Page 1

SPECIAL TOPIC

EDUCATORS LEAD THE WAY ON ESSA Weigh in on Oregon’s State Plan for the Every Student Succeeds Act

Special Section

A PUBLICATION FOR MEMBERS OF THE OREGON EDUCATION ASSOCIATION

TODAY’S

Candidates, bylaws & policies

OEA

page 34

SPRING 2017 VOLUME 91 : NUMBER 3

&CARED FOR

COVERED

OREGON EDUCATORS RALLY BEHIND LEGISLATION TO COVER ALL KIDS WITH HEALTH INSURANCE


You can help the OEA Foundation earn donations just by shopping with your Fred Meyer Rewards Card!

Fred Meyer is donating $2.5 million per year to non-profits in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon and Washington, based on where their customers tell them to give. Here’s how the program works: • Sign up for the Community Rewards program by linking your Fred Meyer Rewards Card to the OEA Foundation at www.fredmeyer.com/ communityrewards. You can search for us by our name or by our non-profit number 85681. • Then, every time you shop and use your Rewards Card, you are helping the OEA Foundation provide children with clothing, shoes, and other basic needs! • You still earn your Rewards Points, Fuel Points, and Rebates, just as you do today. • If you do not have a Rewards Card, they are available at the Customer Service desk of any Fred Meyer store. • For more information, please visit www.fredmeyer.com/ communityrewards.

OEA FOUNDATION


CONTENTS / Spring2017 VOLUME 91 . ISSUE NO. 3

Features

Departments President’s Column

05 / Take part in #OEAMayDAY

By Hanna Vaandering, OEA President

Upcoming

06 / Events for OEA Members Newsflash

26 On the Cover

26 / Covered & Cared For

Oregon educators rally behind new legislation to cover all kids with health insurance, regardless of immigration status By Meg Krugel

Perspective

16 / lessons from cuba

Eugene teachers attend an educational conference in Havana By Pete Mandrapa

Profile

22 / processing through Art

22

07 / members Demand ICE Release of Reynolds Educator 09 / LGBT Educator Survey » ESSA Update

10 / reimagining education after the NCLB era Licensure

12 / New Licensure Kit Unveiled » Politics & You

14 / As Cuts Loom, Educators Fear Larger Class Sizes 15 / Transgender Bathroom Protections Sources + Resources

32 / Books and Opportunities Special Section

34 / candidates, Bylaws and policies

Faced with a new political climate, Hood River Teacher Amirra Malak takes her students on a journey of self reflection By Julia Sanders

ON THE COVER: Alma Vela teaches first grade at Washington Elementary School in Woodburn. PhotO by THOMAS Patterson Above: Kennedy Leavitt is a student in Amirra Malak's art class at Hood River Valley High School. PhotO by THOMAS Patterson TODAY’S OEA | SPRING 2017

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PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE / Spring2017 Hanna Vaandering OEA President

Joined by fellow educators, OEA President Hanna Vaandering meets with members of the press during OEA's second Legislative Training Day, March 27.

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or the past five years we have made a huge investment in our future through the Strategic Action Plan. We set out to grow our capacity and engage and empower our members. I believe our investment is paying off now and will continue to pay off well into the future. Getting involved is key. Every member doing a little something is the answer. That being said, we have an OPPORTUNITY for you. May 1, 2017 will be a Day of Action — #OEAMayDay! There are endless options for you to make this a day to remember, a day we move toward the schools our students deserve. Here are just a few ways you can show your support for our students and public: wear Red for Public Ed on May 1, sign our pledge at oregoned.org/ OEAMayDay, post your educator story on social media, work with your school board to pass a safe and welcoming school resolution, join a walk-in, and talk to community members about our public schools. Let’s make this a great day for our students and public education and show the legislature just how motivated we are to build the schools our students deserve. For more information, go to oregoned.org/OEAMayDay or contact your local president. OEA RA is right around the corner. I look forward to seeing many of you at the Red Lion for the largest democratic deliberative body in the state of Oregon. We will be discussing many issues that will

impact our union and our students for years to come, but most of all, we will be taking action. Please be prepared to have your voice heard and continue to build our union Legislative session is in full swing and there is no shortage of education bills to keep our members and staff busy. We are advocating for the professional discretion that we as educators need to differentiate our instruction to meet the needs of each of the over 500,000 students we serve in our public schools. I have had the privilege of testifying on many issues and am proud to represent 44,000 of the most thoughtful, caring Oregonians. Thank you to all of the members who joined us for our two lobby days this year; your voice makes a difference. For those of you who were unable to join us, I encourage you to go to a local town hall or set up appointments with your legislators. It is far too easy for legislators to ignore the great need in our schools when those who are living the reality are not the voices being heard. We are happy to help you set up appointments or provide support in any way possible. Thank you for all you do every day to help us reach our vision of “improving the lives of all Oregonians through quality public education.” Hanna

A FEW WAYS YOU CAN SHOW YOUR SUPPORT FOR OUR STUDENTS AND PUBLIC: WEAR RED FOR PUBLIC ED ON MAY 1, SIGN OUR PLEDGE AT OREGONED.ORG/OEAMAYDAY, POST ON SOCIAL MEDIA, WORK WITH YOUR SCHOOL BOARD TO PASS A SAFE AND WELCOMING SCHOOL RESOLUTION, JOIN A WALK-IN, AND TALK TO COMMUNITY MEMBERS ABOUT OUR PUBLIC SCHOOLS. Credits: Charles Lapham

TODAY’S OEA | SPRING 2017

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UPCOMING Spring2017

TODAY’S

OEA

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE OREGON EDUCATION ASSOCIATION April 21-22, 2017

OEA Representative Assembly

SPRING 2017 VOLUME 91 : ISSUE NO. 3

n What: OEA member-delegates gather to elect new leaders, reform bylaws and policies, pro-

pose new business items, attend caucus meetings, and celebrate member achievements. n WHERE: Red Lion Hotel on the River—Jantzen Beach, Portland, Ore. n HOW: Go to: www.oregoned.org/action-center/events/representative-assembly. May 1, 2017

May Day: OEA's Statewide Day of Action n WHAT: Join OEA as part of a national day of action for standing up for the schools our

students deserve. Pledge to protect and defend all students, no matter their ethnicity, gender identity, and/or immigration status. n How: Go to www.oregoned.org/OEAMayDay for complete details. May 7-13, 2017

National Teacher Appreciation Week n WHAT: On National Teacher Day, thousands of communities take time to honor their local

educators and acknowledge the crucial role teachers play in making sure every student receives a quality education. n HOW: For more information, go to www.nea.org/teacherday. SAVE THIS DATE! June 30 – July 5, 2017

NEA Annual Meeting and Representative Assembly n WHAT: NEA-Representative Assembly delegates will gather from around the country to elect

leaders, review bylaws and policies and set the direction for the NEA in the coming year. n WHERE: Boston, Mass. n HOW: Go to www.nea.org/grants/1357.htm. SAVE THE DATE! August 1-3, 2017

OEA Summer Leadership Conference n WHAT: OEA is committed to helping you build the skills necessary to return to your local and

engage and empower your communities to take action. Our collective knowledge and expertise, our vision, and our passion give us strength beyond what any of us could do alone. OEA's annual Summer Leadership Conference will be filled with deep learning and lots of fun. n WHERE: Riverhouse Hotel & Conference Center, Bend, Ore. n HOW: Register at: www.oregoned.org/summerconference.

OFFICE HEADQUARTERS 6900 SW Atlanta Street Portland, OR 97223 Phone: 503.684.3300 FAX: 503.684.8063 www.oregoned.org PUBLISHERS Johanna Vaandering, President Jim Fotter, Executive Director EDITOR Meg Krugel PRODUCTION ASSISTANT Milana Grant CONTRIBUTORS Milana Grant, Andrea Shunk, Teresa Ferrer, Charles Lapham, Thomas Patterson To submit a story idea for publication in Today’s OEA magazine, email editor Meg Krugel at meg.krugel@oregoned.org PRINTER Morel Ink, Portland, OR TODAY’S OEA (ISSN #0030-4689) is published four times a year (October, February, April and June) as a benefit of membership ($6.50 of dues) by the Oregon Education Association, 6900 SW Atlanta Street, Portland OR 97223-2513. Non-member subscription rate is $10 per year. Periodicals postage paid at Portland, OR. POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: Oregon Education Association Attn: Sheila Mangan Membership Processing 6900 SW Atlanta Street Portland, OR 97223-2513

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TODAY’S OEA | SPRING 2017

DESIGN AND PRODUCTION Francesca Genovese-Finch


Newsflash OEA Members Demand ICE Release of Reynolds Educator

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rancisco Rodriguez Dominguez has lived in the Portland Metro area since age five; in 2013, he was registered as a participant of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), a program put in place during the Obama administration that allows children brought unlawfully into this country to apply for biannually renewable deferred deportation and work permits. Now an adult, Rodriguez Dominguez has become an active member of the community he has called home for the past 20 years. He works for a food pantry program administered by the Latino Network, a nonprofit organization that provides resources to Latino families in the Portland area. He also works for the Reynolds School District as an assistant at Glenfair Elementary School, his childhood school. He coaches soccer for youth sports and is an avid volunteer at his church. Early in the morning on March 26, Rodriguez Dominguez was detained without a warrant by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents at his home. The agents began pounding at the door, waking the family. His sister heard them through the door, and believing that they were police officers, went to get her brother. When Rodriguez Dominguez went to speak to agents outside, he was swiftly handcuffed and taken away, without an opportunity to let his family know what was happening. During OEA’s March 27 lobby day, OEA members made calls demanding Dominguez’ release, joining the efforts of the ACLU of Oregon, Causa, other community groups in the Portland area. On that day, March 27, Dominguez was returned to his home. His case will be presented before a federal immigration judge who will decide if he will be deported to Mexico. Credits: Meg Krugel

Chemeketa Community College advisor Enrique Farrera meets with a student in academic advising.

Chemeketa emerges as Oregon's most racially diverse community college

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he institution’s commitment to providing the resources that first-year and minority students need to succeed in higher education is evident in the student population at Chemeketa Community College. Of the 30,000 students currently enrolled, 50 percent identify with one or more minority groups. Chemeketa’s wide variety of over 100 scholarships and specialized student assistance programs have made important strides toward equity in post-secondary education. One of the unique ways that Chemeketa has been able to help minority students specifically is the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP). A federally funded program, CAMP allows students with one or more parents who have been employed as a seasonal farmworker in the past two years to apply for monetary aid, as well as supplemental services aimed toward facilitating their success in academics and beyond. Based on an assessment completed by the Oregon Childhood Development Coalition, nearly 11,000 migrant and seasonal farmworkers were employed in Marion and Polk counties in 2012. Money is the most obvious prohibitor to many students coming from migrant families, (though community college tuition is far less expensive than at four-year colleges) — but the cost is often only part of the issue. “Especially for schools serving large minority populations, many of these students’ parents didn’t go to college themselves, so they have no understanding of how to plan for it, or pay for it,” says Chemeketa’s Public Information Officer, Greg Harris. Having the added support of culturally competent academic advising, tutoring and career counseling allows these students to make more informed decisions about their future. TODAY’S OEA | SPRING 2017

7


Newsflash DID YOU KNOW? » Today’s OEA’s best story ideas come from you, our readers! Is your school working on a cutting edge concept, or do you know an educator who should be featured? Email your suggestions for articles to webadmin@oregoned.org.

Thousands of Oregon high school students get the opportunity to learn about skilled trades

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he choice between taking on a massive student loan debt or taking a low-paying job that will keep one in poverty is a decision that many high school students struggle with upon graduation. The annual NW Youth Career Expo aims to give these students more options to think about. In its 13th year, the expo is an event hosted by the Portland Workforce Alliance (PWA). The organization is focused on creating relationships between local businesses and students by providing internships, career days, and their flagship event, the NW Youth Career Expo. Over 6,000 students and 170 different exhibitors were in attendance on March 14, 2017. Seventy high schools were present at this year’s event, with students traveling from as far as Hermiston to participate.

Nominate Oregon's 2018 Teacher of the Year

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he Oregon Teacher of the Year award honors the hard work that educators put in for their students. The recipient of this award will receive a $5,000 cash prize, and a matching gift of $5,000 to their home school. They are also eligible to apply for the National Teacher of the Year award, and are asked to present at public educational events, both locally and nationally. Two runners-up are also selected, receiving cash prizes of $2,000 respectively. Nominations will be accepted until May 12, 2017. To find out more information about the award, or to submit a nomination, visit www.oregonteacheroftheyear.org.

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TODAY’S OEA | SPRING 2017

The career expo helps youth build applicable work skills in trades like construction.

Throughout the day, students learn about many different career paths that require little to no additional schooling, but that can provide them with above-minimum wages and opportunities for upward mobility. They can also participate in mock interviews at the event, which can help them to make a lasting impression; at least 10 students were hired at one Portland-based business because of the

potential they presented at last year’s event. With a growing gap in the number of young people entering skilled trades, PWA realizes how important it is to appeal to new generations of the workforce. “I think an event like this is a recognition that there are skilled jobs that require training and experience that you can only get in the trades,” says JR Gustafson, a representative of PWA.

> ACTION

ODE receives approval for proposed teacher shortage areas for 2017-18 school year

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he U.S. Department of Education has accepted Oregon’s proposal for designated teacher shortage areas, both for subject and geographical areas. Qualified educators may be eligible for loan forgiveness for current federal student loans by applying to teach in the following subjects and locations: Subjects: n Bilingual/English Language Learner n Mathematics n School Nurse n Science

n Spanish n Special

Education

Locations (for any subject): n Gilliam County n Grant County n Lake County n Sherman Count To qualify for loan forgiveness, teachers must work five consecutive years in any of the designated subjects or locations. Please visit the Federal Student Aid website, www.studentaid.ed.gov, for more information.


Newsflash WILL YOU BE THERE? » Take advantage of OEA's upcoming Summer Conference on Aug. 1-3, 2017! This event is a benefit of membership, and provides in-depth training on both professional and union advocacy issues. You won't want to miss it! www.oregoned.org/SummerConference

Oregon Superintendent wins National Superintendent of the Year award

A LGBT Educator Survey

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re you an educator who identifies as lesbian, gay, bisexual, and/or transgender (LGBT)? Would you like to help improve school environments for all educators and students? If you answered “yes” to both questions, please consider participating in a study conducted by Drs. Tiffany Wright, EdD and Nancy Smith, PhD at Millersville University of Pennsylvania. The two professors, also LGBT educators, are collecting national data regarding the perception of current school climates for LGBT educators in hopes that it may bring a higher level of awareness to the entire field of education. Their goal is to provide recommendations based on their findings that will lead to safer school environments for all educators and students. The survey is completely anonymous and only asks for an email address if you would like to receive the results of the study. To learn more about the project, or to request a link to the survey, email Dr. Wright at tiffany.wright@millersville. edu. The survey will close June 1, 2017. Credits: Left; Madison College; Right: Clackamas ESD

fter being named the Oregon Superintendent of the Year last fall, Matt Utterback of North Clackamas School District was tapped for a second time to receive the national award. Utterback has been a champion for underserved students in his community: overall graduation rates have made big gains since his appointment in 2011, but his real accomplishment has been the rate of academic growth seen in African American and Latino students and students with disabilities. In 2015, 89 percent of students in North Clackamas identifying as African American/Black had graduated, the highest number in the state of Oregon. The district has also seen remarkable growth in graduating Latino students and students with disabilities, increasing by 23 and 24 percents, respectively. From the start of his career in education as a teacher in the late 80s, Superintendent Utterback has been dedicated to fostering equity in the classroom. During his second year as a teacher, he co-created a new instructional model designed to engage the most underserved students at his school.

Since then, he has been a leader in the conversation about educational equity by presenting at numerous conferences across the state and sharing his thoughts via the Oregon Leadership Network. In his blog post "Five Leadership Principles That Make a Profound Impact on Students," Utterback demonstrates his commitment intersectional student success: I am proud of our school board and proud to be the superintendent of a school district that is not only talking about equity but is bringing equitable practices into our operations, our classrooms, our resource allocations, and the lives of our students…We have an equity policy because like all school districts, student success in North Clackamas is currently predetermined by race, gender, ethnicity, culture, poverty, language, and disability. We cannot accept this, and that is why we commit to continuous improvement, knowing that our work is never done.

Rainier teacher goes above and beyond the required curriculum

“K

ids want to know,” says Andrew Demko, history teacher at Rainier Jr./Sr. High School, “they may not want you to know that they’re interested, but they are.” Demko’s creative teaching methods have earned national recognition; in 2016 he received the National Council for Social Studies’ Teacher of the Year award in the middle school category. Students in his class learning about ancient history might find their lesson being taught by a Roman soldier one day, and the next their classroom could be transformed into a public debate about the pros and cons of the electoral college. Though they never know what to expect when they enter his class, they know it won’t be an ordinary lecture. Demko’s passion for history has spread through the school in the form of the Rainier Chapter of the National History Club, for which he is the faculty sponsor. The club has received national recognition for service projects they have completed in their community, most notably a partnership with the Vietnam Veteran’s Memorial Fund which allowed students to interview and share the stories of local Vietnam veterans. TODAY’S OEA | SPRING 2017

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ESSA

EDUCATOR VOICE A VITAL PART OF OREGON'S NEW STATE ESSA PLAN BY ANDREA SHUNK / Policy & Practice Strategist, OEA Center for Great Public Schools

O

n Thursday, March 23, the Oregon State Board of Education reviewed Oregon’s Consolidated State Plan under the Every Student Succeeds Act. The board will vote on whether or not to approve the plan at their April 27 meeting. The Oregon consolidated plan lays out a framework for the state’s schools, and particularly lays out major changes to the state’s school accountability system and how Oregon will support schools with an opportunity to grow. Under No Child Left Behind, the predecessor to ESSA, schools were labeled as failing or not failing based solely on reading and math test scores, and test participation. ESSA ends the NCLB era of test-andpunish school accountability and returns decision making back into the hands of those who know students best — families, communities, and educators — while keeping the focus on students most in need. The Oregon Department of Education has spent the past 15 months meeting with a wide range of stakeholders to gather input and feedback on how Oregon will reimagine education. OEA governance, staff, and members were key groups ODE consulted. OEA member involvement was broad, including: n Attending ODE community forums in Spring 2016 and Winter 2016-17; n Participating in the 2016 OEA Education Symposium on accountability; n Nearly 30 members and OEA staff sat on the four ESSA technical workgroups – standards and assessment, educator effectiveness, school and district improvement, and accountability; n OEA Governance and members giving input as part of the ODE ESSA Advisory Team; n Members testifying at the State Board 10

TODAY’S OEA | SPRING 2017

of Education meetings; n And ODE reaching out to specific teacher groups that included librarians, specialized instructional support personnel, and education support professionals. Additionally, the final proposed ODE plan reflects the comments and suggestions OEA members made. These include adding a resource review to the state Comprehensive Needs Assessment, and elevating access to a well-rounded education as a key component of school quality and student success. The Oregon consolidated plan under ESSA is a significant shift from the past 15 years of education under No Child Left Behind. This article will highlight some of the biggest changes. You can access the plan online at www.oregon.gov/ode/rulesand-policies/ESSA or send your questions to OEA staff in the Center for Great Public Schools at oea-essa@oregoned.org.

School Accountability Systems

The federal law requires states to develop accountability systems that include: n Academic achievement in math and reading/English language arts as measured by a statewide summative assessment; n Academic progress in middle and elementary schools; n High school graduation rates (as measured by the four-year cohort graduation rate); n English language proficiency; n And at least one indicator of school quality and student success. OEA and NEA celebrated the inclusion of the school quality and student success indicators in ESSA. This shift recognizes that school success goes far beyond math and reading achievement and includes things like attendance, school climate, and access to a well-rounded education. NEA

promoted this through the Opportunity Dashboard. Oregon’s plan proposed dividing the accountability indicators into four categories (see chart at right). Additionally, each school district would have to report on rates and disproportionality in exclusionary discipline as part of the Opportunity to Learn category, and indicators in wellrounded education category. Many stakeholders, including many OEA members, gave ODE input that measures of a well-rounded education should be a part of the accountability system, and not just reported. ODE’s report says the department will work with stakeholders to better define access to learning opportunities as an indicator.

Well-Rounded Education

No Child Left Behind’s narrow focus on math and reading test scores had disastrous effects on student access to a well-rounded education. Schools and districts, desperate to avoid a failing label, doubled down on math and reading instruction. P.E., libraries, social studies, science, recess, music, the arts are more were left behind and students suffered. The economic downturn of 2008 further eroded the full programs our schools once had. ESSA changes the focus, and clearly and purposefully defines and elevates access to a well-rounded education as vital to student success. The new Title IV program, student support and enrichment grants, specifically provides funds to provide all students with access to a well-rounded education. The proposed Oregon plan has a similar focus. “Extending the Promise of a WellRounded Education” is listed on one of four opportunities the state has identified that if realized, will better serve Oregon’s


ESSA Category

Opportunity to Learn

Academic Success

College and Career Readiness

Indicator

Grade Span Elementary

Middle

Growth in ELA

Yes

Yes

Growth in Math

Yes

Yes

Chronic Absenteeism

Yes

Yes

Yes

Achievement in ELA

Yes

Yes

Yes

Achievement in Math

Yes

Yes

Yes

English learner proficiency & growth

Yes

Yes

Yes

Graduation rate/four-year cohort

Yes

Freshman on-track

Yes

Five-year completion rate

Yes

students. Key areas of the plan that directly address increasing access to a wellrounded education are: n Including equitable access to a well-rounded education as a mandatory component of the Comprehensive Needs Assessment local districts will complete; n Requiring local plan to develop and implement a well-rounded program of instruction; n And detailing how the state would use Title IV federal grant funds. The Oregon Music Education Association, the Oregon Art Education Association, and the Oregon Association of School Libraries joined with OEA in calling for access to a well-rounded education to be used as an accountability measure in Oregon’s system, not just a reporting indicator. OEA will continue to advocate for this because students deserve full programs that inspire their natural curiosity, imagination, and desire to learn. For too many students in Oregon, their access to subjects like art, music, and more, is dictated by their zip code.

system in order for the state to get a waiver from NCLB requirements. The system under SB 290 required teachers who teach in tested grades and subjects to include student test scores from the statewide summative evaluation as a part of their evaluation. Oregon also developed the Oregon Matrix, a uniform process to assign a summative evaluation score to all Oregon educators. ESSA eliminated the federal role in educator evaluations, meaning the U.S. Department of Education can’t mandate any portion of a state’s evaluation system, or even mandate that a state has an evaluation system. Oregon’s plan proposes making it optional to include student test scores. In fact, ODE made the use of state test scores optional starting in the 2015-16 school year. The state plan would make this change permanent. The state plan acknowledges that Oregon educators find the Oregon Matrix problematic. ODE will convene a work group, which will include OEA members, to determine the future of the Oregon Matrix.

Educator Evaluations

The State Board of Education will vote on the proposed Oregon plan at the April 27, 2017 meeting. The Oregon Department

Senate Bill 290 passed in 2011 and overhauled Oregon’s educator evaluation

High

Next Steps

of Education plans to submit the plan to the U.S. Department of Education by May 3. ODE officials will meet with targeted stakeholders in April to finalize specific portions of the plan. Once Oregon submits its plan, the U.S. Department of Education has 120 days to respond to the plan. ODE officials expect the plan to go into effect for the 2017-18 school year. OEA President Hanna Vaandering testified at the March 23 State Board of Education and called on the board to make access to a well-rounded education an accountability indicator, to work toward a more balanced system of assessment, and to reduce the weight of testing participation rates in the state plan. You can submit your concerns and questions to ODE at ESSA.Oregon@state. or.us or OEA’s Center for Great Public Schools at oea-essa@oregoned.org. Members can also stay updated about Oregon’s plan at www.oregoned.org/ essa. The OEA website includes several resources you can use at the local level to use ESSA as a tool to organize for the schools our students deserve. Now is always the time to advocate for high quality teaching and learning conditions for students. TODAY’S OEA | SPRING 2017

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Licensure

NEW LICENSURE KIT UNVEILED Licensure Questions? We can help. REINSTAT

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BY TERESA FERRER / Consultant, OEA Center for Great Public Schools

T

he OEA Center for Great Public Schools and the Teachers Standards and Practices Commission (TSPC) are proud to unveil a new licensure folder and companion set of comprehensive documents explaining the licensing system for teachers in our state. It is our hope that teachers will be able to use this folder to store their personal licensure documents as well as any of our informational documents that can help them navigate their way to both licensure and employment success in Oregon. The licensure documents are built to be collected and referenced only as needed. These documents will be available on both the OEA (www.oregoned.org/licensure) and TSPC (www.oregon.gov/TSPC) websites for those who wish to peruse and download them. As changes occur, we will revise the individual documents as needed, so be sure to check online for the latest version of each (published dates are included on each document and online). The Contents Page inserted in this kit contains a list of licensure documents available in this collection. Please refer to the online collection for any new documents that are added to this list. Today’s OEA routinely contains articles featuring the latest licensure news and tips. Archives of this magazine can be found at www. oregoned.org/communications. OEA offers free Licensure Workshops on site to our local associations and districts (working in collaboration with our local associations) upon request. These are great opportunities for educators to come together to get detailed guidance and overview of Oregon licensure, as well as an active Q & A on all things having to do with the processes and rules of our professional license. Contact your local association president or UniServ Consultant (www. oregoned.org/locations) for more TODAY’S OEA

SPRING 2017

20

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information on how to schedule a licensure workshop in your area. In addition, the OEA Center for Great Public Schools offers the only preparation workshop available in the state for the ORELA (NES) Elementary Education Exam (Subtests I and II). This three-hour workshop is scheduled throughout the year at our headquarters office at 6900 SW Atlanta Street in Tigard, Oregon and is free to OEA members and Student NEA members. Go to www.oregoned.org/orela to register online. If you would like to schedule a training in your local contact Teresa Ferrer at teresa.ferrer@oregoned. org.

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Licensure DID Y KNO OU W?

Tips from the Toolkit... OREGON PRELIMINARY TEACHING LICENSE

The Preliminary License (PreTL) is the first full non-provisional entry license in Oregon that is valid for three years and can be renewed continuously with evidence of meeting Continuing Professional Development (CPD) requirements at renewal. The PreTL signifies that the educator is a novice teacher who has not yet met BOTH the advanced competencies AND experience requirements necessary to qualify for the Professional Teaching License (ProTL). Oregon teachers will remain at a novice status until they are able to obtain the ProTL.

CONTINUING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT (CPD)

TSPC believes that high quality and individualized continuing professional development for educators is essential in nurturing effective educational practice, supportive educational leadership practices and enriched student learning. Continuing Professional Development (CPD) is required to renew most teaching, administrative and personnel service licenses and all school nurses certificates. Professional Development Units (PDUs) are the clock hour per unit accounting of each professional development activity that an educator uses to meet the CPD requirement. Advanced Professional Development (APD) is ONE of the routes educators could use to be promoted to the Professional Teaching License. Educators are responsible for completing this requirement in order to renew and failure to do so does not generally constitute an “emergency” for purposes of qualifying for an Emergency License.

ETHICAL-COMPETENT STANDARDS FOR OREGON TEACHERS

OREGON PROFESSIONAL TEACHING LICENSE

The Professional Teaching License (ProTL) is the second tier of licensure in Oregon that is valid for five years and can be renewed continuously with evidence of meeting Continuing Professional Development (CPD) requirements. This second stage of licensure validates that this is an experienced teacher who has successfully demonstrated an advanced level of educator knowledge, skills and dispositions.

Standards of an ethical and competent nature are set in rule for all Oregon licensed educators. When a complaint against an educator is filed with the Teacher Standards and Practices Commission (TSPC) per Oregon state law, an investigation is initiated by TSPC. Upon completion of a TSPC investigation, the commission weighs the facts and circumstances of the case determined through the investigative process against these standards. These standards are related to a teacher’s performance as an educator but there are other criteria (list of crimes that result in automatic revocation, 60 day notice violations, etc.) that can spur an investigation and discipline on a teacher’s license.

TRANSITION FROM OLD TO NEW LICENSES

Effective January 1, 2016 all new licensure rules supersede previous rules. Educators with old or current licenses may not be issued any of the new licenses until they apply for reinstatement or renewal.

WANT MORE? Find this whole kit online at www.oregoned.org/licensure and on TSPC's website: www.oregon.gov/TSPC.

TODAY’S OEA | SPRING 2017

13


Politics & You

Kelsy Dunlap of McKay High School shares her story of skyrocketing class sizes with lawmakers.

AS CUTS LOOM, EDUCATORS FEAR LARGER CLASS SIZES Educators Descend on the Capitol for Final Lobby Day

H

undreds of educators from across the state passed up a traditional spring break to spend a day in Salem bringing attention to the impact Oregon’s budget crisis will have on their classrooms. Our second Legislative Engagement and Training Day took place on March 27, and began with a training in the morning, and meetings with legislators in the afternoon. OEA members and students pressed their elected officials on several education issues. “As legislators have been piecing together a budget, they have signaled major cuts to education. With the budget being put forward, our class sizes will continue to grow, essential programs will be cut, and learning will suffer,” said OEA President Hanna Vaandering.  Unless the legislature finds additional

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TODAY’S OEA | SPRING 2017

revenue, an additional 3,000 educators could be laid off for the upcoming school year. Educators stressed their fear that cutting more staff could push their packed classrooms to the breaking point. Oregon class sizes are already among the nation’s largest.  Kelsy Dunlap, a fifth-year teacher at McKay High School in Salem, spoke about how in her second year teaching, she had 46 students in her 9th grade physical science class. “With 46 students in a room, I simply do not have the capacity to meet with every student and give them the personal attention they need,” Kelsy explained.  Fear of larger classes was repeated throughout the day’s meetings with legislators. Educators told stories of class sizes so large that students were forced to

sit on counters and floors. One story involved a first-year teacher from Central Point who had 58 students in her full-day Kindergarten classroom.  Our message was simple: let’s fix Oregon’s dead-last corporate tax rate and invest the money in education. Educators pay their taxes — it’s time for large corporations to pay their fair share.  Although many legislators agreed, others made it clear this wouldn’t come easy.  “The reality is that as long as Oregon’s large corporations continue to pay the lowest corporate tax rate in the nation, we will never have the resources we need to build the schools our students deserve,” said Hanna Vaandering, “We elected a pro-public education majority in the legislature, and it’s time for them to start acting like it. Our students are counting on them.”


Politics & You Transgender Bathroom Protections

Rep. Teresa Alonso Leon meets with OEA members to discuss top education priorities this session.

E

arlier this year the Trump Administration rolled back federal guidance designed to protect transgender students from discrimination. Considering these events, it’s become even more urgent to review Oregon’s antidiscrimination laws, as well as look for new ways we can support and protect LGBTQ students and members. In May of 2016, the Oregon Department of Education issued guidance to school districts creating several protections for transgender students. Despite the federal changes, these protections remain in effect.  Here are what Oregon’s transgender guidelines say:  n Students should be able to use the bathroom, names, and pronouns of the gender with which they identify. School leaders should use students' preferred names on transcripts and diplomas. n

A student's gender identity should not exclude them from participation in programs or activities. n

Students should be able to participate in PE and sports corresponding to their gender identity. n

Districts must adopt a policy prohibiting harassment, intimidation or bullying of transgender students. n

School personnel should not disclose information that could reveal a student’s transgender identity.

Ensuring Productive Learning Environments

T

his Legislative Session, we are working on a handful bills that would ensure a safer and more productive learning environment for students and educators. Oregon schools are seeing a rise in serious student behavioral issues and disciplinary challenges which are resulting in difficulty maintaining productive learning environments for all students and physical injuries to other students and educators.  These behaviors have a variety of root causes including, but not limited to, large, unmanageable class sizes, family traumas caused by the Great Recession, and exposure to technology.  Educators simply need more tools to respond to these challenges. We must provide districts with the resources to reduce

class sizes, hire more support staff, school counselors and psychologists, provide safe spaces for students, and provide better reporting and training. Here are some bills that would do this:  HB 2651 to make class size a statewide mandatory subject of collecting bargaining. SB 363 to implement a statewide study of safety and classroom management improvements in special education and related education services. HB 2337 to increase workers’ compensation benefits. SB 293 to expand Individual Education Plan access to more educators. Creation of a task force on productive learning environments to pursue best practices for behavioral management in schools.

n

While retracting the guidance still allows states, like Oregon, to set policies protecting transgender students, it demonstrates a lack of compassion for students.  Educators and schools have a responsibility to continue supporting transgender students, regardless of the Trump Administration’s actions.  Rescinding this guidance opens the door to bullying and discrimination. Educators will continue working to protect our transgender students in Oregon and across the nation. Credits: Left: Charles Lapham; Top: Meg Krugel

PERS Retirement Cuts

S

ome legislators in Salem are proposing extreme cuts to PERS retirement benefits. There have been hearings for several bills, including SB 560 and 913, which would devastate the retirement benefits of thousands of current and future state employees. OEA's message is simple: cutting the retirement of middle class Oregonians is not the appropriate way to piece together a budget, especially when Oregon's corporate tax rate is the lowest in the nation. Oregon already faces a shortage of professional educators — continuing to attack the retirement of these educators will only make problems worse. Are you a public employee worried about retirement cuts? Check out the Retirement Risk Calculator at http://keeporegonspromise.org/retirement-risk-calculator to see how Senate Bills 560 and 913 are projected to impact your individual retirement account.  For more information, visit keeporegonspromise.org TODAY’S OEA | SPRING 2017

15


C The streets of Habana Vieja (Old Havana)

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TODAY’S OEA | SPRING 2017


★ LESSONS FROM

Cuba

EUGENE TEACHERS ATTEND AN EDUCATIONAL CONFERENCE IN HAVANA By Pete Mandrapa, Eugene Education Association Member

I

n March of 2016, I visited Cuba to learn more about the people and an educational system that is producing a highly literate population, which has one of the highest literacy rates in the world. Our group brought along educational supplies to deliver to a school in Havana. On that visit, I was able to get in touch with the Cuban teachers' union (Sindi-

cato Nacional de Trabajadores de la Educacion, la Ciencia y el Deporte SNTECD) and was invited to meet with them in their office in Havana. My contact, Gertrudis Simon Pineda, Executive Board member of the national union in charge of international relations, set up a meeting for us with the Secretary General of the national union Ismael Drullet.

Credits: Eugene Education Association / Cuba Delegation

TODAY’S OEA | SPRING 2017

17


Inside a classroom at the Fernando Alonso National School of Ballet, one of the school sites visited by Eugene EA members.

SNTECD has close to half a million members that include university professors, elementary and secondary school teachers, and all the education workers in the system. They have relationships with teacher unions in many countries of the world and were very interested in developing a relationship with teacher unions in the United States. They felt that as our two governments were moving toward normalized relations, public school workers in both countries should connect and learn from each other about our education systems. At that meeting they extended an invitation to us to come to Cuba for an annual international education conference, Pedagogia 2017, in Havana from Jan. 30 to Feb. 3, 2017. The Cuban Ministry of Education, UNESCO, Unicef, Confederacion de Educadores Americanos (CEA) and others 18

TODAY’S OEA | SPRING 2017

organize the annual international conference. Part of the conference’s focus is international solidarity in defending public education. Tad Shannon, our Eugene Education Association President, was very supportive of this effort from the beginning. EEA has had a history of international solidarity with teacher unions. In the 1980s and 1990s our local Human and Civil Rights Committee had sister union relationships with several Latin American countries including Mexico, Honduras, El Salvador and Nicaragua. We hosted delegations from these countries, organized tours of the US for them and sent our members to Mexico. This year's visit to Cuba would continue that tradition. They have a lot to learn from us and we from them. We were able to raise the money through

fundraising and financial support from OEA and EEA; members of the delegation also used their own money to pay for the expenses. EEA set up a process for picking delegates for the conference and a fivemember delegation was selected. Being bilingual was a top priority, since the conference’s official language was Spanish. We wanted to learn more about the successful literacy program in Cuba, learn about the struggle against racism, sexism, and classism, and further develop relationships with the teachers union and possibly develop a sister school relationship with a Cuban school. We also wanted to learn strategies from educators in other countries on how to defend public education. We met all our goals and learned much more. Over 3,000 educators attended the conference from 51 countries. We were among


COMMENTS FROM THE DELEGATION with the Cuban priorities. “PoorI wasthirdimpressed world country that prioritizes free

I was impressed with the connection of the schools to families and their school communities. Their emphasis on service to the community through community projects for the kids was impressive. They also integrate social values into education.

education, free health care etc. Also the emphasis on the arts and music are in sharp contrast with our priorities.

TAD SHANNON Eugene Education Association President, High School Social Studies teacher

JEANNINE McINTYRE Elementary ELL teacher

“withI wastheimpressed Cuban's scientific approach to learning and education. Lots of project based learning.  They have an internationalist perspective when it comes to education.

DANIEL DENTON Spanish Immersion Middle School Social Studies Teacher

Members of the Eugene delegation join up with George Sheridan, NEA Executive Committee; Jill Christianson, NEA International Relations; Cuban translator; Gertrudes Simon of the SNTECD (National Educators union) Executive Board; Ismael Drullet Perez, Secretary General of SNTECD.

I was very impressed with the variety of “opportunities students have in the area of art and music. We visited magnet schools that bring in the kids with talent and love of art and music.

ABBY LANE ESOL /Bilingual Instructor and Retired ELL Coordinator in Eugene 4J

Credits: Name here

TODAY’S OEA | SPRING 2017

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Above: Educators from more than 51 countries attended the Opening Ceremony of Pedagogia 2017; Below: A Cuban teacher and her students; Bottom: Eugene's delegation visited a Special Ed classroom at Paquito Rosales Benitez School.

the few US educators at the conference. The majority came from Latin American countries, Africa and Europe. George Sheridan, Executive committee member of the NEA, represented NEA. This was the first official contact between NEA and SNTECD, and they hope to continue this relationship. We are in contact with George and hope to work with him on future projects. We also met with the leadership of the SNTECD, specifically Ismael Durret, Secretary General (president of the national union). At the meeting we presented them with an invitation from Hanna Vaandering, OEA President to come to Oregon and attend our Representative Assembly. We also extended an invitation from superintendents from Eugene 4J and Bethel school districts to come to Eugene and visit our schools. They were open to work on that for 2018. Most of us spoke Spanish and attended workshops, lectures and visited several schools during the conference. Our delegation was impressed with the priority the Cuban society places on education. Education is considered to be a human and civil right of every Cuban citizen. This poor, third world country has one of the highest literacy rates in the world, 98 percent, and provides free education from preschool to graduate school. Before the revolution, half of the population was illiterate. One of the first actions taken after the revolution was to start a literacy campaign that reached the most remote villages in the countryside. Cubans also see workers’ rights as human rights and have had a favorable political environment for union organizing. The role of the unions in a socialist system is very different from the unions here in the U.S. They work in a collaborative way with the Ministry of Education, advocating for education workers and education policies. The wages of teachers, along with other public employees, are very low by our standards. They earn, on average, $25 per month. They benefit from the free health care system, free education system and a subsidized housing system. By law, the maximum class size in elementary schools is 25 students. The class over 25 gets a second teacher. In secondary schools, the maximum is 30.


Abby Lane, ESOL /Bilingual Instructor at the U of O College of Education and Retired ELL Coordinator in Eugene 4J, meets with middle school students.

The system places high value on connecting schools to families and communities. Schools generally open at 6:30 a.m. and close 12 hours later, providing free morning and after-school care for working parents. The first part of the day is devoted to breakfast and free play. Core academics take place from 8:40-12:30, followed by lunch and games or recess. In the afternoon kids engage in a range of activities such as health, art, music and sports. After school programs are organized around areas of interest that the young people choose. Cuba’s schools offer a variety of opportunities for the students in academics as well as offering incredible music and art education. Schools offer several hours a week of music and art for students at all levels. Students in every school we visited greeted us with musical and dance performances. It was impressive. On several occasions educators were astonished when we told them that music and art have been cut in many schools in the U.S. The values of peace, justice, cooperation and humanism are all important part of the

curriculum. Cubans believe that by being grounded in their authentic culture and history, young people will become strong citizens that will contribute to further development of their country. Pride in Cuba’s independence is very evident. We were also impressed with the seeming lack of racism and sexism. The leadership in both the union and the education system seemed to be very inclusive. Women and people of color were leaders in the union, the schools we visited and at the conference. We also had an opportunity to meet and participate in workshops in which educators from Latin American countries and Europe shared their struggles. It seems that attacks on public education and unions is happening not only here but in many other countries. Privatization of schools is on the rise and anti labor laws and repression of teacher unions is occurring in many countries. Another thing that struck us was the lack of crime. We found ourselves in different neighborhoods of Havana at all hours and never felt threatened or unsafe.

Credits: Eugene Education Association Members / Cuba Delegation

This experience has had a profound effect on us. At a time when public education is under an unprecedented attack, we were able to see a system that is child-centered, protective of its youth and committed to providing quality education under challenging economic times. The products of this educational system were students who seemed confident, well adjusted and enthusiastic. Cuba is a poor country with some economic and political problems, made much worse by U.S. embargo, but its treatment of its youth and the focus on education is exemplary. We have a lot to learn from them. We plan on developing this relationship further. We will be working on bringing a Cuban teacher to visit our schools, develop a sister school program with a Cuban school and will seek ways to provide material support to counter the economic embargo that has hindered economic development of this small nation. n Pete Mandrapa is a long time Middle School teacher and now a guest teacher in Eugene. TODAY’S OEA | SPRING 2017

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PROCESSING THROUGH

ART

Faced with a new political climate, Hood River Teacher Amirra Malak takes her students on a journey of self reflection By Julia Sanders Photos by Thomas Patterson


A

MIRRA MALAK

may spend her days as an art teacher at Hood River Valley High School (HRVHS), but her story really begins in a tiny village in Upper Egypt, where only one person could read or write. Malak’s father, who was born in this village, became the first person from his town to finish high school and then went on to earn his Bachelor’s degree in Lebanon. “My dad is a big part of why I am teaching and my belief in kids,” said Malak. Inspired by her father’s determination and commitment to his own education, Malak carries with her the notion that no matter who you are or where you are from, dreams can be achieved through perseverance. “Amirra has always been sensitive to equity issues, whether it is socioeconomic, race, or gender. That is just who she is and it is what makes her such a great teacher,” said Tammy Hosaka, school counselor at HRVHS. “She believes that everyone, no matter where you come from, should have the opportunity to be successful and to learn to love art. She is known for standing up for those who can’t stand up for themselves.” Following the 2016 Presidential election, Hosaka notes that there was a growing level of angst amongst students at Hood River Valley High School, about half of whom identify as Latino and the other half as Caucasian. “I would say that there were quite a few students who were afraid. The first emotion seemed to be fear, and then there was shock, and also some sadness,” said Hosaka. “People came to school and there were staff and students who were visibly upset. Staff had to put on their work face and get to work, but the students needed to express themselves.” When Malak woke up the morning after the election, she immediately thought about what her students might be feeling, especially those from immigrant families. “It was a very emotional morning. My

students walked into the classroom and some of them were visibly upset. They had been crying. There was a strange energy in the room. Everyone was sort of sick with it,” Malak said of the new reality in which they were living. The fear felt by many immigrants and outsiders was something Malak has been familiar with her entire life. Being bicultural, or what Malak describes as an “authentic hybrid,” has come with its own share of challenges. Being authentically Egyptian-American meant that she sometimes didn’t feel accepted as legitimately Egyptian or American, leaving her feeling separate from both cultures. Having lived all over the globe, she’s frequently felt like an “other,” which sometimes has led to a fearful existence. “When I lived in the Middle East, I was an American citizen who looked Arab. At the time when we lived in Kuwait, the American embassy was bombed and there was concern that the American school I was attending could be next. It was a serious lock down and was super scary,” said Malak. “The school was closed for two weeks. My social studies teacher’s husband was killed in the bombing, so there was a fear of being American there. Then after we moved to the states, 9/11 happened

and suddenly I felt unsafe because I was Egyptian. So there was a weird awareness of being pulled between two cultures and not being at home in either one and feeling afraid of what you are in both places.” Having experienced cultural ‘otherness’ herself ­— and feeling fearful in those moments — allowed Malak to be in tune the emotionally-charged post-election world her students entered on January 21st, the day after the inauguration. “I couldn’t just go on like it was a normal day,” said Malak. “I said to my students, ‘I can feel that some of you are emotional. Art has this amazing capacity to help in situations when you are emotional." To begin this process, Malak shared a piece of art she had created in the days following 9/11, and spoke about how that tragedy had impacted her as a woman of mixed-cultural identity. Malak then said to her students, "I’d like to ask you, if you want, to spend today processing what you are feeling right now through art — whether you are feeling like it is a great day or a difficult day, I want to give you the space to do that if you would like to." "I was not trying to change anyone’s mind or tell anyone how to vote or anything. I was just giving them a chance to process. There was no requirement that they do this project and they could work on something else if they didn’t want to participate,” she said. As Malak looked around that day, she saw that most of the class chose to work on post-election art. Engrossed in their work, some were crying as they drew. The result was a series of drawings that are sincere and emotionally raw, some stunning in their maturity and artistic ability. One drawing shows a melding of the faces of Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump with the words, “One nation. One people. United” written under it. Another shows the profile of a young Latina woman facing Trump quotes such as “They’re rapists” and “The Mexican government sends over the bad ones because they don’t want to pay for them.” Malak hung the art in the hallway with the simple title, “Students

PREVIOUS PAGE (Clockwise from top left): Taja Adsit, Allison Thompson, Natalie Lapierre, Amirra Malak, Grace Schlemmer, Paris Green and Sofie Larsen-Teskey display their individual art pieces produced following the 2016 Election. Above: The art of a Latina student in Malak's class displays Trump's derogatory comments about Mexican immigrants.

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TODAY’S OEA | SPRING 2017


Amirra Malak's students at Hood River Valley High School felt a range of emotions after the election of Donald Trump as president. To see more of the students' post-election art, visit their HRVHS Facebook page at: facebook.com/HRVHSFineArts. Learn more about Amirra Malak's artist portfolio on her website, amirramalak.com.

Respond to the Election Through Art.” For many students in Malak’s art class, the creation of post-election art was cathartic. “Amirra allowed them to express how they felt about the election through art. Whether they were happy or sad or scared or all of the above. She hung their artwork out for display in the hallway,” said Hosaka. “It allowed our student body to know that it was okay to have an opinion and to have some emotions about what happened.” Not everyone was pleased with the student-created art that now adorned the hallway. “I think for staff, the art was very meaningful, but not for all of us. There were staff who were very upset that she allowed her students to do that and to put the art in the hallway. They demanded that it come down,” said Hosaka, who was surprised that the art display was met with animosity. “It is a small group of people, but it was kind of shocking.” Ultimately, the administration at HRVHS decided to leave the majority of the art on display, since it Above: Thomas Patterson Left: Amirra Malak

was created by the students. “It is a reflection of the students’ emotional stance at that point,” said Hosaka. “For the most part, it was negative about Trump, but there were one or two pieces in the hallway that were pro-Trump.” Malak did some soul-searching after the complaints were made, looking for any wrongdoing in her own actions. Seeing the events as a teachable moment, Malak was candid with her students about the controversy surrounding their art. “I asked my students if they felt like I had pushed any ideas on them or tried to get them to take their art in a certain direction. They said that they had done it all on their own and some even thanked me afterwards, saying that it was super helpful to them,” she said. “I did tell the students about what happened. I said, ‘You should know that your work made some people upset. You should also know that your principal did not take your work down, so you are supported in the building even if some people don’t like

what you were saying in your art.’” Feeling frustrated by the backlash, Malak remembered that freedom of speech is a big part of what she loved about America and was also a big part of what brought her family here in the first place. “I feel that the most American thing you can do is express your point of view authentically, to use your freedom of expression,” she said. “To me, I was honoring America by having my kids do this work." To cope with the controversy, Malak reminded herself of why she became a teacher. “Part of why I went into teaching is the belief that everybody can achieve. Because of my dad’s background and because I went to school with people from many different nationalities, I didn’t go into teaching thinking that there were different categories of students. To me they are all capable of amazing things. They all have a voice. That’s what I wanted to communicate to them, that they all have a voice and they all matter.” n TODAY’S OEA | SPRING 2017

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Alma Vela teaches dual-immersion first grade at Washington Elementary; because of their immigration status, many of her students lack the health insurance they need to treat basic medical issues.

&

COVERED


&CARED FOR OREGON EDUCATORS RALLY BEHIND LEGISLATION TO COVER ALL KIDS WITH HEALTH INSURANCE, REGARDLESS OF IMMIGRATION STATUS

BY MEG KRUGEL • PHOTOS BY THOMAS PATTERSON TODAY’S OEA | SPRING 2017

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For more than a month, a student in Alma Vela’s first grade classroom at Washington Elementary in Woodburn complained of a toothache. Sometimes, the pain would bring the young girl to tears. When the pain became so unbearable she couldn’t concentrate in class, the student was sent home with an application of OraGel — which was really the only form of dental care she’d ever known. Because of her immigration status, Vela’s student had gone her first seven years without having ever seen a dentist. On this occasion, she ended up missing several days of school because of the pain — and the toothache became a big point of conversation at parent-teacher conferences later that month. It’s not unusual that health issues percolate in Vela’s relationships with her students and their families, particularly because of the community in which she teaches, which has the highest population of undocumented families and children in the state. Many parents come to rely on Vela for sharing resources on where to turn for healthcare when their student lacks the insurance to visit a doctor or a dentist. “I have to put myself in their shoes — healthcare is not just something that only affects the individual student. It affects the entire family,” Vela says. For Vela — seeing her students struggle to access the healthcare they need brings the memories flooding back from her own childhood. Her own mother immigrated from Mexico to Woodburn with four daughters, and a year after their border crossing, Vela was born. Because she was the only naturalborn United States citizen in her family, Vela was enrolled in the Oregon Health Plan while her four other sisters went uninsured. Though she had insurance, she moved through her childhood in same manner that her older sisters did — rarely seeing a doctor unless the matter was urgent. “I only went to a doctor when it was severe. Even though I did have coverage, it was very difficult for my mom to get out and make appointments, or be informed of the resources that were available then,” Vela says. It wasn’t until Vela began teaching this year in Woodburn that she made an appointment to see a dentist for a routine 28

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“THE OFFICE OF EQUITY AND INCLUSION VALUES HEALTH FOR ALL OF OREGON'S CHILDREN. NOT ONLY WILL ENSURING THAT ALL CHILDREN HAVE QUALITY HEALTH CARE IMPROVE THE LIVES OF OREGON'S CHILDREN, BUT IT WILL ALSO IMPROVE THE SYSTEMS THAT SERVE THEM. EQUITABLE HEALTH CARE ACCESS IS CRITICAL TO MEETING OUR GOALS OF HEALTH TRANSFORMATION.” Office of Equality and Inclusion

check-up. She remembers sitting in the waiting room and texting her husband, “I feel like such an adult. I’m at the dentist for the first time on my own.” In many ways, Vela’s experiences as the daughter of an immigrant family are directly mirrored in her young students — which is, no doubt, one of the reasons she’s an ideal fit for her teaching position in Woodburn.

THERE’S HOPE

This year, undocumented students like Vela’s are on the brink of a major shift as far as their healthcare is concerned. House Bill 2726 — also referred to as the Cover All Kids legislation — will ensure that a child’s access to health insurance is not determined by immigration status. If the bill passes this Legislative session, all children under the age of 18 — documented and not – will have access to health insurance through the Oregon Health Plan. An additional 17,600 kids

will gain insurance if the bill passes. On Feb. 20, Gov. Brown testified in support of the Bill in front of the House Committee on Health Care. "It is our duty to ensure that our youngest Oregonians have the tools to grow into healthy adults with access to education, health care, and a bright future," Brown was quoted in the Statesman Journal. "Oregon children should have the opportunity to be healthy and ready to learn, and Oregon families should feel confident that a medical event will not dramatically change the trajectory of their lives." The Bill’s chief proponent is the Oregon Latino Health Coalition (OLHC), a collaborative group of 90-plus individuals and organizations (including the Oregon Education Association) dedicated to promoting health and wellness and reducing Latino health disparities through advocacy, prevention, education, and sharing of resources. On a policy front, the Coalition develops statewide legislation that will reduce disparities within Latino communities. Their work began with a legislative campaign in 2015 to bring health care to all children, which became the launch pad for the 2017 legislation currently under consideration. The Coalition sites important facts for prioritizing the Bill — namely, educational outcomes. According to studies done by Harvard and Cornell Universities, insured kids are 9.7 percent less likely to drop out of high school and 5.5 percent more likely to graduate from college. An OLHC report published for the 2015 campaign states that “Health insurance coverage for undocumented children could also help Oregon close the achievement gap. Low-income children and children of color, a growing share of the state’s student body, lag in their educational achievement compared to more affluent white children. The achievement gap threatens our economic competitiveness and our capacity to innovate.” Over the past 10 years, the advent of the State Children’s Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) and the increased push for children’s coverage have led to marked declines in the number of uninsured children. Nevertheless, a great deal of work remains to be done. While the Affordable Care Act extended affordable insurance options to millions of Americans, undocumented


immigrants have been left out of health reform. The most recent Census data show that, for the first time since 1998, the rate of uninsured children has increased, going from 10.8 percent to 11.2 percent. One in nine children is uninsured, with more than half of all uninsured children live in twoparent families.

Above: Isabela* and her two-year-old daughter Aaliyah meet with Salem school nurse Cindy Hoffert, below, to discuss Isabela's options for Graves Disease treatment without insurance.

A DIFFERENT CHILDHOOD

Those numbers hit home for Aldo Soldano, the Campaign Community Organizer for the Oregon Latino Health Coalition and graduate of Woodburn High School. Soldano immigrated to the U.S. with his family when he was six years old, and grew up in low-income farmworker housing. His family came seeking a better life for their children, and in Woodburn, they found it — but not without its own struggle, too. Soldano remembers how cautious his childhood was. He never played sports because he couldn’t risk getting injured without family health insurance. He laughs as he remembers secretly longing to break an Credits: Meg Krugel

TODAY’S OEA | SPRING 2017

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arm so that he’d get to come to school with a cast and have his classmates sign it. “It’s kind of a rite of passage. I remember thinking, I want to break my arm, but I knew that if I did, I wasn’t going to get a cast. In that way, not having health insurance can really take away from your childhood,” he says. “I am fortunate that I have a mom who is super resourceful. She understood what our situation was, in terms of status, and what we qualified for. If there was a free clinic at school, we'd get a quick check-up. A lot of families just get by like that. But it's not consistent, it's not enough. It's not the type of care that you really need to thrive,” he says. When he turned 18, Soldano applied for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), President Obama’s American immigration policy started in 2012 that allows undocumented immigrants who entered the country as minors to receive a renewable two-year period of deferred action from deportation and eligibility for a work permit. Through DACA, Soldano found full-time employment and, for the first time, qualified for health insurance through his employer. “It wasn't until I started working full-time and got benefits that I ever saw a doctor. Prior to that, I fully understood what the consequences were, and I understood the fear,” he says of not having health insurance. Soldano has been effective in his role as a community organizer for the Cover All Kids campaign because his situation is relatable. “I know exactly what it’s like to go through the school system and be a child without care,” he says. “I meet with mothers of young children, and they see that I’m not just an outsider — that I understand where they stand on this issue. It gives them a sense of security that they can trust me.” Soldano knows that even if the bill passes, anxiety will continue to be an issue. The current anti-immigration climate in the era of a Trump Administration has justifiably instilled a sense of fear in families with undocumented children. The Trump Administration has said it plans to increase immigration enforcement efforts in the U.S., with a particular focus on people living in the country illegally. This has hit the community of Woodburn particularly hard in recent weeks — in February alone, federal immigration agents detained more than a dozen 30

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members of Woodburn’s Latino community. Soldano says that for many families right now, healthcare is synonymous with government, and government is not a friend. If Cover All Kids becomes law, a big challenge will be getting the information to families to enroll their children in Medicaid — a government program. Soldano says the responsibility will fall to community organizations who have developed trusting relationships with the communities they serve. “Because of the political climate right now, it wouldn't be strategic for enrollment purposes to do it solely through county services,” Soldano advises. He’s fully prepared for the Oregon Latino Health Coalition to step up to the plate and continue their outreach and advocacy work to ensure the students who need healthcare are getting it. Educators, he notes, also play an important role in seeing this step through.

HEALTHCARE MATTERS

On a Spring day at the Early College High School (ECHS) in Salem, school nurse Cindy Hoffert stops in to check on a few students she’s been asked to help triage. One of these students is Isabela* (*Name changed to protect privacy), an 18-year-old undocumented student in ECHS’s Teen Parent Program. Two years ago, while pregnant with her daughter Aaliyah, Isabela was diagnosed with Graves Disease, an autoimmune disease of the thyroid. If she had not become pregnant and been covered by insurance for those nine months, Isabela's condition may very well have gone undiagnosed. Now, because she’s no longer covered by the Oregon Health Plan but is a legal adult (albeit still a student), she is unable to access the treatment she needs — though she continues to struggle daily with symptoms of the disease, like severe swollen throat, glassy eyes, weight gain and low energy. From time to time, Isabela has been able to access the low-income clinics in Salem and the surrounding areas for immediate health concerns. Still, she walks away with a minimum $500 bill after each visit. Some issues go untreated — she’s using a 4-year-old inhaler to treat her asthma and suffers anxiety — all while raising a toddler

and attending school full-time. Hoffert says the Cover All Kids legislation could make a world of difference for a student like Isabela – and for all the migrant students with whom she meets daily. Year after year, Hoffert’s school nurse caseload continues to grow. She’s been working as a nurse in Salem-Keizer secondary schools for 16 years, and currently serves North Salem, McKay, and all of Salem's alternative high schools. Each of the school nurses in Salem averages a caseload of around 3,500 students per nurse. “That’s just sheer numbers — but then we add in the kids who require tube feedings, insulin shots and other issues that require you to be physically present for them every day,” Hoffert says. A large part of Hoffert’s day-to-day work is helping families navigate how to get a very sick child the care they need. The first question she often must ask is: “Are you documented?” “The reason I have to ask is because I


For Alma Vela, returning to teach in the community where she grew up was always top priority. "Woodburn is where my heart is," she says.

don’t have as many options for you, if you aren’t,” Hoffert says. “I used to feel really bad telling parents that — but now I can say, ‘my hands are tied and it’s no one’s fault’.” Every year, she calls around to various clinics to see if there are any new resources for immigrant families, but each year, the available resources seem to dwindle, even from where they were 10 years ago. When she hits a dead end, she’ll reluctantly tell a family that the only remaining option is the emergency room, which cannot deny care to anyone, no matter their immigration status — though Hoffert knows full well they’ll end up with a bill of at least $2500 from the visit. Of the new legislation, Hoffert has hopes that it will result in more preventative care from the outset, lessening the need for those costly ER visits.

A WORTHY INVESTMENT

Of course, legislation like this comes

Credits: Thomas Patterson

with a price tag — currently estimated at $55 million. Soldano says there are creative ways through revenue reform to fund both this program and other valuable services in jeopardy right now. Gov. Brown has included the expansion in her proposed budget, allocating $55 million in General Fund money for 2017-2019. Studies done by the American Journal of Public Health have repeatedly demonstrated that the uninsured are less likely than those with insurance to receive preventive care and services for major health conditions and chronic conditions. The Oregon Latino Health Coalition says the Bill will ensure access to health care prevents treatable illnesses from becoming expensive health care crises — saving the state money in the long-term. Similar policies to Cover All Kids are already in place in California, Washington, New York, Illinois and Massachusetts. While the Bill has broad bipartisan support, it also faces some staunch criticism

from anti-immigration groups, who cite Oregon’s $1.8 billion budget gap as the primary reason to vote against the legislation. That view, many say, is short-sighted, noting that investment in primary care lessens costs over time, and the addition of 17,000 children to the Oregon Health Plan would represent just over 1 percent of the entire plan’s population. The proposed legislation has a broad swath of Republican support, however; Rep. John Huffman, a Republican from The Dalles and co-sponsor of the legislation, said the insurance expansion “makes sense morally and economically — morally, because I have always advocated for supporting our most vulnerable, and economically, because healthy kids miss less school and their parents miss fewer days of work.” For Soldano and Hoffert, the issue comes down to equity for all students. “There is this little voice stuck on the conversation of immigration, and using the ‘I’ word to define these kids. That's not giving them the place they deserve. It is a dehumanization of the issue from what it really is,” Soldano says. Hoffert agrees, and says Cover All Kids could level the playing field for our students — and educators alike. “If we have 40 kids, 37 might have health insurance and three don’t. Those three students aren’t equal, but they should be. They are a part of our school community; they undergo the same level of rigor that all other students do, but they lack the access to the services that other students have.” Ensuring all students regardless of immigration status have equal access to healthcare could make the work of educators and school nurses that much more seamless and effective, too, Hoffert says. She looks forward to the day when she can approach each of her students’ needs from the same lens and provide each of them the same resources. “When families make that huge decision to come to this country — ­ it’s a leap of faith and they do it for their kids,” Soldano says. “If their children are not able to perform to their full potential, it takes away from the entire purpose of coming here. They took all these risks and left everything behind, but their child is far from receiving the care they need to thrive and push their family out of poverty.” n TODAY’S OEA | SPRING 2017

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Sources + Resources The following information is provided as a resource to members of the Oregon Education Association. Their publication within Today’s OEA is not to be construed as a recommendation or endorsement of the products or services by the Oregon Education Association, its Board of Directors or staff. AWARDS, GRANTS, SCHOLARSHIPS

Jan Stauber Grant for Teachers and Librarians

WHAT: This grant offers a maximum amount of $500 for the development of a program to introduce Sherlock Holmes to students. This grant is offered to encourage students to discover the joys of reading. n WHEN: Application deadline is May 1, 2017. n HOW: For more information and to download the application form, go to http://www.beaconsociety.com/the-janstauber-grant.html n

DON’T QUIT! fitness campaign

WHAT: The National Foundation for Governors’ Fitness Councils (NFGFC) is partnering with the State of Oregon for this year’s DON’T QUIT!™ Campaign. The campaign encourages educators to submit a nomination form explaining why their school is a leader in student fitness. Three schools will be awarded a brand new DON’T QUIT! Fitness Center worth $100,000. n WHO: Public or public charter schools qualify. Nominations must have full support of the school district and meet the qualifications listed on nomination form. n WHEN: School nominations are open through Jun. 2, 2017. n HOW: For more information or to download the application form, go to www. natgovfit.org. Questions? Email info@ natgovfit.org. n

OPPORTUNITIES

Curiosity Across the Content Areas: Engaging Kids Through Student-Directed Inquiry WHAT: This one-day hands-on workshop participants will be involved in a series of lessons that enact key strategies of content-area literacy and project-based, inquiry learning. See how kids can think better around challenging topics, n

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and how they can use close reading and collaborative writing as tools for exploration in any subjects. Come with questions in hand; leave with ideas that can be use right away. n WHEN: Apr. 26, 2017 n WHERE: Hilton Garden Inn Portland/ Beaverton, Beaverton, Ore. n HOW: For more information on the workshop, the cost and how to register, go to www.heinemann.com/ pd/Workshops/products/HWHD17. aspx?sessionId=170426HDOR

Classroom Law Project Summer Institute

WHAT: This year’s Institute helps teachers create the right classroom climate where students are more engaged, more interested in politics, and more willing to listen to other points of view n WHEN: July 10-13, 2017 n WHERE: OSU-Cascades campus, Bend, Ore. n HOW: For more information, visit www.classroomlaw.org/professionaldevelopment/summer-institute/, or contact Scott Kerman, senior Program Manager, skerman@classroomlaw.org.

Teacher Training Institute

WHAT: AP Institute of the Cascades is offering a Teacher Training Institute. Course offerings include: Biology, Calculus AB, Chemistry. English Language and Composition, Environmental Science, Human Geography, Psychology, Statistics, U.S. Government and Politics, and U.S. History. n WHEN: Aug. 15-18, 2017 n WHERE: Central Oregon Community College, Bend, Ore. n HOW: For more information, contact catherine.halliwell-templin@hdesd.org, or go to http://apicascades.org. n

n

TOLI Teaching About the Holocaust

WHAT: This professional development seminar, offered by TOLI in partnership with the Oregon Writing Project, is free and provides participants an opportunity to expand their awareness and understanding of the Holocaust and other, more recent genocides. The seminar also explores ways to integrate instruction on racial and ethnic discrimination in Oregon, specifically within the context of the Japanese-American internment during World War Two. n WHEN : Jul. 17-21, 2017 n WHERE: University of Oregon Campus, Eugene, OR n HOW: For more information and to apply visit, go to www.thememoriallibrary.org/ satellite-program/oregon/ n

FOR STUDENTS

Law Day Conference for High School Students

WHAT: The 37th annual Law Day Conference for High School Students is a one-day conference featuring over 10 different workshops on legal issues concerning youth including student rights, immigration, gun control and careers in the law. Conference Fee: $10/person (including adults). n WHEN: May 2, 2017 n WHERE: Portland State University, Portland, Ore. n HOW: To learn more and to register, go to www.classroomlaw.org/programs/law-day. Registration Deadline: Apr. 21, 2017 n

Essay Contest for Fourth Graders

WHAT: The Sons and Daughters of Oregon Pioneers is sponsoring an essay contest for 4th grade students. The topic is “Discuss the pioneer spirit, a determination of accomplishing goals under very difficult circumstances, and how the result of that spirit has affected our lives today.” n WHEN: Essay deadline is May 15, 2017. n HOW: Submit essays to Dawn Alexander, PO Box 6685 Portland, Oregon 97228. For more information, contact Dawn at dmalex289@msn.com, or go to: http:// oregonsdop.org/scholarships-contests/. n


Sources + Resources ON THE WEB

Resources for Real-World Geography

WHAT: National Geographic Society offers a selection of content from NG Education about how people use geography in their careers. Explore their collection of resources to inspire students with the achievements of real-world geographers. n HOW: To find out more, go to www. nationalgeographic.org/topics/real-worldgeography/ n

The Oregon Blue Book—Online

WHAT: The online Oregon Blue Book is Oregon’s official fact book and almanac containing overviews and details about Oregon’s economy, executive, legislative and judicial branches, election history, state history, public education, all 241 cities and 36 counties, government finance, geography, nine federally recognized Indian tribes, bridges and dams, and much more. n HOW: Go to http://bluebook.oregon.gov. n

Educator guide on Immigrant and Refugee Children

WHAT: This article, titled: “Immigrant and Refugee Children: A Guide for Educators and School Support Staff” from Teaching Tolerance, Spring 2017 (#55) has facts about undocumented students, frequently asked questions about immigration raids, and options for K-12 educators. n HOW: To read this article, go to http://bit. ly/2kvbEpl. n

K-12 Visual Art Online Forum

WHAT: This is an NEA EdCommunities online forum where art educators from across the nation can collaborate. Explore best practices, issues, and trends in art education and what works in the classroom and for students. Collaborate on all aspects of the profession including classroom management, curriculum, policy, standards, assessments, lessons, advocacy. n HOW: To learn more about this online forum or to become a member of NEA EdCommunities, go to https://mynea360. force.com/login. Sign up for free.

BOOKS

Dream Wakers: Mentor Texts That Celebrate Latino Culture by Ruth Culham Stenhouse Publishers, 2016; ISBN-13: 9781625311115; $38.60 (List Price), Available at www.stenhouse.com This book is filled with ideas to teach writing using children's books that celebrate Latino life and culture as mentor texts. Includes an annotated list of more than 120 carefully selected books with do-it-today lesson ideas for teaching the traits of writing.

Promoting Racial Literacy in Schools: Differences That Make a Difference By Howard C. Stevenson Teachers College Press, 2013; ISBN-13: 9780807755044; $33.95 (List Price); Available at www.tcpress.com This book explores how racial stress undermines student achievement and workable strategies to improve their racial literacy skills to read, recast, and resolve racially stressful encounters when they happen.

Teaching Globally: Reading the World Through Literature By Kathy Short, Deanna Day, and Jean Schroeder Stenhouse Publishers, 2016; ISBN-13: 9781571107923; 37.33 (List Price), available at www.stenhouse.com In this edited collection, the authors bring together 14 educators who use global children’s literature to help students explore their own cultural identities. Built around a curriculum framework, the book will help educators integrate a global focus into existing literacy and social studies curricula, evaluate global resources, guide students as they investigate cross-cultural issues, and create classroom activities with an intercultural perspective.

n

Deconstructing Race: Multicultural Education Beyond the Color-Bind By Jabara Mahiri Teachers College Press. 2017; ISBN-13: 9780807757765; $37.95 (List Price); Available at www.tcpress.com This book discusses why multicultural education needs to move beyond racial categories defined and sustained by the ideological, social, political, and economic forces of white supremacy. The author investigates micro-cultural practices and provides a compelling framework for understanding the diversity of individuals and groups. TODAY’S OEA | SPRING 2017

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2017 P R O PO S E D P O L I CY A M E N D ME N TS

Revisions: new language is underlined, deleted a is struck through. POLICY AMENDMENT A The Board of Directors forwards the Proposed Policy Amendment A with a Do Pass Recommendation

7000 – RELIEF FUND POLICY (OEA Bylaws Article XII) II. SITUATIONS FOR WHICH EXPENDITURES MAY BE AUTHORIZED

charter schools. Submitted by: Board of Directors Contact: Hanna Vaandering POLICY AMENDMENT C The Board of Directors forwards the Proposed Policy Amendment C with a Do Pass Recommendation

1300 PURPOSES AND POLICY DEVELOPMENT IV. POLICY DEVELOPMENT

G. The 2017 Representative Assembly approves the interim policy established by the Board of Directors during the September 2016 Board meeting authorizing the one- time transfer of up to $750,000 from the Relief Fund to the Collective Bargaining Fund to support Ballot Measure 97.

E. Policy for areas not covered by OEA Representative Assembly action is not established by staff, but staff may recommend interim policy to the OEA Board of DirectorsExecutive Director.

Rationale: Interim Policy adopted by the OEA Board of Directors to provide needed support for Ballot Measure 97 campaign.

Submitted by: Bylaws and Policies Committee

Submitted by: Board of Directors Contact: Hanna Vaandering POLICY AMENDMENT B The Board of Directors forwards the Proposed Policy Amendment B with a Do Pass Recommendation

3400 I. ACHIEVEMENT OF ORGANIZATIONAL EXCELLENCE B. Local Association Requirements (OEA Bylaws, Article XVI, Section 1) 17. OEA will not organize the employees of a charter school or approve affiliation of a charter school unit unless an internal legal determination is made that the charter school clearly is not subject to either the NLRA or the LMRDA. 18. OEA will disaffiliate from any already- represented charter school where a jurisdictional challenge is filed objecting to representation of the charter school’s employees under the PECBA, unless an internal legal determination is made that the charter school clearly is not subject to either the NLRA or the LMRDA. 19. Except as provided for elsewhere in OEA Policies and Bylaws, the Board has the authority to initiate disaffiliation proceedings and to disaffiliate from local associations. Rationale: Interim Policy adopted by the OEA Board of Directors to address recent changes in National Labor Relations Board treatment of certain types of 34

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Rationale: To reflect the appropriate chain of command, and to promote efficiency. Contact: Sena Norton POLICY AMENDMENT D The Board of Directors forwards the Proposed Policy Amendment D with a Do Pass Recommendation

F. 7. The PIE Board(elected by OEA Board) (appointed by the UniServ Council and subject to approval by the OEA Board) a body which oversees the administration of voluntary contributions for political candidates and/ or issues. It is a separate corporate body. H. OEA Choice Trust (elected by OEA Board) (Trustees subject to approval by OEA Board)- a separate corporate entity which has charge of the statewide school employee Choice program. Rationale: To reflect established past and current practice of the PIE Board, UniServ Councils, and OEA Board. Submitted by: Bylaws and Policies Committee Contact: Sena Norton POLICY AMENDMENT F The Board of Directors forwards the Proposed Policy Amendment F with a Do Pass Recommendation

1300 PURPOSES AND POLICY DEVELOPMENT VI. SUMMARY OF OEA TERMINOLOGY I. “UEP” refers to Unified Education Profession

1300 PURPOSES AND POLICY DEVELOPMENT

Rationale: A definition for UEP was lacking in OEA Policies.

VI. SUMMARY OF OEA TERMINOLOGY

Submitted by: Bylaws and Policies Committee

G. Non-Governance Bodies - within the assigned service area of each OEA UniServ Consultant, there is a UniServ Council comprised of representatives from each local association, the OEA Board Director(s), and others other OEA members as determined by the Council (OEA Bylaws, Article XVII). The Councils are established to assist in the implementation of the adopted state program, and to adjust it to accommodate various specific local needs. They assist in the evaluation of the implementation of the service program on an annual basis. UniServ Councils operate under OEA established Policies (OEA Policy, UniServ 5000, describes the UniServ function.)

Contact: Sena Norton

Rationale: To be consistent with NEA bylaws, and to clarify language. Submitted by: Bylaws and Policies Committee Contact: Sena Norton POLICY AMENDMENT E The Board of Directors forwards the Proposed Policy Amendment E with a Do Pass Recommendation

1300 PURPOSES AND POLICY DEVELOPMENT VI. SUMMARY OF OEA TERMINOLOGY

POLICY AMENDMENT G The Board of Directors forwards the Proposed Policy Amendment G with a Do Pass Recommendation

2100 – GENERAL REGULATIONS III. LIMIT OF ONE STATE OFFICE No member will be allowed to hold more than one elected state office at a time, except the OEA President who serves as the first alternate NEA Director (OEA Bylaws Article VII, Section 2A), and the OEA Vice President who serves as the second alternate NEA Director (OEA Bylaws Article VII, Section 2B). A current officer elected to a new office will be able to complete his/her term in the event of an overlap of less than three months due to the initiation date of the new office. Rationale: To make consistent with OEA Policies and Bylaws. Submitted by: Bylaws and Policies Committee Contact: Sena Norton


POLICY AMENDMENT H The Board of Directors forwards the Proposed Policy Amendment H with a Do Pass Recommendation

board shall select its chairperson and render a decision after conducting an investigation, hearing or other proceedings that it determines are necessary.

11. To be a voting member of the Executive Committee.

In the event the OEA President does not comply with a request for a judicial review, the complainant may take the request to the OEA Board of Directors and petition for action from the OEA President or an NEA Director.

12. To be a voting member of the Program Budget Committee.

Rationale: To identify who determines whether a conflict of interest exists.

Rationale: To reflect established past and current practice of the OEA President, OEA Executive Committee, and the Budget Committee, and to make consistent with other officers’ role statements.

Submitted by: Bylaws and Policies Committee

2300 – OFFICERS OF THE OEA I. PRESIDENT'S ROLE STATEMENT

Submitted by: Bylaws and Policies Committee Contact: Sena Norton POLICY AMENDMENT I The Board of Directors forwards the Proposed Policy Amendment I with a Do Pass Recommendation

2300 – OFFICERS OF THE OEA IV. NEA DIRECTORS' ROLE STATEMENT J. To be a voting member of the Program Budget Committee. Rationale: To reflect established past and current practice of NEA Directors, and Program Budget Committee, and to make consistent with other officers’ role statements. Submitted by: Bylaws and Policies Committee Contact: Sena Norton POLICY AMENDMENT J The Board of Directors forwards the Proposed Policy Amendment J with a Do Pass Recommendation

2700 – JUDICIAL PANEL & REVIEW BOARD I. PROCEDURE FOR ESTABLISHING THE JUDICIAL PANEL AND REVIEW BOARDS E. Three-person Review Board When a charge or a petition for review is filed under the provisions of Article X, Section 3, of the OEA Bylaws, the OEA President shall select by lot one person from each region to form a review board. No person who has a conflict of interest as determined by the OEA Conflict of Interest Officer or OEA General Counsel if the Conflict of Interest Officer is involved in the case, may serve on a review board. If the OEA President is the charged or charging party, the OEA Vice President shall perform any duties assigned to the President for these proceedings. The review

Contact: Sena Norton POLICY AMENDMENT K The Board of Directors forwards the Proposed Policy Amendment K with a Do Pass Recommendation

2800 – LEGAL DEFENSE PROGRAM PURPOSES I. PURPOSES A. Individual To provide funds for legal assistance to members of the OEA/NEA in matters that are considered employment related through the Legal Defense Program of the Oregon Education Association and the Kate Frank/ DuShane Fund Unified Legal Services Program of the National Education Association (“ULSP”). II. PROCEDURES Before entering into any legal proceeding where funds are expected to be received from the Legal Defense Program, or the Frank/DuShane Fund ULSP, the following procedures shall be followed: E. The applicant(s) shall fill out a Legal Defense Program/DuShane Fund ULSP assistance request and return it to the UniServ Consultant, who will sign and forward it to the Legal Defense Program Committee consultant. A copy of that form shall be provided to the local. F. An applicant's request for legal funding beyond the initial consultation with an attorney shall be reviewed in a timely manner and decision on further proceedings will be made by the Legal Defense Program consultant with approval of the LDP Committee. 3. Legal Defense Program/ DuShane Fund ULSP will be reimbursed: b. from that portion of other monetary recovery by way of litigation, arbitration, compromise, or settlement which exceeds the member's out-ofpocket loss in a share proportionate to the extent of Legal Defense Program and Dushane ULSP

contributions to the total expense incurred in such proceedings. In no event shall such reimbursement exceed the total amount of assistance extended by the Legal Defense Program/ DuShane Fund ULSP. OEA GUIDELINES FOR LEGAL ASSISTANCE I. Legal Assistance to Members A. Purpose The Legal Defense Program of the Oregon Education Association (“LDP”) and the Unified Legal Services Program of the National Education Association ULSP provide funds for legal assistance to members of the OEA//NEA in matters that are employment related. C. Procedures Before entering any legal proceedings where funds are expected to be received from LDP or the Kate Frank/DuShane fund ULSP, these procedures should be followed: D. Implementation 6. The LDP and NEA Kate Frank/DuShane Fund ULSP will be reimbursed: b. From that portion of other monetary recovery by way of litigation, arbitration, compromise, or settlement which exceeds the member's outof-pocket loss, in a share proportionate to the extent of LDP and NEA Kate Frank/DuShane ULSP contributions to the total expense incurred in such proceedings. In no event shall such reimbursement exceed the total amount of assistance extended by LDP and NEA Kate Frank/DuShane Fund. ULSP. 8. The Legal Defense Program and NEA Kate Frank/ DuShane fund ULSP will be reimbursed: b. From that portion of other monetary recovery by way of litigation, arbitration, compromise, or settlement which exceeds the bargaining unit's out-of-pocket loss in a share proportionate to the extent of LDP and NEA Kate Frank/DuShane ULSP contributions to the total expense incurred in such proceedings. In no event shall such reimbursement exceed the total amount of assistance extended by LDP or NEA Kate Frank/DuShane. ULSP. D. Funding 1. The LDP and NEA Kate Frank/DuShane Fund ULSP shall pay all legal fees and costs incurred by bargaining units in approved cases. NEA has a cap on annual and lifetime funding for approved ULSP TODAY’S OEA | SPRING 2017

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cases. Policy 3200 I. MEMBERS’ PERSONAL, PROFESSIONAL, LEGAL AND HUMAN RIGHTS D. Guidelines for Legal Assistance for OEA/NEA Members from the OEA Legal Defense Program or the NEA DuShane Fund. ULSP.

period after the beginning of the school year to join the Association. Any member who has been dismissed but whose case is still in process shall continue to be considered an active member of the Association until the legal issues relating to employment status are resolved.

Contact: Sena Norton

Rationale: Brings into compliance with Legal Defense Program rules and NEA Unified Legal Services guidelines.

OEA GUIDELINES FOR LEGAL ASSISTANCE

Submitted by: Bylaws and Policies Committee

The DuShane Fund ULSP of the National Education Association, and the Legal Defense Program of the Oregon Education Association provide funds for assisting members of the NEA/OEA in court cases that are job-connected. It is important that attorneys, OEA staff members, and other persons connected with such litigation understand the appropriate procedure for such proceedings. All such proceedings should have the approval of the local association, where possible. The UniServ Consultant should help process the application for funding. Attorneys who are retained should proceed in cooperation with the local association, the UniServ Consultant, and the Executive Director (or his/her designee) of the Oregon Education Association.

Contact: Sena Norton

Before entering any litigation where funds are expected to be received from the NEA DuShane Fund ULSP or the OEA Legal Defense Program, the following information should be provided:

Rationale: Reflects established past and current practice of the OEA Legal Defense Program, and brings into compliance with NEA and OEA Legal Defense Program requirements by ensuring timely funding decisions and legal action.

E Procedures for Legal Assistance to the OEA Bargaining Units 4. Authorization for Legal Assistance

POLICY AMENDMENT M The Board of Directors forwards the Proposed Policy Amendment M with a Do Pass Recommendation

2800 – LEGAL DEFENSE PROGRAM II. PROCEDURES F. An applicant's request for legal funding beyond the initial consultation with an attorney shall be reviewed in a timely manner and decision on further proceedings will be made by the Legal Defense Program consultant with approval of the LDP Committee. The LDP Committee will review, at least annually, legal funding decisions made by the Legal Defense Program.

Submitted by: Bylaws and Policies Committee Contact: Sena Norton

POLICY AMENDMENT O The Board of Directors forwards the Proposed Policy Amendment O with a Do Pass Recommendation

I. Legal Assistance to Members D. Implementation 4, A member's request for legal funding shall be reviewed in a timely manner and a decision will be made by the LDP consultant, with approval of the LDP Committee. Written notice will be sent to the member by certified mail within five working days from the date of the decision when funding is denied. 5. An applicant's request for legal funding beyond the initial consultation with an attorney shall be reviewed in a timely manner and a decision on further proceedings will be made by the LDP consultant with the approval of the LDP Committee. Written notice to the member, sent by certified mail, will follow any denial of further funding. II. Legal Assistance to Bargaining Units C. Procedures 7. A bargaining unit's request for legal funding shall be reviewed in a timely manner and a decision will be made by the LDP consultant, with approval of the LDP Committee. Written notice will be sent to the bargaining unit by certified mail within five working days from the date of the decision when funding is denied.

The Board of Directors forwards the Proposed Policy Amendment N with a Do Pass Recommendation

Rationale: Reflects established past and current practice of the OEA Legal Defense Program, and brings into compliance with NEA and OEA Legal Defense Program requirements by ensuring timely funding decisions and legal action.

OEA GUIDELINES FOR LEGAL ASSISTANCE

Submitted by: Bylaws and Policies Committee

Submitted by: Bylaws and Policies Committee

I. Legal Assistance to Members

Contact: Sena Norton

Contact: Sena Norton

B. Criteria for LDP Assistance

C. The OEA will seek aid from the NEA DuShane Fund ULSP in meeting the expenses of special cases covered by NEA DuShane Fund ULSP policy. Rationale: To reflect terms currently used by both NEA and the OEA Center for Legal Services.

POLICY AMENDMENT L The Board of Directors forwards the Proposed Policy Amendment L with a Do Pass Recommendation

2800 – LEGAL DEFENSE PROGRAM II. PROCEDURES A. The applicant(s) must be a member of the OEA, or an OEA bargaining unit, at the time of the occurrence that gives rise to the need for legal assistance. New member applicants shall be granted a one-month grace 36

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POLICY AMENDMENT N

5. Workers Compensation Cases b. Funding may be authorized for representation in cases when the decision in the workers compensation proceeding could have an effect on a related Fair Dismissal Appeals Board (“FDAB”) claim or other court claim in which attorney fees already have been authorized. Rationale: A definition for FDAB is not included in OEA Policies. Submitted by: Bylaws and Policies Committee

POLICY AMENDMENT P The Board of Directors forwards the Proposed Policy Amendment P with a Do Pass Recommendation

OEA GUIDELINES FOR LEGAL ASSISTANCE II. Legal Assistance to Bargaining Units A. Purpose It is important to provide financial aid, staff and legal assistance to bargaining units for factfinding, Employee Relations Board (“ERB”) matters, arbitrations, and related court actions, assuring equitable treatment for


all members. Rationale: A definition for ERB is not included in OEA Policies. Submitted by: Bylaws and Policies Committee Contact: Sena Norton POLICY AMENDMENT Q The Board of Directors forwards the Proposed Policy Amendment Q with a Do Pass Recommendation

3200 I. MEMBERS’ PERSONAL, PROFESSIONAL, LEGAL AND HUMAN RIGHTS G. Qualifying for OEA Bargaining Crisis Assistance 5. Before the 30 day cooling-off period ends, the local association, in consultation with the local UniServ Consultant, shall: a. Participate in an initial pre-strike evaluation by OEA administered by a Strike Evaluation Team. The Team will be composed of UniServ Consultants and local leaders from other local OEA associations. In consultation with the local UniServ Consultant, the Associate Executive Director for the Center for Advocacy & Affiliate Services shall appoint the Consultants to the team, and the OEA President shall appoint the local leaders. The local association may request changes in the Strike Evaluation Team. A report from this Team will be forwarded to the local association, the local UniServ Consultant, the OEA Executive Committee and the OEA Associate Executive Director for the Center for Advocacy & Affiliate Services or designee. Rationale: Review by the Executive Committee is required because, ultimately, the Executive Committee plays a crucial role in sanctioning a strike. Submitted by: Bylaws and Policies Committee Contact: Sena Norton POLICY AMENDMENT R The Board of Directors forwards the Proposed Policy Amendment R with a Do Pass Recommendation

weaknesses identified in the initial report, the local association will: P participate in a follow-up pre- strike evaluation by the same OEA team. A final report from this Team will be forwarded to the local association, the local UniServ Consultant, the OEA Associate Executive Director for the Center for Advocacy & Affiliate Services or designee, the OEA Executive Committee, and the OEA Relief Fund Committee. Rationale: Removes superfluous letter. Submitted by: Bylaws and Policies Committee Contact: Sena Norton POLICY AMENDMENT S The Board of Directors forwards the Proposed Policy Amendment S with a Do Pass Recommendation

3400 I. ACHIEVEMENT OF ORGANIZATIONAL EXCELLENCE C. Association Services 3. Fair Share Services (OEA Bylaws, Article II) Fair Share fee payers shall be entitled to all benefits provided to bargaining unit members excepting the right to vote and hold office (and rights to special services-- such as instructional institutes--unless granted by the OEA Board of Directors upon written request by local associations). Fair share (agency shop) fee payers shall be accorded the rights and privileges as required by law and determined by the OEA Board of Directors. Rationale: To make consistent with OEA Bylaws and Oregon law. Submitted by: Bylaws and Policies Committee Contact: Sena Norton POLICY AMENDMENT T The Board of Directors forwards the Proposed Policy Amendment T with a Do Pass Recommendation

5000 – UNISERV III. THE UNISERV CONSULTANT AND OTHER UNISERV STAFF

I. MEMBERS’ PERSONAL, PROFESSIONAL, LEGAL AND HUMAN RIGHTS

A. UniServ Consultant Responsibilities

a. Approximately two weeks following the initial strike evaluation, after having addressed any organizational

The UniServ Consultant shall carry out the policies and programs of the local associations within the UniServ Council. Rationale: Reflects OEA structure and makes consistent with OEA Bylaws. Submitted by: Bylaws and Policies Committee

3200

5. Before the 30 day cooling-off period ends, the local association, in consultation with the local UniServ Consultant, shall:

priorities of services needed in their service units.The OEA Representative Assembly will determine the priorities for the state. The UniServ Councils will determine the responsibilities of each UniServ Consultant so as to implement the state priorities and to determine the priorities of services needed in their service units.

The main purpose of the UniServ structure is to provide competent professional field service to the local membership of the unified local-UniServ CouncilOEA-NEA. Detailing the responsibilities of the UniServ Consultant is left to the respective UniServ Councils who are charged with the responsibility of determining the

Contact: Sena Norton POLICY AMENDMENT U The Board of Directors forwards the Proposed Policy Amendment U with a Do Pass Recommendation

5000 – UNISERV III. THE UNISERV CONSULTANT AND OTHER UNISERV STAFF B. Employment procedures of UniServ professional personnel 4. Final interviews and approval of appointments. c. The final recommendation shall be made to the UniServ Council by the Council’s Executive Committee or the designated representatives and the OEA Board Director(s) with the advice of other members of the interview committee. Rationale: To clarify which executive committee makes the recommendation. Submitted by: Bylaws and Policies Committee Contact: Sena Norton POLICY AMENDMENT V The Board of Directors forwards the Proposed Policy Amendment V with a Do Pass Recommendation

5000 – UNISERV III. THE UNISERV CONSULTANT AND OTHER UNISERV STAFF C. Employment of UniServ Associate Personnel 1. Each UniServ office shall employ at least one full-time Secretary. UniServ Secretaries Assistants are employees of the OEA and are covered by the provisions of the Collective Bargaining Agreement between the Associate Staff Organization and OEA. Rationale: This requirement was eliminated during contract negotiations with the OEA Professional TODAY’S OEA | SPRING 2017

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Staff Organization. Reflects current OEA staffing. Also, replaces “Secretaries” with “Assistants” to be consistent with current OEA terminology.

Contact: Sena Norton

Submitted by: Bylaws and Policies Committee

The Board of Directors forwards the Proposed Policy Amendment Y with a Do Pass Recommendation

Contact: Sena Norton POLICY AMENDMENT W The Board of Directors forwards the Proposed Policy Amendment W with a Do Pass Recommendation

5000 – UNISERV III. THE UNISERV CONSULTANT AND OTHER UNISERV STAFF 3. The UniServ Secretary Assistant shall support members, and be accountable to the UniServ Consultant and, ultimately, to OEA. 4. The UniServ Consultant shall have the authority to recommend dismissal of the UniServ Secretary Assistant consistent with OEA policies, directives, relevant laws and the ASO Collective Bargaining Agreement. Rationale: Reflects OEA structure and confirms compliance with relevant law. Also, replaces “Secretaries” with “Assistants” to be consistent with current OEA terminology. Submitted by: Bylaws and Policies Committee Contact: Sena Norton POLICY AMENDMENT X The Board of Directors forwards the Proposed Policy Amendment X with a Do Pass Recommendation

5000 – UNISERV III. THE UNISERV CONSULTANT AND OTHER UNISERV STAFF 2. The aApplicants who are determined by the Executive Director or designee to be qualified for Secretary the UniServ Assistant position shall are eligible to be interviewed by OEA. Those applicants who are determined to be qualified for the position may be offered interviews. The interviews shall be conducted by a designee from OEA and the UniServ Consultant and a joint recommendation of employment shall be made to the Executive Director. If a joint recommendation cannot be made, then the Executive Director will determine how to proceed. Rationale: Reflects established past and current practice of the OEA Executive Director and Human Resources department. Clarifies process. Submitted by: Bylaws and Policies Committee 38

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POLICY AMENDMENT Y

6000 – POLITICAL ACTIVITIES REBATEFAIR SHARE PREAMBLE

negotiation and grievance processing costs, training and professional development, internal organizing, visits to school buildings for purposes related to collective bargaining, contract enforcement, investigation of working conditions, etc., litigation related to or concerning represented employees, social and recreational activities to promote bargaining unit solidarity, unit member education, etc.

In response to concerns which have been expressed regarding the constitutional rights accordance with legal requirements regarding the rights of persons who are required by contract to pay money to or join the Oregon Education Association and any of its affiliates (hereinafter referred to as the OEA), the OEA Board of Directors adopts the following political activity rebatefair share procedure.

I. “Non-chargeable expenses” are expenditures that are not germane to collective bargaining or contract administration, including but not limited to: the administration of and contributions to political action committees, supporting or contributing to candidates for political office or political organizations, lobbying, electoral and political efforts (except for lobbying directly related to unit member employment), charitable contributions, member-only benefits, etc.

I. DEFINITIONS

IJ. “Fair share fee" means a payment in lieu of dues which is paid to the OEA (or to an OEA affiliate for subsequent transmission to the OEA) by a nonmember pursuant to a contractual requirement as authorized in ORS 243.650 (10), ORS 243.650, and ORS 243.666 and related statutes.

A. "Affiliate" means any local affiliate of the OEA. B. "Days" means calendar days. C. "Board of Directors" means the Board of Directors of the OEA. D. “Executive Director" means the Executive Director of the OEA or his/her designee. E. "Fiscal year" means September 1 through the following August 31. F. "OEA dues" means the dues and assessments for the fiscal year in question. G. "Nonmember" means a nonmember of the OEA who is required to pay a "fair share" fee to the OEA. H. "Political activity" means: 1. The administration of an independent political action committee. 2. The determination and/or publicizing of an organizational preference for a candidate for political office. 3. Efforts to enact, defeat, repeal, or amend legislation which is not related to the working conditions (legislation changing any of the provisions of ORS Ch. 243.650 et. seq., or its successors, shall be deemed related to working conditions), welfare, job security, or working environment of employees represented by the OEA and/or its affiliates. H. “Chargeable expenses” are expenditures that are germane to collective bargaining or contract administration, including but not limited to: contract

II. LEGAL REQUIREMENTS AND REVIEW This procedure will be implemented in accordance with the provisions of the Public Employee Collective Bargaining Act and binding legal precedent under the PECBA and the United States Constitution regarding union security and fair share, including but not limited to Chicago Teachers Union, Local No.1, AFT, AFL-CIO v. Hudson, 475 U.S. 292 (1986). The OEA will regularly direct counsel to review its implementation of this procedure to insurance compliance with the law. PRELIMINARY POLITICAL ACTIVITY REBATE A. Not more than thirty (30) days after the OEA Board of Directors adopts the OEA annual budget, the OEA Executive Director shall determine the percentage of the budget which is allocated to political activity. B. The OEA dues for active members for the fiscal year in question shall be multiplied by the aforesaid percentage and the product shall constitute the preliminary political activity rebate for nonmembers who are eligible for OEA active membership. C. A computation similar to that provided for in


the above paragraph shall be made using the OEA dues for associate members, if any, and the product shall constitute the preliminary activity rebate for nonmembers who are eligible for that class of OEA membership. 1. When used herein the phrase "preliminary political activity rebate" is intended to refer to the rebate appropriate to the particular membership class in question. III. CALCULATION OF CHARGEABLE EXPENSES A. Based on audited financial statements, the OEA will prepare a calculation annually that identifies the percentages of its expenses that are chargeable and non-chargeable. B. Local affiliates will have the option of preparing their own calculation of chargeable expenses or, if legally permissible, will apply the “local presumption” which presumes that the Local’s percentage of chargeable expenses is at least as great as the OEA’s. IV. NOTIFICATION OF REBATE FAIR SHARE PROCEDURE A. Notification of the Fair Share Procedure will be sent to all non-members annually. Such notice shall: 1. Explain how the OEA calculated the percentage of non-chargeable expenses and provide access to the relevant financial statements and auditor reports. 2. Explain that non-members have the right to object to the use of their fair share fees for nonchargeable purposes and describe the procedure for filing an objection to receive a rebate of nonchargeable expenses. 3. Explain that non-members have the right to challenge the OEA’s calculation of the percentage of non-chargeable percentage and describe the procedure for filing a challenge. A. As soon as possible after a fair share requirement becomes operative in a particular fiscal year in a bargaining unit for which an OEA affiliate is the collective bargaining representative and informs OEA that such a requirement is operative, the Executive Director shall send to such affiliate: 1. A copy of the OEA political activity rebate procedure. 2. Sufficient notice packets for each nonmember of that affiliate. 3. The local will provide by mail or hand delivery

to each nonmember every year the OEA supplied notice packet which indicates:

nonmember who requests a political activity rebate a written communication informing him/her that:

a. That nonmembers may request a political activity rebate from the OEA;

A. His or her request for a political activity rebate has been received;

b. The steps to be taken by a nonmember in order to request a political activity rebate; and

B. An amount equal to the preliminary political activity rebate has been placed in an escrow account on his/her behalf; and

c. The amount of the preliminary political activity rebate and the manner in which it has been computed. B. A fair share rebate notice shall be printed in the first two issues of TODAY’S OEA, or in similar publications generally available to all employees in bargaining units represented by OEA affiliates, published during each fiscal year in question. IV. REQUEST FOR REBATE A. A nonmember who objects to the expenditure of any portion of his/her fair share fee for political activity may request a political activity rebate by sending a written communication to the OEA Executive Director. Said communication shall be considered timely if it is postmarked not more than thirty (30) days after the nonmember paid any portion of the fair share or knew or reasonably should have know of his/her right to request a political activity rebate, whichever is later. B. The written communication shall include a statement by the nonmember that he/she is not a member of the OEA and objects to the expenditure of any portion of his/her fair share fee for political activity, a request for a political activity rebate, and the following information: 1. The name and address of the nonmember; 2. The position in which the nonmember is employed; 3. The name of the OEA affiliate which is the collective bargaining representative for the bargaining unit in question; and 4. The amount of the fair share fee. C. If the written communication does not contain the above information, it shall be returned to the nonmember with appropriate instructions for resubmission. For purposes of timelines, the date of the initial communication shall be determinative. V. ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF REQUEST FOR ACTIVITY REBATE 1. The OEA Executive Director shall send to each

C. The political activity rebate to which he/she is entitled shall be sent to him/her not more than thirty (30) days after the end of the fiscal year in question. VI. FINAL POLITICAL ACTIVITY REBATE A. After the fiscal year in question has ended, the OEA Executive Director shall utilize the procedure set forth in "II" to compute, on the basis of the percentage of the OEA annual budget actually spent for political activity, a final political activity rebate for nonmembers who are eligible for OEA active membership. When used herein, the phrase "final political activity rebate" is intended to refer to the rebate appropriate to the particular membership class in question. B. Not more than thirty (30) days after the end of the fiscal year in question, political activity rebates shall be sent by certified mail, return receipt requested, to those nonmembers who requested such rebates as provided below: 1. A nonmember who has paid the full amount of a fair share fee which was equal to OEA dues shall receive the full amount of the final political activity rebate. 2. The entitlement to a political activity rebate of a nonmember who has paid the full amount of a fair share fee which was less than OEA dues shall be determined as follows: the full amount of the final political activity rebate times the percentage that the fair share fee paid is of full OEA dues. 3. A nonmember who has paid a fair share fee for less than an entire year shall receive a proportionally reduced political activity rebate. C. The OEA Executive Director shall include with such rebates a written communication which explains the reason for any difference between the preliminary and final political activity rebates and indicates the steps to be taken by a nonmember in order to challenge the amount of the final political activity rebate pursuant to "VII" below. VII. CHALLENGE TO FINAL POLITICAL ACTIVITY TODAY’S OEA | SPRING 2017

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REBATE A. If a nonmember contends that the final political activity rebate does not accurately reflect the percentage of the OEA annual budget actually spent for political activity, he/she may challenge the final political activity rebate by sending a written communication to this effect to the OEA Executive Director. Said communication shall be considered timely if it is postmarked not more than ten (10) days after the nonmember received the rebate and written communication from the OEA Executive Director pursuant to "VI" above. B. The OEA Executive Director shall refer any challenge to the OEA Board of Directors. The OEA Board of Directors shall take such steps as it deems appropriate to resolve the issue, provided that the nonmember and/or his/her representative shall have the right to submit written material and to present oral argument to the OEA Board of Directors. The OEA Board of Directors may, at its option, consolidate two or more such challenges into a single proceeding. C. Each nonmember who filed a timely challenge to the final political activity rebate shall be notified by certified mail, return receipt requested, of the decision of the OEA Board of Directors. If a nonmember is not satisfied with the decision of the OEA Board of Directors he/she may, within ten (10) days after receipt of said decision, submit the matter to arbitration. Said appeal to arbitration shall be in writing to the OEA Executive Director and shall be timely if it is postmarked not more than ten (10) days after the nonmember received the decision of the OEA Board of Directors. The OEA Executive Director shall transmit all said appeals to the American Arbitration Association. The Voluntary Labor Arbitration Rules of the American Arbitration Association shall apply, as then in effect, provided that: 1. The OEA Board of Directors shall have the burden of establishing a prima facie case in support of the final political activity rebate; 2. The arbitrator's function shall be to determine whether or not the final political activity rebate accurately reflects the percentage of the OEA annual budget actually spent for political activity as defined in "A" above, and the arbitrator shall have no power to modify any provision of this rebate procedure; and 3. If more than one nonmember submits the matter to arbitration, the American Arbitration Association shall consolidate all of the challenges can into a single proceeding. The American 40

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Arbitration Association may modify its rules with respect to the selection of the arbitrator, the order of the proceedings, the apportionment of the expenses of the arbitration among the parties, and/ or in such other respects as may be necessary to accommodate the consolidation. D. The OEA Board of Directors and/or the arbitrator may increase, but not decrease the final political activity rebate. If the OEA Board of Directors and/or the arbitrator increases the final political activity rebate, those nonmembers who requested political activity rebates shall be sent promptly any additional amount to which they be entitled.

of this procedure. F. A request for rebate to OEA shall constitute a request for any locals with fair share agreements unless the local adopts a specific procedure of its own in conformance with U.S. Constitutional requirements. Locals will calculate the rebate, if any, in accordance with this policy at the end of their fiscal year. Rationale: Brings into compliance with state and federal law. Clarifies process, and reflects established past and current practice. Submitted by: Bylaws and Policies Committee Contact: Sena Norton

VIII. UNION SHOP If the members of the bargaining unit are required by contract to become members of an OEA affiliate as a condition of employment, all OEA members in said bargaining unit shall be eligible to obtain a political activity rebate pursuant to the procedure set forth herein as if they were nonmembers. IX. AFFILIATE REBATES A. For every nonmember who files a timely request for rebate as provided in "IV" of this procedure, the Executive Director shall communicate said request to the local affiliate which is the collective bargaining representative for the bargaining unit which includes the nonmember. B. Said communication shall be treated as a timely request by said nonmember for a political activity rebate from said affiliate. C. The political activity rebate of said affiliate shall be calculated in like manner as provided for calculation of the OEA rebate in this procedure. For purposes of this provision, the definitions in "I" of this procedure shall apply, but "fair share fee" shall mean a payment in lieu of dues which is retained and expended by the OEA affiliate, exclusive of NEA and OEA dues. D. Promptly at the close of each fiscal year, each local affiliate shall, by certified mail, return receipt requested, send to each nonmember, who has timely requested a political activity rebate, a rebate in the amount calculated as due from said affiliate. E. Any appeal of the amount of the OEA political activity rebate shall be deemed to be an appeal of the amount of the local affiliate paid activity rebate as well, and shall be processed as part of said appeal according to the procedures set forth in "VII"


2017 P R O PO S E D BY LAWS A M E N DME N TS

Revisions: new language is underlined, deleted language is struck through. BYLAWS AMENDMENT A The Board of Directors forwards the Proposed Bylaws Amendment A with a Do Pass Recommendation

ARTICLE I. MEMBERSHIP AND DUES Section 3. Active Members 4) Dues Adjustments b. Continuing active members whose employment has been involuntarily terminated shall be considered active members with all rights and privileges during the term of their litigation. Dues payment shall be held in abeyance during the term of the litigation. Rationale: Brings into compliance with Legal Defense Program rules and NEA Unified Legal Services guidelines. Submitted by: Bylaws and Policies Committee Contact: Sena Norton BYLAWS AMENDMENT B The Board of Directors forwards the Proposed Bylaws Amendment B with a Do Pass Recommendation

ARTICLE I. MEMBERSHIP AND DUES Section 5. Student Members A. Any undergraduate or full-time graduate student enrolled in, or preparing for, a teacher education program in a college or university may become a student member of the OEA by joining a Student Oregon Education Association chapter. An SOEA member may also join a local association of OEA and must also be a student member of NEA. Anyone who has been an active member of any NEA state affiliate is ineligible for SOEA membership. Membership shall include the right to vote, serve as a delegate and to receive OEA publications. Rationale: Brings into compliance with NEA rules. Also, makes consistent with other membership categories. Submitted by: Bylaws and Policies Committee Contact: Sena Norton BYLAWS AMENDMENT C The Board of Directors forwards the Proposed Bylaws Amendment C with a Do Pass Recommendation

ARTICLE VII. ELECTION OF OFFICERS, DIRECTORS AND DELEGATES Section 2. Nominations

A. President Nominations for the President shall be made by a direct vote of the members in a local association or UniServ Council or by petition of fifty OEA members. A local association or UniServ Council may nominate only one member. An officer of a local association or UniServ Council shall report the name of the nominee in writing, along with a statement of qualifications, to the OEA President on or before sixty days (60) prior to the meeting of the OEA Representative Assembly that will elect the President. Nominations by petition need not be reported or signed by an officer of a local association or UniServ Council, but should include a statement of qualifications. A statement of qualifications of each nominee, if available, shall be sent to all delegates, OEA local associations, and UniServ Councils two weeks prior to the meeting of the OEA Representative Assembly that will elect the President. The nominations shall be reported to the OEA Representative Assembly at its election meeting. In addition, nominations may be made from the floor of the OEA Representative Assembly meeting. The OEA President shall be simultaneously nominated to a concurrent term as the first alternate NEA Director. B. Vice President Nominations for the Vice President shall be made by a direct vote of the members in a local association or UniServ Council or by petition of fifty OEA members. A local association or UniServ Council may nominate only one member. An officer of a local association or UniServ Council shall report the name of the nominee in writing, along with a statement of qualifications, to the OEA President on or before sixty days (60) prior to the meeting of the OEA Representative Assembly that will elect the President. Nominations by petition need not be reported or signed by an officer of a local association or UniServ Council, but should include a statement of qualifications. A statement of qualifications of each nominee, if available, shall be sent to all delegates, OEA local associations, and UniServ Councils two weeks prior to the meeting of the OEA Representative Assembly that will elect the Vice President. The nominations shall be reported to the OEA Representative Assembly at its election meeting. In addition, nominations may be made from the floor of the OEA Representative Assembly meeting. The Vice President shall be simultaneously nominated to a concurrent term as the second alternate NEA Director. C. Regional Vice Presidents Nominations for Regional Vice Presidents shall be made by a direct vote of the members in a local association or UniServ Council within the designated

region or by a petition of fifty OEA members within that region. A local association or UniServ Council may nominate only one member. An officer of a local association or UniServ Council shall report the name of the nominee in writing along with a statement of qualifications, to the OEA President on or before sixty days (60) prior to the meeting of the OEA Representative Assembly that will elect the Regional Vice Presidents. Nominations by petition need not be reported or signed by an officer of a local association or UniServ Council, but should include a statement of qualifications. A statement of qualifications of each nominee, if available, shall be sent to all delegates, OEA local associations, and UniServ Councils in the appropriate region prior to the meeting of the OEA Representative Assembly that elects Regional Vice Presidents. The nominations shall be reported to the OEA Representative Assembly at its election meeting. In addition, nominations may be made from the floor, provided that any such nominee is from the region for which the office is designated to serve. D. Board of Directors Nominations for OEA district directors shall be made by direct vote of the members in a local association or UniServ Council or by petition of fifty OEA members in the district concerned. A local association or UniServ Council may nominate only one member. An officer of a local association or UniServ Council shall report the name of the nominee in writing, along with a statement of qualifications to the OEA President, postmarked or received on or before January 15. E. NEA Directors for Oregon Nominations for NEA Director shall be made by a direct vote of the members in a local association or UniServ Council or by a petition of fifty OEA members. A local association or UniServ Council may nominate only one member. An officer of a local association or UniServ Council shall report the name of the nominee in writing along with a statement of qualifications, to the OEA President on or before sixty days (60) prior to the meeting of the OEA Representative Assembly that will elect the NEA Director. Nominations by petition need not be reported or signed by an officer of a local association or UniServ Council, but should include a statement of qualifications. A statement of qualifications of each nominee, if available, shall be sent to all delegates, OEA local associations, and UniServ Councils two weeks prior to the meeting of the OEA Representative Assembly that will elect the NEA Director. The nominations shall be reported to the OEA Representative Assembly at its election meeting. In addition, nominations may be made from the floor of the OEA Representative Assembly meeting. TODAY’S OEA | SPRING 2017

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2017 PR O PO S E D BY LAWS A M E N DME N TS

F. NEA Representative Assembly State Delegates Nominations for NEA Representative Assembly State Delegates shall be made by direct vote of the members in a local association or UniServ Council within the designated region or by petition of fifty NEA members within that region. A local association or UniServ Council may nominate only one member. An officer of a local association or UniServ council shall report the name of the nominee in writing, along with a statement of qualifications, to the OEA President, postmarked or received on or before January 15. Nominations by petition need not be reported or signed by an officer of a local association or UniServ Council.

(1), Education Support Professional Director(s), district Directors and will include Oregon Education Association members who are serving as an NEA Director-at-Large or NEA Executive Committee member. Rationale: To reflect the fact that OEA now has three NEA Directors. Submitted by: Bylaws and Policies Committee Contact: Sena Norton

B. School Closures and Sanctions

Section 3.

Contact: Jo Cooper

B. The OEA President shall annually appoint a chairperson for each OEA Cabinet from the members of that Cabinet the Executive Committee.

Section 2. Nominations G. Nominations for Student Leadership Conference/ NEA Delegate shall be made by the direct vote of the members of the Student Oregon Education Association or by petition of 10 Student OEA members. The Student Membership Committee of OEA shall report the names of the nominees postmarked or received on or before January 15. The report shall be in writing with a statement of qualifications to the OEA President. The term for Student Leadership conference NEA Delegate shall be for (one) 1 year. Rationale: To provide more of a voice to students as we build our student program’s numbers and strength. Submitted by: Bylaws and Policies Committee Contact: Sena Norton BYLAWS AMENDMENT E

Rationale: To reflect established past and current practice of the OEA President, Cabinets, and Executive Committee. Submitted by: Bylaws and Policies Committee Contact: Sena Norton BYLAWS AMENDMENT G The Board of Directors forwards the Proposed Bylaws Amendment G with a Do Pass Recommendation

ARTICLE X. JUDICIAL PANEL Section 2. When a case arises, a review board of three persons shall be selected from the Judicial Panel by the OEA President according to OEA policy. [See Policy 2700 I.E.] The OEA Executive Director shall appoint such adviser(s) and provide assistance as may be needed. The review board shall be considered dissolved upon completion of its task. No person shall be selected who has a conflict of interest as determined by the OEA Conflict of Interest Officer or OEA General Counsel if the Conflict of Interest Officer is involved in the case.

The Board of Directors forwards the Proposed Bylaws Amendment E with a Do Pass Recommendation

Rationale: To address the issue of who determines whether a conflict of interest exists.

ARTICLE VIII. OEA BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Submitted by: Bylaws and Policies Committee

Section 1.

Contact: Sena Norton

A. The Board of Directors shall consist of the President, Vice President, Regional Vice Presidents (3), stateelected NEA Directors (23), Ethnic Minority Director 42

TODAY’S OEA | SPRING 2017

To provide financial assistance for members and local associations who suffer a loss of income due to a natural disaster which closes schools, budget defeat deficit with school closure, work stoppage or strike build-up.

The Board of Directors forwards the Proposed Bylaws Amendment F with a Do Pass Recommendation

Submitted by: Credentials Committee

ARTICLE VII. ELECTION OF OFFICERS, DIRECTORS AND DELEGATES

Section 1. Purposes

Section 2. Rules and Procedures

ARTICLE IX. OEA CABINETS AND LEGISLATIVE ADVISORY COUNCIL

The Board of Directors forwards the Proposed Bylaws Amendment D with a Do Pass Recommendation

ARTICLE XII. OREGON EDUCATION ASSOCIATION RELIEF FUND

BYLAWS AMENDMENT F

Rationale: To bring the Bylaws in line with current practices of Credentials Committee; clarifies nomination procedures.

BYLAWS AMENDMENT D

Amendment H with a Do Pass Recommendation

BYLAWS AMENDMENT H The Board of Directors forwards the Proposed Bylaws

1) The OEA Board of Directors shall establish rules and procedures for the investigation of and provision for assistance to bargaining unit members in need, where natural disaster prevents school operation, and therefore results in a loss of income, or where schools have been closed by budget defeatdeficit. Rationale: To address an apparent word-choice error. Submitted by: Bylaws and Policies Committee Contact: Sena Norton BYLAWS AMENDMENT I The Board of Directors forwards the Proposed Bylaws Amendment I with No Position Recommendation

ARTICLE VI. ELECTED OFFICERS B. The term of office of the President shall be two three years, or until a successor is inducted into office. A President may be elected to a maximum of one additional term. C. The term of office of the Vice President shall be two three years or until a successor is inducted into office. The election cycle of the Vice President will coincide with the election cycle of the president. A Vice President may be elected to a maximum of one additional term. D. The term of office of each Regional Vice President shall be for two three years. The first year of that term shall coincide with the second year of the term of the office of the president. Regional Vice Presidents may be elected to a maximum of one additional term. Rationale: Changing the term lengths of president, vice president and regional vice presidents allows them to coincide with term of office for NEA officers. This will also allow our officers to work for the members without constantly campaigning. The work they do for us is important and their concentration should be there and not on having to campaign for office. Submitted by: Petition of 20 OEA signatures


Contact: Karen Watters BYLAWS AMENDMENT J The Board of Directors forwards the Proposed Bylaws Amendment J with a Do Pass Recommendation

ARTICLE VIII. OEA BOARD OF DIRECTORS Section 4. I. Approve all employee group contracts. Rationale: This is to clarify that the Board must approve the contracts with staff unions, managers, directors and confidentials. Submitted by: 20 OEA signatures Contact: Hanna Vaandering BYLAWS AMENDMENT K The Board of Directors forwards the Proposed Bylaws Amendment K with a Do Pass Recommendation

ARTICLE VII. ELECTION OF OFFICERS, DIRECTORS AND DELEGATES Section 3. Election Districts and Regions A. Election Districts For the purpose of electing directors to the OEA Board of Directors, the state shall be divided into districts. The Director(s) shall be elected by the membership at large within each district. Districts will be allocated Director(s) equal to a ratio of 1 director per 1,000 members and whole multiples thereof; i.e., 1-1,999 members (1 Board Director), 2,000-2,999 members (2 Board Directors), 3,000-3,999 (3 Board Directors) based on the January 15 active membership. Every Board district will be guaranteed 1 Director. The number of Directors will be adjusted if for any two consecutive years the membership numbers warrant a change. If membership numbers warrant an additional director for a board district, an election will be held at the next annual Board election to determine which member(s) will represent the Board district for one full three-year term. Following this first full term, the length of the term for this newly-added position may be staggered (1-year or 2-years) to accommodate the board rotation schedule. This language does not apply to OEA-Retired, District #27, which would always have only one Director. In districts with multiple board director seats, seats will be tracked in the order they were added (ex.: 10a, 10b, 10c…) When membership numbers drop below the required ratio for two consecutive years, the last board director seat added in a district will be the first removed

(ex: 10c) upon completion of the current term. If any newly-added board seat is up for election and has been out of compliance in membership numbers for 1 year, the election will be for a one-year term only. n At the conclusion of that one-year term, if the

membership numbers are still below the ratio, the board seat will not be renewed. n At the conclusion of that one-year term, if the

membership numbers are above the ratio, the election will be for a full, three-year term. The state shall be divided into the following districts: District #1 Ashland, Butte Falls, District 6, Eagle Point, Grants Pass, Grants Pass ACE, Medford, Phoenix-Talent, Prospect, Rogue River, Rogue River ACE, Southern Oregon ESD and Three Rivers District #2 Banks, Banks ACE, Forest Grove, Gaston, and Hillsboro District #3 Salem- Keizer EA District #4 Bethel ACE, Creswell, Crow- ApplegateLorane, Fern Ridge, Junction City, Junction City ACE, Lane County ESD,Lowell, Marcola, McKenzie, Oakridge, Pleasant Hill, South Lane, Springfield and Triangle Lake District #5 Eugene EA (Includes Bethel EA and including substitutes) District #6 Bandon, Brookings-Harbor, Central Curry, Central Curry CEA, Coos Bay, Coquille, Mapleton, Mapleton ACE, Myrtle Point, North Bend, Port OrfordLanglois TA, Powers, Assoc of Reedsport, Assoc of Reedsport ESP, Siuslaw and South Coast ESD District #7 Bend, Black Butte (NCBL), Burns- Hines, Crane TA, Crook County, Culver, Dayville (NCBL), Frenchglen (NCBL), High Desert, Madras (Includes Jefferson Co. ESD), Mitchell, Mitchell ACE (NCBL), Redmond and Sisters District #8 Adrian (NCBL), Annex, Baker, Cove, Elgin, Enterprise, Imbler, John Day, Joseph, LaGrande, Long Creek, Long Creek ACE (NCBL), Monument, Monument ESP, North Powder, Nyssa, Ontario, Pine Eagle, Prairie City, Union, Union/Baker ESD, Vale and Wallowa District #9 Canby, Colton, Colton ACE, Estacada, Molalla River, Oregon City, and West Linn District #10 Portland Association of Teachers (including substitutes) District #11 Alsea TA, Central, Corvallis, Dallas, Falls City, Lincoln County, Monroe TA, Perrydale TA, Philomath District #12 Arlington, Athena-Weston TA, Condon, Echo, Fossil ACT, Helix AE, Helix ACE (NCBL), Hermiston AT, Intermountain ESD, Ione (NCBL),

Milton-Freewater, Morrow County, North Central ESD, Pendleton AT, Pilot Rock, Sherman County, Spray, Spray ACE (NCBL), Stanfield and Umatilla District #13 Astoria, Clatskanie, Jewell, Knappa #4, Neah-Kah-Nie TA, Nestucca Area, Northwest, Rainier, Scappoose, Seaside, St. Helens, Tillamook, Vernonia and Warrenton District #14 Centennial, Corbett, Corbett ACE, Gresham-Barlow, Parkrose FA, and Reynolds and Riverdale District #15 Beaverton and Beaverton Subs, (including substitutes) District #16 Amity TA, Dayton, Gervais, North Marion, Sheridan, Silver Falls, St. Paul, State Teachers, United North Marion Educators, Willamette Valley, Willamina, Woodburn and Yamhill-Carlton (NCBL) District #17 Cascade, Central Linn, Greater Albany, Greater Albany ACE, Harrisburg, Jefferson, Lebanon, Lebanon ACEESPA, Linn-Benton-Lincoln ESD, North Santiam, Santiam Canyon, Scio CTA and Sweet Home District #18 Columbia Gorge ESD, District 21, Hood River County, Mosier TA, Multnomah County ESD, North Wasco ESP, South Wasco and South Wasco ACE District #19 Klamath County, Klamath County ACE, Klamath Falls, Klamath Falls ACE, Lakeview, North Lake and Paisley District #20 Clackamas ESD, Clackamas ESD ESPA, David Douglas, Gladstone TA, North Clackamas, and Wy’East District #21 Camas Valley TA, Days Creek, Days Creek ACE, Elkton, Glendale, Glide, North Douglas, Oakland TA, Oakland ACE, Riddle, Riddle ACE, Roseburg, South Umpqua, Sutherlin, Winston- Dillard, Yoncalla and Yoncalla ACE District #24 Association of Salem Keizer ESP District #26 Lake Oswego, McMinnville, Newberg, Riverdale TA, Sherwood and Tigard- Tualatin District #27 OEA-Retired District #30 Blue Mountain FA, Chemeketa FA, Chemeketa PT EA Clackamas CC ACE, Clackamas CC FA, Clackamas CC PT FA, Clatsop CC FA, Clatsop CC PTFA, Community College (NCBL), Klamath CC FA, Lane CC EA, Mt. Hood CC CEA. Mt. Hood CC FA, Mt. Hood CC PT FA, Rogue CC EA and Treasurer Valley EA, Umpqua CC FA, Umpqua CC PT, ACE of Umpqua CC Rationale: These changes need to be made so that the Bylaws reflect current District composition. Submitted by: Board of Directors Contact: Hanna Vaandering TODAY’S OEA | SPRING 2017

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OEA MEMBERS SEEK AS S O C I AT I O N P O SIT IO N S

Candidates’ statements are printed exactly as submitted, and have not been corrected for spelling, grammar, or punctuation.

Candidate for OEA President

Candidate for OEA Vice President

1 Position (2-year Term)

Candidate for OEA Vice President 1 Position (2-year Term)

ALEJANDRA BARRAGÁN

C. JOHN LARSON STATEMENT The OEA will be going through some difficult times in the coming years. With the loss of agency fee looming on the horizon and an administration hostile to Public Education, now is the time to act. We must continue to engage our members around politics, bargaining, and professional practice. Strengthening the education profession is important to me; I believe that every student deserves a quality public education, and that we must continue to advocate for fully funded schools, an atmosphere of safety in all aspects of school life, and a common sense approach to assessment. In the current political environment it is more important than ever that OEA stand up for the students in Oregon. We must be on the front line in the fight for racial justice and equity across our state and our nation. The public school system is the foundation of our democracy and opportunity in America. QUALIFICATIONS

Hermiston » President » Vice-President » Grievance Chair » Building Representative » Negotiations Chairperson Morrow County » President » Vice President » Secretary » Building Representative » Bargaining Chairperson Columbia River UniServ » President » Vice-President » Secretary OEA » Vice President » Board of Directors » Oregon Representative NEA Board of Directors » Executive Committee » Chair — Budget Committee » Chair — Audit Committee » Co-Chair Cabinet for Advocacy and Affiliate Services » OEA Resolutions Committee » PAC Captain — NEA Fund For Children NEA » Board of Directors » Board of Directors Discussion Group Facilitator » PAC Council Representative » Resolutions Committee » Resolutions Co-Chair Alternative Compensation Sub-Committee » Student Member Planning Committee » UniServ Advisory Committee

1 Position (2-year Term)

STATEMENT Serving as the Ethnic Minority Director of Oregon Education Association these last three years, strengthened the voice of underrepresented members and students throughout the state. Through the collaborative work of the NBI on dismantling institutional racism with a diverse group of OEA members, and gaining awareness of inequities across the state, I realized our work has just begun. Our union’s core values, especially those of collaboration, respect for diversity, and social justice guide my work. In addition to strengthening member voices, OEA must strengthen our partnerships with other community organizations to create stronger public schools for all students — especially ones often underserved. Our union faces an array of challenges and as OEA Vice President, I look forward to uniting our union to build the schools Oregon students deserve. Unite our Union, unite our voice. QUALIFICATIONS Local: Reynolds Education Association » Building Representative » Executive Board State: Oregon Education Association » Ethnic Minority Director » OEA RA Delegate » OEA PIE Convention Delegate » Summer Leadership Conference participant » OEA Lobby Day participant » OEA Statewide Advocacy Conference participant » OEA Ethnic Minority Affairs Committee participant » OEA Human and Civil Rights participant National: National Education Association » Minority Leadership Training Conference participant » National Council of Urban Education Association Conference participant Personal: » Oregon Public School Graduate » 7 year elementary school teaching experience

REED SCOTTSCHWALBACH STATEMENT Our power is in our members. Collective action at the local level improves working and learning conditions. Strong buildings build strong locals, and strong locals build a strong OEA. Our collaboration statewide builds the schools students and educators deserve. Strong locals and strong state organizations are threatened by a Trump Supreme Court decision on fair share. Members must see themselves in all our union work. OEA actively working together with locals will increase connections with all members, not just those in crisis. We must boldly express the values of our organization in our work. Our work as local and statewide leaders must reflect our values of advocating for social justice, improving democracy, ensuring respect for diversity and upholding professional and union standards of integrity. Working collaboratively across all of Oregon, and with our NEA family, OEA will be a force for positive change in public education across the nation. QUALIFICATIONS Local » President » Vice president » Chair: • Bargaining • Grievance • Bargaining Crisis

» State Organizing Task Force » Judicial Council

National » NEA Board of Directors » Committee Chair: • NEA Membership Organizing • Board Steering, Floor State Strategy » OEA Executive Com» NEA Crisis Guide mittee Advisory Panel » OEA Board of Directors » NEA Campaign to Win » OEA Budget Committee » NEA Women/Minority » (Co)Chair: Conference • NEA-PAC » US State Department • Cabinet for Public Fulbright program: Affairs Grantee (Mexico), • NEA-RA Floor Strategy Trainer, Selection Com • OEA GLBTQ Caucus mittee Chair » Trainer: • Summer Conference • Advocacy Conference • Organizing Summit • SPARKS » Delegate: • OEA-RA • PIE » Congressional Advocacy Team » Governor’s Task Force on School Safety, K-12 representative » New Member Advisory Council


Please Note: Candidate statements that exceed the word limit stated for each particular opening (OEA President, OEA Vice President, NEA Director – 3-year term, NEA Director – 2-year term, and Region III Vice President) is cut off at the stated word limit. The following candidates will be determined by a vote at the OEA Representative Assembly, April 21-22, 2017

Candidate for NEA Director 1 Position (3-year Term, Term begins Sep 1, 2017)

JENNIFER SCURLOCK STATEMENT I believe in public education! As a high school English teacher, it is a joy and privilege to inspire young minds to grow and think critically about the world around them. Educators should be advocates for students, pushing students to be well-rounded citizens beyond their educational experience. As your NEA Director, I am here to support and advocate for all educators and students at the state and national level, fighting for the resources we need to further our work in education. I am committed to being a listening ear, ensuring that every voice is heard and valued. QUALIFICATIONS

» Interim NEA Director (9/2016 – current) » Oregon Advisory Committee Member for ESSA (6/2016 – current) » Minority Affairs Director for EEA (3/2016 – current) » Churchill High School Equity Team Leader (9/2016 – current) » OEA Summer Leadership Pre-Conference and Conference Workshop Presenter (8/2016) » Organizer and presenter for OEA/EEA Town Hall Symposiums: Addressing Institutionalized Racism (10/2016; 1/2017) » Workshop presenter for OEA Board of Directors: Addressing Institutionalized Racism” (12/2016) » NEA MLT/WLT Training Attendee (1/2016) » OEA Union School “Teaching for Transformation” Training Attendee (4/2016) » OEA EMAC Committee Member (10/2015 – 9/2016)

Candidate for NEA Director 1 Position (2-year Term, Term begins Sep. 1, 2017)

Candidate for Region III Vice President 1 Position (2-year Term)

ENRIQUE FARRERA

CORINNE M. SWAN

STATEMENT As President of the Association of Classified Employees/ESP at Clackamas Community College. In my experience, I have learned that bringing people together is what drives me to advocate for others. I like providing leadership to those who need our support but also to be a vehicle of change for positive outcomes that reflect our communities. I believe the voices of all educators in the state of Oregon are identified as the strongest supporters and champions of student achievements. My responsibilities with the union, has lead me to be a strong proponent for students continued success on all levels of education.

STATEMENT I have truly enjoyed serving members of KCEA, KLUC and the OEA for 19 years. My goal is to ensure that my local and State Union are strong and more empowered. I am dedicated to working with members and leadership for the betterment of public education. It would be my privilege to serve as Region III Vice President. I have a solid understanding of what makes Region III unique and the challenges we face as members in our region.

QUALIFICATIONS

Local » President of Association of Classified Members/ESP at Clackamas Community College » Bargaining Team Member for Association of Classified Members/ESP at Clackamas Community College » Building Representative for Association of Classified Members/ESP at Clackamas Community College State: OEA » Higher Education Coordinating Commission State Commissioner National » Interim NEA Director Personal » Bilingual » Veteran » Team Player » GED Spanish Instructor » Leader » Organizer » Parent

NO PHOTO PROVIDED

QUALIFICATIONS

Local » KCEA President (5 years) » KCEA Vice President (2 years) » KLUC Executive Committee Member » Building Representative (11 years) » KCEA Bargaining Chair (1 year) » KCEA Bargaining Team (5 years) » KCEA Professional Development Committee State » OEA Relief Fund Committee » OEA Representative Assembly (16 years) » OEA PIE Convention Delegate (1 year) » OEA Board of Directors (8 years) » Numerous State Leadership Conferences and Trainings National » Pacific Regional Leadership Conference » NEA RA (1 year) Personal » Teacher with Klamath County Schools (26 years) » Kindergarten teacher (21 years) » Married to the love of my life and best friend (28 years) » Amazing children (2)

TODAY’S OEA | SPRING 2017

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#OE

AM

OEA’s STATEWIDE

DAY OF

ED WE NE YOU

ayD ay

Monday, May 1, 2017

ACTION

Join OEA in standing up for the Schools our Students Deserve as part of a national day of action at local school sites Monday, May 1, 2017. This is a great opportunity for educators to organize at school sites and connect with their community to: protect, and defend all students, no matter their ethnicity,  Welcome, gender identity, and/or immigration status. a safe learning environment for all students regardless of where  Provide they were born, how they look, or who they love.

 Invest in our future by fully funding public education. our public schools from privatization that drains resources from  Protect public school students.

SIGN THE PLEDGE oregoned.org/OEAMayDay #OEAMayDay

Use Our Hashtag


#OE

AM

ED WE NE YOU

OEA’s STATEWIDE

DAY OF

ayD ay

Monday, May 1, 2017

ACTION

Here is how you can get involved: INDIVIDUALY 

Take the online pledge: bit.ly/OEAmaydaypledge

Wear “Red for Ed” on May 1

Wear an “ALL STUDENTS” sticker (Talk to your UniServ Office about how to get one)

Share what you are doing for May Day on social media using the hashtag #OEAMayDay

Like the #OEAMayDay event on Facebook and post your photos to the

event page

IN YOUR SCHOOL 

Organize a ‘WALK-IN’ before school with colleagues and community members to support all of our students (oregoned.org/OEAMayDay)

Take a group picture with your colleagues and post it to social media using the hashtag #OEAMayDay

IN YOUR COMMUNITY  Ask your School Board to pass a resolution confirming your district as a Safe Zone

 Attend a public community event celebrating May Day and take an OEA May Day sign (oregoned.org/OEAMayDay)

 Support our immigrant community by making a donation to one of our partner organizations, Causa, here: causaoregon.org/donate


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Periodicals POSTAGE PAID at Portland OR

Lift Every Voice UNITY // ACTION // EQUITY OEA Summer Leadership Conference • oregoned.org/summerconference

Spring 2017 Today's OEA  

The Spring 2017 issue of Today's OEA magazine.