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2012 reception room issue

TODAY’S FDA F

l o r i d a

D

e n t a l

True ge Coura ) (page

A

s s o c i a t i o n

The 411 on Discoun Health t Cards (page

31

22)

Tooth Talk (page 13 )

ncer Oral Ca e 18) (pag

Pierce Out (page 14)

Florida Dental Association Annual Reception Room Issue


The sign of a

professional! Dentists who join the American Dental Association and Florida Dental Association are committed to a code of ethics and professional conduct that puts patients first.


contents c o v e r s t o ri e s

8-22

Your Oral Health

columns

special

5 President’s Message

7 Calling All Artists!

31 Off the Cusp

26 Test Your Dental Knowledge (Activity Sheets)

features 8 The Facts About Fluoride and Your Oral Health 13 Tooth Talk 14 Pierce Out! 18 Women Close the Oral Cancer Gender Gap 22 The 411 on Health Discount Cards

Read this issue on our website at:

www.smileflorida.org.

www.smileflorida.org

Today’s FDA is a member publication of the American Association of Dental Editors and the Florida Magazine Association.

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Today's FDA

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florida dental assocIation 2012 reception room issue VOL. 25, NO. 2

editor Dr. Hugh Wunderlich, CDE, Palm Harbor, Editor

staff Patty Harrison, publications managing editor Jill Runyan, production coordinator • Lynne Knight, marketing coordinator

council on communications Dr. Stephen Zuknick, Brandon, chairperson • Dr. Dawn Martin, Gainesville, vice chairperson Dr. Jorge Centurion, Miami, trustee liaison • Dr. Michael A. Chanatry, Jacksonville Dr. Jeannette Pena-Hall, Miami • Dr. Richard Huot, Vero Beach Dr. James “Eddie” Martin, Pensacola • Dr. Hugh Wunderlich, CDE, Palm Harbor, editor

board of trustees Dr. Cesar R. Sabates, Coral Gables, president Dr. Kim Jernigan, Pensacola, president-elect Dr. Terry Buckenheimer, Tampa, first vice president Dr. Richard Stevenson, Jacksonville, second vice president Dr. Ralph Attanasi, Delray Beach, secretary Dr. Larry Nissen, Merritt Island, immediate past president Daniel J. Buker, Tallahassee, executive director Dr. Paul Benjamin, Miami • Dr. Gerald W. Bird, Cocoa Dr. David Boden, Port Saint Lucie • Dr. Stephen Cochran, Jacksonville Dr. Lee Cohen, Palm Beach Gardens • Dr. Don Ilkka, Leesburg Dr. Bryan Marshall, Weekiwachee • Dr. Jolene Paramore, Panama City Dr. John Paul, Lakeland • Dr. Tom Ward, Miami Dr. Paul Miller, New Port Richey, treasurer Dr. Alan Friedel, Hallandale, speaker of the house Dr. Hugh Wunderlich, CDE, Palm Harbor, editor

publishing information Today’s FDA (ISSN 1048-5317/USPS 004-666) is published bi-monthly, plus one special issue, by the Florida Dental Association, 1111 E. Tennessee St., Tallahassee, Fla. 32308-6914. FDA membership dues include a $10 subscription to Today’s FDA. Non-member subscriptions are $150 per year; foreign, $188. Periodical postage paid at Tallahassee, Fla. and additional entry offices. Copyright 2012 Florida Dental Association. All rights reserved. Today’s FDA is a refereed publication. POSTMASTER: Please send form 3579 for returns and changes of address to Today’s FDA, 1111 E. Tennessee St., Tallahassee, Fla. 32308-6914.

editorial and advertising policies Editorial and advertising copy are carefully reviewed, but publication in this journal does not necessarily imply that the Florida Dental Association endorses any products or services that are advertised, unless the advertisement specifically says so. Similarly, views and conclusions expressed in editorials, commentaries and/or news columns or articles that are published in the journal are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the editors, staff, officials, Board of Trustees or members of the Florida Dental Association.

editorial contact information All Today’s FDA editorial correspondence should be sent to Dr. Hugh Wunderlich, Today’s FDA Editor, Florida Dental Association, 1111 E. Tennessee St., Tallahassee, Fla. 32308-6914. FDA office numbers: 800.877.9922, 850. 681.3629; fax 850.201.5013; e-mail address, fda@floridadental.org; website address, www.floridadental.org.

Advertising Information For display advertising information, contact: Patty Harrison at pharrison@floridadental.org or 800.877.9922, Ext. 7115 For classified advertising information, contact: Jill Ihasz at jihasz@floridadental.org or 800.877.9922, Ext. 7113. Advertising must be paid in advance.

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President’s message cesar R. sabates, DDS

Your FDA-member Dentist and Your Oral Health

C

hances are if you are reading this message you are seated in the reception room of a member of the Florida Dental Association (FDA). Congratulations on choosing an American Dental Association (ADA)/FDA member to be your dentist! ADA/FDA-member dentists are committed to providing you with the best in dental treatment and are committed to upholding the ADA’s Code of Ethics. Your oral health is an integral part of your overall health. By visiting your dentist on a regular basis, you are well on your way to living a longer and healthier life. Your dental team, working together to achieve this goal, consists of the dentist, dental hygienist and dental assistant. You’ve heard the old adage that “the eyes are the windows to the soul?” Well, your mouth is a mirror to your overall health and happiness. Your smile can give us insight to your personality and important clues to your health can be found in the details of your teeth, gums and tongue. Did you know that your dental health, or lack thereof, could be a factor in cardiovascular disease or diabetes and could lead to delivery of a pre-term and/or low-birth-weight baby? Did you know that oral cancer can be deadly if not detected early? Oral cancer screening is a routine part of a dental examination. Each year in the United States, more than 21,000 men and 9,000 women are diagnosed with oral cancer. Early detection offers the greatest possibility for a cure. Oral cancer can develop in any part of the mouth including the lips, gum tissues, lining of the cheek, tongue and the hard and soft palate. Oral cancer is most prevalent in those who use tobacco in any form. Alcohol use combined with tobacco greatly increases your risk. Living in Florida, we must protect our lips from the sun since prolonged exposure increases your risk of lip cancer. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, gum disease is the second most common oral disease worldwide, second only to tooth decay. Research has shown that infections in the mouth are associated with diabetes, cardiovascular disease and Alzheimer’s disease and that the treatment of periodontal disease may help in the management of chronic disease. Researchers have found that people with gum disease are nearly twice as likely to suffer from coronary artery disease. Periodontal disease can also exacerbate existing heart conditions.

www.smileflorida.org

You must do your part to help your dentist provide you with optimal health care. It is essential that you inform your dentist of all of your current and past medical issues. Make sure your dentist is aware of all the medications you are currently taking and please update this list at every visit. Your dentist wants to know not only what medications have been prescribed to you, but also those overthe-counter medications that you may be taking like aspirin, Ibuprofen, vitamins, etc. It is very important for you to communicate to your dentist if you take medications that interfere with clotting mechanisms such as Plavix, Aspirin or Coumadin, etc. And of course, continue to have regular checkups so your dentist can properly monitor your dental health! Thank you for choosing an ADA/FDA member dentist! We look forward to helping you obtain and maintain a healthy mouth and a healthy body.

Dr. Sabates is the FDA president. He can be reached at 305.448.7217 or sabdent@aol.com.

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Affordable dental insurance that puts you in control! Dental experts say there is an undeniable relationship between a healthy mouth and overall good health. Let us find a plan that is right for you. • Extensive provider networks • Price points to fit every budget • Multiple carriers and multiple plans to suit different needs • Individual/family or group available We can help you find the best option: • Argus Dental • Blue Cross Blue Shield of Florida (through Florida Combined Life) A wholly owned subsidiary of the Florida Dental Association

• Ameritas • United Concordia

Call your dental insurance experts at FDAS for more information. 800.877.7597 • Fax: 850.681.7737 insurance@fdaservices.com www.fdaservices.com (enhanced with online forms, service and support)


artwork contest

Calling All Artists!

The Florida Dental Association (FDA) is holding an art contest. This year’s contest theme, “My Oral Health,” Children 13 years old and younger are invited to participate. The winning picture will be displayed in an upcoming issue of Today’s FDA, which is distributed to nearly 6,500 dentists in Florida. Entries must be submitted on 8.5 x 11 inch paper. Participants must be patients of an FDA-member dentist and 13 years of age or younger. Name, address, phone number and age must be included with all submissions. Submissions will be reviewed by the Today’s FDA Editorial Board. Entries should be mailed to the following address by Tuesday, May 29, 2012:

Communications Department Florida Dental Association 1111 E. Tennessee St. Tallahassee, FL 32308

www.smileflorida.org

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fluoride

The

Facts

...

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fluoride

About

Fluoride and Your

Oral Health

Please see fluoride, 12

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fluoride

Fluoridation Supporters Following is a partial list of Florida and U.S. organizations that recognize the public health benefits of community water fluoridation for preventing dental decay: American Hospital Association American Medical Association Florida Medical Association American Academy of Pediatrics American Association of Dental Research American Association of Public Health Dentistry American College of Dentists American Dental Association American Dental Hygienists’ Association Florida Dental Association National Institute for Dental and Craniofacial Research Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors American Water Works Association American Association for the Advancement of Science American Pharmacists Association American Public Health Association American School Health Association Association of State and Territorial Health Officers U.S. Department of Defense U.S. Public Health Service Florida Public Health Association Florida Department of Health

fluoride from 9

A

n overwhelming amount of scientific evidence consistently indicates that fluoridation of community water supplies is the single most effective, safe and economical way to prevent dental decay among our citizens. More than 65 years ago Grand Rapids, Michigan became the world’s first city to adjust the level of fluoride in its water supply. Since that time, fluoridation has dramatically improved the oral health of tens of millions of Americans – approximately 72.4 percent of the U.S. population served by public water systems receive the benefit of optimallyfluoridated water. Community water fluoridation is the single most effective public health measure to prevent tooth decay, and The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has proclaimed it one of the 10 great public health achievements of the 20th century.  Fluoridation of community water supplies is simply the adjustment of the existing, naturally occurring fluoride levels in drinking water to an optimal fluoride level recommended by the U.S. Public Health Service for the prevention of tooth decay. Studies conducted throughout the past 65 years have consistently shown that fluoridation of community water supplies is safe and effective in preventing dental decay in both children and adults. Simply by drinking water, children and adults can benefit from fluoridation’s cavity protection whether they are at home, work or school. Today, studies prove water fluoridation continues to be effective in reducing tooth decay by 20 to 40 percent.  The Florida Dental Association (FDA) and the American Dental Association (ADA) continue to endorse fluoridation of community water supplies as safe and effective for preventing tooth decay. The FDA and ADA policies regarding community water fluoridation are based on the overwhelming weight of peer-reviewed, credible scientific evidence. The FDA, working together with the Florida Department of Health and local health departments, advocates for optimal fluoridation statewide. Much of the state’s public drinking waters are fluoridated to appropriate and safe levels approved by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In areas that are not fluoridated, the FDA and its partners offer assistance to local groups that may seek to have fluoride added to their water supply on a long-term basis.

(source: Florida Department of Health, Public Health Dental Program) 10

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fluoride

Frequently Asked Questions v

What is community water fluoridation?

Fluoride is naturally present in all water and is often called “nature’s cavity fighter.” Community water fluoridation is the precise adjustment of fluoride that occurs naturally in a community’s water supply to the level recommended for optimal dental health. Adjusting community water supplies to optimal fluoride levels is similar to fortifying salt with iodine, milk with vitamin D and orange juice with vitamin C.

v

Is community water fluoridation the only way to get the cavity prevention benefits of fluoride?

The benefits of fluoride can be provided in many forms, including fluoride toothpaste, dietary fluoride supplements (tablets, drops and lozenges), professional fluoride treatments (gels and varnish) and optimally-fluoridated drinking water. However, community water fluoridation is more cost effective than other forms of fluoride treatment or application; is accessible to the entire community; provides frequent exposure to small amounts of fluoride over time, making fluoridation effective for both children and adults in helping to prevent tooth decay; and doesn’t require a change in behavior to obtain the decay preventing benefits.

v

Doesn’t community water fluoridation just benefit children?

No. People of all ages and backgrounds will benefit. As we age, many factors can result in less saliva, a condition known as “dry mouth.” The risk of tooth decay increases with dry mouth, particularly on the softer root surfaces. When fluoride is in the mouth, the teeth become much more resistant to decay. Fluoridated water is safe, effective, and the least expensive way to reduce tooth decay in children and adults.

v

Is community water fluoridation cost effective?

Yes. The savings in dental treatment costs to a community by providing water fluoridation are substantial. It has been calculated that the lifetime cost per person of providing fluoridated water in the United States is less than the cost of a single filling. Every $1 invested in community water fluoridation saves $38 in dental treatment costs.

v

Can community water fluoridation cause cancer?

The U.S. National Cancer Institute says very clearly that there is no evidence linking water fluoridation to any form of cancer. The CDC stated that studies to date have produced “no credible evidence” of an association between fluoridated drinking water and an increased risk for cancer. The American Cancer Society also recognizes the public health benefit of water fluoridation.

Too often, community leaders consider eliminating fluoride from their city’s drinking water. If your city is facing this decision, you can get more information by calling the FDA at 800.877.9922 or by visiting the following online resources: www.smileflorida.org, http://www.ada.org/fluoride.aspx and www.doh.state.fl.us/family/dental/fluoridation/index.html.

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In 2011, Project: Dentists Care and Give Kids A Smile, both FDHF programs, provided $10 million in low cost or free dental care to Floridians in the most need.

$10 million dollars in florida smiles! support the Florida Dental Health foundation Your donations to the Florida Dental Health Foundation help access-to-care programs for underserved children, adults and seniors. Donations to the FDHF support these programs: • Project: Dentists care • Give kids a smile • Mouth Wise education program • Disaster aid

For more information, or to volunteer, contact the Florida Dental Health Foundation. 800.877.9922, Ext. 7161 fdhf@floridadental.org www.floridasdentalcharity.org

The Florida Dental Health Foundation is a non-profit, charitable organization approved by the Internal Revenue Service as a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt corporation. The FDHF is registered with the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Affairs(#SC-02435). The FDHF receives 100 percent of charitable contributions. No portion of contributions are retained by a professional solicitor. A COPY OF THE OFFICIAL REGISTRATION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE DIVISION OF CONSUMER SERVICES BY CALLING TOLL FREE, (800) 435-7352, WITHIN THE STATE. REGISTRATION DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT, APPROVAL, OR RECOMMENDATION BY THE STATE.


Tooth Talk

tooth talk

By: Jaimie M. Engle

To keep your teeth now and when you get older, listen closely to Mr. and Mrs. Molar: Hi! I’m Mr. Molar and this is my wife. We’re going to give you some good advice. Like brush and floss your teeth each day And they will never go away. And to keep your teeth nice and dandy Don’t eat lots of gum and candy. Snack on veggies, snack on cheese. Foods like these are sure to please. Eat fewer cookies. Eat fewer chips. Too much soda makes teeth sick. See a dentist twice a year. You’ve brushed and flossed, so have no fear! He’ll take tooth pictures. It’s lots of fun. Then you’ll get a smile for a job well done. Healthy teeth are just the start, for healthy teeth means healthy heart.

We hope you’ve learned some good hygiene for brushing and flossing in between. And if you brush the way we say, Your teeth will never go away! Jaimie Engle has been writing professionally since 2003. Her non-fiction work has appeared in magazines, newspapers and various online publications with her most recent work in the October 2011 Chicken Soup for the Soul — Answered Prayers book. Mrs. Engle’s competition-winning poetry was published in the 2009 July/August issue of Writer’s Journal Magazine. She resides in Melbourne with her family.

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oral piercings

Melissa Carman

T

he history of oral piercing dates back to ancient times. The earliest known oral piercing, in the figure of a dog, was created in Egypt in 1500 B.C. and was considered to be a symbol of royalty. Later, Mayan and Aztec cultures administered ritualistic tongue piercings as a religious offering to honor their gods. It’s probably safe to say that the people in these cultures did not consider the oral health implications of their oral piercing actions. Fast-forward to today. In this day and age, an earring stud or hoop protruding out of someone’s

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oral piercings

tongue or lip is not an unusual sight. Today, body piercings are seen as a fashion statement, worn as accessories – as innocuous as wearing a ring or a necklace. Some view it as art, while others view it as a form of expressing their identity. However, oral piercing, which involves the tongue, lips, or cheeks, has actually been implicated in a number of harmful dental conditions and could be a potential risk to your health. So when it comes to making a fashion statement with oral piercing, you’re better off just saying “pierce out.” In tongue piercing, a barbell-shaped piece of jewelry is placed through the tongue with a needle. The end of the jewelry is then placed through the hole and a backing is screwed on. In lip and cheek piercing, a cork is positioned inside the mouth to support the tissue as it is pierced with a needle. The needle is inserted through the tissue and into the cork backing. The needle is then replaced with jewelry and a backing is screwed into place. Healing typically takes four to six weeks but can sometimes take months, and oral piercings usually are administered without anesthesia which, for the squeamish, may be reason enough to avoid them! Please see pierce, 17

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oral piercings

“ ” Many recent scientifc studies show associations between oral health and a variety of general health conditions – including diabetes and heart disease.

pierce from 15

Many dentists discourage patients from getting oral piercings because of their serious oral health complications, including: redness and/or swelling at the piercing site. In certain cases, swelling from a tongue piercing can be so severe that it can actually close off the airway and block breathing. infection. The mouth is full of bacteria that can enter the piercing site and cause an infection. Handling the jewelry with unclean hands can also transmit bacteria, and food particles that accumulate around the jewelry can breed bacteria, as well. excessive bleeding can occur at the piercing site from damaged blood vessels. nerve damage, including numbness and change in taste, if the piercing is done incorrectly. gum recession, especially with barbell-type jewelry, where the constant rubbing of the metal against the gum tissue can actually cause recession. damage to the teeth. The metal jewelry that comes into contact with teeth can cause breaks or cracks, especially during eating, talking, or sleeping or if the wearer continuously “plays” with the jewelry. allergic reactions to the metal at the piercing site. choking. If the jewelry comes loose, it could be easily swallowed and pose a choking hazard.

• • • • • • •

Other side effects have been reported, including scar-tissue formation and speech impediments due to an increase in saliva flow and/or from having a foreign object in the mouth. The National Institutes of Health has even linked hepatitis to oral piercing. Reprinted with permission from Word of Mouth, a publication of the Massachusetts Dental Society.

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oral cancer

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oral cancer

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oral cancer

â&#x20AC;&#x153;

Regardless of age, sex or risk factors, an oral cancer screening should be part of a comprehensive and regular dental examination.


oral cancer

Melissa Carman

A

ccording to recent findings, the Oral Cancer Foundation (OCF) concludes that oral cancer rates among women and young people have increased. In the past, the overwhelming majority of oral cancers occurred in men and was diagnosed during middle age, usually attributed to tobacco use (smoking and chewing) and excessive alcohol consumption. Although oral cancer is still primarily found in men over 45 years of age, oral cancer rates have closed the gender gap. While once one female case was reported for every six male cases, now, one in every two cases reported is a woman. The OCF indicates that this increase is mainly associated with greater tobacco and alcohol use among women. In addition to this disturbing trend, new data indicates that young people – both male and female – are now at a greater risk for oral cancer, often due to exposure to the human papillomavirus 16 (HPV 16) – a strain of the sexually transmitted virus previously connected with an increased risk of cervical cancers. These new findings make visual screening during routine dental exams more important than ever. A quick visual survey of the mouth, gums, throat, tongue and lips by a dental professional may be a patient’s best defense against oral cancers, as early detection is crucial to effective treatment. The OCF reports that early detection increases a person’s survival rate to between 80 and 90 percent of those diagnosed with oral cancer or precancerous abnormalities. Later detection and treatment can decrease one’s survival rate to 50 percent. A trained dental professional can detect early warning signs of precancerous and cancerous growths by simply viewing the mouth, but may augment the exam with a fluorescent rinse or a special device called a VELscope that casts a bluish light; both of these methods may expose abnormalities that might otherwise go unnoticed. Also important to fighting oral cancer is an understanding of your risk factors. Tobacco users and alcohol drinkers are at the greatest risk, but sexually active young people – especially those diagnosed with HPV 16 – now are considered at increased risk. In addition, excessive sun exposure may contribute to your risk, as the lips are very vulnerable to solar radiation, and skin cancers may spread into the mouth. And, keep in mind that men over 45 years of age are still considered to be at the greatest risk.

www.smileflorida.org

According to the OCF, the following are some of the major risk factors and signs of oral cancer. Oral Cancer Risk Factors: smoking/tobacco Use excessive alcohol consumption age/gender HPV 16 excessive sun exposure

• • • • •

Oral Cancer Signs: bleeding white patches redness persistent sores unusual swelling persistent sore throat

• • • • • •

Regardless of age, sex or risk factors, an oral cancer screening should be part of a comprehensive and regular dental examination. Current dental guidelines recommend twice-a-year checkups and cleanings, at which time oral cancer screenings should be performed. While the OCF reports the number of oral cancer diagnoses at 35,000 new cases a year, new data indicates this total will continue to rise. But with proper and early detection during routine dental exams, these cases may be treated with lifesaving results. Reprinted with permission from Word of Mouth, a publication of the Massachusetts Dental Society.

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health discount cards

Carrie Millar Membership Services Manager FDA Services

For many of us, purchasing a traditional insurance plan can be financially impossible. Even employer-sponsored plans are starting to put more costs back on the employees, eliminating these plans as an option, even if the employee qualifies. Often a cost-saving measure can be a health discount card. These cards can either supplement a higher deductible plan or be the only source of health coverage. There are a plethora of program providers in the market; however, consumers often can have difficulty finding a program that is backed by a trustworthy organization and does not come with exclusions or severe limitations. While using the Internet is a good starting point to search for a program, a skilled broker or agent is always the best option for making sure you know what you are getting for your money.

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Today's FDA

411 How Do Health Discount Cards Work? A health discount card is not health insurance. It simply provides discounts on health services. A company has a network of physicians, optometrists, chiropractors, etc. who have agreed to reduced fees for belonging to the health discount program. When a consumer purchases the card, they are eligible for these discounts. These services can range from ancillary health services like chiropractic care, vision, dental and prescription drugs to full medical procedure discounts. Some programs even include gym membership and smoking cessation program discounts.

Who Do They Work For? While health discount cards are not a substitute for health insurance, they are a better alternative than having no coverage at all. For individuals unable to qualify for health insurance because of pre-existing conditions or canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t afford health coverage, these make more sense than going without any coverage. Individuals with health insurance that has high deductibles, no prescription coverage or no ancillary service coverage may also benefit from health discount cards. These individuals can use the discount card to supplement their existing coverage. For example, if your employer offers a $3,000 deductible health plan with no pharmacy, vision or dental benefits, a discount card could be used to reduce your out-of-pockets costs for what the health plan does not cover.

Cost Savings Example The amount of discount and covered services varies between the different programs, but here is one example of how a plan can save money compared to not having any coverage at all.

Reception Room Issue 2012

www.smileflorida.org


health discount cards

Verify Before You Buy! In today’s economy there are many bogus health plans rapidly popping up around the state and defrauding vulnerable consumers seeking affordable health coverage. Make sure the company, broker or agent that you buy insurance from is licensed in the state of Florida. You can call the Florida Department of Financial Services at 877.MY.FL.CFO to verify. Stay Protected!

“Must Ask” Questions When Shopping Plans What types of services do you receive discounts? Know up front if the plan is a pharmacy-only discount plan or if it extends to other services. The premium cards will give discounts for a large variety of medical services including physicians and hospitals, while others only include vision, dental or chiropractic services. Know what you are getting discounts on before you buy. How much is the discount? Make sure the savings is worth the cost. Ask for a schedule of fees for the different services offered. If the discount is only 10 percent and the cost of the discount card

is more than 10 percent, it might not make financial sense to buy the card. All companies should at least offer a savings range for each type of procedure. Where is a list of providers that offer the discounts? Make sure the network of providers is in your area. The program might advertise that you get discounts on dental procedures, but if they don’t have any dentists in your area that take the card, it is not a benefit to you. Most programs should provide an online directory for you to search for providers before you purchase. Is there a health care advocacy component? Look for plans that include pro-

grams to help their members make the best health decisions. The program could include telephone access to advice and assistance in making health decisions, online health assessments or reading material on several health topics. Knowing how to use your plan will help them and you save money. Ms. Millar is the membership services manager for FDA Services. She has a Masters in Business Administration and a Bachelors of Science in Risk Management/ Insurance from Florida State University. She has worked for FDA Services since 2004 and can be reached at insurance@ fdaservices.com.

Product: Blue Cross Go Blue 90 for Bob, 45-year-old male in 32779 ZIP code, monthly cost $31.

Treatment

Standard Charge

Go Blue Discounted Rate

Savings

Bob has upper respiratory pain and goes to ENT

$176

$76

$100

Lab panels ordered by ENT done at BCBS preferred lab

$173

$49

$124

Follow up specialist visit

$125

$54

$71

Subscribed generic antibiotic

$42

$5

$37

Total Cost w/o card Total Cost with Card $516 $184 www.smileflorida.org

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Total Savings $332 Today's FDA

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Guaranteed acceptance with GoBlue!

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See how affordable your monthly premium can be with GoBlue. • Up to $50 toward doctor visits • Up to $50 toward dentist visits • $5 to $15 toward covered prescriptions • Lab visits (services) are free when you go stay in-network • Visit the dentist of your choice • Visit a doctor of your choice, go to an urgent care or convenient care center • Lower than retail prices from network pharmacies for covered prescriptions and diabetic supplies

FDA Services Inc. 800.877.7597 www.fdaservices.com 1113 E. Tennessee St., Ste. 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308

These plans have limitations and exclusions and the premium and amount of benefits provided depend upon the plan selected and your age. For costs and complete details, contact your insurance agent. These programs and services are not a part of your benefit plan and are not a substitute for medical advice from your doctor. 67810-0910 MX


find it at www.ada.org Z

Step one Go to www.ada.org and click on “Public Resources.”

Step two

*Search the ADA Seal database to find more than 300 consumer products that have passed our rigorous screening process and received the ADA Seal of Acceptance.

Browse these ADA Public Resources. • ADA Seal of Acceptance Program & Products* • Find a Dentist • Oral Health Topics • Manage Your Oral Health • ADA for Educators • ADA for Kids • For Employers • Find a Dentist • En Español

The American Dental Association is the oldest and largest national dental organization in the world. We support the best possible oral health care for the public by strengthening the dental profession.

America’s leading advocate for oral health Dentists who are members of the Florida Dental Association also belong to the American Dental Association.


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OFF the cusp Hugh Wunderlich, DDS, CDE, Editor

Take a moment and think – who is the most courageous person you know? For me, traditional images come to mind first. My father gave up his youth to fight the Japanese in World War II and my grandparents reared a family in the middle of the Great Depression. But the most courage I have ever seen was exhibited by a family in my dental practice — the Demarest family. At first glance, they are like any other happy family in Palm Harbor. Norman Rockwell likely would have painted them for the cover of the Saturday Evening Post with mother Laura on the left, father Robert on the right, and two young daughters, Mary and Hannah centered in front. However, a few years ago something courageous happened to change the painting. A local church in Palm Harbor asked the Demarest family to become the foster family for an abandoned 4-year-old girl named Lina. In a short time, Lina became the family’s focus and they chose to make the adoption permanent.

When Laura and Robert traveled to South America to complete the adoption, the orphanage director asked if they would perhaps adopt another child, this time a small boy. John was unadoptable in his country because of his handicap. John is black. So now, the Demarests have four wonderful children to complete their family. Their Rockwell painting seems complete, but you do not yet know the whole story. The first time I saw Lina, I knew my day was going to end differently. She might be the most beautiful girl I’ve ever seen, but her smile and beauty are different. I wanted to stare and look away at the same time. When Lina was an infant, she was horribly burned. She had no face. Her eyes, ears, nose and mouth were punch holes in a coffee-colored patchwork of scar tissue. Her eyebrows and any cartilage that would frame her face burned away long ago. Still-unfused skull bones made solitary wisps of hair dance on her head with every heartbeat. During dental exams, I felt like a locksmith because Lina was unable to open or close her scar-frozen mouth. I read somewhere that it takes 17 muscles to smile. That’s not true. Lina smiles without using any. Helen of Troy could launch a thousand ships; Lina can melt a thousand hearts. I do not fear much of anything anymore. Laura and Robert have given me a gift. I now understand real courage, and I get to be their dentist AND their friend.

Dr. Wunderlich is editor of Today’s FDA. He can be reached at 727.789.1212, or tfdaeditor@floridadental.org.

I read somewhere that it takes 17 muscles to smile. That’s not true; Lina smiles without using any.

www.smileflorida.org

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dentistry: gateway to good health oral health care • payment options • access options • quality of care • school resources Fluoridation • cosmetic dentistry • treatment planning • special care

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Serving Floridians with information about oral health care, access to dental care and dental education

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2012 Reception Room Issue of Today's FDA

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