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CONTENTS: FALL 2014

22 34

28 Directories 38 How to Use

4

TAKE CARE OF CAREGIVERS

20

6

WHAT I KNOW NOW

22

CROCK-POT COOKERY

8

10 THINGS EVERY CAREGIVER SHOULD KNOW

26

BOOK CLUB

28

WISE & WELL

30

GIRLFRIEND GETAWAY

By Tiffany White

Directories

38 Adult Day Care 39 42 48 52 60 68 69

Facilities Aging-in-Place Facilities Alzheimer’s Care Facilities Assisted Living Facilities Home Health Nursing/Rehab Facilities Personal Care Facilities Retirement Communities

By Lucy Pritchett

By Yelena Sapin

12

PLANNING YOUR LEGACY By Marie Bradby

16

CAREGIVER CIRCLE By Pam Windsor

For advertising information, call 502.327.8855 or email advertising@todayspublications.com.

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34

TAKE A TRIP

40

SCENT SENSE

46

CARE PACKAGE FOR THE CAREGIVER

By Marie Bradby

By Carrie Vittitoe

32

By Tiffany White

By Melissa Donald

By Ashlie Stevens

By Ashlie Stevens

By Connie Meyer

IT’S HECK GETTING OLD

By Yelena Sapin

18

BIG MOVES, BIG DECISIONS

UPDATES AND HAPPENINGS By Gioia Patton

By Alissa Hicks

72

IT’S YOUR STYLE By Tiffany White

72


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From the Editor Volume 11 / Number 3 PUBLISHER

Cathy S. Zion cathy@todayspublications.com EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Anita Oldham anita@todayspublications.com EDITOR

Tiffany White tiffany@todayspublications.com CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

Linda Hitt Kempf COPY EDITING

Lucy M. Pritchett ADVERTISING DIRECTOR

Susan Allen susan@todayspublications.com

Take Care of

Caregivers W

hen I was a child, my mother and I visited with our family in Virginia most summers. Usually we would stay with our cousin, Clarine. I looked forward to those trips because Clarine stocked her refrigerator with all my favorite drinks and snacks. She was a nurturer who unselfishly gave of her time to anyone who needed extra attention. In the last 20 years of her life, Clarine took care of her mother, husband, brother, and cousin up until their final days. Caring for her loved ones seemed to be the natural thing for her to do — not only because they were family members, but because she wanted them to have the best life possible. I can’t remember a time when someone was taking care of her, and she didn’t have a caregiver support group to get her through the rough spots. If you are a caregiver, read our feature (pg. 8) about advice every caregiver can use. Or if you know a caregiver who needs help, find ways of making her life easier. Boost his mood by nominating him for our Care Package for the Caregiver Award (pg. 46) or volunteer to care for his loved one for a couple of hours. It will make both of you feel good.

Got something to say? We’d love to hear from you! Send an email to tiffany@todayspublications.com and put “feedback” in the subject line. Also, don’t forget to visit TodaysTransitionsNow.com to read current and archived articles or find out about upcoming events. 4 todaystransitionsnow.com | Fall 2014

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Teri Hickerson teri@todayspublications.com Suzy Hillebrand suzy@todayspublications.com Joyce Inman joyce@todayspublications.com Kaitlyn Tew kaitlyn@todayspublications.com MEDIA ASSOCIATE

Alissa Hicks alissa@todayspublications.com GRAPHIC DESIGNER

April H. Allman april@todayspublications.com GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Kathy Bolger kathyb@todayspublications.com ASSISTANT EDITOR/DESIGNER

Jessica Alyea jessica@todayspublications.com PHOTOGRAPHY

Melissa Donald melissa@todayspublications.com OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR

Jillian LeMaster officeadmin@todayspublications.com CIRCULATION MANAGER

W. Earl Zion COVER ART

Silvia Cabib TODAY’S TRANSITIONS is published by: Zion Publications LLC

9750 Ormsby Station Road, Suite 307 Louisville, KY 40223 (502) 327-8855 Fax (502) 327-8861 TodaysTransitionsNow.com The opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the writers and do not necessarily reflect the position of the publisher. The staff has made good-faith efforts to provide comprehensive and accurate listings in all directories. Information included in the directories is based strictly on that supplied by each entity. Zion Publications does not endorse or guarantee any advertiser’s product or service. Copyright 2013 by Zion Publications LLC with all rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited without permission from Zion Publications LLC.


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WHAT I KNOW NOW

Barry Bernson Many of our days have begun in the company of Barry Bernson, 69. He recently retired as news anchor for WDRB's Fox in the Morning, and before that he was anchor for WHAS's Good Morning Kentuckiana. BY LUCY M. PRITCHETT / PHOTO MELISSA DONALD

What was the first news event that made an impression on you?

The Korean War. I can still remember watching Douglas Edwards on CBS evening news talking about Panmunjom (site of the signing of the Korean Armistice Agreement). And the coronation of Queen Elizabeth. What drives you?

Storytelling. I have been lucky to make a living telling stories for 50 years. My latest project is a documentary, A History of Kentucky in 25 Objects, which is scheduled to air on KET in November.

What advice would you give the younger you?

Follow your passion because if you find something you are passionate about and do it, somebody will eventually pay you to do it.

Barry is the author of Bernson's Corner: A Reporter's Notebook and has narrated more than 600 audio books for Louisville's American Printing House for the Blind.

When should a man raise his voice?

How does a man handle fame?

When he sees social injustice. The hottest places in hell are reserved for those who remain silent. What book is on your nightstand?

The (very long) Robert Caro biography of Lyndon Johnson.

Realize that fame is not the end. It is a by-product rather than a goal. How did you get started in journalism?

My parents planned for me to go to law school or medical school. But I flunked out of pre-law my freshman year. I moved back home and got a job on a newspaper – the Paterson (N.J.) Morning News. I started as a copy boy, then became a reporter. That led to my first radio job in 1964. 6 todaystransitionsnow.com | Fall 2014

What does it take to survive in one's career?

You have to be good at what you do. You have to balance what you want to do with what management wants you to do. You can push the envelope so you can sleep at night, but if you work for other people, know that you have to please them. What piece of advice has served you well?

Put the toilet seat down.

Realize that fame is not the end. It is a by-product rather than a goal. What would you do with 15 free minutes?

Work on the Sunday New York Times crossword puzzle. What can't you quite get the knack of?

Getting a consistent golf swing. I know I will never throw a curveball like a major league baseball player or a winning touchdown as a quarterback. But, every round or two I will hit one or two shots as good as (Rory) McIlroy. It's known as intermittent reinforcement. The world would be a better place if...

More things were coated in dark chocolate. What tech tools do you favor?

I like the computer because it makes writing easier. But

I do sometimes miss my old Royal typewriter with the green keys. What do you drive?

A 2014 metallic red Avalon Hybrid. (His license plate: WORDS.) What is the biggest issue facing America today?

In the large view, we seem to have forgotten how to care for, and about, one another. What is still on your bucket list?

Attend a Boston Red Sox game at Fenway Park. What was your childhood dream?

To play shortstop for the Brooklyn Dodgers. Words you’ve lived by?

Something I saw written on a gravestone became my guiding principle as a reporter: My Father He never told me how to live He simply lived and let me watch


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10

Things

every caregiver should know BY YELENA SAPIN

1

“When you’re caring for a loved one, it can be a slippery slope. You just keep sliding downhill and don’t even recognize that you’re falling until you’re flat on your back. Get help before you think you need it so you can stay mentally and physically healthy.”

2

“Be ready to adjust your life around your caregiving and to rearrange your house for that person’s needs and handicaps. Get professional training before you bring them home if you’ll need to do any procedures, but don’t try to remember it — write it down. And hang in there! ‘Let go and let God’ is my motto.”

– Raegena McCage, primary caregiver for her father

“Whatever happens, you have to have patience. When you’re caring for someone who’s sick, you have to realize that sometimes what they’re doing and saying is not them; it’s not their fault, it’s just something that happens. You can’t take it personally.”

3

– Carol Cockerel, primary caregiver for her husband

four “Check out medical supply stores such as Gould’s or Cooley’s. There are chairs and lifts if whoever you’re caring for can’t get around well, belts that help them stand and get their footing, special utensils if they can’t hold a spoon steady. There are all sorts of devices that they can use, so go take a look.” – Linda Bertram, Home Care Specialist, ElderServe

– Becky Beanblossom, President of Home Instead Senior Care 8 todaystransitionsnow.com | Fall 2014

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<< PAGE 8

six

5

“With a diagnosis, whether it’s Alzheimer’s or any kind of a terminal illness, you’re faced with the unknown. You don’t know what’s ahead, but you know it’s not going to be easy. I would encourage people to join a support group. I was in one, and it really was my crutch during those six years.”

“I believe it’s our job in life to make sure our loved ones are cared for, but I don’t believe it’s our job to do all of the caring. Sometimes we feel this great sense of guilt for not being able to be the primary caregiver for our parents or loved ones or not really being involved in their care, and I think that’s unfortunate because not every person is called to be a caregiver. I think you have to be true to who you are, and in doing that you can certainly make sure that your loved one is cared for, but you don’t have to be the one to do it if you’re not best suited to do it.” – Becky Beanblossom

7

“My daughter-in-law prepared a scrapbook of my husband’s life for his 80th birthday, and we found that very comforting for him. I wish that was something I had started early on so that he could have helped with it and had a legacy to leave afterward. I also began to keep a journal. After his death, I would read something that I had completely forgotten about, and I was so glad for the renewal of that memory. If you keep a journal of the nice things that people do or did for you when you’re going through that difficulty, it serves as a source of comfort and gratitude that you had such friends and had some happy memories of a very difficult time.” – Carol Doerhoefer

– Carol Doerhoefer, primary caregiver for her husband, who had Alzheimer’s

9

“At Home Instead, we have the 40-70 rule: if you’re 40 and your parents are 70, or if you’re 70 and your adult children are 40, it’s time to start having those conversations about your wishes for the future and getting a realistic picture of what your resources are. The more those conversations are had, the more it puts everybody at ease with what could happen. It makes it so much easier for your loved ones who will have to be making those decisions for you if you can’t.” – Becky Beanblossom

8

“Take advantage of a daycare facility. My mother comes to the daycare here, and it’s been a real help for her to get out and be among people. She’s 97 years old, so she’s lost many of her family and friends, but here it’s a new group of people, and she’s becoming more social. My mother is a storyteller, and if she were at home, there wouldn’t be anyone for her to talk to but me.”

– Linda Johnson, receptionist at Heartsong Memory Care and primary caregiver for her mother

ten

“Don’t try to do everything perfectly. Realize that you’re going to make some mistakes, and that’s OK. You also have to have somebody who is going to give you some relief or someone you can talk to. And you have to know when you’ve had enough and can no longer do it. Caregiving is really hard, and it’s not for everyone, so don’t beat up on yourself.” – Delcie Birts, Home Care Specialist at ElderServe

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Planning your

Legacy Steps to take to leave money to your favorite charities after you die BY MARIE BRADBY

A

few years ago, when Sara was helping serve supper to children at the Dare to Care Kids Café with other church volunteers, she met a teenage girl who relied on the evening meal program. Sara, a retired school teacher, also learned that the girl was behind in school. “Right away, I said I had to do something,” Sara says. “Here she was, 14 or 15 years old, and she didn’t know what most children would know even in the second or third grade. It was just a shame. She was just there by herself. No one else was attending to her. I thought, ‘Well, I better be doing something.’ That started it.” Sara’s experience with the Dare to Care Food Bank program made such an impact on her that she rewrote her will directing a bequest be made to the charity. She contacted the organization to let 12 todaystransitionsnow.com | Fall 2014

them know her plans and had a meeting with the development officer. “It seemed to me that leaving money to people who were much wealthier than I was didn’t make sense,” she says. “So I will leave everything to Dare to Care. “I would in no way be described as wealthy. I wanted to focus on something that I [was involved with] personally and something that is fundamental. The relief of hunger is certainly most fundamental.” Sara is not alone in her philanthropic desires. Americans — individuals, corporations, foundations, and bequests — gave $335.15 billion to charities in 2013, with individuals giving the lion’s share at 72 percent according to the National Philanthropic Trust. Even if you have moderate means, making a gift from your estate to a charity you care about can make a difference. Here are some basic steps to take. PAGE 14 >>


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<< PAGE 12

Getting Started

1. Ask yourself: “What do I want my legacy to be? What do I want to leave behind?” This will give you a chance to evaluate your passions in life. People have different reasons why, when, and how they give gifts to organizations and not-for-profits. 2. Do your homework and make sure the charity that serves the cause you want to support is legitimate. Go to the Charity Navigator website, charitynavigator.org, to research the organization, its financial situation, and its effectiveness so you know you are leaving a legacy to an organization that is doing essential work. 3. Feel free to call the charity to take a tour of its offices and to talk to the development staff.

Seek Expert Advice

4. Reach out to your lawyer, accountant, financial adviser, or banker. Tell them, “This is what I want to do. How do I accomplish it?”

Ask yourself: “What do I want my legacy to be? What do I want to leave behind?” This will give you a chance to evaluate your passions in life. 14 todaystransitionsnow.com | Fall 2014

Ways to Gift

5. The simplest way to gift money to a charity is to name it as a beneficiary on your financial instruments — life insurance, certificates of deposit, annuities, IRAs, and other retirement funds. You usually don’t need an attorney to make these designations. These nontestamentary transfer accounts (Payable on Death, Transferable on Death) are outside of your will and do not go through probate. If you have forgotten who your beneficiaries are, contact the issuer to get your beneficiary declaration page. 6. Make sure the beneficiaries on your financial instrument are correctly assigned and up to date. 7. You can change your beneficiary designations at any time and usually at no cost. You don’t have to use an attorney. Beneficiaries under these accounts receive the gift automatically when you die. 8. You can designate multiple beneficiaries, giving each designee a percentage. For example, 75 percent to your adult child and 25 percent to a charity. 9. Make sure your will and your nontestamentary accounts don’t conflict. An attorney will look at all your assets and beneficiary designees when drafting your will to make sure your intentions are fulfilled. 10. You also can make a bequest through your will. This requires the advice of an attorney in order to create the proper legal language in your will and to make sure your total estate is handled the way you want.

Communicate

11. Tell your children/spouse that you plan to give to a charity. That way there will be no surprises and it will lessen any possible future hard feelings or contests to the will. 12. Let the charity know your plans before you are gone so they can carry out any specific wishes you might have, such as setting up a scholarship in your name. Also, charities like to contact the children and family after you pass to acknowledge the gift and say thank you.

Additional Gifting Options

13. You can set up a private, named fund or make a general donation to the cause of your choice at the Community Foundation of Louisville, cflouisville.org, which is a grantmaking public charity that brings together the financial resources of individuals, families, and businesses to support nonprofits in the Louisville area. It has more than 1,200 charitable funds and each year distributes more than $30 million in charitable grants. 14. Other ways to gift your estate are more complex and costly. For example, you can set up a private family foundation (think Gheens Foundation, James Graham Brown Foundation) or a variety of trusts, such as a Charitable Remainder Trust or a Charitable Lead Trust. Consult your estate attorney to discuss these types of vehicles.

Thanks to the several financial experts we spoke with: Martin Walters, managing partner with Walters, Walters and Redmond Associates, a private wealth and business financial adviser firm with Ameriprise Financial; Bea Rosenberg, a certified public accountant with Deming, Malone, Livesay & Ostroff accounting firm; Lee Cave, a lawyer specializing in elder law; Jackie Keating, chief development officer with Dare to Care Food Bank; Steve Corzine, bank adviser in wealth management at PNC Bank and Dare to Care board member; and Robin Miller, vice president for resource development at the Home of the Innocents.


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! d l O g n i t t e G It’s Heck BY YELENA SAPIN

es don’t work the way they Solutions for when our bodi

PROBLEM:

Thinning Hair

A

ccording to Dr. Joseph Fowler, clinical professor of dermatology at the University of Louisville, hormonal changes can wreak havoc on our follicles and lead to thinning and weakening of the hair shaft as we age. While this tends to be most noticeable in men, many women also find that their tresses are not as lush as they were in their youth, especially after they’ve gone through menopause. Harsh chemical treatments and the pulling, twisting, and high heat of some hairstyles can also cause hair breakage and hair loss, compounding the problem.

PROBLEM:

Itchy Scalp

M

any people get itchy scalp, often accompanied by dandruff, and we don’t really know the cause of that, says Dr. Fowler. There might be some genetic factors, and people with other skin conditions such as seborrheic dermatitis, psoriasis, and eczema are especially prone to it. Contrary to popular belief, an itchy, flaky scalp is not necessarily a sign of dryness. “The scalp is loaded with oil glands, and what people sometimes think of as dry scalp is actually inflammation from the dermatitis, which produces the scaling and flakiness,” Dr. Fowler says.

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used to

SOLUTION:

SOLUTION:

Medication

Gentler Hair Care

Commonly known as the brand Rogaine, minoxidil has been scientifically proven to be particularly effective in reducing hair thinning. Available without a prescription, it works by blocking the hormonal effects on the hair follicles without interfering with the actual hormones, says Dr. Fowler. A prescription medication called finasteride has also been shown to block some of those hormonal effects in both sexes, but it is not recommended for use by women of childbearing age.

If you have a tendency toward thinning hair, you need to protect what you have and be gentle with your hair. “The stress you put on hair from pulling, twisting into tight braids, or vigorously brushing can certainly add to visible hair thinning,” Dr. Fowler says. Some chemical treatments can also irritate the scalp and weaken hair, causing breakage. Perms are especially damaging, but it’s a good idea to be careful with hair color as well. Any additional trauma to already vulnerable strands can make thinning hair worse.

SOLUTION:

SOLUTION:

Most people with mild cases of dandruff and seborrheic dermatitis can control their symptoms with over-thecounter shampoos, says Dr. Fowler. Of all the dandruff shampoos, those containing tar are the most effective, but they tend to be the least cosmetically appealing due to the strong smell. Itch-relieving products such as Scalpicin can also be helpful in reducing scalp inflammation and redness, and scalp oils help soften and hold in the flakes, reducing the appearance of dandruff.

More severe cases of itchy scalp and flakiness might need to be treated with stronger prescription products and cortisone medications. Severe scaling, itching, and redness can also be a sign of an allergic reaction to a hair product. Switching to a different brand might not help since most brands have similar ingredients. “In that situation we recommend a skin allergy test to try and identify what you’re allergic to,” Dr. Fowler says.

Over-the-Counter Treatments

Prescription Treatments


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Caregiver

CIRCLE BY PAM WINDS

OR

Find Yard Help Now: • Offer to pay a teen you can trust from your church or neighborhood • Inquire about reputable lawn services you could use

Our loved one needs care... now what? More than 65 million people provide care for a chronically ill, disabled, or aged loved one each year, according to the National Alliance for Caregiving. For families considering caring for a loved one themselves, start first with a family meeting that includes all siblings. “At this meeting, family members can determine which one would be best suited based on geography, skills, interest, etc. to handle responsibilities,” says Pam Jeseo, owner of Silver Tree Home Care. When families need outside help with caregiving, experts recommend an agency, one e pag Flip to that does background 52 to find our checks, to make sure directory of local home health care you know who’s coming services. into the home. “I really discourage people from hiring an individual on their own,” explains Cindy Venable, director of Louisville’s Office for Aging & Disabled Citizens, “because of the risk.” Agency caregivers are also trained to deal with some of the special challenges seniors face such as Alzheimer’s or dementia. “There’s a specific way you need to communicate with them,” Jeseo says. “It needs to be in a very compassionate, respectful way that preserves their dignity.” For families considering an outside agency but concerned about cost, veteran’s benefits and long-term care insurance might be able to help. 18 todaystransitionsnow.com | Fall 2014

Find the

Right Help When looking for someone to help with yard work or other odd jobs, you can’t be too careful. “We hear from the Crimes Against Seniors Unit all the time about people getting scammed on roofing and driveway repairs, really anything,” explains Cindy Venable, director of Louisville’s Office for Aging & Disabled Citizens.

notes Reanna Smith Hamblin, vice president of communication for the BBB. “Don’t just hire someone on the spot.”

“We tell people to check with the Better Business Bureau first before they do business,”

Don’t pay in advance for work to be done on the yard or around the home.

Get solid recommendations from friends or family members who are very familiar with the person or business you are considering hiring.


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Big Moves, Big Decisions BY CARRIE VITTITOE

W

hen summer moves into fall, every gardener knows the time has come to plant mums, cut back fading summer blooms, and clean out the clay pots for storage in the garage. The seasons of gardening come with their differing beauties and responsibilities, and the seasons of life are the same. Eventually, we know we need to embrace the autumn and early winter of our lives. Chris Hoganson, a certified senior move manager with Memory Movers, a division of Utterly Organized, recommends that older adults think of “rightsizing” their lives, which helps them make their homes most suitable for their current lives. The term “downsizing” has unpleasant connotations; one who is downsized feels a sense of loss and powerlessness. Hoganson believes rightsizing gives people a sense of empowerment. “A fresh start can be scary, but it can also be very uplifting,” she says. WHEN IT'S TIME TO RIGHTSIZE When it comes to rightsizing, the best-case scenarios are when older adults decide on their own that they are tired of 20 todaystransitionsnow.com | Fall 2014

maintaining a large home and yard. They might want to buy a patio home to reduce maintenance responsibilities or move into a retirement community for camaraderie. Some people want to remain in their longtime homes, but they need to make changes to how they live and what they have for a better “aging in place” experience. Acute health conditions force some people to rightsize before they are ready. A broken hip that leads to time in a rehabilitation center is stressful, and that stress is magnified when chronic difficulties with walking force the patient to make a drastic change in residence. In such a situation, it is often challenging for families to help their loved ones manage such a big life change. Adult children might be busy with jobs or their own children, or they may live many states away and not be able to help often. An adult child might have a hard time dealing with a parent who is angry, frustrated, depressed, or simply overwhelmed at the prospect of going through the home and possessions. Sometimes it makes sense, logistically and psychologically, to call in a professional who can remain objective.

FINDING PROFESSIONAL HELP Gigi Hildenbrand is happy she and her brother hired a senior moving professional to help their mother rightsize her home. Gigi, who is the mother of 9-year-old twins and works full-time, says, “You’re already stressed out because you don’t have enough time, and you’re trying to be patient with your parent.” Gigi says even though her mother didn’t necessarily look forward to the work involved in rightsizing, having professionals guide and support her was ultimately a good experience. “She enjoyed having someone hear her stories about the items that had been part of her life, and after the work was done she would say, ‘Oh, I feel like a weight has been lifted off my shoulders,’” Gigi says. So what should you look for in a senior moving professional? An important criterion is certification by the National Association of Senior Move Managers. Membership in this organization means the professional has received training, passed a test, and has resources and support available from the national association. Membership in the National Association of Professional Organizers is also valuable. Reputable rightsizing professionals are sensitive to their clients during this vulnerable time, and they work to address needs within their clients’ budgets. They do not throw anything away unless being specifically directed to by their clients. Once a professional organizer is hired, he or she will visit the client and assess what needs to be done. Based on the clients’ needs, she will put together a timeline and help the client decide who else might need to be involved. For example, if a client has antiques or art, an appraiser may need to be contacted. Whether or not a professional is hired, there are things adult children can do to help their parents during the process of rightsizing. Hoganson urges, “Whenever possible, have the parent make decisions. An adult child may not understand it, but they should respect it.” Adult children need to also be mindful of what they can handle within their own busy lives. Rightsizing, like any major life endeavor, requires considerable work on many fronts, but ultimately it can be a profoundly liberating experience.


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What’s for Dinner?

Juicy Mediterranean chicken marinated overnight and slow-cooked for hours makes for an easy, flavorful gourmet dish.

Crock-Pot Cookery STORY & PHOTOS BY MELISSA DONALD

Using a Crock-Pot or slow cooker is a handy and helpful way to prepare a meal if you are away for the day or want an easy way to prepare dinner that doesn’t require constant attention. Here are three recipes along with some tips on how to make cooking and baking a bit easier in your Crock-Pot. Crock-Pot Tip 1: Easy clean-up Large Crock-Pots can be heavy and hard to clean. Food cooking in a Crock-Pot tends to coat the top portion of the ceramic dish insert, which may require lots of soaking. A Crock-Pot liner (shown at right) is a quick and easy way to clean up a Crock-Pot and is available at your local grocery store. Place the plastic liner on the inside of the Crock-Pot ceramic dish before turning on. Put your meal in, then 22 todaystransitionsnow.com | Fall 2014

place the lid on top with the top portion of the liner overlapping the outside of the Crock-Pot. Do not lift the Crock-Pot plastic liner with contents inside while the meal is hot — serve directly from the Crock-Pot. Once cool, completely remove the remaining food from the Crock-Pot, lift out the plastic liner, and throw it away. The Mediterranean chicken meal pictured above is a quick dish that is easy to assemble. This gourmet flare with little

preparation is best when it’s prepared the night before and sits overnight in the refrigerator. I suggest placing everything in the plastic Crock-Pot liner, closing with a twist tie, and placing in the refrigerator overnight. RECIPE ON PAGE 24 >>


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<< PAGE 22

Mediterranean Chicken

adapted from Cynthia Graubart’s recipe found in Slow Cooking for Two cookbook (pictured on p. 22) 2 cloves of fresh garlic, minced or 1½ tsp of jarred minced garlic ¼ c. dried parsley 1 Tbsp dried oregano 1 Tbsp dried basil ½ tsp salt ½ tsp black pepper 16-20 bite-sized pitted prunes ½ c. pitted Spanish green olives ½ c. pitted Kalamata olives ¼ c. capers with a little juice 3 Tbsp red wine vinegar 1/3 c. dry white wine ½ c. olive oil 4 bone-in skinless chicken breasts or boneless skinless breasts 2 bay leaves 3 Tbsp dark brown sugar

Combine all ingredients except chicken, bay leaves, and brown sugar in a large bowl and mix well. If using a plastic Crock-Pot liner, place the chicken in the liner and pour the rest of the ingredients over top. If you are not using a liner, place the chicken in the ceramic Crock-Pot bowl and pour the rest of the ingredients over top. Add the bay leaves. Make sure they are submerged in the mixture. Place the lid on the Crock-Pot ceramic bowl or tie the top of the liner bag and place in the refrigerator overnight. Half an hour before placing in the Crock-Pot, remove the chicken dish from the refrigerator. After the half hour, place the Crock-Pot bowl or liner in the Crock-Pot and turn on high. For bone-in chicken breasts, cook on high for 4 hours. For boneless breasts, cook on high for 2½ hours. Cooking time may vary by slow cooker. Serve with juices.

Caregiver Tip 3: Plan ahead Here’s a delicious dessert that’s also easy to prepare. You can mix together and place the first five dry ingredients in a jar or airtight container and store in the pantry for quick assembly.

Molten Lava Cake

adapted from littlehouseliving.com

Caregiver Tip 2: Freeze for later Seniors tend to eat smaller portions. Rather than preparing a large meal for one or two people that will sit for a week in the refrigerator, assemble a meal and freeze it in smaller portions. This recipe for taco soup is quick and easy to prepare. The person you are caring for can remove a portion from the freezer, add water, turn on the Crock-Pot and in hours, have a homemade meal.

Taco Soup 1 lb lean ground beef, browned 1 Tbsp olive oil salt and black pepper to taste 1 medium yellow onion, chopped 1 15.5-oz can pinto beans 1 15.5-oz can kidney beans 2 15.5-oz cans black beans 1 15.5-oz can creamed corn In a medium size skillet, place the olive oil, ground beef, and chopped onion and add salt and black pepper. Cook until the ground beef is cooked all the way through and the onions have started to soften, about 10 minutes on medium heat. Stir occasionally.

2 10-oz cans tomatoes & green chilies 1 1.25-oz package of taco seasoning mix, such as McCormick brand 1 1-oz package ranch dressing mix To serve: 1 cup of water per frozen portion Frito Corn Chips or tortilla chips Sour cream

While the beef and onions are cooking, place the canned beans in a strainer and rinse thoroughly. Let drain. Place the creamed corn, tomatoes and chilies, taco and ranch seasonings in a large bowl and mix well. Add the drained beans and the cooked beef and onions

24 todaystransitionsnow.com | Fall 2014

in the same bowl and mix until everything is well incorporated. Separate into pint-size freezer bags. To prepare soup, remove a bag from the freezer, place the contents in the Crock-Pot, add 1-1½ cups of water, and cook on low for 2-3 hours. Serve topped with chips and sour cream.

½ + ½ c. sugar 1 c. white all purpose flour 3 + 3 Tbsp unsweetened cocoa powder 2 tsp baking powder ½ tsp salt ½ c. milk 2 Tbsp unsalted butter, melted & cooled ½ tsp vanilla 1 c. semi-sweet chocolate chips 1¾ cold water cooking spray or cooking oil In a large bowl mix together ½ c. of sugar, flour, 3 Tbsp cocoa powder, baking powder and salt. Whisk together. In a small bowl mix together the butter, milk, and vanilla. Add to the dry ingredients listed above. Spray the inside of your Crock-Pot with cooking spray or coat with cooking oil. Place the chocolate batter in the bottom of the Crock-Pot. Top with the semi-sweet chocolate chips. In another bowl mix together the other ½ c. of sugar, 3 Tbsp of cocoa powder and pour the hot water over top. Stir until the sugar is dissolved. Pour the sugar/cocoa/water mixture over top of everything in the Crock-Pot. Place the lid on top and bake in the Crock-Pot on high for two hours. Watch to make sure the sides do not burn. Spoon out of the Crock-Pot and serve warm with whipped cream or ice cream.


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BOOK CLUB: MAYOR'S BOOK CLUB

Catching Up Here's what other area clubs are reading next:

FOOD FOR THOUGHT My Antonia by Willa Cather Contact: Janet Raderer, 502.897.5986

Book club member Cynthia Robinson enjoys the discussion of Ann Patchett's State of Wonder during a meeting of the Mayor's Book Club, held at the Louisville Free Public Library.

The Whole World in a Book BY ASHLIE STEVENS / PHOTOS PATTI HARTOG

P

personal effects of a colleague who died there hotographs flashed across a projector under mysterious circumstances. screen. A dull-gray sloth, a lush rainforest, a “This is something that reads as if it is real, but I tribal woman in a sack dress and red face paint — found myself looking up photos of the people and each image flickered into the Centennial Room tribes Patchett mentions and realizing that they of the Louisville Public Library on York Street for are all made up,” Kelly Dunnagan, the facilitator about 10 seconds, transporting the members of of this month’s energetic meeting, the Mayor’s Book Club to the MAYOR'S BOOK CLUB says with a chuckle. She pushes edges of the Amazon, before WHEN: Third Wednesday of the month her auburn hair away from her slowly fading away. WHERE: Louisville Public Library eyes before continuing, “She A dozen men and women CONTACT: Kelly Dunnagan really has a great imagination.” sat in a scattered circle, each 502.574.1611 That blur between fact and leafing through a copy of State fiction (all with a healthy dose of of Wonder by Ann Patchett. It’s a exoticism) is one of the things that intrigued the story about a pharmaceutical company employee Mayor’s Book Club readers. Before the meeting, who journeys to Brazil to bring back information one woman had even Googled the ‘Lakashi tribe’ about drug research being conducted in the of Brazil, only to realize that Patchett named the jungle by a mysterious doctor. Even more fictitious group after her favorite breakfast cereal. important, she is charged with recovering the

JCC BOOK CLUB The Fault in Our Stars by John Green Contact: Slava Nelson, 502.459.0660

THE RANSDELL READERS The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt Contact: Maureen Kirk, 502.893.7988

< From the book “Never be so focused on what you're looking for that you overlook the thing you actually find.”

— Ann Patchett, State of Wonder

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Wise&Well

Tidbits, news, and tips to help you live your healthiest years yet BY ASHLIE STEVENS

Made for Walking When you want to exercise outside in the changing fall weather, it can be difficult to determine how to suit up so you’re not too hot or cold. Andy Fenton, operator at Fleet Feet Sports, 2239 Taylorsville Road, gives some tips on colderweather workout gear and how to find the perfect walking shoe. Fenton advises walkers and runners to implement the “20 degree rule” when getting dressed. After a few minutes of exercise, your heart rate increases and your body temperature rises; so, if it is 50 degrees outside, you should dress as if it is 70 degrees.

Your cold-weather exercise outfit should consist of a well-fitting base layer (a moisture-wicking T-shirt); a thin jacket; and then, depending on conditions, weather-wear such as a rain- and wind-resistant coat to top things off.

Fight Allergies Naturally

Myron Hardesty, the owner of Weeds of Eden, 7505 New LaGrange Road, is a clinical herbalist and physician’s assistant who is a proponent for natural measures in caring for fall allergies. Hardesty says allergies are exacerbated by a number of factors including the environment, pet dander, and food allergens. Then, according to Hardesty, “when fall plant-based allergens infiltrate the air, allergy sufferers are pushed over the threshold of what their body can handle, resulting in a full-blown attack.” For this reason, cutting out food-based allergens such as dairy, soy, and gluten can be especially helpful in ensuring you don’t reach your allergen threshold — and then spend your autumn sniffling and miserable.

Fall Flavors The time has come to fill your shopping cart with fresh fall flavors. According to registered dietitian Nancy Kuppersmith, as we age, women especially need extra doses of these nutrients: Bone- and musclestrengthening protein, calcium, vitamin D, and magnesium: These nutrients can be found, respectively, in seasonal game meats, dairy, fatty fish, and squash and pumpkin seeds. Fenton has one major tip for people looking to walk for exercise: “Invest in a shoe actually made for exercise, even if it is branded as a running shoe.” Here are three benefits in doing so: Breathability: A traditional walking shoe that is simply made for

wandering the office is often made of leather, which retains sweat, heat, and moisture. This can lead to foot discomfort and encourage bacterial and fungal infections. Ensure that you purchase a breathable running shoe to prevent these issues. Style: According to Fenton, “styles have shifted

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this year toward neutrals with pops of bright color.” Support: To make walking comfortable, a shoe that provides optimal support is necessary. By having your foot properly measured at a specialty running store, you can determine the best fit for your exercise goals.

Eye-maintaining antioxidants: Any colorful fall fruits and vegetables are a great source of antioxidants. Heart-healthy vitamins B6, B12, and folic acid: Fortified cereal is a source of both B6 and B12. Folic acid, known also for its application in the prevention of Alzheimer’s disease and several types of cancer, can be found in leafy greens, broccoli, and asparagus.


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Connie’s World Connie Meyer writes regularly for Today’s Transitions. You can reach Connie at ConnieL605@aol.com.

D N E I R F L IR

Y A W A T E G

G I

am getting ready for another trip with girlfriends. A girlfriend trip is no big deal for most. For me, my first trip away was a huge deal. I grew up as an only child, and I never spent a night away from home until I married. I did try to spend the night away once when I was five or six, but I cried and my mother came immediately. She never encouraged me to stay or to try again. During the transitional teen years, I always managed to find a reason not to attend slumber parties or accept overnight invitations from my girlfriends. I was teased in my extended family as a “mama’s baby.” That is what I was. I felt guilty for being weak and fearful. I now realize the fear came from my mother, not me. I don’t blame her. My dad worked nights, and I know my mother needed me home so she would not be alone. When I married, my mother cried. Not just at the wedding, and not just a little. It did not exactly make leaving easy. Even though my parents loved my husband, they loved me more. Such all-encompassing love fueled my guilt and made me feel like I had somehow let them down.

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Even after both my parents had been gone for a long time, the fear remained. Things that most people take for granted were hard for me. When my girlfriends first asked me to go on a trip with them for a week, I was terrified and thrilled at the same time. This was several years ago, and those teen years were long past. I was 57, but all the fear and insecurity returned with a vengeance. I’m surprised I didn’t break out in zits. Did they really want ME? Didn’t they know how afraid I was of going? I tried to hide it, but I was filled with fear and anxiety. What if I couldn’t sleep? What if I got sick? What if the sky should fall upon my head? Chicken Little was a mere amateur next to me when it came to finding things to worry about. I had not been on a trip in more than 30 years of marriage without my family. How would I survive a week away from home? My girlfriends made it easy. As soon as we were in the car, my anxiety started melting like an icicle on a warm winter day. I forgot to worry and started to relax. I was having such a good time I forgot to be afraid. My fear was replaced by fun, and I was having too much of it to worry about anything.

That is the gift of girlfriends. They accept you the way you are, and they love you anyway. They laugh at you and with you. They listen. They lift you up when you’re feeling down. They make you feel comforted and comfortable when you are together. They encourage you and applaud your accomplishments. This trip will be my seventh or eighth with these three wonderful girlfriends. I no longer worry. I am no longer afraid. I look forward to this time together as a time of renewal and pure joy. There is nothing like waking up every morning and having coffee with girlfriends as you plan the day ahead. There is nothing like walking along the beach together and playing tennis together and praying together. There is nothing like saying a “John-boy” good-night before bed. There is simply nothing like it. My family gets almost as excited as I do because they know how much these trips mean to me. When I hear women talk about how their husbands don’t like for them to travel without them, I feel lucky. My husband has gently encouraged me to do more, be more. He has always been proud of me. How many women have a loving, accepting husband with supportive girlfriends waiting in the wings? If you don’t have girlfriends, find some. If you have never been on a trip with your girlfriends, plan one. If your husband doesn’t want you to go, go anyway. It can be a life-changing experience. I know it was for me. Bon voyage! Connie's girls group, L-R: Bonnie Caldwell, Melanie Shane, Connie Meyer, and Karen Hougland.


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Updates & Happenings | news you can use + events not to miss |

BY GIOIA PATTON

Murder By Midnight > WhoDunnit Inc.

I Love Lucy Live on Stage > Broadway in Louisville

This production takes audience members back to 1952 as members of the Desilu Playhouse studio audience where they await the filming of two hilarious and oh-so-familiar I Love Lucy episodes. A charming host entertains and enlightens the crowd to the behind-the-scenes filming process of a brand new thing called “television,” while the Crystaltone Singers perform advertising jingles in perfect ‘50s style harmony and the sidesplitting antics of Lucy, Ricky, Fred, and Ethel are presented live on stage and in color for the first time! WHEN: Oct. 7-12, various performances WHERE: Kentucky Center TICKETS: starting @ $28. Discounts available for groups of 10+. CONTACT: kentuckycenter.org, 502.584.7777, or box office

The Game’s Afoot > Derby Dinner Playhouse It’s December 1936 and Broadway star William Gillette, admired for his leading role in the play Sherlock Holmes, has invited his fellow cast-members to his Connecticut castle for a weekend of revelry. But when one guest is stabbed to death, the festivities in this house of tricks and mirrors quickly turn dangerous. It’s up to Gillette himself to assume the persona of his beloved Holmes and track down the killer. WHEN: Oct. 7-Nov. 16, various performances WHERE: Derby Dinner Playhouse, Clarksville, Ind. TICKETS: $32-$45. Discounts available for groups of 20+. CONTACT: derbydinner.com or 812.288.8281

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In 1904, a young man awakens to find that his entire history is a fabrication, and he isn’t who he thought he was. He desperately needs to discover who reinvented his life and why. But the clock is ticking away… toward murder! Arthur Patrick Brophy plays WhoDunnit’s popular detective hero, Dr. Angus MacCrimmon, an insightful but cantankerous Scottish physician. WHEN: Saturday evenings from Oct. 11-Nov. 15 WHERE: Hilton Garden Inn-Airport TICKETS: $45.50 includes dinner, show, tax and

gratuity. Discounts available for groups of 6+. CONTACT: whodunnitky.com or 502.426.7100.

Advance reservations required.

Spreading It Around > Bunbury

Theatre Wealthy widow Angela Drayton is tired of handing out money to her unappreciative children, so she starts the “S.I.N. (Spending It Now) Foundation” to give to those truly in need. Naturally, this terrifies her greedy son and devilish daughter-in-law, driving them to devise a plan to have her committed. The play was written by Landos D’Arrigo, who has written jokes for such comedy icons as Phyllis Diller, Lily Tomlin, and Joan Rivers. WHEN: Oct. 10-26 various performances WHERE: The Henry Clay Building TICKETS: General admission-$21,

seniors (age 62+) $18 CONTACT: bunburytheatre.org or 502.585.5306


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KATHY COOKSIE NEAL, 58

Retired administrator for MSD and wife of Kentucky State Senator Gerald Neal Favorite travel destination:

A beautiful beach anywhere with family.

Best time to go: Thanksgiving. How the tradition began: “We started this after my dad died in 1992. We just decided we wanted to do something different, so we’ve been doing this since 1993. It’s worked out great.” Accommodations: For two decades, this group of 20 family and

a e k a T

! p i Tr IE BY MAR

BRADBY

“I haven’t been everywhere, but it’s on my list.”

D

— Susan Sontag

estination: vacation. Nothing gets us excited like a trip. Whether you are collecting seashells on a beach, sitting on a porch with lemonade in hand, or driving down the Sunset Strip, the urge to travel is part of our DNA: the yearning to move, to have new experiences, to unwind. Find out about three favorite travel spots for local women.

BERNADETTE HAMILTON, 66

Retired administrator for the Jefferson County Public Schools and wife of sculptor Ed Hamilton. Favorite travel destination: Oak Bluffs, a

summer resort on the island of Martha’s Vineyard, Mass., often accessed by a ferry or a flight on a puddle hopper airplane where luggage is stored in the wings. You’ll see gingerbread cottages, shops, beaches, cultural events, and dinner parties on the northeast shore.

Best time to go: “We go the last week of

August and stay for a week.”

Accommodations: Bernadette and Ed rent a

house with friends Bob and Laura Douglas.

What she does there: “We love to shop for food, we love to cook, we love to feed people. As soon as we get there, we go to 34 todaystransitionsnow.com | Fall 2014

friends have rented a house in a variety of locales from Virginia Beach; the Outer Banks of North Carolina; Gatlinburg, Tenn.; and now Orange Beach in Gulf Shores, Ala. “This year, we’ve got a 12-bedroom, 12-bath house in the Gulf Shores. Everybody needs their own space for a week.”

What she does there: “We walk on the beach, sit outside, swim in the ocean. You can venture out and do something else. You are not pressured to do anything. You can lay around all week if you wish. It’s a fun time with my nieces and nephews, and a couple of friends go too. It’s a time when we can all get away and no one has the sole responsibility of cooking or entertaining everyone. I make up a schedule and everyone knows they have to cook one meal.” Everyone else just goes and eats. “You don’t have to clean up or anything. That way you aren’t worn out. On Thanksgiving, you bring one item that you cook. Whereas if you have the dinner at your house, you have to cook and clean up everything.” Why this works: “It helps us as a family to reconnect. We have our mother — she’s 85 — we’re all with her for a week. We act like when we were kids almost. We play cards, play dominoes, trash talk. Things that you don’t have time to do because people are so busy now. This gives us a week to get back together again.”

the grocery and buy food and we spend the rest of the time hanging out, having cocktails, and visiting places on the island. We have special places to go where they have blueberry pancakes. They have even taught me how to eat oysters on the half shell.” Why this works: “What’s relaxing about it is you are so far away from Louisville ... (and) away from telephones.” Attire: “You don’t have to worry

about what you look like. Everyone’s in jeans. You have people walking around in flip flops and ugly hats. We have seen senators in shirts that have come right out of the dryer. We’ve seen Eleanor Holmes Norton (U.S.

Representative, District of Columbia) just walking around in shorts. She would never come up on ‘the hill’ like that.” For rentals, contact Martha’s Vineyard realtor Carleen Cordwell with Island Home Realty, 508.333.3078 or carleen.cordwell@martharealty.com. PAGE 52 >>


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2014 Medicare A and B with KY and IN Medicare and Medicaid Updates Medicare A covered services per benefit period 2014 Covered Services 2014

Benefit Period 2014

2014 Medicare Pays

2014 Patient Pays

Hospitalization

Acute 24-hour medical, rehab, nursing, multi-disciplinary care, medications, treatments and supplies for patients in a dual occupancy room unless doctor orders a private room due to medical necessity.

First 60 days................... Day 61 thru 90............... For each benefit period Day 91 thru 150............. Lifetime reserve days total 60 non-renewable Days 151 and after.........

All over $1184....................... All over $296.......................

$1184 $296

All over $592.......................

$592

Zero.......................................

All costs

Skilled Nursing & Rehab

First 20 days

100% approved costs

Zero

Days 21 thru 100

All over $148

$148

Days 101 and after

Zero

All costs

Services necessary for home care and skilled services to benefit the patient per his/her doctor

100% approved amount*

Zero

80% approved amount*

20% approved amount*

As long as doctor sees a need for continued terminal care

All with cost limits on inpatient respite care and outpatient meds

Limited cost sharing for outpatient drugs and inpatient respite care

Patient must have prior 3-day hospital stay within 30 days to be eligible for 24-hour skilled nursing care per doctor's order.

Home Health Care

Medically necessary skilled home care post hospital stay. (Need IVs, rehab, nursing)

Hospice Services

Doctor-prescribed pain control and support for terminal care.

Medicare Part B: Medical services per benefit period. Fiscal amounts are new 2014 rate changes Covered Services 2014

Benefit Period 2014

2014 Medicare Pays

2014 Patient Pays

• Physician, surgeon fees • Diagnostic-related tests • Medical supplies • Ambulance services • Physical, speech, occupational therapists

Per medical necessity

80% approved amount over deductible paid

$162 deductible plus 20% of Medicare-approved charges plus any costs over approved charges

Outpatient hospital services

Per medical necessity

80% approved amount after $147 deductible

20% approved amount after $147 deductible

Home health care

Per medical necessity

All costs

Zero

Immunosuppressive drugs

Per medical necessity

1 yr. immunosuppressive therapy post transplant

20% of cost

Blood services

As needed

80% of cost after 3 pints

First 3 pints plus 20% cost

Kentucky Medicaid = KY

2014 Medicaid Allowables

Indiana Medicaid = IN

Service

Individual KY / IN

Married Couple KY & IN (same)

Home health care......................................... Cash resources ............................................ May maintain health insurance.................... Personal maintenance allowance*............... May keep prepaid burial contract.................

Yes............................................................... Up to $2,000 / up to $1,500........................ Yes............................................................... $40 month / $52 month............................... Yes...............................................................

Yes................................................................ Up to $115,920............................................ Yes................................................................ $1,939-$2,898 monthly................................ Yes................................................................

• Some Medicare services not covered by Part A and Part B include: Long-term custodial care, routine dental care, dentures, cosmetic surgery, acupuncture, hearing aids. • Medicare Part D is the Medicare Prescription Drug Coverage plan. 36 todaystransitionsnow.com | Fall 2014

*Call 1-800-MEDICARE (633-4227) for information or visit medicare.gov/coverage


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The Directories Are Now Online! Click on this page to access directory listings.

DIRECTORIES Adult Day Care Aging-in-Place Communities Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Care Assisted Living Home Health Nursing/Rehab Personal Care Retirement Communities

Larger color Enhanced listings are paid for by the facility. Those interested in Enhanced listings can call (502) 327-8855. Some facilities/services are not listed because information was not provided at printing time. If you feel your facility or service should be listed in the next directory, email directories@todaystransitions.com, or call (502) 327-8855.

38 todaystransitionsnow.com | Fall 2014


Click on the Directory names below to access the online directory listings.

Adult Day Care Directory Day program for adults who need to be monitored for safety reasons and/or need nursing care, treatments, incontinence care, and other health services. There are medical Adult Day Care facilities which must be licensed. Adult Day Care facilities that are social cannot provide nursing care. Some offer pickup and delivery services within a radius.

Aging-in-Place Communities Directory An Aging-in-Place community offers several levels of care on one campus. A resident could move into a retirement facility or assisted living facility, then utilize higher levels of nursing care when needed through personal care or nursing/rehab care. A residentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s room might change, but not his or her address.

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Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Aging-in-Place Communities Directory An Aging-in-Place community offers several levels of care on one campus. A resident could move into a retirement facility or assisted living facility, then utilize higher levels of nursing care when needed through personal care or nursing/rehab care. A resident’s room might change, but not his or her address.

Scent Sense You might need to pay more attention to your scent. Researchers in Japan discovered that the oxidation of sebaceous glands in mature skin causes aging odor which can start at age 40. But Mirai Clinical has developed a line of products aimed at eliminating old age smell using a combination of Persimmon tannin and Green Tea. While I think — or at least hope I don’t have old age smell yet — I figured it couldn’t hurt to put their products to the test.

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The Mirai Clinical Purifying Body Wash made my skin feel smooth and had a light fragrance that didn’t clash with my perfume. If you prefer not to use body wash, their Deodorizing & Purifying Body Bar works equally as well and can be used all over your body unlike conventional soaps. The final result was fabulous: after each use, I felt fresh and squeaky clean. Go to miraiclinical.com to find out more details and purchase their products. — Tiffany White

Eliminate the “old age” smell with products including Persimmon tanni and Green Tea.


Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Care Directory Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s care is provided at different levels, from assisted living to the skilled care of nursing/rehab. Some facilities accept Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s patients into their general care, and others have separate units designed to meet the specific needs of patients with this disease.

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Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Care Directory Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s care is provided at different levels, from assisted living to the skilled care of nursing/rehab. Some facilities accept Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s patients into their general care, and others have separate units designed to meet the specific needs of patients with this disease.

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Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Alzheimer’s Care Directory Alzheimer’s care is provided at different levels, from assisted living to the skilled care of nursing/rehab. Some facilities accept Alzheimer’s patients into their general care, and others have separate units designed to meet the specific needs of patients with this disease.

Caregive r winner T O D AY ’ S T R A N S I T I O N S

Meet our “Care Package for the Caregiver” contest winner! LaTasha Johnson is the winner of our quarterly Care Package for the Caregiver Award, which includes two tickets to Derby Dinner Playhouse, four hours of sitter service from Home Instead Senior Care, and a $25 gift card to A Taste of Kentucky.

< LaTasha Johnson PHOTO MELISSA DONALD

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Why She Won: LaTasha has devoted nearly her whole life to caring for others. She is the primary caregiver for her 72-year-old dad and works full time taking care of the elderly. “I’ve been taking care of my dad, William Montgomery, who suffers from multiple myeloma, for the past three years,” she says. “It’s a blessing to me. Ever since I was a little girl, I was the one always wanting to take care of everyone else. I think it’s a job God gave me, and He won’t let me do anything else.” LaTasha, who also has five grandchildren, says she always puts others first. “I take care of my grandbabies after taking care of everyone else. Even if I have plans, I’ll drop them and do something for someone else.” As a CNA for Almost Family, caregiving is second nature for LaTasha and something she says gives her immense satisfaction. “God gave me a gift, and taking care of people is special to my heart.” — Alissa Hicks


Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Assisted Living Directory Assisted living offers minimal assistance in care, such as providing meals, helping with baths, and offering reminders to take medications. While some residents drive, scheduled transportation may be provided. Daily activities are organized, and there is around-the-clock supervision. No health care is provided, and these facilities are not licensed, but certification is required.

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Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Assisted Living Directory Assisted living offers minimal assistance in care, such as providing meals, helping with baths, and offering reminders to take medications. While some residents drive, scheduled transportation may be provided. Daily activities are organized, and there is around-the-clock supervision. No health care is provided, and these facilities are not licensed, but certification is required.

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Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Home Health Directory Home Health Care refers to care provided in a person’s home. Medical Home Health Care is a licensed level of care that provides nursing care and personal care. (These agencies also provide non-medical care.) Non-medical Home Health Care agencies in Kentucky must be certified. Agencies in Indiana must be licensed. They can assist with the self-administration of medications or treatments, provide limited personal care, serve as companions who prepare light meals and tidy homes, and may offer transportation or errand services.

TakeaTrip! DEBORAH AUBESPIN, 68

Retired special education teacher, now a part-time teacher, and wife of Mervin Aubespin, retired Courier-Journal associate editor. Favorite Travel Destination: Los Angeles, Calif., that mecca of beach,

mountain, desert, entertainment, fashion, celebrities, museums, traffic, palm-treed streets, tony restaurants, food trucks, and perpetual summer.

Best time to go: She spends two to three

weeks in June.

Accommodations: “We stay with my daughter

Sarah. She lives in Silver Lake, a hipster neighborhood,” Deborah says. Sarah is a production coordinator for the Sundance channel series, Rectify. Deborah also likes to stay at La Quinta Resort, a spa in the Santa Rosa Mountains near Palm Springs where they go to relax for a few days. “This is an old place where Clark Gable, Gene Autry, Carol Lombard, and other actors would go in the 1930s.”

What she does there: “We always go to the Playboy Jazz Festival at the Hollywood Bowl. We pack a lunch with wine and 52 todaystransitionsnow.com | Fall 2014

continued from page 34

champagne. Sarah will order dinner baskets. Then we eat there and hang out and listen to the jazz. “If Sarah is working, we hang out, drive all over, go to museums. The last time I was there, I went to the Getty Center. It’s a wonderful place,” says Deb, who saw an exhibit of works by photographer Herb Ritts, who photographed actors, models, and the intelligentsia for 25 years. “The Getty Center is very modern and overlooks the Hollywood Hills. You drive up and take a tram to the museum. It’s just glorious. You look out over LA. “We hike to the ‘Hollywood’ sign and through Runyon Canyon. You can hike and run around Mandeville Canyon. The canyons are beautiful in LA. Somehow I become like an LA girl. I do more physical stuff out there. It’s just so accessible, and you don’t have to go far. I go to the beach because Mervin is a beach person.” Why this works: “I love LA. I love the weather, the desert. I’m happy there. My daughter’s there. I’m from San Francisco, so LA is like a second home. Louisville is my first home. I came to Louisville in my 40s. So my whole frame of work, my value system and outlook on life is Californian.”


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Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Home Health Directory Home Health Care refers to care provided in a personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home. Medical Home Health Care is a licensed level of care that provides nursing care and personal care. (These agencies also provide non-medical care.) Non-medical Home Health Care agencies in Kentucky must be certified. Agencies in Indiana must be licensed. They can assist with the self-administration of medications or treatments, provide limited personal care, serve as companions who prepare light meals and tidy homes, and may offer transportation or errand services.

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Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Home Health Directory Home Health Care refers to care provided in a personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home. Medical Home Health Care is a licensed level of care that provides nursing care and personal care. (These agencies also provide non-medical care.) Non-medical Home Health Care agencies in Kentucky must be certified. Agencies in Indiana must be licensed. They can assist with the self-administration of medications or treatments, provide limited personal care, serve as companions who prepare light meals and tidy homes, and may offer transportation or errand services.

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Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Home Health Directory Home Health Care refers to care provided in a person’s home. Medical Home Health Care is a licensed level of care that provides nursing care and personal care. (These agencies also provide non-medical care.) Non-medical Home Health Care agencies in Kentucky must be certified. Agencies in Indiana must be licensed. They can assist with the self-administration of medications or treatments, provide limited personal care, serve as companions who prepare light meals and tidy homes, and may offer transportation or errand services.

Chew on This Healthcare facilities such as Floyd Memorial Hospital are making the dining experience more enjoyable for patients while they’re recuperating. Check out executive chef Debbie Richter’s healthier version of chicken and dumplings online @

TodaysTransitionsNow.com.

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PHOTO MELISSA DONALD


Fall 2014 | todaystransitionsnow.com

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Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Nursing/Rehab Directory Nursing homes are facilities that provide beds for around-the-clock intermediate, skilled, and/or rehabilitative care.

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Fall 2014 | todaystransitionsnow.com

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Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Nursing/Rehab Directory Nursing homes are facilities that provide beds for around-the-clock intermediate, skilled, and/or rehabilitative care.

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Fall 2014 | todaystransitionsnow.com

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Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Nursing/Rehab Directory Nursing homes are facilities that provide beds for around-the-clock intermediate, skilled, and/or rehabilitative care.

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Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Nursing/Rehab Directory Nursing homes are facilities that provide beds for around-the-clock intermediate, skilled, and/or rehabilitative care.

Fall 2014 | todaystransitionsnow.com

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Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Nursing/Rehab Directory Nursing homes are facilities that provide beds for around-the-clock intermediate, skilled, and/or rehabilitative care.

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Fall 2014 | todaystransitionsnow.com

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Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Personal Care Directory Personal Care offers residents minimal assistance for bathing, grooming, toileting, and dressing. The resident must be able to move around (even if in a wheelchair or scooter). Some health care is provided and medications are given. These facilities are licensed.

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Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Personal Care Directory Personal Care offers residents minimal assistance for bathing, grooming, toileting, and dressing. The resident must be able to move around (even if in a wheelchair or scooter). Some health care is provided and medications are given. These facilities are licensed.

Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Retirement Communities Directory Retirement communities are for those who are totally independent. Special services are provided, such as meals in a central dining area. Most people drive, but some transportation is usually offered. These communities offer no health care services and are not required to be licensed or certified.

Fall 2014 | todaystransitionsnow.com

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Click on the Directory name below to access the online directory listings.

Retirement Communities Directory Retirement communities are for those who are totally independent. Special services are provided, such as meals in a central dining area. Most people drive, but some transportation is usually offered. These communities offer no health care services and are not required to be licensed or certified.

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Helpful Resources FREE HOUSING ADVOCATE

Senior Home Transitions After hospitalization and/or rehab, what’s next for your loved one? Having personally gone through the process of placing a loved one after rehab, I know how confusing the options can be. Particularly if you only have a short time to find that new home! I have personally visited each community and will help you find the perfect new home based on your financial situation and personal needs. I can also help connect you with resources to help financially.

All at NO COST to you! Patti Naiser SeniorHomeTransitions.com 502.396.9228

SENIOR CARE CONSULTING

All About Care 4 Seniors 502.244.CARE (244.2273)

allaboutcare4seniors.com Linda Hitt Kempf, RN, LNHA Geriatric Care Manager Worried About Mom & Dad?

INSURANCE

Robin Brown, 21 years with State Farm,

says she likes to help people plan a good life:“We help people protect the things they can least afford to lose: their home, their car, their income when they’re sick or hurt, and their earning capability. The unexpected happens often in life. I want my clients to be prepared for it. We’re also here to help clients assemble and preserve wealth in the most tax efficient ways possible. We educate clients to help them take care of the people who are special to them and to plan for retirement.” Let Robin help you plan for your dreams and manage risk to protect what is yours now and in the future.

Robin Brown, CLU, ChFC, CASL Agent State Farm 4209 Shelbyville Rd, Louisville, KY 40207 502.897.6476 • robinbrowninsurance.com

SENIOR MOVING SERVICES

Staging Your Next Move DOWNSIZING MOVING ESTATE CLEAN-OUT

Our team helps eliminate hassle and stress. • Home staging for faster sale • De-cluttering, sorting and organizing • Unpacking and arranging of new space

”LET ME HELP YOU DO THIS RIGHT... SO YOU NEVER HAVE TO DO IT OVER.“ -LK

We help with ALL your moving tasks.

Since 1984 *Reputation For Excellence

Lynn Medeiros 502.523.8889 LynnM@StagingYourNextMove.com

2013 Winner of the Top BBB Ten-Year Award for Excellence & Zero Complaints Author... Caring for Aging Loved Ones Today’s Transitions Magazine

10% Savings With This Ad

Kathi Jaggers 502.773.3824 KathiJ@StagingYourNextMove.com StagingYourNextMove.com

LAW

Timmel Law LLC – KY & IN lic. ELDER PLANNING WORKSHOPS & CONSULTATIONS NO CHARGE MEDICAID & VA BENEFIT Helping individuals and their families including those with elder or special needs issues identify, evaluate and plan for long term care, estate and life care options. Call or email to join us for a workshop where you can learn about Estate Planning and protecting your loved ones’ assets.

Timmel Law, LLC 812.590.2771 aa@timmellaw.com timmellaw.com

TRANSPORTATION

Able Care, Inc. Providing non-emergency, ambulatory and wheelchair accessible transportation in Louisville, Kentucky since 2001; the door through door service is available for physician appointments, medical procedures, therapy, dialysis, radiation, and chemotherapy; as well as social functions and daily errands. Evenings and weekends with advance notice. Caregivers or family members are welcome to ride at no additional charge. Pre-paid voucher packages are available. Payment is requested at the time of service. BBB Accredited Business.

P. O. Box 99381 Louisville, Kentucky 40269-0381 502.267.1911 • FAX: 502.267.3004 ablecareinc.com

If you would like to advertise in the Helpful Resources Directory, call 502.327.8855 or email advertising@todayspublications.com. – THIS IS AN ADVERTISEMENT – Fall 2014 | todaystransitionsnow.com

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Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Your Style

WRITTEN & STYLED BY ALISSA HICKS / PHOTO MELISSA DONALD

ADD JUST ENOUGH Use accessories to make your outfit shine

B

arbara was a vision in black, and since this sleek and sophisticated Stylist Alissa Hicks ensemble was more on the minimal side, I played up this outfit with bold accessories. The jacket left room for a fun necklace, so I chose this large gold piece to accentuate Barbaraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s neckline and give the outfit some flare. I also chose simple drop earrings that tied the black and the gold in nicely. Normally, I would use just one statement piece, but with such a simple outfit, a gold chunky bracelet gave the look what it needed. We also loved this Diane Von Furstenberg clutch, which was pretty and a tad edgy with its snakeskin pattern.

MODEL: Barbara Gillaspie Barbara is wearing: Bali jacket, $109; Shell, $49; Bali pants, $89; all from The Willow Tree, 502.423.9822 // Necklace, Olivia & Co. 502.426.4046, $59; Bracelet, Rodeo Drive 502.425.8999, $75; Earrings, Rodeo Drive, $52; Clutch by Diane Von Furstenberg, Rodeo Drive, $268

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Today's Transitions Fall 2014  

Your source for later living

Today's Transitions Fall 2014  

Your source for later living