the enemies. Don’t take yourself or anyone else too seriously. If you’re afraid, you should probably do it anyway. Loss is going to happen. Your heart will break. Loved ones will die. Pets, too. The human spirit is incredibly resilient. Nature heals. Sunsets, stargazing, and campfi es are recommended. Laughter and music can ease just about any pain.

Elizabeth prepares to hitch hike through Europe.

Here she stands inside her boutique located on Frankfort Ave.

Riverdance - The 20th Anni ersary Tour > THE KENTUCKY CENTER

Riverdance - The 20th Anniversary World Tour is an innovative and exciting blend of dance, music, and song. Drawing on Irish traditions, the combined talents of the performers propel Irish dancing and music into the present day, capturing the imagination of audiences across all ages and cultures. Riverdance - The 20th Anniversary World Tour features new costumes, new lighting, new projections and the addition of a brand new number, “Anna Livia,” featuring the female members of the Irish dance troupe in an a cappella hard-shoe number. WHEN: April 10-12 @ 7:30pm WHERE: The Kentucky Center TICKETS: ranging from $35-$94 CONTACT: Box office (walk up or drive-thru), 502.584.7777, or

kentuckycenter.org. Groups of 10 or more contact 502.569.3060.

Dance into Spring

Take a break from the mundane and enjoy a day of dancing with your friends at the Senior Derby Dance. The event will feature a Derby hat contest, music, vendors, and lunch. WHEN: April 27, 10am-2pm WHERE: St. Matthews Community Center TICKETS: $5 CONTACT: 502.890.9409 or DerbyDance@SeniorHelpers.com by

April 17.

36 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2017

Hosparus Expands Their Servic s

In addition to their hospice services, Hosparus will be offering palliative care and advanced illness care to adults and children starting March 17. The organization wants to broaden their reach in providing comprehensive care to patients. CONTACT: HosparusHealth.org

“You can cut all the flo ers but you cannot keep Spring from coming. - Pablo Neruda


Spring 2017 | todaystransitionsnow.com

37


Updates & Happenings Sondheim on Sondheim

> CENTERSTAGE AT THE JCC Hailed as a “funny, affectionate, and revealing tribute to musical theater’s greatest living composer and lyricist,” Sondheim On Sondheim is an intimate portrait of the famed songwriter in his own words and music. Th ough the use of exclusive interview footage, audiences are treated to an inside look at Stephen Sondheim’s personal life and artistic process as well as a live revue of his most memorable songs. Selections include music from A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, Gypsy, Company, A Little Night Music, Sweeney Todd, Into the Woods, and more. WHEN: April 10-12 @ 7:30pm WHERE: The Kentucky Center TICKETS: Ranging from $35-$94 CONTACT: Box office (walk up or drive-thru), 502.584.7777, or kentuckycenter.org.

Groups of 10 or more contact 502.569.3060.

Delivering Joy Th ough Stories

The Rocking Chai Tour

> KENTUCKY CENTER At 73, Jeanne Robertson continues to charm audiences with her humorous observations about life around her. Th s 6-foot-2 inch former Miss North Carolina has an infectious personality, heart, and sense of humor. WHEN: April 28, 8pm WHERE: Brown Theatre TICKETS: $35-55 CONTACT: 502.584.7777 or 800.775.7777, in-person at The Kentucky Center box office and drive-thru, and 502.566.5111 (V) or 502.566.5140 (TTY). You can also get tickets at kentuckycenter.org

38 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2017

In 2015, Dr. Rita Fleming – a Jeffersonville obstetrician – traded in her lab coat for a computer keyboard. Over the course of her career, Dr. Fleming has delivered more than 7,000 babies, but she wanted to give something more to these children as they grew. So she picked up her pen and began writing poetry geared towards children. Her books, Does Grandma Have a Mustache? and Did Grandpa's Dog Pass Gas?, are two collections of delightfully catchy poems for children. You can fi d them at Carmichael’s Bookstores, Karen’s Book Bam in La Grange, and the Bluegrass Paint and Post Offi . In Southern Indiana, you can fi d them at Lavender Hill Florals, Sugar Maple Antiques & Gifts, nd Destinations Booksellers.

Try Thi

On March 23, Wesley Manor will host an event called the Virtual Dementia Tour, nationally sponsored by Second Wind Dream, is designed to help participants achieve a greater understanding of dementia. Caregivers, family, and all those who attend the event will have the opportunity to undergo a simulation of what people with dementia experience on a daily basis. Participants will wear special goggles that simulate tunnel vision, headphones playing scrambled gibberish to simulate background noise, gloves, and shoe inserts. Once geared up, guides put participants in a dimly lit room and have them do everyday tasks. The event will be free and open to the public. Contact 502.969.3277 to register.

“Is the spring coming?" he said. “What is it like?". . . "It is the sun shining on the rain and the rain falling on the sunshine . . ." -Frances Hodgson Burnett


Her Fitness Fix STORY BY BRIGID MORRISSEY PHOTO BY MELISSA DONALD

Pattie Moore, 59

Nutrient Specialist, Institute of Anti-Aging Medicine Where She Exercises: Pattie belongs to Blairwood Tennis, Swim and Fitness Club for her swimming, tennis, and weight-training workouts, and the Tennis Club of Springhurst for tennis and Pilates. Best Exercise: To say Pattie is active is an understatement. Her favorite activity and pastime of 20 years is Pilates, which includes two hours of mat classes and an hour of private sessions on the machines. Her weekly regimen also includes an hour of both Fusion Weekly and Booty Bar, three hours of tennis lessons and up to six hours of tennis games, and four days of either a 2- to 3-mile walk or a go on the rowing machine. How She Stays Motivated: Pattie had a good head start growing up as an athlete involved with softball and volleyball. It has been a key motivating factor to remain active in her later years. “I can’t not do something. I’m not a morning person, but everyone thinks I am. Exercise gets my day going. It’s kind of like a drug in that way.” Future Fitness Goals: Pattie isn’t one to make New Year’s resolutions, but her vow is to incorporate weight training into her schedule. “I’m not a runner or do anything out of the ordinary. I just want to maintain the shape that I’m in so as I get into my 60s and 70s, I don’t look or feel like I’m in my 60s or 70s.”

40 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2017


Easy Gardening BY MARY ELLEN BIANCO

T

he smell of freshly picked basil and the taste of a fresh tomato off the vine can be motivation to grow plants at home. We asked local expert Mary Ann Dallenbach, owner of St. Matthews Feed & Seed, for advice on ways to make gardening more accessible. Mary Ann says, “Grow what you like and start small. Pick three things — it’s supposed to be fun.”

Grow Your Garden Anywhere

Denise Peterson, who is a master gardener, bought this Meyer Lemon tree from ValuMarket.

Container gardening doesn’t require a lot of space or effort. “There are tons of things to grow inside or on a balcony or patio such as lettuces, onions, carrots, and microgreens,” Mary Ann says. Microgreens are germinated seeds that have developed tiny roots and edible fi st leaves. “Lime, lemon, kumquat, and avocado trees can be grown in a container,” she says. “Also herbs such as basil, chives, and cilantro, which like cool nights and warm days. Mint is woodier and hardy.” Mary Ann advises starting with a good, clean pot. Aphids can be carried in from a dirty pot. “Always use potting mix, which has the ability to expand, such as ferti-lome,” Mary Ann says. “It’s light and airy. Healthy soil equals healthy plants.” Next comes the choice of seeds. Mary Ann uses non-genetically modifi d organism (GMO) seeds. The GMO process makes plants more resistant to rain, drought, pests and diseases, but it is controversial since it’s done in a laboratory. Adequate fertilizer and controlling pests is vital. “What you do to fertilize after the plant starts growing is important,” PAGE 44>>

42 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2017


â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gardening is supposed to be fun."

Spring 2017 | todaystransitionsnow.com

43


<< PAGE 42

Mary Ann says. “If you want to grow organic plants for your fruits and vegetables, then you should use organic fertilizers.” Some suggestions are Espoma indoor plant food or Monty’s Plant Food, which is locally manufactured. Pests such as aphids can appear due to over or under watering. “You can control pests, and you need to do it immediately,” Mary Ann says. She suggests mixing one part rubbing alcohol to 8-9 parts water. It can either be sprayed on the infected plant, wiped on the affected leaves with a paper towel, or dipped on a Q-tip. Adequate light for any type of plant is always important.

Bend No More Raised beds on stilts is another gardening option, keeping you from having to stoop over. “You can build by the square foot, and the instructions read like a recipe,” Mary Ann says. “I’ve used logs that a friend gave me to build them; then I add soil and frost protection hoops or fabric.” Adding compost is a key ingredient in organic gardening. It’s made from organic matter that has been decomposed and recycled as a fertilizer. “Purchase those that don’t make you sick,” Mary Ann says. “Good ones won’t smell. Black Kow manure is all-natural and organic.” Other types are from spent mushrooms or lobster body compost.

Baby Your Plants

Greenhouses are available, ranging from portable sizes to walk-in types. “They must have some sort of heat — keep them outside on the sunny side of your yard,” Mary Ann says. “The light may supply enough heat.” It can be diffi ult to keep a greenhouse free of bugs. “Pests thrive in a moist environment,” Mary Ann says. “Carnivorous plants such as the Venus Flytrap or the pitcher plant control them.” You can start your garden with minimal tools. “It’s pretty simple — you can even use spoons or your hands,” Mary Ann says. “Start with a clean pot, potting mix, seed, fertilizer, pest control, and provide adequate light.” She also suggests reading gardening books, doing online research, or taking classes at garden centers to build on your knowledge and skills. No excuses. Get your green thumb on!

TOP PHOTO: Garden bed installation done by YouthBuild Louisville. BOTTOM PHOTO: Denise turned a terra cotta planter upside down to be used as a stand.

44 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2017

Try these other gardening alternatives AQUA GARDENS: “Aqua gardens constantly circulate water and light and are priced around $35,” Mary Ann says. “Plant towers also circulate water and light, but they’re expensive, costing around $400.” COMMUNITY GARDENS: “We have great community garden centers in Louisville and we try to donate to them,” Mary Ann says. “The Jefferson County extension office is a good resource.” Eat Local, Grow Local workshops are listed on the website. Community gardens around town: Jefferson County Extension Office https://jefferson.ca.uky.edu/, (502) 569-2344 The Parklands: http://www.theparklands.org/Things-To-Do/Community-Gardens Black Acre Conservancy: http://blackacreconservancy.org/community-garden/ City of Louisville: https://louisvilleky.gov/government/mayors-healthy-hometownmovement/community-gardening


Wise&Well

Tidbits, news, and tips to help you live your healthiest years yet

BY MARK KAELIN

Let Go of Caregiver Stress “It’s normal to feel stressed, frustrated, and even overwhelmed at times when caring for an ill loved one,” says Dr. Greg Nordloh, counseling psychologist at Southern Indiana Rehab Hospital. Don’t go it alone! Ask for help by enlisting the aid of family, friends, or a private caregiver. Also remember, “You can be devoted to someone and still take care of yourself,” Nordloh says. Caregiving is challenging. To help, Southern Indiana Rehab Hospital offers monthly caregiver support meetings. For information on dates, times and location, contact Nordloh at 812.941.3153.

Rest Your Eyes Dry eyes are irritating, uncomfortable, and affect your vision. “People with chronically dry eyes are more susceptible to bacterial infections and corneal scarring,” says Ophthalmologist Dr. Julie Lee. Strategies you can use to alleviate this condition include: avoid fans and vents that directly blow on your face; take frequent breaks when reading or working on your computer; soak your eyes with a warm, steamy, washcloth; and take an omega-3 supplement. 46 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2017

Got Muscle? Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham recently concluded that older adults require more weekly training sessions than younger adults to maintain muscle mass. “You should shoot for three to four weight-lifting sessions a week,” says Michael Jett of the University of Louisville’s Exercise Physiology Department. To avoid aggravating old injuries or chronic conditions, Jett suggests performing exercises that involve multiple muscle groups like rowing, pressing, and squatting.

OVERCOMING EXERCISE BARRIERS ProRehab Physical Therapy’s new metabolic conditioning program is designed to make exercise accessible to everyone. “Initial appointments are conducted by a physical therapist,” says Alex Burtch, sports performance director. Workout sessions are designed to avoid aggravating chronic conditions while maximizing weight loss and strength gains. To find out more contact Burtch at 502.454.5544

Something to Smile About Imagine being unwilling to smile in a family photo or struggling to chew food. These are common occurrences if you’ve had teeth removed. Thanks to improvements in dental procedures, however, “we can now rebuild bone and replace teeth with implants, giving people back their smiles and their function,” says Dr. Bryan Harris, a specialist in restorative dentistry at the University of Louisville. To learn more about restorative dental options, contact the U of L School of Dentistry at 502.852.1054.


Spring 2017 | todaystransitionsnow.com

47


How to Use These Directories CONTENTS

These directories are organized first by this location chart. On the following pages, you’ll find descriptive listings of local facilities in each of the eight categories listed under Contents at right. Larger enhanced listings are listed first and are paid for by the facility. Regular listings follow.

Payment Options: These definitions can help you navigate the payment options in each directory:

Adult Day Care............................50 Home Health.....................62 Aging-in-Place Communities.....52 Independent Living............. 69 Alzheimer’s Care....................54 Nursing/Rehab..................... 70 Assisted Living.........................58 Personal Care..................... 76

Private – consumer pays out-of-pocket. Private Ins. – could include Medicare supplements or HMOs/health insurance. KIPDA – Kentuckiana Regional Planning and Development Agency, which offers subsidies and Medicaid waivers. LTCi – long-term care insurance; helps cover the cost

of services for people who have an extended physical illness, extended disability, or cognitive impairment. VA – Veterans Administration; provides financial assistance to retired veterans needing medical, surgical, and rehabilitative care. Hospice – a facility or service that provides supportive care for terminally ill patients and their families.

Facilities by Location Use this chart and the map at left to quickly view facilities by location. Facilities are organized by zone letters and colors that coordinate with the map.

Zone

ngi

Christian Care Communities (Chapel House, Christian Health Center, Friendship House)

40203

A

Treyton Oak Towers

40203

A

The Altenheim Eastern Star Home

40204 40204

A X A

HCM Adult Day Center

40204

A

Nazareth Home

40205

A

Clifton Oaks Care Center

40206

A

Sacred Heart Home

40206

A

X

ElderClub

40211

A

X

Parkway Rehabilitation and Nursing Center

40217

48 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2017

X

Pl ac Al e zh eim er ’s C As ar e sis te d Liv In in de g Liv p e in nd g e nt Nu rs in g/ Re ha Pe b rs on al Ca re

Zip Code

Ag in

Facility Name

Ad u

lt D

ay

Ca

re

If you are interested in a listing, call 502.327.8855 or email advertising@todayspublications.com.

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

A

X

X

X

X


-P la Al ce zh eim er ’s C As ar e sis te d L iv in In g d L iv e p e in n d g e nt Nu rs in g/ Re Pe ha rs b on al Ca re

re Ca

gin Ag

Belmont Village

40207

B

Masonic Homes of Kentucky - Louisville (Sally’s Garden, Sam Swope Care Center, Masonic Home Village, Miralea, The Meadow Active Lifestyle Community The Pillars Assisted Care Center)

40207

B

St. Matthews Care Center

in

ay tD

Zone

ul

Zip Code

Ad

Facility Name

X X

X

X

X

X

X

40207

B

X

Westport Place Health Campus

40207

B

X

Bee Hive Homes of Lyndon

40222

B

Episcopal Church Home Magnolia Springs Senior Living

40222 40222

B X B

X X

X

X

Westport Care Center

40222

B

X

X

B B

X X

X

Park Louisville Brookdale Blankenbaker

The Forum at Brookside Village East, Inc.

40243 40243 40245 40245

Clarity Pointe Louisville Forest Springs Health Campus Magnolia Springs East Senior Living Symphony at Oaklawn

40223 40243

B B

X

X

X

B X B

40245

B

X

40245

B

X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X X X

X

X X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X X

40219 40219 40219 40228 40241 40241 40241

C X C C X C C C C X

40291

C

Forest Hills Commons Glen Ridge Health Campus Good Samaritan Society Brookdale Stonestreet Heartsong Memory Care

40299 40299 40299 40272 40272

C X C C D X D X X

Park Terrace Health Campus Symphony at Valley Farms

40272 40272

D D

Green Valley Care Center

47150

E

Bee Hive Homes of Goshen Friendship Health & Rehab Exceptional Senior Living Masonic Homes of Kentucky - Shelbyville

40026 40056 40059 40065

G G G H X

Green Meadows Health Care Center Bee Hive Homes of Grayson County

40047 42754

I K

X X

Aldersgate at Wesley Manor Franciscan Health Care Center Wesley Manor Retirement Community Bee Hive Homes of Smyrna Parkway Barton House Brownsboro Park Retirement Community Springhurst Pines - (Cornell Trace, Parr’s at Springhurst, Springhurst Health and Rehab Morning Pointe

X

X

X

X X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X X X

X

X

Spring 2017 | todaystransitionsnow.com

49


Adult Day Care Directory Day program for adults who need to be monitored for safety reasons and/or need nursing care, treatments, incontinence care, and other health services. There are medical Adult Day Care facilities which must be licensed. Adult Day Care facilities that are social cannot provide nursing care. Some offer pickup and delivery services within a radius.

Christian Care Communities

ElderClub

Type: medical Hours open: M-F 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Cost per day: $60 Transportation available: yes Showers available: yes Therapy offered: Physical, occupational, speech, special arrangement Special services: Personal care, nurse on duty, medication administration, enrichment activities tailored to fit the individual s needs, based on the internationally known “Best Friends” approach to care. Meals, home-like setting, safety. Owner: Christian Care Communities, Inc. (since 1884) Payment Accepted: private, Medicaid waiver, VA

Type: medical Hours open: M-F 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Cost per day: $60 Transportation available: $10 each way Showers available: yes Therapy offered: Special arrangement Special services: Medically supervised by professional staff. Each day filled with a variety of activities specially designed to meet th physical, social, emotional and intellectual needs of elderly who are frail, disabled or experiencing memory loss. Owner: ElderServe, Inc. Payment Accepted: private, Medicaid waiver, VA

1015 W Magazine St, Louisville, KY 40203 (502) 815-6465 • ChristianCareCommunities.org

631 S. 28th Street, Louisville, KY 40211 (502) 776-3066 • elderserveinc.org

HCM Adult Day Center

Heartsong Memory Care Adult Day Health Center

Type: Special arrangement Hours open: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Cost per day: $66 Transportation available: no Showers available: no Therapy offered: Physical, occupational & speech by special arrangement Special services: Specializing in memory care, disability & families in need of respite. Geriatric psychiatric nurse on duty, medication administration. Experienced & caring staff. Daily exercise, stimulating activities for both mind & body. Lunch & snacks. Owner: Highlands Community Ministries Payment Accepted: Private, Medicaid, LTCi, VA

Type: medical Hours open: 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Cost per day: $60-$125 Transportation available: yes Showers available: yes Therapy offered: PT, OT, ST by arrangement Special services: Activities to promote cognitive, physical, social, and spiritual well-being. Secure indoor and outdoor space to move about freely. Assessments, medication administration, and health care by licensed nurses. Owner: Heartsong Memory Care LLC Payment Accepted: private, Medicaid Waiver, VA Contract

936 Barret Avenue, Louisville, KY 40204 (502) 459-4887 • hcmlouisville.org/adultday

Sacred Heart Home

2120 Payne Street, Louisville, KY 40206 (502) 895-9425 • sacredheartlou.org

Type: medical Hours open: 7:30am-5:30pm Cost per day: $66 Transportation available: no Showers available: no Therapy offered: Physical, occupational, speech Special services: Daybreak Adult Day center offers a respite for caregivers, an alternative to care in the home in a safe caring environment. Stimulating activity program for groups or individually, enhancing the well-being of each person. Owner: Nazareth Home, Inc. Payment Accepted: Private, LTCi, Medicaid waiver

9260 Stonestreet Road, Louisville, KY 40272 (502) 935-3300 • heartsong-mc.com

Enhanced Listings Providing more descriptive, larger and color information about your location. Four-issue rate is very reasonable $270 each or $27/month. Call 502.327.8855 or email Advertising@TodaysTransitionsNow.com.

Click here to read these listings on our website. 50 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2017


Spring 2017 | todaystransitionsnow.com

51


Aging in Place Communities Directory An Aging-in-Place community offers several levels of care on one campus. A resident could move into a retirement facility or assisted living facility, then utilize higher levels of nursing care when needed through personal care or nursing/rehab care. A resident’s room might change, but not his or her address.

The Forum at Brookside

Masonic Homes of Kentucky — Louisville Campus

Levels of care: retirement, personal care, nursing facility Capacity: retirement-240, personal care-24, nursing facility-60 Special services: A beautiful gated community, 24-hr security, chef prepared meals, flexible dining plan, indoor heated pool, new exe cise room, recreational activities, pet friendly, a great staff and management team, gorgeous patio homes and apartment, continuum of care. Owner: Five Star Senior Living, Inc.

Levels of care: Independent living, personal care, skilled nursing, memory care Capacity: independent living-269 apts/12 patio homes; personal care-84; skilled nursing-136; memory care-56 Special services: Short-stay and outpatient rehab available for all levels of care. On-site dialysis clinic. Region’s only Life Care and Life Plan programs provide discounts on health care services to entry fee residents. Owner: Masonic Homes of Kentucky, Inc.

200 Brookside Dr, Louisville, KY 40243 (502) 245-3048 • theforumatbrookside.com

3701 Frankfort Ave, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 259-9627 • masonichomesky.com

Masonic Home of Shelbyville

The Meadow Active Lifestyle Community

Levels of care: assisted living, personal care, nursing facility Capacity: assisted living-21 apts., personal care-27, nursing facility-117 Special services: Award-winning staff provides nursing care, short stay and outpatient rehab, activities, dining, transportation and physician services. Easy access from I-64 on U.S. 60. Owner: Masonic Homes of Kentucky, Inc.

Cost per month: 1BR $2,845+; 2BR $3,995+; Second person fee for all units $1,145/mo Capacity: 122 apts Special services: Coming in 2018. Upscale apartments with amenities including restaurant-style dining, concierge service, fitness and cente , art studio and gallery, movie theater, spa, underground parking and more. Includes Life Care and a full continuum of care on campus, including assisted living, personal care, memory care and skilled nursing when you need it. 24/7 security. Owner: Masonic Homes of Kentucky, Inc.

711 Frankfort Rd, Shelbyville, KY 40065 (502) 633-3486 • masonichomesky.com

3701 Frankfort Ave, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 897-8727 • themeadowlifestyle.com

Nazareth Home

Sacred Heart Home

Levels of care: Alzheimer’s, nursing/rehab, personal care Capacity: Alzheimer’s-48, nursing/rehab-118, personal-50 Special services: Nazareth Home is designed to offer rehab and restorative therapy, specialized in dementia care, personal care services and winning therapeutic recreation and exercise program. Mass celebrated on-site. Owner: Sisters of Charity of Nazareth

Levels of care: Alzheimer’s, nursing/rehab, personal care, independent Capacity: nursing/rehab-121, personal care-31, independent-16 Special services: Sacred Heart Home is designed to offer rehab and restorative therapy, skilled nursing and personal care services. Therapeutic recreation and exercise programs. Mass celebrated on-site. Owner: Nazareth Home, Inc.

Springhurst Pines

Treyton Oak Towers

Levels of care: retirement, personal care, health and rehab center Capacity: patio homes-58 units, personal care-79 apts., nursing beds-90 Special services: Springhurst Pines has 3 distinctive senior communities, one great campus: Cornell Trace for independent living, Parr’s at Springhurst for personal care needs and Springhurst Health and Rehab for skilled nursing and rehabilitation. Owner: Baptist Homes, Inc.

Levels of care: skilled, retirement, personal care Capacity: retirement-165, skilled-60, personal care-40 Special services: Celebrating over 30 years of gracious retirement living. An elegant yet affordable continuum of care community in Old Louisville. Spacious apartments, beautiful dining room, valet parking, spa services, onsite therapy, dentist, bank, and more. Access to the arts and medical community. Owner: Third & Oak Corporation

2000 Newburg Road, Louisville, KY 40205 (502) 459-9681 • nazhome.org

3101 N Hurstbourne Parkway, Louisville, KY 40241 (502) 412-3775 • springhurstpines.org

2120 Payne Street, Louisville, KY 40206 (502) 895-9425 • sacredheartlou.org

211 W Oak St, Louisville, KY 40203 (502) 589-3211 • treytonoaktowers.com

Click here to read these listings on our website. 52 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2017


Spring 2017 | todaystransitionsnow.com

53


Alzheimer’s Care Directory Alzheimer’s care is provided at different levels, from assisted living to the skilled care of nursing/rehab. Some facilities accept Alzheimer’s patients into their general care, and others have separate units designed to meet the specific needs of patients with this disease.

The Aldersgate at Wesley Manor 5012 E Manslick Rd, Louisville, KY 40219 (502) 969-3277 • WesMan.org

Number of beds: 28 Separate unit: yes Cost per month: $4270-5730 Special services: Personal Care, including full medication management, licensed nurse on site 24/7, rehab and physician services, geriatric psychiatrist, secure memory garden, daily activities, chapel, beauty salon, satellite TV package, long-tenured staff. Priority placement for short-term rehab and skilled nursing.No long-term contracts, entrance fees or deposits. See Nursing/Rehab directory for advanced Alzheimer’s/dementia care. Owner: Methodist Retirement Homes of Kentucky Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

The Altenheim

936 Barret Ave, Louisville, KY 40204 (502) 584-7417 • thealtenheim.org

Number of beds: 32 Separate unit: no Cost per day: private: $292, semiprivate: $216 Level of care: Nursing/rehab, independent living, personal care Special services: Small, non-profit senior health ca e community located in the Highlands offering a secure Alzheimer’s unit. Our above average staff to resident ratio provides our residents with the highest quality of care by our skilled team of experts. Owner: The Altenheim Payment Accepted: private, LTCi

Belmont Village Senior Living St. Matthews

Barton House

6830 Overlook Dr, Louisville, KY 40241 (502) 423-7177 • bartonlouisville.com

4600 Bowling Blvd, St. Matthews, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 721-7500 • belmontvillage.com

Number of beds: 20 Separate unit: yes (freestanding) Cost per month: $5632 Level of care: Personal care Special services: Barton House, a secure home-like residence, is designed exclusively for seniors with Alzheimer’s disease and other related memory impairments. We provide a specialized program that enhances quality of life. Owner: Goodworks Payment Accepted: private, LTCi

Number of beds: 28 Separate unit: yes Cost per day: $105 to $224 Level of care: Personal care Special services: Range of research-based, award winning programs for early to later stage memory loss. Programs identify interests and abilities, provide structured routine, and help maintain a sense of purpose. Memory care residents supported by specially trained staff in private, custom-designed area within the community. Owner: Belmont Village, L.P. Payment Accepted: private, LTCi

Clarity Pointe of Louisville

Episcopal Church Home Memory Care Center

Number of beds: 60 Separate unit: yes (freestanding) Cost per month: $5650-$6050 Level of care: Personal care Special services: Built with Purpose, staffed with Compassion because Memory Care is all we do. Licensed nursing staff available 24/7. 20 apartments each in 3 neighborhoods. Each neighborhood has its own dining room, living room, and engagement area. Transportation, Spa and salon services available. Our community opens to a secured outdoor park with covered walking area and beautifully landscaped walkways. Owner: Clarity Pointe Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

Number of beds: 52 Separate unit: yes Cost per day: $235 Level of care: Personal care Special services: Using a small, home-like neighborhood living design and very caring professional staff, we enhance wellness and encourage socialization. Wide variety of activities, open to persons of all faith traditions. Owner: Episcopal Church Home Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

13700 English Villa Drive, Louisville, KY 40245 (502) 309-2190 •ClarityPointeLouisville.com

7504 Westport Rd, Louisville, KY 40222 (502) 736-7800 • echky.org

Forest Hills Commons

Heartsong Memory Care

Number of beds: 28 Separate unit: yes Cost per day: call for details Level of care: Personal care Special services: • Personalized support services by licensed nursing staff around the clock • Wide range of specialized social and recreational programs • Enclosed courtyard for outside activities and independence Owner: American Senior Communities Payment Accepted: private

Number of beds: 36 Separate unit: yes Cost per month: $4750-$5050 Level of care: Personal care Special services: Private rooms w/private showers; companion rooms avail; secure courtyards; meals & snacks; therapies (PT/OT/ST) & physician visits on site; med mgmt & admin health services coordinated by licensed nurses 24 hours/day. Owner: Heartsong Memory Care, LLC Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA Aid & Attendance

9107 Taylorsville Rd, Louisville, KY 40299 (502) 499-5533 • ascseniorcare.com/location/forest-hills-commons/

9260 Stonestreet Rd, Louisville, KY 40272 (502) 935-3300 • heartsong-mc.com

Click here to read these listings on our website. 54 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2017


Spring 2017 | todaystransitionsnow.com

55


Alzheimer’s Care Directory continued from page 54

Magnolia Springs Louisville Senior Living

Magnolia Springs East Louisville Senior Living

Number of beds: 20 Separate unit: yes Cost per month: $5750-$6450 Level of care: Memory care Special services: Home-like setting w/all private apts. Our specialized program, Heartfelt Connections, enhances the lives of our residents by providing a safe, secure, and comfortable environment for your loved one with dementia. Please see our ad on page 61. Owner: Grandview Care Payment Accepted: LTCi, VA

Number of beds: 20 Separate unit: yes Cost per month: $5495-$6295 Level of care: Memory care Special services: Home-like setting w/all private apts. Our specialized program, Heartfelt Connections, enhances the lives of our residents by providing a safe, secure, and comfortable environment for your loved one with dementia. Please see our ad on page 61. Owner: Grandview Care Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

8225 Whipps Mill Rd, Louisville, KY 40222 (502) 716-5160 • Louisville.Magnolia-Springs.net

13600 LaGrange Rd, Louisville, KY 40245 (502) 855-7500 • EastLouisville.Magnolia-Springs.net

Masonic Home of Louisville — Sally’s Garden A Memory Care Neighborhood

Masonic Home of Louisville — Sam Swope Care Center

Number of beds: 32 Separate unit: yes Cost per day: $194-235 Level of care: Personal care Special services: Residents find fulfilling lives in our memory c e neighborhood with trained staff providing 24/7 support. Private rooms/baths, social activities/fitness p ograms, comfortable and secure environment. New Beginnings and Inspirations programs offer holistic and personalized life enrichment. Owner: Masonic Homes of Kentucky, Inc. Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, Hospice, private ins.

Number of beds: 24 Separate unit: yes Cost per day: $320-$360 Level of care: Nursing/rehab Special services: Advanced memory care household offers Snoezelen room, secured courtyard, residential kitchen, salon services and community and campus security and monitoring. New Beginnings and Inspirations programs offer holistic and personalized life enrichment. Owner: Masonic Homes of Kentucky, Inc. Payment Accepted: Medicare, private, LTCi, Hospice, private ins.

3701 Frankfort Ave, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 897-4907 • masonichomesky.com

3701 Frankfort Ave, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 897-4907 • masonichomesky.com

Nazareth Home

Park Louisville

Number of beds: 48 Separate unit: yes Cost per day: $278 Level of care: personal care, nursing/rehab Special services: A faith-filled senior neighborhood. ward-winning small neighborhood living design, very caring professional staff, gourmet dining, on-site religious services, secure green spaces, daily activities, beauty shop, rehab services. Open to persons of all faith traditions. Free tours. Owner: Sisters of Charity of Nazareth Payment Accepted: Private, LTCi, Medicare, Medicaid

Number of beds: 64 Separate unit: yes Cost per day: $173 Level of care: Personal care Special services: Park Louisville is a personal care residence that is 100% dedicated to caring for those in the early to middle stages of Alzheimer’s disease & related dementias. We focus on preferences, abilities & independence. Call today to schedule your personalized tour. Owner: Providence Group Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

2000 Newburg Rd, Louisville, KY 40205 (502) 459-9681 • nazhome.org

10451 Linn Station Rd, Louisville, KY 40223 (502) 423-8776 • parklouisville.com

Symphony at Oaklawn

Symphony at Valley Farms

Number of beds: 34 Separate unit: yes Cost per day: $147-233 Level of care: personal care Special services: Intimate secured memory care neighborhood with private apartments and bathrooms, beautiful landscaped courtyard, enclosed sun-room, and activities rooms. Nurses and caregivers 24 hours/day, medication management. Owner: Compass Pointe Healthcare Payment Accepted: LTCi, VA

Number of beds: 34 Separate unit: yes Cost per day: $129-152 Level of care: assisted living Special services: Our Memory Care offers a unique program called In The Moment, this focuses on the individual person instead of pre-determined activities, this approach engages your loved one in the moment they are experiencing right now and provides a compassionate and meaningful interaction. Owner: Compass Pointe Healthcare Payment Accepted: LTCi, VA

100 Shelby Station Drive, Louisville, KY 40245 (502) 632-5500 • symphonyatoaklawn.com

10201 Valley Farms Blvd. Way, Louisville, KY 40272 (502) 937-3028 • symphonyofvalleyfarms.com

Click here to read these listings on our website. 56 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2017


Assisted Living Directory Assisted living offers minimal assistance in care, such as providing meals, helping with baths, and offering reminders to take medications. While some residents drive, scheduled transportation may be provided. Daily activities are organized, and there is around-the-clock supervision. No health care is provided, and these facilities are not licensed, but certification is required.

Bee Hive Homes of Goshen

Bee Hive Homes of Grayson County

Number of units: 16 Cost per month: $3800-$4800 (all inclusive) Transportation available: No Special services: Assisted living with scenic views and easy access to primary roadways. Relax with compassionate caregivers and generous staffing. Enjoy fireplaces, a sunroom, gardens, and a chaletstyle porch. Monthly rates and short-term stays. Owner: Eric and Catherine Sherrard Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

Number of units: 16 Cost per month: $3500 (all inclusive) Transportation available: free scheduled transportation Special services: Small homelike community. Staff provides personalized care 24 hours/day. Home cooked meals, house keeping/laundry/linen service, activities, free cable tv and wifi. Use our fu niture or bring your own. Owner: John & Mary Nell Bouvier Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

12336 US Hwy 42, Goshen, KY 40026 (502) 292-3200 • beehivehomes.com

1417 Brandenburg Road, Leitchfield, KY 4275 (270) 668-4392 • beehivehomes.com

Bee Hive Homes of Lyndon

Bee Hive Homes of Smyrna Parkway

Number of units: 14 Cost per month: $3950 (all inclusive) Transportation available: free scheduled transportation Special services: Friendly home-like atmosphere. Home cooked meals, housekeeping/laundry/linen service, variety of activities, free cable TV. Caring and friendly staff. When it comes to care, small is huge! Call today for a tour. Owner: Michael & Michele Allen Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

Number of units: 15 Cost per month: $3300-3500 (all inclusive) Transportation available: free scheduled transportation Special services: Friendly home-like atmosphere. Home cooked meals, housekeeping/laundry services, variety of activities, cable TV — all included at no extra cost. Compassionate and friendly staff. Call today for a tour! Owners: Mark & Wilma Hegele Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

8401 LaGrange Rd, Louisville, KY 40222 (502) 541-4719 • beehivehomes.com

Brookdale Stonestreet

3928 Horne Ave, New Albany, IN 47150 (812) 948-1960 • www.Brookdale.com

Number of units: 60 Cost per month: Efficiency - $2420; 1BR-$3190; 2BR $3930 Transportation available: Planned outings 2-3 times per week Special services: Located in a park like setting, residents enjoy home cooked meals, housekeeping/laundry services, cable/internet, transportation, recreational/social events, and safety pendants. All included at no additional costs. Our compassionate care staff is available 24/7. Respite stays available. Please call us today. Owner: Brookdale Senior Living, Inc. Payment Accepted: private, private ins., LTCi, VA

8800 Smyrna Parkway, Louisville, KY 40228 (502) 345-2634 • beehivehomes.com

Christian Care Communities’ Chapel House 945 S 5th St, Louisville, KY 40203 (502) 585-5656 • ChristianCareCommunities.org

Number of units: 203 Cost per month: Studio starting at $665-$790 plus services (a la carte). Lower rates based on income. Transportation available: Planned outings 2-3 times per week Special services: Beautifully landscaped gardens with walking paths, outdoor pavilion. Nurse practitioner, on-site hair salon, grocery, fine dining social events, medication reminders, bathing assistance, chaplains. Owner: Christian Care Communities Payment Accepted: private, Sec 8 & HUD

Click here to read these listings on our website. 58 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2017


Spring 2017 | todaystransitionsnow.com

59


Assisted Living Directory continued from page 58

Christian Care Communities’ Friendship House

Hoskinson House at Wesley Manor

Number of units: 184 Cost per month: Studio and 1BR apts. $816-938 plus services (a la carte). Lower rates based on income. Transportation available: planned outings 2-3 times per wk. Special services: Beautifully landscaped gardens with walking paths, outdoor pavilion. On-site hair salon, grocery, restaurant-style dining, scheduled transportation, social events, medication reminders, bathing assistance, Chaplains. Owner: Christian Care Communities Payment Accepted: private, Sec 8 & HUD

Number of units: 39 Cost per month: Starting at- Studio: $2555, 1 BR: $3410, 2 BR: $4535 Transportation available: Free for shopping, medical appointments, and outings Special services: Three specialized levels of service, activities, salon, spa, outpatient rehab, chapel, library, ice cream parlor, Wi-Fi, satellite TV package, medication reminders. 5 floor plans, pets welcome. No longterm contracts, entrance fees or deposits. Owner: Methodist Retirement Homes of KY Payment Accepted: private, some LTCi, VA

960 S 4th St, Louisville, KY 40203 (502) 585-5656 • ChristianCareCommunities.org

5012 E Manslick Rd, Louisville, KY 40219 (502) 969-3277 • WesMan.org

Magnolia Springs East Louisville Senior Living

Magnolia Springs Louisville Senior Living

Number of units: 75 Cost per month: Studio $3195-$4195, 1BR $4895-$5395, 2BR $6095-$6395 Transportation available: Yes, medical appts., shopping and community outings Special services: More than a place to live, Magnolia Springs represents a place to celebrate life with purpose. Specializing in food, family and fun, this 11 acre campus offers a walking trail, gazebo & country charm at affordable pricing. Location convenient to shopping and medical community w/ transportation provided at no extra cost. Please see our ad on page 61. Owner: Grandview Care Payment Accepted: private, VA, LTCi, AL ins.

Number of units: 71 Cost per month: Studio $3195-$4195, 1BR $4895-$5395, 2BR $6095-$6395 Transportation available: Yes, medical appts, shopping and community outings Special services: More than a place to live, Magnolia Springs represents a place to celebrate life with purpose. Specializing in food, family and fun, this campus offers all of the benefits of city living with amenities onsite Please see our ad on page 61. Owner: Grandview Care Payment Accepted: private, VA, LTCi, AL ins.

13600 LaGrange Rd, Louisville, KY 40245 (502) 855-7500 • EastLouisville.Magnolia-Springs.net

Masonic Home of Shelbyville — The Pillars Assisted Living Community 711 Frankfort Rd, Shelbyville, KY 40065 (502) 633-3486 • masonichomesky.com

Number of units: 21 Cost per month: Studio $2174, 1BR $2282-$2500, 2BR $2717-$3043 Transportation available: $30/hour, $5/in-town, $1/mile Special services: Spacious new apartments with 24-hour staff attendants, emergency assistance and security call system. Meals, activities, salon and housekeeping. Laundry located on each floo . Spiritual support from staff chaplain. Owner: Masonic Homes of KY, Inc. Payment Accepted: private

Village East, Inc.

11530 Herrick Lane, Louisville, KY 40243 (502) 643-8248 • villageeastcommunity.org

Number of units: 19 Cost per month: Suite - $2,795-$3995 Transportation available: Yes Special services: Building is one floor no step no elevators. Fee includes suite utilities, TV, cable, phone call system, meals, laundry, housekeeping, activities, 24/7 staff services discounted, supportive living plan. Owners: Village East, Inc. Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

8225 Whipps Mill Rd, Louisville, KY 40222 (502) 716-5160 • Louisville.Magnolia-Springs.net

Symphony at Valley Farms

10201 Valley Farms Blvd, Valley Station, KY 40272 (502) 937-3028 • symphonyatvalleyfarms.com

Number of units: 31 Cost per day: alcolve $114; 1BR $122, 2BR $140 Transportation available: Free Special services: Symphony at Valley Farms, located in the south end of Louisville, with a wide range of care for your loved ones. Our residents and their families are at ease knowing they have the care they need. Owners: Compass Pointe Healthcare Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, AL ins., VA

Enhanced Listings Providing more descriptive, larger and color information about your location. Four-issue rate is very reasonable $270 each or $27/month. Call 502.327.8855 or email Advertising@TodaysTransitionsNow.com.

Click here to read these listings on our website. 60 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2017


Assisted Living Directory

Click here to read these listings on our website. Home Health Directory Home Health Care refers to care provided in a person’s home. Medical Home Health Care is a licensed level of care that provides nursing care and personal care. (These agencies also provide non-medical care.) Non-medical Home Health Care agencies in Kentucky must be certified. Agencies in Indiana must be licensed. They can assist with the self-administration of medications or treatments, provide limited personal care, serve as companions who prepare light meals and tidy homes, and may offer transportation or errand services.

AccessiCare Elder Home Care

Adaptive Nursing & Healthcare Services, Inc.

Type: non-medical Services: Personal care, homemaking, transportation, errands Cost per hour: $11.25-$20 Employees’ status: drug tested, bonded, liability ins., background check, direct hires, withhold taxes, worker’s comp. Min. time required: 3 hrs. Special services: AccessiCare is locally owned/operated by a proud Navy Veteran and a Registered Nurse licensed and serving Kentuckiana on call 24/7. We provide drug tested, trained, experienced, certifie caregivers to assist those in need of help with daily activities of living. Owners: Jon and Debra Baker, RN Payment Accepted: private, Medicaid, LTCi, VA

Type: non-medical Services: nursing, personal care, homemaking, transportation, errands Cost per hour: $16-$20 Employees’ status: bonded, liability ins., background check, direct hires, withhold taxes, worker’s comp. Min. time required: N/A Special services: Locally/Veteran owned providing Medicaid PA & Medicaid Waiver services to patients throughout southern Indiana. Home Health Aide & Nursing services, personal care, respite services with RN oversight. Owner: Mike Root Payment Accepted: private, Medicaid, private ins., LTCi, VA

Serving Kentucky and Indiana (502) 528-4422, (812) 725-3843 • accessicare.com

Always Best Care Senior Services

4965 U.S. Hwy 42, Ste. 1000, Louisville, KY 40222 (502) 272-4400 • abc-loudowneast.com

Type: Non-medical, R.N. care management Services: In home or in facility personal care, homemaking, errands, companionship Cost per hour: Starting at $16 Employees’ status: Direct hires, drug tested, bonded, FBI fingerprint checked, skills tested, taxes withheld, workers comp, Institute fo Professional Care Education training Min. time required: 1-3 hrs @ higher rate Special services: Strive for long term caregiver/client matches, make personal intros, tailor care plans. Alz. ALS, COPD, Diabetes, MS, Parkinson’s, Post-hospital/rehab & stroke care. Bathe, groom, dress, transfer, feed, incontinence care. Free care assessment & home safety evaluation. Help w/ VA benefits. Discounts: Rx & fall alert p oducts. Owner: Robin and Ken Helfers, Certified Senior Advisor Payment Accepted: Private, LTCi, VA, Medicaid Waiver, CDO

702 North Shore Dr, Suite 103, Jeffersonville, IN 47130 (812) 283-7700 • adaptiveindiana.com

Amedisys Home Health Care

9000 Wessex Place, Suite 304 Louisville, KY 40222 (502) 429-4550 • www.Amedisys.com

Type: Medical, R.N. care management Services:nursing care, personal care, physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy Cost per hour: Medicare Accepted Rate Employees’ status: worker’s comp, liability ins., background check, direct hires, withhold taxes Min. time required: N/A Special services: Certified Medica e and Medicaid Home Health Agencies. See page 72 for additional Amedysis locations. Skilled Nursing, Home Infusion, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Speech Therapy, Telehealth Monitoring, Medical Social Services and Behavioral Health Program. Owner: Amedysis Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, private ins., VA

Click here to read these listings on our website. 62 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2017


Spring 2017 | todaystransitionsnow.com

63


Home Health Directory continued from page 68

BrightStar Care

Capacity Care

Type: non-medical Services: personal care, homemaker, transportation, errands, Alzheimer’s/dementia care, Parkinson’s, ALS, respite, med reminders, meal prep, end of life care, RN/geriatric case management. Cost per hour: $19-$24 Employees’ status: bonded, liability ins., background check, direct hires,withhold taxes, CPR certified, drug testing Min. time required: 1 hr Special services: Joint Commission Accredited. Compassionate care, excellent service. Non-medical care by skilled and attentive professionals. All care is overseen by a Registered Nurse and is available 1-24 hours/day with Guaranteed Caregiver Compatibility. Owner: Christian & Leslie McCutcheon Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA, worker’s comp

Type: non-medical Services: personal care, respite, errands, med. reminders Cost per hour: $16-$18 Employees’ status: background check, drug testing, liability ins., worker’s comp., withhold taxes Min. time required: N/A Special services: Locally Owned Non-Medical Home Care for those living independently in home and persons with disabilities. Our companions must have continuing education. Thank you for considering us. Owner: Theresa Hinton, CEO Payment Accepted: private, LTCi

Caregivers Health Network

Caretenders

Type: medical Services: nursing care, therapy, personal care, homemaking Cost per hour: $56-$186/visit Employees’ status: bonded, liability ins., background check, direct hires, withhold taxes Min. time required: N/A Special services: Certified Medica e and Medicaid home health agency. Specialty care programs in geriatrics, medication management, orthopedics, cardiology, urology, wound care, psychiatric nursing telehealth monitoring, and social workers. Owner: Almost Family, Inc. Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private ins.

Type: medical Services: nursing care, therapy, personal care, homemaking Cost per hour: $56-$186/visit Employees’ status: bonded, liability ins., background check, direct hires, withhold taxes Min. time required: N/A Special services: Certified Medica e and Medicaid home health agencies. Multiple Kentuckiana locations (see directory). Specialize in geriatrics, orthopedics, cardiology, urology, wound care, psychiatric nursing and social workers. Owner: Almost Family, Inc. Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private ins., private

400 Blakenbaker Pkwy., Ste 301, Louisville, KY 40243 (502) 893-4700 • louisvillehomecare.org

9510 Ormsby Station Road Ste 100 Louisville, KY 40223 (502) 423-4336 • caregivershn.com

4010 Dupont Circle, Suite 406, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 893-8414 • capacitycare.com

4545 Bishop Lane, Ste 200, Louisville, KY 40218 (502) 238-5150 • almostfamilycaretenders.com

Caring Excellence Personalized Home Care Services

ComForcare Home Care

Type: non-medical Services: Personal care, homemaking, medication reminders, exercise assistance transportation, respite Cost per hour: $18-$20 Employees’ status: Exceptionally trained, bonded, liability ins., background check, direct hires, withhold taxes Min. time required: Flexible up to 24/7 Special services: Locally owned, Consistent Caregivers, Caregiver Matching and RN Case Management. Senior Care, Parkinson’s Care, Alzheimer’s Care and After-Hospital Care in your home. All care directed by Registered Nurse and Master Level Social Worker. Owner: Kayla Cook, RN, Elisabeth Knight, MSSW Payment Accepted: Private, LTCI, VA, Medicaid Waiver

Type: non-medical Services: personal care, dementia care certified homemaking, transportation, errands Cost per hour: $17-$20 Employees’ status: bonded, liability ins., background check, direct hires, worker’s comp, withhold taxes Min. time required: flexible Special services: Available 24/7. Provide free RN assessment to develop best care plan for client’s needs. Provides care in home, hospital, assisted living, and nursing homes. Our quality caregivers go through a 10-step hiring process and continuous training. Owners are very much hands on and in tune with families and caregivers. See our ad on page 73. Owner: Chris and Julie Prentice Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, workman’s comp.

2225 Emerson Avenue, Louisville, KY 40205 (502) 208-9424 • caringexcellenceathome.com

308 N. Evergreen Road, Louisville, Ky 40243 (502) 254-0850 • LouisvilleEast.ComForCare.com

ElderServe Homecare

Helping Hands Companion Care Services

Type: non-medical Services: personal care, homemaking, transportation, errands, respite, Alz. care, Parkinson’s MS, stroke recovery Cost per hour: $20-$22 Employees’ status: bonded, liability ins., background check, drug testing, direct hires, withhold taxes Min. time required: 3 hrs Special services: Non-medical services for individuals who want to continue living in their home but need assistance with daily activity. Services include Personal Care, Home Mgmt, and Respite. Owner: Elderserve, Inc. Payment Accepted: private, KIPDA, VA, LTCi

Type: non-medical Services: personal care, homemaking, transportation, errands, respite, med. reminders Cost per hour: $19.75 Employees’ status: bonded, liability ins., background check, direct hires, withhold taxes, drug testing Min. time required: Flexible Special services: *Personalized loving care available in home, assisted living, nursing home or hospital *Scheduling up to 24 hours 7 days a week *Trained and experience caregivers *Free assessments *Serving Kentucky and Southern Indiana since 1996. Owner: Terry Graham, RN; Dawn Smithwick, BSW Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

215 W. Breckinridge Street, Louisville, KY 40203 (502) 583-8012 • elderservehomecare.org

2301 Hurstbourne Village Dr. #100, Louisville, KY 40299 (502) 426-9783 • home-companions.com

Click here to read these listings on our website. 64 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2017


Home Health Directory continued from page 64

Home Instead Senior Care

Homewatch CareGivers

Type: non-medical Services: personal care, homemaking, transportation, med. reminders, errands, meal prep, respite care, CAREGiver consistency, case management, Alzheimer’s and dementia care, certified in Hospital Readmission Prevention, RN oversight for every client Cost per hour: $20-$24 Employees’ status: bonded, liability ins., background checks, direct hires, withhold taxes, annual drug and alcohol screens. Min. time required: Flexible Special services: Employee-Owned & State Certified, CAREGivers full screened & trained. Free assessment, 24/7, 1-hr response time, every shift is guaranteed. Locally owned since 1999. Owner: Employee-owned, Becky Beanblossom, President Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

Type: non-medical Services: personal care, homemaker, transportation, errands Cost per hour: $20-23 Employees’ status: bonded, liability ins., background check, direct hires, withhold taxes Min. time required: flexibl Special services: Fully trained and experienced CNA’s, on-staff nurse, complimentary evaluations, customized care plan, company with 30 years of home care experience, Alzheimer’s/Dementia expertise, “Let our family care for yours.” Owner: Steve and Trish Kochersperger Payment Accepted: private, LTCi

4610 Taylorsville Rd, Louisville, KY 40220 (502) 515-9515 • louisvillehomecare.com

13117 Eastpoint Park Blvd, Suite G, Louisville, KY 40223 (502) 244-1212 • homewatchcaregivers.com/Louisville

Hosparus Health

KentuckyOne Health VNA

Type: medical Services: nursing & physician services, pain mgt, social workers, spiritual care, CNA’s, Bereavement & Volunteer Programs Cost: per day Employees’ status: bonded, liability ins., background check, direct hires, withhold taxes Min. time required: N/A Special services: Offering quality end-of-life care and bereavement services. Hosparus offers care, comfort and counseling for those who need it most regardless of their ability to pay. See our ad on back cover. Owner: Hosparus Inc. Payment Accepted: per days fees under Medicaid, Medicare, other ins., private pay (income adj.)

Type: medical & non-medical Services: skilled nursing, therapy, home infusion, private duty Cost per hour: $18 (private duty) Employees’ status: bonded, liability ins., background check, direct hires, withhold taxes Min. time required: 3 hrs Special services: 2Skilled Nursing, Physical, Occupational, and Speech Therapy, Home Infusion Services, Private Duty, and Chronic Disease Management Programs. Please see our ad on page 27. Owner: KentuckyOne Health Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, private ins., LTCi

3532 Ephraim McDowell Dr, Louisville, KY 40205 (502) 456-6200 • hosparus.org

200 High Rise Drive, Suite 373, Louisville, KY 40213 (502) 584-2456/(800) 346-4577 • vnanazareth.org

Kindred at Home

Right at Home

Type: medical Services: nursing care, physical, occupational, and speech therapy, medical social services Cost per visit: $70-$185 Employees’ status: bonded, liability ins., background check Min. time required: N/A Special services: Certified Medica e Home Health Agency specializing in geriatric care. Our services include specialty programs for Orthopedics, Safe Strides (fall prevention), Parkinson’s Services, and Cardiopulmonary. Great healthcare has come home. Owner: Kindred Payment Accepted: Medicare, private ins.

Type: non-medical Services: geriatric care management, transportation, companionship Cost per hour: $17-$20 Employees’ status: bonded, insurance, background & drug screened and competency tested pre-hire & annually, TB tested, direct hires, taxes withheld. Min. time required: 3 hrs Special services: We understand that aging isn’t easy & know that caregiving for your aging loved one can be hard on you. We’d be honored to help lighten your caregiving load. Let us help you spend your time caring, not caregiving. Owner: Terry Rogers Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, worker’s comp

710 Executive Park, Louisville KY 40207 (502) 895-4213 • kindredathome.com

221 Executive Park, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 897-0580 • louisville.rightathome.net

Senior Helpers - Louisville/Southern Indiana

Silver Tree Home Care

Type: non-medical Services: personal care, homemaking, transportation, errands, respite, Alz. care, med reminders, Live Ins Cost per hour: $13.50$21 Employees’ status: bonded, liability insurance, background check, drug tested, direct hires, withhold taxes Min. time required: Flexible Special services: Senior Helpers provides quality care by screening and training all staff. Customer service is a priority with caregiver/client match, continued communication and schedule flexibilit . Med reminders, Live Ins. Call us for help filing your A Aid and Attendance Pension. Owner: Nancy Galloway Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, EFT, Medicaid Waivers, VA Aid and Attendance Pension

Type: non-medical Services: personal care, homemaking, dementia care, errands, transportation, geriatric case management Cost per hour: $15-$21 Employees’ status: bonded, liability insurance, background check, drug testing, direct hires, withhold taxes Min. time required: Flexible Special services: Home Care Pulse Certified P ovider of Choice. Affordable, customized home care. Caregivers are matched, screened, and trained. Services include med reminders, meal prep, lt. housekeeping, transportation and more. Also, serving Oldham County (La Grange, Crestwood): (502) 222-0018. Owner: Pam S. Jeseo Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA, worker’s comp

200 Breckenridge Lane, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 690-2648 • seniorhelpers.com

Visiting Angels

126 S. Sherrin Avenue, Louisville 40207 (502) 897-6547 • VisitingAngels.com

Type: non-medical Services: personal care, housekeeping, meal prep, laundry, errands & transportation, Alzheimer’s care, fall prevention, med reminders, respite, 24-hour care Cost per hour: $16-20 Employees’ status: bonded, liability & worker’s comp insurance, background checked, drug tested, direct hires, state licensed Min. time required: Flexible Special services: Customized Care by reliable, experienced caregivers. Visiting Angels allows you to select your own caregiver and conducts an inhome assessment prior to starting care. Client feedback and family communication are an integral part of our customer service. Over 500 locations nationwide. Owner: Andrew Block, locally owned & operated Payment Accepted: Private, LTCi, Veterans, Medicaid

66 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2017

10608 Watterson Center Ct, Unit 102, Louisville, KY 40299 (502) 240-6464 • homecarelouisville.net

Click here to read these listings on our website.


Spring 2017 | todaystransitionsnow.com

67


Home Health Directory

PHOTO PATTI HARTOG

Click here to read these listings on our website.

Meet Our

Caregiver Winner Donna Mattox is our quarterly caregiver winner. Her prize includes tickets to a Derby Dinner Playhouse performance and four hours of sitter service from Home Instead Senior Care. Why She Won: When Donna Mattox’s husband Richard was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease 34 years ago, the couple didn’t let the diagnosis become a stumbling block. Despite his condition, Richard led a Parkinson’s support group but when his disease progressed, Donna took over leadership while also being his primary caregiver. Linda Mann, one of the support group members, says she admires Donna’s ability to effectively split her time between handling both responsibilities. “Somehow, she manages to find th time to send out a monthly newsletter to all of our members to let us know about research opportunities, information about our upcoming meeting, and a wonderful story that inspires encouragement, motivation, and perseverance.” Donna says being able to share her experiences with the people in her support group has added to the quality of her life and gives her the motivation to keep going.

68 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2017


Independent Living Directory Independent Living communities are for those who need no services and are totally independent. Special services are provided, such as meals in a central dining area. Most people drive, but some transportation is usually offered. These communities offer no health care services and are not required to be licensed or certified.

The Altenheim

Brownsboro Park Retirement Community

Units in facility: 20 Cost per person per month: 1BR $1620 Minimum age: no Special services: Located in the Highlands, spacious apartment, housekeeping, laundry and linen service at no additional charge, 3 meals served, daily activities, social outings and religious services, beauty and barbershop. Part of a continuing care retirement community. Owner: The Altenheim Payment Accepted: private, LTCi

Units in facility: 134 Cost per person per month: Studio $1975; 1BR $2325-$2725; 2BR $2825-$3195 Minimum age: 62 Special services: Family owned & operated since 1986, several spacious floor plans, located on 14 beautiful ac es. Warm, friendly residents, spacious apartments, activities, housekeeping, transportation and excellent chef-prepared meals. Owner: Bunker Hill Assoc. III, LLC Payment Accepted: private

936 Barret Ave, Louisville, KY 40204 (502) 584-7417 • thealtenheim.org

Cornell Trace

2960 Goose Creek, Louisville, KY 40241 (502) 429-7700 • brownsboropark.com

The Forum at Brookside

9729 Cornell Trace Rd, Louisville, KY 40241 (502) 326-9838 • springhurstpines.org

200 Brookside Dr, Louisville, KY 40243 (502) 245-3048 • theforumatbrookside.com

Miralea Active Lifestyle Community

Sacred Heart Home

Units in facility: 120 apts, 12 patio homes Cost per person per month: 1BR $2569-$3241; 2BR $3688-$3912; Patio home $4024-$4444 Second person fee for all units: $1076/mo. Minimum age: 62 Special services: New apartment and and patio homes, restaurant-style dining, concierge service, fitness and aquatics center and upscale amenities on 83-acre campus. Includes Life Care and a full continuum of care on campus, including personal care, memory care and skilled nursing when you need it. 24/7 security. New apartments at The Meadow opening in 2018. Owner: Masonic Homes of Kentucky, Inc. Payment Accepted: private

Units in facility: 16 Cost per person/per day: $73-$82 (add $52 for double occupancy) Minimum age: 62 Special services: Sacred Heart Home offers a secure and safe living enviroment, private and studio apartments, private dining room and selective menus. Activity programs and Mass. Owner: Nazareth Home, Inc. Payment Accepted: private

Units in facility: 58 Cost: entrance fee $200,000-$250,000; 2 & 3BR patio homes plus monthly maintenance fee Minimum age: 62 Special services: Exquisite patio homes with enclosed porches and attached garages. All appliances included, security system, no property taxes, no homeowner’s insurance, spacious floor plans, all maintenance inside an out, exercise room and a beautiful clubhouse with a lunch café. Owner: Baptist Homes, Inc. Payment Accepted: private

3701 Frankfort Ave, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 897-8727 • miralea.com

Units in facility: 240 Cost per person per month: Studio $2920; 1BR $3870; 2BR $4850 Minimum age: 60 Special services: Gorgeous patio homes and apartments, gated community, 24 hr security, indoor heated pool, exercise room, chef prepared meals, flexible dining plan, ecreational activities, pet friendly, a great staff and management team, full continuum of care. Owner: Five Star Senior Living, Inc. Payment Accepted: private

2120 Payne Street Louisville, Ky 40206 (502) 895-9425 • sacredheartlou.org

Treyton Oak Towers

The Village Active Lifestyle Community

Units in facility: 169 Cost per person per month: $2625-$5199 Minimum age: 62 Special services: Serving Louisvillians for 30 years. Rooftop deck, greenhouse, art studio, fitness cente , masseuse; Fleur de Lis dining room. On site dentist, bank, and salon. All in a safe secure continuum of care community. Owner: Third and Oak Corporation Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, private ins., LTCi

Units in facility: 149 Cost per person per month: Market rate: 1 BR $713$1294, 2 BR $1298-$2187; Affordable housing: Studio $611-$703, 1 BR $628-$753, 2BR $753; Life Plan monthly fees: $1386-$2887 Minimum age: mature adult, 55 (market rate) and 62 (affordable housing) Special services: Remodeled entry fee apartments offer Life Plan discount on full continuum of care on campus, including personal care, memory care and skilled nursing when you need it. 24/7 security. Payment Accepted: private, affordable housing options

211 W. Oak St, Louisville, KY 40203 (502) 589-3211 • treytonoaktowers.com

3701 Frankfort Ave, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 894-0195 • masonichomesky.com

Click here to read these listings on our website. Spring 2017 | todaystransitionsnow.com

69


Independent Living Directory

Click here to read these listings on our website. Nursing/Rehab Directory Nursing homes are facilities that provide beds for around-the-clock intermediate, skilled, and/or rehabilitative care.

The Altenheim

936 Barrett Ave, Louisville, KY 40204 (502) 584-7417 • thealtenheim.org

Number of beds: 32 Cost per day: private $292, semiprivate $216 Special services: Small, non-profit senior health ca e community located in the Highlands, Our above average staff to resident ratio provides our residents with the highest quality of care by our skilled team of experts. Owner: The Altenheim Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, Hospice, private ins.

Christian Care Communities’ Christian Health Center Louisville West 1015 West Magazine St, Louisville, KY 40203 (502) 815-6460 • ChristianCareCommunities.org

Number of beds: 92 Cost per day: private $235, semiprivate $220 Special services: Short/long term rehab therapy, and hospital to home care, rm service, licensed nurses 24/7, all rehab therapies inhouse. Chaplain, fine dining, hair salon, snacks, activities. Chapel memory care and long term care. Owner: Christian Care Communities, Inc. Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, private ins., LTCi

Christian Care Communities’ Christian Health Center Louisville

920 S 4th St, Louisville, KY 40203 (502) 583-6533 • ChristianCareCommunities.org

Number of beds: 117 Cost per day: private $256, semiprivate $239 Special services: Transitional care, short term rehabilitative hospital to home care, room service, spa, licensed nurses 24/7, all rehab therapies in-house. Advanced gym equipment, hair salon. Memory care and long term care, wellness. Owner: Christian Care Communities, Inc. Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, private ins., LTCi

Clifton Oaks Care Center

446 Mt. Holly Ave, Louisville, KY 40206 (502) 897-1646 • CliftonOaksCenter.com

Number of beds: 110 Cost per day: private $239, semiprivate $215 Special services: Pulmonary Program led by a Pulmonologist. Wound program with a wound care physician rounding weekly. Spacious private rooms on our rehab unit with a separate entrance. Phones, Satellite TV, 24 Hour Snack Center. Owner: Providence Healthcare Management Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, VA, LTCi, private ins.

Forest Springs Health Campus

The Forum at Brookside

Number of beds: 58 Cost per day: $244-$290 Special services: Now Open! Personal care, independent living, longterm care, short-term rehabilitation, 24-hour skilled nursing care, outpatient therapy and respite services. Private suites, state-of-the-art therapy gym and fine dining Owner: Trilogy Health Services, LLC Payment Accepted: Medicare, private, LTCi, LTCi, VA

Number of beds: 60 Cost per day: private $288; semiprivate $237 Special services: Heartfelt care and skilled staff provide short & long term nursing care and rehab-physical, occupational, and speech for your loved one’s comfort, quality, and engaged lifestyle. Beautifully located in eastern Jefferson County. Owner: Five Star Senior Living, Inc. Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, Hospice, LTCi, private ins.

4120 Wooded Acre Lane, Louisville, KY 40245 (502) 243-1643 • forestspringshc.com

200 Brookside Dr, Louisville, KY 40243 (502) 245-3048 • theforumbrookside.com

Click here to read these listings on our website. 70 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2017


Spring 2017 | todaystransitionsnow.com

71


Nursing/Rehab Directory continued from page 70

Franciscan Health Care Center

Friendship Health & Rehab

3625 Fern Valley Rd, Louisville, KY 40219 (502) 964-3381 • franciscanhc.com

7400 Friendship Drive, Pee Wee Valley, KY 40056 (502) 241-8821 • friendshipky.com

Number of beds: 85 Cost per day: $283 Special services: Located off I-65 on Fern Valley Road offering long-term care, short-term rehab, assisted living, 24-hour skilled nursing care, physical, occupational, and speech therapy. Private suites, state-of-the-art therapy gym, fine dining, cable, and phone Owner: Trilogy Health Services, LLC Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, LTCi, private ins., VA, Humana contract

Number of beds: 128 Cost per day: private $270-$285; semiprivate $225-$238 Special services: Renovated private rehab suites w/smart televisions, sleeper sofas, free WIFI, 24 hour nursing care, physical, occupational, and speech therapies, remodeled therapy gym with state-of-the-art equipment, physiatrist and wound care physician, long term care, chaplain or spiritual services, personalized treatment plans, activities, hair salon, cable TV, free laundry, and transportation. Owners: Kevin Badger & Robert Young Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, private ins, LTCi

Glen Ridge Health Campus

Good Samaritan Society

Number of beds: 68 Cost per day: private $288 Special services: Offering long-term care, short-term rehab, 24-hour skilled nursing care, physical, occupational, and speech therapy, as well as outpatient therapy. Private suites, state-of-the-art therapy gym, fine dining, cable, and phone Owner: Trilogy Health Services, LLC Payment Accepted: Medicare, private, LTCi, private ins., VA

Number of beds: 98 Cost per day: private $253; semi-private $218 Special services: NEW Short-term Rehab to Home Center, 22 Private Suites, Separate Entrance, 16 Scenic Acres, Virtual Therapy Room & Therapy Gym; 7 days/wk; RN 24/7 on site. GSS has provided LongTerm Skilled Care since 1926. GSS seeks to,”provide an environment where people are loved, valued, and at peace.” GSS is faith-based and it is also the largest non-profit serving seniors in the United States Owner: Good Samaritan Society Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, private ins., LTCi, Hospice

6415 Calm River Way, Louisville, KY 40299 (502) 297-8590 • glenridgehc.com

3500 Good Samaritan Way, Jeffersontown, KY 40299 (502) 267-7403 • good-sam.com/Jeffersontown

Green Meadows Health Care Center

Green Valley Care Center

Number of beds: 122 Special services: Our physical, occupational and speech therapists work closely with our award-winning nursing staff to personalize a therapy regimen designed to regain your highest level of independence and mobility. Owner: Aspen Healthcare, LLC Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, LTCi, VA, private ins., health ins.

Number of beds: 125 Cost per day: private-$258; semiprivate-$214 Special services: All rooms include free basic cable, free phone line for local phone calls, and free Wi-Fi. We provide short-term rehab to home, longterm care and have a secured memory care unit. Owner: Life Care Centers of America Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, private ins., LTCi

310 Boxwood Run, Mt Washington, KY 40047 (502) 955-7600 • greenmeadowshealthcare.com

3118 Green Valley Rd, New Albany IN 47150 (812) 945-2341 • lcca.com/19/

Masonic Home of Louisville — Sam Swope Care Center

Masonic Home of Louisville — Sam Swope Care Center

Number of beds: 136 Cost per day: $295-330 Special services: Area’s largest on-site rehabilitation center and onsite dialysis clinic. Offers hair salon, cafe, library and specialized activities through Inspirations program. Six residential houses promote healing and recovery. Owner: Masonic Homes of Kentucky, Inc. Payment Accepted: Medicare, private, LTCi, Hospice, private ins.

Number of beds: 136 Cost per day: $295-330 Special services: Area’s largest on-site rehabilitation center and onsite dialysis clinic. Offers hair salon, cafe, library and specialized activities through Inspirations program. Six residential houses promote healing and recovery. Owner: Masonic Homes of Kentucky, Inc. Payment Accepted: Medicare, private, LTCi, Hospice, private ins.

3701 Frankfort Ave, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 897-4907 • masonichomesky.com

3701 Frankfort Ave, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 897-4907 • masonichomesky.com

Click here to read these listings on our website. 72 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2017


Spring 2017 | todaystransitionsnow.com

73


Nursing/Rehab Directory continued from page 72

Masonic Home of Shelbyville

Nazareth Home

Number of beds: 117 Cost per day: private $248-$295, semiprivate $236-$250 Special services: Award-winning staff provides short-stay, long-term and outpatient rehab featuring Nautilus equipment. Physical, occupational, speech and respiratory therapies offered 7 days a week. Five-star rated. Owner: Masonic Homes of Kentucky, Inc. Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, private ins., Hospice, LTCi

Number of beds: 87 Cost per day: $268-$278 Special services: Skilled and long term nursing care, all private rooms, exercise, social activities, massage and holistic therapy. Fine dining and award winning activity programs. Short stay Medicare recovery program bridging hospital to home. Owner: The Sisters of Charity of Nazareth Payment Accepted: LTCi, Medicare, Medicaid

711 Frankfort Rd, Shelbyville, KY 40065 (502) 633-3486

2000 Newburg Rd, Louisville, KY 40205 (502) 459-9681 • nazhome.org

Park Terrace Health Campus

Parkway Rehabilitation and Nursing Center

Number of beds: 88 Cost per day: $227-$275, $353 private deluxe Special services: Offering long-term care, short-term rehabilitation, 24-hour skilled nursing care, physical, occupational and speech therapies, as well as respite care. Private resident suites, state-of-the-art therapy gym, fine dining, cable, TV and phone Owner: Trilogy Health Services, LLC Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, LTCi, private ins.

Number of beds: 252 Cost per day: private $215, semiprivate $195 Special services: Stimulating and fun recreational activities. Spacious private and semi-private rooms. TV’s, cable and phones available in all rooms. Weekly Catholic and Interdenominational Services. On site cafe open 7 days a week. Owner: Parkway Extended Care, Inc. Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, private ins., LTCi

9700 Stonestreet Rd, Louisville, KY 40272 (502) 995-6600 • parkterracehc.com

1155 Eastern Pkwy, Louisville, KY 40217 (502) 636-5241 • parkwayrehabandnursing.com

Sacred Heart Home

St. Matthews Care Center

Number of beds: 121 Cost per day: $323-$367 Special services: Skilled and long term nursing care, private and semi-private rooms, exercise, social activities, massage and holistic therapy. Fine dining and activity programs. Short stay Medicare recovery program bridging hospital to home. Owner: Nazareth Home, Inc. Payment Accepted: LTCi, Medicare, Medicaid

Number of beds: 125 Cost per day: private $254, semi-private $214 Special services: Short-term rehabilitation, which includes 42 private rooms with a separate entrance. Focus on complex disease management including TPN, wound care and tracheostomy care. Offering physical, occupation and speech therapy 7 days a week and a RN 24/7 onsite. Enhanced dining services including restorative dining. Owner: St. Matthews Care Center Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, LTCi, VA, Hospice, private ins.

2120 Payne Street, Louisville, KY 40206 (502) 895-9425 • sacredheartlou.org

227 Browns Lane, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 893-2595 • stmatthewscare.com

Southern Indiana Rehab Hospital

Springhurst Health and Rehab

Number of beds: 60 Cost per day: semiprivate-$1688/$403 Acute/Sub-Acute Special services: Acute Rehab Hospital including 26 Sub-Acute Rehab beds providing intensive short term rehabilitation while minimizing your length of stay and maximizing your functional abilities. Owner: A partnership of Frazier Rehab Institute and Floyd Memorial Hospital and Health Services Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, health ins., LTCi, VA

Number of beds: 90 Cost per day: private $310 Special services: All private rooms with $5.3 million rehab expansion now open. Short-term rehab, long-term care, 24-hour skilled nursing and outpatient therapy. Cable, phone, comprehensive program for individual needs, private dining rooms, in-room dining, bistro, activities room, daily housekeeping, extensive therapy and restorative care. Owner: Baptist Homes, Inc. Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, LTCi

3104 Blackiston Boulevard, New Albany, IN 47150 (812) 941-8300 • SIRH.org

3001 Hurstbourne Pkwy, Louisville, KY 40241 (502) 426-5531 • springhurstpines.org

Treyton Oak Towers

Westport Care Center

Number of beds: 60 Cost per day: private $268-$318; semiprivate $209 Special services: Serving Louisvillians for 30 years; rendering superior nursing care and a wide range of rehabilitative services; Caring, friendly staff providing skilled nursing, short and long term rehabilitation. We are a continuum of care community. Owner: Third and Oak Corporation Payment Accepted: Private, LTCi, Medicare

Number of beds: 144 Cost per day: private $7436, semiprivate $6772/ ACU $7787 Special services: Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care and Programming Pain Management Therapy; including Physical, Occupational and Speech Diabetic care; Pharmacy Services Owner: Westport Care Center Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, private ins., LTCi, VA, Hospice

211 W. Oak St, Louisville, KY 40203 (502) 589-3211 • treytonoaktowers.com

Westport Place Health Campus 4247 Westport Rd, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 893-3033 • westportplacehc.com

Number of beds: 59 Cost per day: $249-$288 Special services: Offering personal care, long-term care, short-term rehabilitation, 24-hour skilled nursing, outpatient therapy and respite services. Private suites, state-of-the-art therapy gym and fine dining Owner: Trilogy Health Services, LLC Payment Accepted: Medicare, Medicaid, private, LTCi, private ins.

74 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2017

1101 Lyndon Lane, Louisville, KY 40222 (502) 425-0331 • westportcare.com

Enhanced Listings Providing more descriptive, larger and color information about your location. Four-issue rate is very reasonable $270 each or $27/month. Call 502.327.8855 or email Advertising@TodaysTransitionsNow.com.


Nursing/Rehab Directory

Click here to read these listings on our website.

Updates & Happenings Speed Cinema Presents: 18th Annual Animation Show of Show

Who says cartoons can’t be art? The Animation Show of Shows showcases the best animated shorts from film festivals all around the world. For 97 minutes, visitors will view a variety of animations from creators like Disney/Pixar, a short based on Shel Silverstein’s The Giving Tree, and films about current issues, such as civil rights. Th s exhibit is a perfect combination of entertainment and education, and can be enjoyed from one seated location – great for older adults. Be sure and catch it while it’s here! When: March 24-26 Where: Speed Art Museum Cost: $9 for non-Members; $7 for members Contact: 502.634.2700 Spring 2017 | todaystransitionsnow.com

75


Personal Care Directory Personal Care offers residents minimal assistance for bathing, grooming, toileting, and dressing. The resident must be able to move around (even if in a wheelchair or scooter). Some health care is provided and medications are given. These facilities are licensed.

The Aldersgate at Wesley Manor

The Altenheim

Number of beds: 28 Cost per day: $142-$191 Special services: Full medication management, licensed nurse on site 24/7, rehab and physician services, geriatric psychiatrist, secure memory garden, daily activities. Priority placement for short-term rehab and skilled nursing. Chapel, satellite TV, beauty salon, long-tenured staff. Located on 35 beautiful acres. No long-term contracts, entrance fees or deposits. See Nursing/Rehab directory for advanced Alzheimer’s/dementia care. Owner: Methodist Retirement Homes of KY Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

Number of beds: 30 Cost per day: $136-$144 Special services: Senior health care community located in the Highlands. Providing the independence of home living with all the services you need: 24-hour nursing, housekeeping and laundry service; 3 meals served; daily activities; social outings; religious services; beauty and barbershop. Part of a continuing care retirement community. Owner: The Altenheim Payment Accepted: private

5012 E. Manslick Rd, Louisville, KY 40219 (502) 969-3277 • WesMan.org

936 Barret Ave, Louisville, KY 40204 (502) 584-7417 • thealtenheim.org

Belmont Village Senior Living Community

Brookdale Blankenbaker

Number of beds: 128 Cost per day: $105-$224 Special services: Supported by specially-trained staff and licensed nurse onsite 24/7. Residents enjoy chef-prepared meals, fitnes center, therapy services, vibrant social calendar and range of enrichment programs for brain health. Award winning Circle of Friends program available for early stage memory loss. Owner: Belmont Village, L.P. Payment Accepted: private, private ins., LTCi

Number of beds: 99 Cost per day: $99-212 Special services: An exclusive community offering Independent Living, Memory Care and Personal Care services. Situated on a lovely, wooded acreage and surrounded by banks, restaurants, churches and hospitals, our community is a wonderful place to call home. Owner: Brookdale Payment Accepted: private, private ins., LTCi, VA

4600 Bowling Blvd, St. Matthews, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 721-7500 • belmontvillage.com

Eastern Star

923 Eastern Star Ct. Louisville, KY 40204 (502) 499-5533 • easternstarhomeky.com

Number of beds: 24 Cost per day: $105 Special services: Since 1952 The Eastern Star Home has been dedicated to offering a positive environment while promoting health and social interactions to exceed our resident’s expectations and enrich the lives we have the pleasure to serve in a traditional Home setting. Owner: Order of the Eastern Star Payment Accepted: private, LTCi

Forest Hills Commons

9107 Taylorsville Rd Louisville, KY 40299 (502) 499-5533 • ascseniorcare.com/location/forest-hills-commons/ Number of beds: 120 PC, 30 PC Memory Care Cost per day: $204, $236, $284 Special services: Variety of floor plans with patio or balcony options studio, 1 bedroom, 2 bedroom; Personalized support services by licensed nursing staff around the clock; Wide range of engrossing social and recreational programs. Also offering a specialized memory care neighborhood catering to all resident needs. Owner: American Senior Communities Payment Accepted: private

Masonic Home of Louisville — The Pillars Assisted Care Center 3701 Frankfort Ave, Louisville, KY 40207 (502) 897-4907 • masonichomesky.com

Number of beds: 84 Cost per day: $155-204 Special services: 2011-12 Personal Care Facility of the Year. Private rooms and couples suites. On-site podiatry, dentistry and optometry. Activities through Inspirations program. 24/7 security. Rehab and dialysis clinic. Salon, theater and restaurants on campus. Owner: Masonic Homes of Kentucky, Inc. Payment Accepted: private, private ins.

903 Blankenbaker Pkwy, Louisville, KY 40243 (502) 244-4244 • brookdale.com

Exceptional Senior Living

6901 Carslaw Court Prospect, KY 40059 (502) 415-8663 • www.ExceptionalSeniors.com

Number of beds: 65 Cost per month: Personal Care Studio: $3500 (plus levels of care) 1 Bedroom: $4600 plus levels of care 2 Bedroom: $5000 plus levels of care Memory Care: $5800 Special services: 24-Hour Onsite Nurse,s Restaurant-Style Dining, Movie Theater, Salon, Fitness Center, Outdoor Courtyard, Anytime Bistro, Wireless Internet. Owner: Exceptional Senior Living Payment Accepted: private

The Forum at Brookside

200 Brookside Dr, Louisville, KY 40243 (502) 245-3048 • theforumatbrookside.com

Number of beds: 24 Cost per day: $204, $236, $284 Special services: Heartfelt care and skilled staff provide personal care for your loved one’s comfort, quality, and engaged lifestyle. Beautiful campus conveniently located in eastern Jefferson County. Owner: Five Star Senior Living, Inc. Payment Accepted: private, private ins., LTCi

Morning Pointe of Louisville

4711 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy, Louisville, KY 40291 (502) 873-3800 • morningpointe.com

Number of beds: 73 Cost per day: $106 & up Special services: Conveniently located near Watterson Trail, a new, single level, state-of-the-art Senior Living/Personal Care community on nine acres. Comfortable home-like environment. Medical component with 24-hour licensed nursing and staff. Owner: Morning Pointe Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

Click here to read these listings on our website. 76 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2017


Spring 2017 | todaystransitionsnow.com

77


Personal Care Directory continued from page 76

Nazareth Home

Parr’s at Springhurst

Number of beds: 33 Cost per day: $161 Special services: Personal Care program includes apartments and activities designed for independence and choice. All rooms are spacious to promote recovery, privacy and family involvement. Owner: The Sisters of Charity of Nazareth Payment Accepted: private

Number of beds: 79 apts. Cost per day: $132-$204 Special services: All-inclusive pricing structure. Offers licensed personal care in a beautiful apartment setting. Studio, 1 BR and 2 BR floor plans Three restaurant-style meals, daily housekeeping, transportation, beauty salon, ice cream parlor, Bistro, engaging activities and Nurses 24 hours/7 days per week. Owner: Baptist Homes, Inc. Payment Accepted: private, LTCi

2000 Newburg Rd, Louisville, KY 40205 (502) 459-9681 • nazhome.org

3101 N. Hurstbourne Pkwy, Louisville, KY 40241 (502) 412-3775 • springhurstpines.org

Sacred Heart Home

Symphony at Oaklawn

Number of beds: 31 Cost per day: $147-$165 Special services: Personal Care program includes apartments and activities designed for independence and choice. All rooms are spacious to promote privacy and family involvement. Owner: Nazareth Home, Inc. Payment Accepted: private

Number of beds: 56 Cost per day: $146-$242 Special services: Studio, 1 bedroom & 2 bedroom apartments with support from nurses and caregivers 24/7. Beautiful courtyards, salon, wellness center, community vehicle & van transportaion, social & recreational activities, and meals. Owner: Compass Pointe Healthcare Payment Accepted: private, LTCi, VA

2120 Payne Street Louisville, KY 40206 (502) 895-9425 • sacredheartlou.org

Treyton Oak Towers

211 W. Oak St, Louisville, KY 40203 (502) 589-3211 • treytonoaktowers.com

Number of beds: 40 Cost per day: $143-$175 Special services: Serving Louisvillians for 30 years; Spacious private apartments; restaurant style dining; daily activities; on site therapy, wellness center, dentist; salon and more; devoted staff uniquely equipped to enhance every stage of life. Owner: Third and Oak Corporation Payment Accepted: private, LTCi

100 Shelby Station Drive, Louisville, Ky 40245 (502) 632-5500 • symphonyatoaklawn.com

Enhanced Listings Providing more descriptive, larger and color information about your location. Four-issue rate is very reasonable $270 each or $27/month. Call 502.327.8855 or email Advertising@TodaysTransitionsNow.com.

Click here to read these listings on our website. Updates & Happenings Prepare to Fight arkinson’s

If you’re caring for a family member who has Parkinson’s disease, knowing where to fi d help makes your situation much easier. Attend the Parkinson’s Disease Lightning Rounds to connect you and your family with local companies who can suggest benefic al programs and services. When: April 11, 1:30-4pm Where: Forest Hills Commons (9107 Taylorsville Road) Cost: Free, but reservations are required. Contact: Katherine Autin, 502.314.8307 or kautin@aol.com. 78 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2017


Helpful Resources ADULT DAY HEALTH CENTER

Fern Creek/Highview United Ministries Adult Day Health Center

Providing a structured program balancing physical & cognitive activities designed to help frail older adults function at their highest levels. State licensed medical model providing nursing services, medication administration, personal care, memory care, meals, & caregiver respite for over 24 years. Medicaid Waiver, VA, LTCI, & Private Pay.

9300 Beulah Church Rd. 40291 • 502.762.9612 adcdir@fchum.org • fchum.org

FREE HOUSING ADVOCATE

Senior Home Transitions

After hospitalization and/or rehab, what’s next for your loved one? Having personally gone through the process of placing a loved one after rehab, I know how confusing the options can be. Particularly if you only have a short time to find that new home! I have personally visited eac community and will help you find the perfect new home based on you financial situation and personal need . I can also help connect you with resources to help financiall . All at NO COST to you! Patti Naiser • SeniorHomeTransitions.com • 502.396.9228

LAW

Timmel Law LLC – KY & IN lic.

ELDER PLANNING WORKSHOPS & CONSULTATIONS NO CHARGE • MEDICAID & VA BENEFIT

Helping individuals and their families including those with elder or special needs issues identify, evaluate and plan for long term care, estate and life care options. Call or email to join us for a workshop where you can learn about Estate Planning and protecting your loved ones’ assets. Timmel Law, LLC 812.590.2771 • aa@timmellaw.com • timmellaw.com

NO COST REFERRAL SERVICE

Assisted Living Locators

Assisted Living Locators is a No Cost Referral Service. As professional Eldercare Advisors, we provide personal assistance in locating the right options for your elderly loved one. We can reduce your stress by providing a free consultation and help you find the right Assisted Living, Personal Care, Alzheimer’s/Dementia Care, Nursing Homes and Retirement Communities. Assisted Living & Home Care Options • Arthur & Kathy Lemons 502.208.4072 • arthurl@assistedlivinglocators.com wwwAssistedLivingLocatorsLouisville.com

TRANSPORTATION

Able Care, Inc., since 2001 Providing non-emergency, ambulatory and wheelchair accessible transportation. Our service is available for: • Physician appointments, medical procedures, therapy, dialysis, radiation, and chemotherapy • Social functions and daily errands • Evenings and weekends with advance notice Caregivers or family members are welcome to ride at no additional charge. Pre-paid voucher packages are available. Payment is requested at the time of service. BBB Accredited Business. Louisville, Kentucky 40269-0381 • 502.267.1911 • ablecareinc.com Spring 2017 | todaystransitionsnow.com

79


Connie’s World

First Dat

Connie Meyer writes regularly for Today’s Transitions. You can reach Connie at ConnieL605@aol.com.

M

y father-in-law has been gone for 13 years. I miss so many things about him, but most of all, I miss his goodnatured teasing. Whenever I would visit, he would greet me with, “Hey, there, Connie Minor Meyer.” Since my parents had both died ahead of him, he always managed to keep them alive for me by sharing stories and evoking my maiden name in greeting. Dad knew how much my Daddy would have loved knowing he was keeping the “Minor” name alive. Dad used to love to tease about when his son Jon and I started dating in high school. He never seemed to tire of hearing about when we met in 10th grade homeroom. Since Dad ran a bowling alley at the time, he loved it when I told him one of the fi st things Jon asked me was, “Do you bowl?” It wasn’t long after that question that Jon asked me out on a date. I had just turned 16 when I went on that fi st date. Jon and I made it a double-date with my best friend Sherry and his best friend Kirby to go to a football game. The only thing I hated more than football was cold weather, and I had to try to get through both on that fi st date. I wore really heavy gray gloves that I refused to remove even in the car after the game. Those gloves were my protection against not only the cold, but any attempt Jon might make to

hold my hand. Of course that seemed pretty unlikely, since I was sitting as close to the door on my side as possible. I thought about keeping my hands hidden in my pockets, but the gloves were so bulky they wouldn’t fit. On the ride home, Jon and I were in the back seat when he asked me if I was cold. “I’m OK,” I answered warily. “I just thought you might be cold since you still have your gloves on,” he said. “Yeah, well my hands are always cold,” I responded, unwilling to relent even a little. Kirby and Sherry seemed to be having a fi e time up front while poor Jon was still struggling to carry the conversation with little more than one-word responses from me. I had nothing personal against Jon. He seemed nice, and I enjoyed talking with him in homeroom. I just wanted to be home with a

80 todaystransitionsnow.com | Spring 2017

"I wore really heavy gray gloves . . . [they] were my protection against not only the cold but any attempt Jon might make to hold my hand." good book. I couldn’t understand why everyone had to be dating all of a sudden. I liked things the way they used to be. We were almost home when without warning, I felt his hand gently close around my glove. My heart started pounding, but I didn’t dare move or react. I just pretended not to notice, and before I knew it we were home, and Jon released my gloved hand as gently as a brush of butterfly wings. Relieved, I said good night quickly and hurried to the door. Before I could get

safely inside, Jon was next to me, asking if we could go to a movie together next week. “Gee,” I thought, “he just won’t leave me alone.” Then I surprised myself by saying, “Sure, that sounds OK.” After he’d gone, I fi ally removed my gloves, putting them away carefully in the dresser drawer. Suddenly I felt so warm inside that I didn’t think I would need them again. It has been 50 years since that fi st date with Jon, and in October we celebrated our 42nd wedding anniversary. Since that fi st date, Jon has held my hand through the birth of our two sons, the death of parents, and countless joys and sorrows in between. If Dad could be here now to ask once more about how we met, I’m sure I would tell him this story and wonder with him what might have happened if my hands had not been so cold.


Today's Transitions magazine  
Today's Transitions magazine  

Spring 2017 Issue