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Flavour Passport is the best way to discover local wineries, dining hotspots, and more. This easy-to-use app lets you explore the best places to eat and drink in Niagara. Book a reservation or discover great deals. Whether you are in the mood for cheap eats or locating the best hard to find wineries, let Flavour Passport guide you on your next taste adventure.


//CONTRIBUTORS

JILL THAM

LYNN OGRYZLO Lynn is a food, wine and travel writer, author of three international award-winning cookbooks and regular contributor to REV Publications. Lynn specializes in culinary tourism covering regional cuisine destinations, slow food, culinary holidays, wine, spirits and “la dolca vita”. She can be reached for questions or comments at lynnogryzlo.com.

Jill’s passion for writing came after seeing the movie Stand by Me. She prefers listening to Niagara bands to practising her guitar and running the track better than shopping. When Jill is not moonlighting as a freelance writer, she is an Elementary teacher juggling her three children. Along with being a regular contributor to Today Magazine, Jill’s articles have been featured in Canadian Running, Pedal, Allergic Living and @OECTA. jilltham.wordpress.com @JillBT

ANDREA KAISER

ANDREW HIND

Mariana Bockarova is a PhD Candidate at the University of Toronto, where she teaches Psychological Resiliency, the Science of Happiness, and the Psychology of Relationships. Her research explores narrative medicine and mental health. She also holds a Master’s degree from Harvard University concentrated in Psychology.

Andrew is a freelance writer specializing in travel, history and lifestyle. He has a passion for new adventure, experiences and also for exploring little known stories. Andrew is never without a book or three in hand and some obscure historical fact at the tip of his tongue. Follow him @discoveriesAM

GABRIELLE TIEMAN Gabrielle is a passionate about the written word. A newcomer to Niagara, Gabrielle is a graduate of the University of Ottawa’s Journalism program and has written for a number of newspapers and publications across Canada. Her passion lies in profiling members of the community and uncovering the hidden gems within a city. When she is not writing you can find her on her bicycle - most likely with a large coffee in hand.

SHERMAN ZAVITZ A retired teacher, Sherman Zavitz has had a fascination with the history of Niagara Falls and area for many years. Active in many history-related organizations, he has authored five books and has been a columnist for the Niagara Falls Review for over 20 years. He has been recognized for his historical expertise by being appointed official historian for both the City of Niagara Falls, Ontario and the Niagara Parks Commission. TODAYMAGAZINE.CA 7


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On The Boulevard is published by Rev Publishing Inc. All opinions expressed in On The Boulevard are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the view of Rev Publishing, it’s employees or owners. Reasonable care is taken to ensure that the information contained in this magazine is as up-to-date and accurate as possible, as of the time of publication, but no responsibility can be taken by On The Boulevard for any errors, omissions or comments made by writers or interviewees that are contained herein. Furthermore, responsibility for any losses, damages or distress resulting from adherence to any information made available through this magazine is not the responsibility of On The Boulevard. All unsolicited manuscripts and/or photographs submitted are assumed to be intended for publication or republication in whole or in part. The right to alter, edit or refuse photos and/or manuscripts intended for publication is assumed. All unsolicited material submitted to On The Boulevard are submitted at the author’s risk. Manuscripts and or photographs intended to be returned must be accompanied by sufficient postage. Today On The Boulevard does not assume any responsibility for any claims of our advertisers and reserves the right to refuse any advertising.

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// I N S I D E

EDITOR’S NOTE

FOOD & DRINK

ABOUT TOWN

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Finding your favourite wine can be overwhelming and sometimes daunting, but here, we arm you with some basic wine speak to make it easier.

Cassoulet, the best of bean feasts, is everyday fare for a peasant, but ambrosia for a gastronome.

FIND YOUR FAVOURITE

NIAGARA’S ICONIC FOOD

LIFESTYLE & CULTURE

W

elcome to the winter edition of On the Boulevard. As a tourism publication, we bring you in depth articles on all the best things to see and do during your visit to Niagara Falls. In this issue, we cover many different facets of Niagara: the tasty side (delving into Niagara’s most iconic food on page 12), the historical side (Shady Dealings, page 20 and Arthur Hoyt Day on page 27) and the fun side (with a huge roundup of all of Niagara’s best attractions, page 38). There is definitely something for everyone here. This is a great time of year to visit the Region, so take advantage of that by getting out and exploring all the amazing spaces and places we have to offer.

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with this helpful guide, makeup lovers get work their magic and turn out some serious runway ready looks for suitable day to day wear.

Arthur Hoyt Day came to Niagara Falls not to enjoy the beauty, majesty and history of the area, he came with murder on his mind.

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TREND FORWARD

SHADY DEALINGS The Pavillion Hotel was the brainchild of William Forsyth, who was one of Niagara’s earliest entrepreneurs in the tourism industry, but also a shameless and aggressive opportunist.

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DAREDEVILS Niagara Falls has always held an allure for those who like danger, the ones who like to test the limits of human resistance. Join us as we highlight a history of stunting at the falls: with the outcomes of these stunts ranging from joyful to tragic.

ARTHUR HOYT DAY

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NIAGARA’S PLAYBOOK Whatever your travel style, be it wanting to spend time outdoors, challenging yourself with new adventures or plain having fun (or a mixture of all these), Niagara offers tourists no shortage of wonders to behold, and fun to be had. From our plentiful nature trails to the crazy Clifton Hill, here we’ve compiled a short list of the city’s most popular tourist attractions, for you to cross off and make Niagara your playgorund.

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FOR FACTS SAKE The thrill of finding that per-

fect outfit in a sea of previously loved clothing is one of the greatest thrills there is.

HERE.SEE.DO.

STARS COME TO NIAGARA Over the years, there have been a number of Hollywood legends who have visited Niagara Falls. Often times, they sneak in with little fanfare and sneak out almost unnoticed. Other times, celebrities arrive with more publicity, such as Jimmy Stewart, Marilyn Monroe and Shirley Temple.

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CELEBRATING ICEWINE: NIAGARA’S COOLEST EXPORT Each January, Niagara focuses their attention on the sweetest fruits of their labour, transforming the region into a wintry wonderland for a three week long celebration of all things icewine.

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EVENTFUL Events happening throughout the Niagara Region.

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//FOOD & DRINK

BY ANDREA K AISER

FIND YOUR A Chardonnay is just a Chardonnay, right? Aren’t all Cabernets created equally? But then again why do I like some Rieslings but not others? Most important, how do I find my favourite? Not always an easy task, as wine is perhaps one of the most complex and intimidating topics and also a highly personal aspect of the culinary world. Finding your favourite can be overwhelming and sometimes a daunting task but you can arm yourself with some basic wine speak to improve the likelihood.

THINK ABOUT WHAT YOU LIKE TO EAT. First thing to think about is what you normally like to eat and drink. Do you take your coffee black or do you love a double double? Soda pop or soda water? I love anything pickled, salt and vinegar chips and sharp vinaigrettes so it’s no surprise I love dry, highly acidic wines. Simply knowing if you like your wines sweet or dry can start you off on the right foot. Don’t be embarrassed or afraid to say you like your wines with a ‘hint of sweetness’, if the wine is well made it will have a great level of acidity to create balance on the palate. And remember a wine is good if you like it, so sweet wine lovers unite and be proud to tell the world! BE ACQUAINTED WITH DIFFERENT GR APE VARIETIES. No question that flavours do vary for grape varieties much like apples or pears. Yes, all apples are all apples, but yet you might have a preference for a Courtland or Delicious and maybe Mutsu, as they all have slightly different textures and flavours. In the wine world first get to know white versus red grapes and then concentrate on ‘typical’ flavours

for each variety. For example, Sauvignon Blanc generally has grapefruit and gooseberry flavours while a Riesling commonly has honey and apricot notes on the nose and palate. Again, think about what you ordinarily eat and how the wine flavours compare to what you normally enjoy. Chances are you will see some similarities.

GET TO KNOW THE WINEMAKER. While we can determine what grapes we generally like best, all winemakers however are not created equally. To further perplex wine drinkers, much like chefs, winemakers each have their own personality and therefore style in winemaking. Some winemakers prefer wines with oak, others without, some like bright fruity flavours, others more complex and intricate. But most excel at wines they personally love, often investing the most time and effort into wines they are passionate about. And that’s why the Wineries of Niagara-on-the-Lake Winemakers’ Pass is the perfect opportunity to get to know your neighbourhood winemakers and to help you find your favourite. You can use it all year-round and taste the wine that each winemaker is most proud of, one that he or she feels shows their true self, their wine personality. So get tasting, and get the lowdown on your local wines and winemakers and find the one you love! Take a bit of time to think about what you are drinking and look for similarities in both grapes and styles. Perhaps philosopher Sir Roger Scruton said it best, “Wine is not just an object of pleasure, but an object of knowledge; and the pleasure depends on the knowledge.” You can buy your Winemakers’ Pass All Year-Round at wineriesofniagaraonthelake.com. O

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Altered image of Leonardo DaVinci’s Mona Lisa.


Niagara's

When we think of Italy, we think of pasta and pizza, Germany is schnitzel and sauerkraut or France, escargot and cassoulet. But when I ask people about Niagara, our identity isn’t as clear as our history could have predicted. Ryan Crawford is chef and owner of Backhouse Restaurant in Niagara-on-the-Lake. Crawford has, at different points in his career, raised his own animals, has mostly made his own cheeses, baked his own bread and is now growing his own food on his 3-acre garden plot. Whatever he is doing, he has always looked to the soil and climate of the region to define the food he serves. Where Niagara was once the chicken capital of Ontario, Crawford claims, “vineyard lamb is now the next generation of iconic foods”. But wait. Featherstone Winery is also raising a flock of ducks and Crawford has pickled 20-litres of Niagara sour cherries in anticipation of the meal he’ll make from them. Then he wants to include some black walnuts grown down the road. He’s talking about local food, but is this a typical local dish? Crawford doesn’t like the old moniker of ‘farm-to-table’ cuisine preferring instead to use the term, ‘cool climate cuisine’. “It’s about finding out what grows best in Niagara, what gives the best flavours and developing this base of food,” explains Crawford. Like grape growers determining what grapes make the best wine in Niagara’s terroir, Crawford is doing the same thing with produce: cultivating flavours in search of the regions most delicious assets. When it comes to flavours that can claim Niagara heritage, Catherine O’Donnell, chef and owner of Willow Cakes and Pastries talks of table grapes and stone fruit. Tender fruits like cherries, peaches, apricots and Sovereign Coronation seedless table grapes

BY LYNN OGRYZLO

ICONIC In a region that has always grown it’s own food, I find it amazing that Niagara doesn’t have a culinary identity… Or does it?

TODAYMAGAZINE.CA 13


have a long and prosperous history in Niagara and O’Donnell preserves, juices and processes all she can so she can get summer flavours all year round. It’s one of Niagara’s most iconic culinary traditions. At Willow the team of chefs puree peaches for cheesecakes, topping on tarts or filling for donuts. Fresh Niagara blueberries are frozen for compote, used to make jelly or cooked into fillings for Christmas chocolates. Cherries are juiced and used to make cherry buttercream frosting or fillings for tarts. O’Donnell is not alone in her quest to preserve the seductive flavours of Niagara’s tender fruit, over at Ravine Vineyards in St. Davids the folks there have revived their canning factory brand, Lowrey Bros. Chef Ross Midgley has always felt that tender fruit and Niagara are synonymous, but to Ravine, it’s much more than homegrown, it’s a way of life. More than 120 years ago the Lowrey family (owners of the farm, land, winery and restaurant) once owned the canning factory, Lowrey Bros. With the revival of the brand, you can now buy Niagara only jams, pickles, sauces and canned whole fruits made from Niagara fruits and vegetables. In fact, the restaurant is housed in the farm’s original ‘canning house’. Now that’s culinary heritage! The preserves are not only used in many dishes in the restaurant but you can also buy them in the Canning House grocery store behind the winery retail shop. “People of Niagara have been eating tender fruit their whole life and it’s become a comfort flavour for them. They may not consciously think about it, but when they eat our preserves, the flavours seem to bring up childhood memories and that’s a great thing that not many other foods can do,” says Midgley.

It’s like the pie lady on Niagara Stone Road. Each year she puts a simple table out by the roadside and sells Niagara grape pies. She uses Sovereign Coronation grapes, the seedless kind that grows in Niagara and bakes them into a pie that looks an awful lot like a blueberry pie except for the crumbly topping. You’ll know the place because of the line-up of cars on the weekends and you may think this grape pie is a delicious novelty but the reality is, that grape pie is actually part of Niagara’s lost edible history. Like Midgley says, flavours and memories: “we yearn for them”. In addition to preserving food with a palette history, Midgley stresses the importance of supporting regional farming while cultivating a healthy local culture and family life close to home. “Local is alive and well here in Niagara. I think it always will be,” predicts a chef who like the others interviewed for this story, wouldn’t think of using anything else but Niagara’s fresh tender fruit. Ray Taylor, the executive chef at the Fallsview Casino Resort agrees with Midgley about Niagara’s flavours and memories. Taylor talks of the pure joy one gets from enjoying a simple Niagara fruit crumble and cobbler made from peaches, cherries and apples but then he so quickly pivots to exquisite desserts crafted from Niagara’s most iconic food, icewine. “I can do from simple to exquisite because I have a clientele that demands everything from simple to exquisite,” says a chef who delights in the endless options he can create for his much loved local fruit. But whether Taylor is making a simple cherry cobbler or an icewine laced chocolate dessert his attention to the best never wavers, “we always put away Niagara fruit to uses in all of our dishes and desserts.” Taylor brandies cherries to serve with duck, uses fruit and icewine purees on desserts and makes a luscious icewine foam for both sweet and savoury dishes. He even talks of the black walnuts grown throughout Niagara as one of his newest, most exciting foods to work with. As I write this story it’s the beginning of October and Niagara fields are dotted with orange pumpkins, squashes and gourds, the beautiful fall vegetables that are a passion of chef and owner of The Garrison House and Zest Kitchen, David Watt. “I love the fall, the crazy squashes and the fabulous soups I can make from them. Our butternut squash, ale and cheddar soup is phenomenal,” says Watt. Like the others in this story he also has a love affair with Niagara tender fruit but his favourite season is fall when he can work with savoury, hearty flavours. The Garrison House food is “geared to comfort food like lamb shanks with nut-brown ale. Our cooking is focused on beer. I like to do dishes that complements beer,” which brings us to another new way Niagara cuisine is evolving; from a wine region to a wine and beer region with a beer cuisine that follows. So it seems to me that Niagara’s iconic food has always been and still remains tender fruit. If you’re thinking that’s nothing new just remember, that’s what makes it iconic! Those luscious peaches, cherries, apricots and plums are now complemented with the new generation of local foods the likes of vineyard lamb, black walnuts and an emerging beer industry. As consumers may believe that Niagara’s iconic foods are those that evoke strong flavours and long memories, the industry is much more. Chefs are unlimited in the dishes they can create with local foods; farmers are now stretching their creative muscle and taking chances on growing new crops. Add to that the influence of culinary entrepreneurs the likes of our new brewmasters and what you get isn’t a static iconic food that represents a region. Instead you get an exquisite, creative, evolution of cuisine, culinary culture, local foods, diverse dishes and a region that leads with its palate. O


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//LIFESTYLE & CULTURE

trend fqrward HAIR & BEAUTY LOOKS FOR WINTER BY GABRIELLE TIEMAN

This winter we are savoring the drama of it all. After countless seasons of celebrating the no-makeup makeup, easy-breezy hair and overall “I Woke Up Like This” look, this cold weather season catapults us into a dreamy fantasy of polished yet exaggerated graphic looks; allowing makeup lovers to work their magic and turn out some serious runway ready looks for suitable day to day wear. Dramatic pop-art reminiscent eyeliner, tight springy curls, glitter adorned smoky eyes and impossible to ignore lips; we may be preparing to bundle up for the winter, but these beauty trends will have us feeling hot, hot hot.

HAIR

Big Polished Curls: See ya later smooth waves and blowouts. This fall, it is all about letting your natural spring and volume take over – with a little guidance of course.

The Trick: The It hair of the season is simple; stop over processing your locks with blow driers and flat irons and embrace your hairs natural kink. For a little extra help [we can’t all have naturally curly locks], grab a tiny curling iron and go crazy defining coils all over your head in a non-uniform fashion for an exaggerated curled look.

Old Hollywood Glam: The classic S curl gets a modern update with brushed out big volume. The Trick: To take your curl from ordinary to extraordinary, first invest in a good quality volumizing spray or mousse to help lift your hair at the roots and achieve fullness. Then start curling! Working from the base of your head to the top, curl strands of hair and then coil the strand into a ring and pin

it at the roots. This will allow your hair to cool and hold the curl with maximum volume. Once cooled, release each curl, spritz generously with hairspray and brush out any tight coils. This will give your hair maximum volume and that to die for Hollywood coifed look.

Youthful Updos: Flip through your old yearbooks and take a cue from your younger self with playground inspired pigtails, tight double braids and classic low ponytails. The Trick: Keep your look from turning into a primary school throwback by keeping it chic and sleek. Products like frizz fighting shampoos, finishing sprays, serums and, of course, heavy-duty hairspray will help keep fly-aways and baby hairs that escape at bay. A bonus tip to keeping your braids and tails modern: a centre part. By parting your hair naturally in the centre and separating your hair into two sections, you create a balanced look. This will allow locks to appear crafted instead of thrown up in haste on the way to the gym. >> TODAYMAGAZINE.CA 17


MAKEUP Graphic Eyeliner: Just like an artist on her canvas, take your eyeliner outside the box this season and get artsy with your favorite liners.

The Trick: Who says rimming your lids is the only way to go? Give a new dimension to your look and have a little fun with your eyeliner this season by drawing on multiple lines, creating over exaggerated wings with long brush strokes and colouring completely outside the eye. Nervous to try your hand at creating a thicker cat eye because you can’t seem to steady your hands? The easiest way to do so is to make sure you have an easy to use eyeliner pen or brush at your disposal. The less pressure you need to use, the more fluidly the line will go on your lid.

The Silver Touch: Upgrade your colours with one simple addition: classic metallic silver and chrome in every form.

The Trick: Metallic details and shimmering eyeshadows are all the rage this season. Not only do these modern shades brighten up the whites of your eyes, but this 90s party girl fav can also add a playfulness that can go from a day at the office to a night on the town with one simple swipe. For daytime, add a touch of metallic to the inside corner of your eyes to brighten up any dark circles that may not have disappeared with your morning coffee. Heading out for a cocktail? Try a shadow or liner with a sequin. A touch of sequins added along with your eyeliner or spattering away from the outside corner of your eye can add a whimsical aspect to your typical night out look.

Barely There Brows: Sorry Cara Delevingne, but this winter’s brows are tamed and lighter than ever.

The Trick: Runways and fashion blogs were flooded with naked brows this season as designers tossed away the filler pencils and bleached their models brows for an out of this world look. For those of us not daring enough to bleach the color out of our brows, try lightening the hairs with brow setting gels or simply ease up on the pencils this season; this will draw attention down towards your eyes and create a more open looking appearance. Doll Eyes: Eyes are the window to the soul – and the star of this season’s beauty trends.

The Trick: Think oversized lashes on the top and the bottom, dramatic falsies and clumpy mascara wands gone wild. Lengthy, thick lashes are the key to making your eyes pop and giving you the appearance of being bright eyed and awake all season long. How to master a truly dramatic false eyelash: it is all in the glue. Invest in a strong setting glue that dries black instead of the typical clear products. Simply touch it up with eyeliner once it is dry and you’re set to turn heads. Not a fan of false eyelashes? Use multiple coats of mascara on both the top and bottom lashes for a wide-eyed appearance.

A Dark Pout: The pop of a smoky eye moves south for the winter and is replaced with black and dark maroon lips. The Trick: Keep your dark pout from looking too Halloween-esque by keeping the rest of your makeup simple and maintaining strong lines that do not travel outside of your lip’s natural shape. Ensure you don’t paint on a clown mouth by first outlining your lips with a pencil. If you are not a fan of a pencil, invest in a tiny lip brush and paint your lipstick on instead of using the tube. That way you can control the amount that goes on your lip and keep it looking natural. O


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SHADY DEALINGS THE STORY OF WILLIAM FORSYTH BY ANDREW HIND


FORSYTH DIDN’T WANT JUST A PIECE OF NIAGARA FALLS, HE WANTED THE WHOLE THING AND WOULD GO TO JUST ABOUT ANY LENGTHS, STOOP TO ANY DEPTHS, TO GET IT.

Niagara Falls is blessed with a number of hotels offering fine hospitality, beautiful views, and comfortable, even luxurious, accommodations. Each has their own distinct charms, their own merit, something unique to provide guests. But all have one thing in common: they are spiritual descendants of the Pavilion Hotel, the first luxury, tourist hotel in Niagara Falls. For more than a decade, it was the place to go and the place to be seen. Yet few of the wealthy, well-heeled patrons knew the depths to which the Pavilion’s owner sank to ensure his hotel profited, or paid any heed to the vicious behind-the-scenes war going on to capture precious tourist dollars. The competition was fierce and at stake was economic dominance of a developing industry. The Pavilion Hotel was the brainchild of William Forsyth, one of Niagara’s earliest entrepreneurs in the tourism industry but also a shameless and aggressive opportunist with a disreputable past. Born in the United States in 1774, he developed a somewhat shady reputation early, by running a smuggling operation. In 1799, not long after arriving in Canada, he was charged of a felony but acquitted. A few years later he was found guilty of another unspecified crime and jailed. Forsyth escaped from his prison and made a desperate attempt at fl ight, but was apprehended shortly after.

During the War of 1812, Forsyth, described as a “small wiry man, weighing barely 150 pounds,” fought with the British as part of the 2nd Lincoln Militia. His commanding officer, Thomas Clark, suggested he was poorly liked by his fellow soldiers, ‘a man of uncouth behaviour,’ and indicated he was prone to cowardice and deceit. In the post-war period, Forsyth found a new opportunity to exploit. Since 1815, Niagara Falls had been attracting wealthy world travelers—Americans, predominantly—intent on seeing the renowned natural wonder in person. However, there was no tourist hotel to wrap these tourists in the luxury they expected. Forsyth was determined to remedy that. His plan began in 1817 when he purchased Wilson’s Tavern, a Niagara inn built in 1797. In 1821, Forsyth purchased more than 100 acres surrounding the hotel, and a year later tore down the aging structure and in its place built the luxurious Pavilion Hotel. The Pavilion Hotel, which was located just north of where the Minolta Tower now stands, was three storeys in height, of white clapboard construction, and boasted covered verandas overlooking the Falls and rapids. Because it catered to the elite of society, the Pavilion included a well-stocked library, a piano, billiard table, and accommodations for ‘noblemen and gentlemen of the highest rank with their families’. Forsyth made sure to stock the hotel with ‘the best flavoured and most costly wines and liquors.’ There could be no doubt that the Pavilion was by far the largest and most famous hotel in Niagara at the time, accommodating as many as 150 guests in style, many of whom remained for weeks or even months at a time. Among the prominent guests were two Governor-Generals of British North America and the Duke of Richmond William Forsyth was undeniably the leading figure when it came to selling the Falls as a tourist attraction, but he wasn’t the only one and as the decade wore on competition from other hotels became fiercer. That didn’t sit well with Forsyth. The Falls were big enough to share, but that wasn’t his style. Forsyth didn’t want just a piece of Niagara Falls, he wanted the whole thing and would go to just about any lengths, stoop to any depths, to get it. When rival hotelier John Brown built a plank road from his Ontario House hotel to the Falls, Forsyth promptly ripped it up. When Thomas Clark and Samuel Street acquired ferry rights on the river to bring guests to their own hotel, Forsyth harassed and sabotaged the operation so aggressively it couldn’t operate. And when the Ontario House burned to

the ground under mysterious circumstances in 1826, many in town pointed fingers at Forsyth as the likely culprit. The accused made little attempt to dissuade this opinion; when asked about the fi re, he would simply smile knowingly but remain silent. Forsyth finally pushed his luck too far and it cost him dearly. In 1827, he built a fence around the Pavilion and down to the banks of the Niagara, enclosing part of the shoreline and laying claim to it as his own. But this wasn’t just any stretch of river: enclosed within Forsyth’s self-proclaimed domain was Niagara’s ultimate prize, Table Rock. Table Rock was a huge platform of rock, several acres in size, that once hung more than fi fty feet over the gorge just above the lip of the Falls. From the edge, sightseers were no more than five feet from the raging waters below, so close that you could almost dip your toes into the raging water. The bravest people crept to the edge nearest the Falls and peered out over the wondrous vista. Over the years, as the rock beneath it eroded and crumbled, vast slabs of it tumbled away until, bit by bit, Table Rock disappeared. But that wasn’t until much later. In the 1820s, Table Rock was the favoured spot from which to view the falls. If one could take possession of Table Rock, as Forsyth realized, he could monopolize tourism at Niagara Falls. Once the opportunistic entrepreneur had put up his fence, the only way to enjoy that view would be through his hotel and only after paying a fee. The other hotelkeepers were enraged that Forsyth was attempting to grab the Niagara experience for himself. The fence was completely illegal as the Crown owned the land along the river bank to a depth of sixty-six feet, so soldiers were sent to tear the fence down. Forsyth rebuilt the fence, and once again soldiers tore it down. Around the same time, Brown sued Forsyth for tearing up his road, while Clark and Street sued him for ruining their ferry service. In the end, after five years and a fortune spent in court, Forsyth lost. In 1833, now a beaten and despondent man, he sold the hotel to his rivals, Street and Clark, and moved to Fort Erie. William Forsyth was never again a player in the Niagara Falls tourism industry As for the Pavilion, it declined in popularity during the 1830s and by the closing years of the decade, the Pavilion had been superseded by Clifton House, the next generation of luxury hotel and the new place to be seen. The end for the controversial hotel came on February 19, 1839 when a raging fire, the cause of which was never determined, consumed it in spectacular fashion. O

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a history of risk takers who dared to brave the falls.

DARE DEVIL’S OF NIAGARA FALLS

O

n July 5, 1887 the Queen Victoria Park Commission took over jurisdiction of the land along the Niagara River gorge and the decision was made to address the many tragedies that had occurred at the Falls due to stunts and daredevil acts. The Commissioners decided to prohibit rope and wire walkers from anchoring their ropes and wires on the gorge wall. As recently as 1976, the Commission studied the question of tightrope walks across the Niagara Gorge, meeting with representatives of the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation to jointly review this issue.

Their recommendations noted that the original purpose for establishing the Niagara Parks was to remove the growing carnival atmosphere adjacent to the Falls. After consideration of items such as allocation of resources, environmental impact and public safety, both Commissions denied permission for these events. In November 1996, The Niagara Parks Commission denied a request for a proposed skywalk by Jay Cochrane. Commission Chairman Gary Burroughs announced, “The net effect of this type of event is to encourage less qualified individuals to perform stunts or feats that put not only themselves at risk, but also those who may be involved in their rescue.”>>

TODAYMAGAZINE.CA 23


daredevi s JEAN FRANCOIS GRAVELET (THE GREAT BLONDIN) Professionally known as “The Great Blondin”, Gravelet was the first of many tightrope walkers to appear at Niagara Falls. He was a professional artist and showman trained in the great tradition of the European circus. At age 31 he came to America and made the announcement that he would cross the gorge of the Niagara River on a tightrope. On June 30, 1859 the rope was in position and at five o’clock in the afternoon Blondin started the trip that was to make history. Watchers saw him lower a rope from the tightrope to the Maid of the Mist, pull up a bottle and sit down while he refreshed himself. He began his ascent toward the Canadian shore, paused, steadied the balancing pole and suddenly executed a back somersault. Never content merely to repeat his last performance, Blondin crossed his rope on a bicycle, walked blindfolded, pushed a wheelbarrow, cooked an omelet in the centre and made the trip with his hands and feet manacled. Yet even these stunts failed to satisfy Blondin’s urge to test himself. He announced that on August 19 he would cross the gorge carrying his manager, Harry Colcord, on his back. It was to be the supreme test of Blondin’s skill and stamina. According to Colcord, the trip was a nightmare. In the unguyed centre section, the pair swayed violently. Blondin was fighting for his life. He broke into a desperate run to reach the first guy rope. When he reached it and steadied himself, it broke. Once more the pair swayed alarmingly as Blondin again ran for the next guy. When they reached it Blondin gasped for Colcord to get down. Six times in all Colcord had to dismount while Blondin had to charge the crowd on the brink to prevent the press of people forcing them back in the precipice. He died in England at the age of 73. WILLIAM LEONARD HUNT A resident of Port Hope, Ontario, known as Signor Farini, William Hunt duplicated almost all Blondin’s stunts, but never managed to steal the limelight from Blondin. The Niagara Falls Gazette reported Farini’s September 5, 1860 washing machine stunt, “He strapped an Empire Washing Machine to his back and walked slowly to the desired place in the centre of the rope”. He secured his balancing pole and machine on the cable. He then drew water from the river nearly 200 feet below, in primitive style, with a pail and cord.

Several ladies, desiring to patronize him in his character as a washerwoman, had given him their handkerchiefs to wash. Before long his washing was done, the handkerchiefs wrung out and hung up to dry on the uprights and crossbars of the machine. With the washing flapping in the wind, he adjusted his load and returned. HARRY LESLIE After the 1859 and 1860 performances of Blondin and Farini, there was a lull until June 15, 1865 when Harry Leslie, billed as “The American Blondin”, crossed the Whirlpool Rapids gorge on a rope. ANDREW JENKINS On August 24, 1869 Andrew Jenkins crossed the Whirlpool Rapids on a rope, riding a velocipede. MARIA SPELTERINA A 23-year-old Italian woman, Maria Spelterina was the only woman to cross the Niagara gorge on a tightrope. In 1867, she walked backwards, put a paper bag over her head, and wore peach baskets on her feet to inject some drama into her crossings. STEPHEN PEER Stephen Peer of Niagara Falls, Ontario made several crossings, but a few days after his walk on June 25, 1887, his body was found on the rocks below. It was assumed that he had fallen while attempting a night crossing wearing his street shoes. ANNIE TAYLOR (Survived) Mrs. Annie Taylor, a 63-year-old schoolteacher, decided that a trip over Niagara Falls was her way to fame and fortune. On October 24, 1901, assistants strapped her (along with her cat, as seen in this photo) into a special harness in a barrel. A small boat towed the barrel out into the main stream of the Niagara River and the barrel was cast loose. The rapids first slammed it one way, then the other, then came the drop and a bone-wrenching jar so violent that Mrs. Taylor was sure she hit rocks. Seventeen minutes after the plunge, the barrel had been tossed close enough to the Canadian shore to be hooked and dragged onto the rocks. Mrs. Taylor was dazed but triumphant and being the first person to conquer the mighty Falls of Niagara, she found the fame she sought so desperately. But fortune was a bit more elusive. Twenty years after her brush with death at Niagara, she died destitute.


Niagara Falls has always held an allure for those who like danger, like to test the limits of human endurance. It has held so much allure in fact, that Niagara Parks had to officially state that stunting on their property is prohibited. These pages highlight a history of stunting at the Falls; some stunters were successful, others BOBBY LEACH (Survived) Bobby Leach, an Englishman, successfully made a trip in an all-steel barrel on July 25, 1911, and then spent 23 weeks in hospital recuperating from numerous fractures and other injuries. Fifteen years later on a lecture tour in New Zealand, he slipped on an orange peel, broke his leg and died of complications from the injury.

were not as lucky.

CHARLES STEPHENS (Died) The next barrel stunter to try the Falls was also an Englishman, Charles Stephens. When his heavy oak barrel hit water after the drop over the Falls on July 11, 1920, Stephens went out the bottom. He was killed and only one arm was recovered. JEAN LUSSIER (Survived) Jean Lussier, a native of Quebec, designed a six-foot rubber ball composed of 32 inner tubes and a double-wall steel frame. One of the biggest crowds on record saw the stunt on July 4, 1928. The ball took some hard knocks in the rapids but the skip over the Falls was perfect. About one hour after entering his ball, Lussier stepped ashore none the worse for wear. For many years he displayed his ball at Niagara Falls and sold small pieces of the inner tubes for souvenirs at 50 cents a piece. GEORGE STATHAKIS (Died) On July 4th, 1931, George Stathakis, a Greek chef from Buffalo, went over the Falls in a 2,000-pound contraption of wood and steel. He survived the plunge over the Falls only to die after becoming trapped behind the curtain of water for 22 hours. He had enough oxygen for only three hours. RED HILL JR. (Died) In the summer of 1951, Red Hill Jr. planned to go over the Falls in a flimsy contrivance he called the “Thing” which consisted of 13 inner tubes held together with fish net and canvas straps. On August 6, the “Thing” headed into the rapids with Hill in it. It was tossed into the air, upended, thrown from side to side and bounced off rocks. It was starting to disintegrate even before it reached the Falls. When the drop came, the “Thing” disappeared into churning water at the base of the Falls. Seconds later what was left floated into view. The following day, Hill’s battered body was taken from the river. O

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There she goes over

BY SHERMAN ZAVITZ

It happened in an instant. On August 24, 1844, Martha Rugg and a male friend were standing on Table Rock, then a sizeable rock shelf that projected from the top of the Niagara River gorge close to the Canadian Horseshoe Falls. Noticing some flowers growing in a thin layer of earth at the edge of the rock platform, Martha walked over to pick them. As she reached the edge the earth suddenly gave way. Her friend shot out his arm to grab her but caught only her shawl which quickly came loose. With a piercing scream, Martha dropped some 120 feet into the gorge, landing on a pile of jagged rocks. Witnesses flew down a nearby spiral stairway to her rescue. When they reached Martha she faintly whispered, “Pick me up.� She was carried up the steps and over to the Clifton House Hotel at the foot of Clifton Hill. She died there three hours later. >>

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Since then he had been maintaining two households. Realizing this arrangement could not last long, he decided that Desire, his wife of 8 years, had to go. He then organized the fateful excursion to Niagara Falls. For many years dramatic incidents involving death or a near death have been a part of the Niagara Falls story. Most of these incidents, such as the one about Martha, were the result of an accident. The slightly bizarre story of Arthur Hoyt Day, however, was a notable exception. A death was involved but it was not due to an accident. Day had come to Niagara Falls not to enjoy the beauty, majesty and history of the area. He came here with murder on his mind. On Sunday, July 27, 1890, the 26- year- old Day along with his wife Desire and his sister Mary Quigley travelled by train from their Rochester, New York home to Niagara for, as the two ladies were told, a day of sightseeing. After arriving in Niagara Falls, New York, the trio crossed the Railway Suspension Bridge (it was located where the Whirlpool Rapids Bridge is now) and began walking along the Canadian side of the Niagara River gorge towards the whirlpool. According to Mary Quigley’s later testimony, she eventually became tired and sat down on a rock to rest while her brother and Desire walked on a bit further. She could see Day with his wife immediately in front of him standing a short distance away at the very edge of the gorge. Her attention was then drawn to something else for a moment and when she next looked for her brother and sister-in-law, she saw only Arthur. He was waving a black handkerchief and motioning for her to come over to him. Desire was nowhere in sight. When Mary reached him, Day quickly and calmly admitted he had pushed his wife over the bank because “I wanted to get rid of her.” Telling his sister not to go the police, he handed her a train ticket to get home and then disappeared. When she next saw him three days later back in Rochester, he told her he was feeling only some regret for what he had done.

What Mary Quigley did not know, however, was that 15 days before the Niagara trip, Arthur had married a Lizzie Breen when, as he later admitted, they were both very drunk. Since then he had been maintaining two households. Realizing this arrangement could not last long, he decided that Desire, his wife of 8 years, had to go. He then organized the fateful excursion to Niagara Falls. After Day moved back in with Lizzie, she began having some concerns about her new husband. For one thing, he kept talking in his sleep, saying such things as “There she goes over.” She also began hearing rumours that he was already married. Lizzie finally went to the police who soon after arrested Day for bigamy. Now a large problem arose: Desire could not be found. Then came a break in the case. When the police questioned Mary Quigley, she broke her silence and told the story of the July 27th trip. She was then brought back to Niagara Falls. On August 10th Mary took American and local authorities to the spot along the gorge where Desire had been pushed over the edge. After a difficult search, the victim’s body, badly decomposed, was found on the rocks below. Arthur Hoyt Day was then extradited and charged with murder. He was taken to Welland, some 20 miles west of Niagara Falls, and lodged in the Welland County jail there. The trial was held on October 8, 1890 in Welland. The case had created such a sensation that the court room was jammed with spectators and hundreds of others who had hoped to watch the proceedings had to be turned away. Day appeared impeccably dressed, including a red flower in his suit coat lapel. He pleaded not guilty. The Crown’s case rested largely on the testimony of Mary Quigley while the defense tried its best to discredit her

testimony because of her past. Mary, who was described in the press as “hard-looking,” had been married four times, arrested on numerous occasions and at one time had been the madam of a Lockport, New York, brothel. For his part, Day said that after reaching the Canadian side of the Niagara River, he and Desire had quarrelled. They had then parted company and he hadn’t seen her since. Later, his story changed and he testified that she had slipped while trying to pick some berries. He never could explain, however, why he had not reported her lengthy disappearance or accident. The 12-man jury brought in a guilty verdict. The judge then pronounced the death penalty and directed that Day “be taken from the prison where you are confined on December 18th and hanged by the neck until you are dead and may the Lord have mercy on your soul.” The hanging took place on gallows set up outside the courthouse on East Main Street in Welland. As the Welland Tribune reported: “About 70 persons witnessed the execution, Niagara Falls town being especially well represented. The wind was raw and whilst waiting for the grievesome event many kept warm by vigorous marching and counter marching.” Smartly dressed as always and with the usual flower in his lapel, Day was lead to the gallows at 7:55 a.m. He maintained his innocence to the end, accusing his sister of having lied at the trial and being the one really responsible for Desire’s death. His arms had already been pinioned and now his legs were bound and the black cape pulled over his head. At exactly 7:57, as the Lord’s Prayer was being recited by the officiating minister, the drop was released. As the Tribune later noted, “Arthur Hoyt Day had paid a fearful penalty for a fearful crime.” O TODAYMAGAZINE.CA 29


Y O U R A D U LT E N T E R TA I N M E N T G U I D E

TH E PINKVAULT.C O M


HOLLYWOOD’S love affair with

NIAGARA

BY ANDREW HIND AND MARIA DA SILVA

Over the years, among the 15 million annual visitors to Niagara Falls there have been a number of Hollywood legends. Often times, they sneak in with little fanfare and sneak out almost unnoticed. Other times, celebrities arrive with more publicity, temporarily—and sometimes unintentionally—detracting attention away from the Falls and onto themselves.

JIMMY STEWART

image source: moviescramble.com

Awkward yet charming, modest yet successful, quiet yet courageous, actor James “Jimmy” Stewart embodied America at its best. Yet, when he visited Niagara Falls for a pair of days in 1940, he was embraced by Canadian fans as one of our own. His was the most celebrated visit of a movie star to date. By 1939, with a string of hits that included You Can’t Take it with You (1938) and Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939), Stewart had solidified a position as one of the most bankable young stars in Tinseltown. Determined to make the most of their asset, MGM cast Stewart in three more films in 1940: The Shop Around the Corner, The Mortal Storm, and The Philadelphia Story, Story for which he won his one and only Oscar for best actor. Each of the films was a hit, but the gruelling schedule of the past few years left Stewart exhausted physically and emotionally. Jimmy Stewart needed a vacation. Determined to get as far away from the Hollywood lifestyle as possible, Stewart avoided the hot spots of the rich and famous and instead decided to head for the unspoiled wilderness of Lake Temagami, in Northern Ontario. Unmarried at the time, he invited his parents and two sisters along for two weeks of fishing and hiking. On the return trip, the Stewart’s paid a visit to Niagara Falls on September 6 and 7, booking rooms at the General Brock Hotel (now the Crowne Plaza Hotel). Built in 1927 for the then astronomical cost of $1.5 million, the General Brock was the first luxury

hotel in the area and, due in part to its elegant ballroom and rooftop garden, was at the time considered among the most majestic and celebrated hotels in Ontario. Stewart’s impending arrival at the General Brock Hotel was the worst-kept secret around. The result was that when the actor arrived to check-in that afternoon, he was met by a large crowd of eager fans. Though on vacation and badly in need of escape from the demands of stardom, Stewart was gracious with the fans and lingered to sign autographs. Such affability was typical of the man, and was undeniably part of his charm. Few fans left disappointed. Later that day, Stewart and his family viewed the falls. He was like any other tourist, taking photographs and marvelling at the sights. Stewart was delighted with what he saw, later telling a reporter he thought the Falls were “the most picturesque sight he had ever seen.” Stewart left the hotel on the second day to find the entrance once again crowded with fans eager for a chance to see their idol. There were dozens of them, each one demanding a piece of the star’s attention, and yet Stewart took it all in stride, lingered long enough to send most of his fans home happy with a signature or the memory of a brief conversation with a screen legend. Later that day, he and his family left Niagara Falls to return home to the States. The Canadian vacation, short though it may have been, reinvigorated Stewart and gave him the energy and passion to film three more movies in 1941 before enlisted in the Army Air Force and becoming a decorated bomber pilot in World War Two. >> TODAYMAGAZINE.CA 31


MARILYN MONROE

NIAGARA WAS ONE OF THE BIGGEST MOVIES OF THE YEAR AND CATAPULTED MARILYN MONROE TO STARDOM.

For about three weeks during June 1952, Niagara Falls had an extra attraction beyond the raging falls themselves: Marilyn Monroe, soon to be Hollywood’s most glamorous star, was in town filming her first starring role in the thriller Niagara. Director Henry Hathaway would take full advantage of the magical setting by using a number of local landmarks in the film. But Niagara Falls, attractive as it is, didn’t have everything the filmmaker required to make his dream a reality. The script called for a motel overlooking the Falls, but there simply wasn’t one because Queen Victoria Park occupied all of the lands alongside the river’s shore. As a result, a makeshift motel was constructed in the park, directly opposite the American Falls and with a view towards the Horseshoe Falls. Named the Rainbow Motel, the six-unit building (most of which was false-fronted) would be the setting for many of the most important scenes of the movie. While Hathaway kept the young star on a short leash and largely away from the distracting public, Monroe was able to enjoy herself in Niagara Falls with sightseeing, included a stroll through Queen Victoria Park, shopping at the Table Rock Gift Shop, trips to Niagara-on-the-Lake with lover Joe DiMaggio, and a ride on the Maid of the Mist tour boat. Marilyn stayed at the exclusive General Brock Hotel in room 801 and somehow managed to juggle two relationships between takes. One of her suitors was Joe DiMaggio, who stayed on the American side in the Hotel Niagara but slipped across to rendezvous with her several time a week. At the same time, Marilyn was growing close to her long-time friend Bob Slatzer, and the two shared adjoining rooms. There, with the Falls as a stunning backdrop, Slatzer proposed and Marilyn accepted (the magic of Niagara did not endure long, however: they married in Tijuana, Mexico, on June 18 and were divorced just four days later). None of this personal drama was known to Monroe’s adoring fans, who eagerly awaited the arrival of Niagara in theatres. The world premiere was shown simultaneously at Niagara Falls, Ontario, and Niagara Falls, New York on January 28, 1953. In Niagara Falls, Ontario, the film was shown at the Seneca Theatre, and despite a seating capacity of more than 1,000 the demand was so great the movie had to be shown five times a day for more than a week. In the end, Niagara was one of the biggest movies of the year and catapulted Marilyn Monroe to stardom. Niagara was soon overshadowed by Monroe’s more famous films, but the impact of the movie immense. Niagara helped cement Niagara Falls’ reputation as the Honeymoon Capital of the World. For years, the local Chamber of Commerce would receive hundreds of letters from people inquiring about rooms at the Rainbow Motel featured in the movie. There was, of course, no Rainbow Motel; the set had been hastily torn-down as soon as filming was completed. Nevertheless, in the wake of the movie’s release hordes of lovers and sightseers flocked to the Falls every year, transforming the economy. Thanks to Marilyn Monroe’s charm and beauty, Niagara had changed Niagara Falls forever. >>


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SHIRLEY TEMPLE With her famous blond ringlets and deep dimples, the child star Shirley Temple charmed and entertained theatre audiences during the Depression years, her singing and dancing captivated millions and helping to raise the people’s spirits during a difficult period. She was so essential to public morale during this trying period that President Franklin Roosevelt famously remarked, “As long as we have Shirley Temple we’ll be alright.” The hopes of an entire nation rested on the tiny shoulders of a young child. During World War Two, with two brothers fighting with the United States Marine Corps, the young woman concentrated more on raising wartime morale than acting. Temple boosted moral by visited wounded men in the hospitals and appearing at military bases to chat and dance with the men. It was in this goodwill capacity that Shirley Temple graced Canada with her presence in October 1944. Her first stop was the nation’s capital, Ottawa, where she was scheduled for several appearances to help promote the sales of war bonds. Then, on October 22, accompanied by her parents and publicity agent, she arrived in Niagara Falls to participate in more charitable work. Once settled in the General Brock Hotel, the 16-year old enjoyed the sights along the Niagara River, including the famous Spanish Aero Car. She also visited Oak Hall, which at the time was being used as a RCAF (Royal Canadian Air Force) convalescent home, raising the spirits of the ill and wounded airmen Later, she visited Queen Victoria Park where a huge crowd anxiously awaited her arrival. She was to be the guest of honour in a ceremony that had two purposes: in addition to raising funds through Victory Bonds to support the war, it saw the re-lighting of the falls, dark since 1939 to conserve electricity for war production purposes. Amongst the large crowd that night were two young Air Force men who managed to strike up a conversation with Temple and summon the courage to ask for her autograph. While chatting, they just happened to mention that they were about to hitchhike to Hamilton when the lighting ceremony was over. Temple realized she was going to the same city to catch a train to Chicago, so she graciously offered the two surprised men a ride. With her selflessness and graciousness, Shirley Temple wrote herself into Niagara lore. For years after, residents would warmly recall her visit. O


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FOR

FACTS SAKE DID YOU KNOW...

In 1960, Roger Woodward was the boy who had survived a descent over the Falls after a boating accident above the Falls. (1)

that there was a man named the Hermit of Niagara? Francis Abbott, Hermit of Niagara, wrote a letter to Peter Porter(the owner at that time of Goat Island) asking if he could live on Goat Island. The letter he received in reply denied him permission but that did not stop him. In 1829 Francis moved onto Goat Island and lived there for 3 years. He left the island to go into town for his necessities, but other than that he lived as a hermit. He would entertain tourists by performing balancing acts on the wooden pier leading to Terrapin Tower (a long since removed viewing station on Goat Island) Unfortunately he died of drowning while trying to bathe. He went over the American Falls, he was only 27. (4)

Fish actually travel over the Falls. Don’t believe it? Visit the Cave of the Winds. This place will prove the fact and you might even meet someone who has actually been struck by a fish on his journey down the Falls. Roughly 90% of(3)the fish that plummet (3) down the falls survive.

Annie Taylor “Queen of the Mist”, a school teacher from Bay City Michigan was first person to travel over the Falls in a barrel on October 24, 1901. (1)

WHY IS THE WATER SO GREEN

The startling green colour of the Niagara River is a visible tribute to the erosive power of water. An estimated 60 tons of dissolved minerals are swept over Niagara Falls every minute. The colour comes from the dissolved salts and “rock flour,” very finely ground rock, picked up primarily from the limestone bed but probably also from the shales and sandstones under the limestone cap at the falls. (2)


FUN NIAGARA FALLS TRIVIA In the last 12, 500 years, the Falls has eroded back 7 miles, and is the fastest moving waterfall in the world. While the falls will continue to erode, the rate at which it moves has been greatly reduced due to an ability to control the flow of water, and divert it for hydro-power generation. 50,000 years from now, if erosion continues at the current rate, the falls will have (2) disappeared.

O ER

N OF THE FA O I S L

LS

INTERESTING FACT: According to the U.S.G.S. (United States Geological Survey) of Niagara Falls, it appears that almost 1/3 of the Canadian Falls lies within US Territory and Terrapin Point is in Canada.

aeria ls l view of the fal

Of the world’s surface fresh water flows over Niagara Falls. (5)

Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End, Bruce Almighty, Superman and Niagara starring Marilyn Monroe are just a few movies that had portions (6) filmed at Niagara Falls.

The Minolta Tower rises 325 feet (1) above the Falls.

The Skylon Tower rises 775 feet above the Falls. (1)

sources: (1) https://www.niagarafalls.ca/living/about-niagara-falls/facts.aspx | (2) http://www.niagaraparks.com/about-niagara-falls/geology-facts-figures.html | (3) http://www. justluxe.com/community/top-12-most-interesting-facts-about-niagara-falls_a_1822789.php | (4) www.experience-niagara-falls-canada.com/facts-about-niagara-falls.html | (5) http://sciencewithkids.com/science-facts/facts-about-Niagara-Falls.html | (6) https://www.sheratononthefalls.com/2014/09/15/5-movies-filmed-niagara-falls/ TODAYMAGAZINE.CA 37


FOR THINKERS, EXPLORERS AND THRILL SEEKERS. Whatever your travel style, be it wanting to spend time outdoors, challenging yourself with new adventures or plain having fun (or a mixture of all these), Niagara offers tourists no shortage of wonders to behold, and fun to be had. From our plentiful nature trails to the crazy Clifton Hill, here we’ve compiled a short list of the city’s most popular tourist attractions, for you to cross off and make Niagara your playgorund.

N I AGA R A’ S

PLAYBOOK


//ABOUT TOWN

OUTDOOR FUN H O R N B LOW E R

A must do when visiting Niagara Falls, as this is the best view of the Falls you’ll get. Located at 5920 Niagara Parkway, Niagara Falls. More info at niagaracruises.com

W H I R L P O O L J E T B OAT Take a thrilling ride down the Niagara River in either the jetboat or the wetjet. Located at 61 Melville Street, Niagara-on-the-Lake. More info at whirlpooljet.com

JOURNEY B E H I N D T H E FA L L S Travel through the tunnels behind Niagara Falls for a unique perspective. Located at 6650 Niagara Parkway. More info at niagaraparks.com

M YST E RY M A Z E Have a fun adventure in the Mystery Maze and see how long it takes you to find your way out! More info at falls.com Located at 4943 Clifton Hill. >>

TODAYMAGAZINE.CA 39


Editorial Credit: oneinchpunch / Shutterstock.com

N I AGA R A S KY W H E E L You’ll get a most unique view of Niagara Falls from this giant ferris wheel. Located on Clifton Hill. More info at cliftonhill.com

N I AGA R A G O - K A RTS Enjoy on of the fastest tracks in North America and a game of mini putt afterwards. Located at 7104 Kinsmen Court. More info at gokartniagara.com

WHITE WATER WALK Follow the boardwalk along Niagara’s stretch of white water rapids. Located just off the Niagara Parkway. More info available at niagaraparks.com


N I AGA R A HELICOPTERS

Established 1982

Family Estate

Take a thrilling ride over the Falls! Located at 3731 Victoria Ave. More info at niagarahelicopters.com

•Wine Sensory Garden • •Open 7 Days a Week • • Award Winning Icewines • • Artisanal Cheese and Gifts • D I N O S AU R A DV E N T U R E G O LF Play mini golf in a prehistoric world amidst an erupting volcano, moving dinos and more. Located on Clifton Hill. More info at cliftonhill.com >>

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Editorial Credit: mikecphoto / Shutterstock.com


THE ACTIVE TRAVELLER

C R O S S C O U N T RY S K I I N G S N OW S H O E I N G Niagara is full of amazing places to get outside and explore, especially on foot (or, well, at least with something strapped to your foot) We are lucky to have conservation areas filled with walkways and wildlife, scenic skiing trails, and tons of paths that snake and meander through some of the best scenery this province has to offer. Your best bet is probably to bring your own equipment if possible, but if not, check out Ski Pro Shop in St. Catharines (skiproshop.com) for information on rentals. There are daily, weekend, monthly and seasonal rentals available.


W H E R E TO G O :

BRUCE TRAIL C R O S S C O U N T RY S K I I N G & S N OW S H O E I N G This is Canada’s oldest and longest footpath, and the Niagara portion of it stretches from Queenston to Beamsville. Planned hikes are available on pre determined days, or you can hike solo whenever you want. Badges are given if you register and then complete the entire Niagara section of the trail. If you are extremely ambitious, you can sign up to hike the entire trail from end to end. To put it in perspective, if you hiked for 8 hours a day, it would take approximately 30 days to finish the entire trail. There is no set time limit for doing an end-to-end hike, you could take thirty days or thirty years, and either way, you still get the coveted badge at the end. Maps are available online from the Bruce Trail Conservancy.

S H O RT H I L L S P R OV I N C I A L PA R K C R O S S C O U N T RY S K I I N G & S N OW S H O E I N G Short Hills is a huge 735-acre natural environment park, which covers parts of St. Catharines, Pelham and Thorold. It’s a great place for winter activities, and trails are marked according to which activity is permitted on the trail. This is an area where it is extremely important to stay on the marked path, as it’s very easy to get lost in Short Hills (I speak from experience; I have had to be rescued not once, but twice from Short Hills. I didn’t even knowingly leave the marked path, so fellow directionally challenged people beware) Parking is available off Pelham, Roland and Wiley Roads.

B A L L’ S FA L L S S N OW S H O E I N G This beautiful area set in Twenty Valley got its name from the family that originally lived there. In addition to being able to see the original home, restored church, an operating flour mill, a lime kiln, a black smith shop and carriage shed, there is also a recently opened Centre for Conservation, which has many interactive exhibits and programs. Several trails run through the area, and maps are available online, which will lead you to the various points of interest, as well as the upper and lower falls.

N I AG A R A R I V E R PA R K WAY T R A I L C R O S S C O U N T RY S K I I N G & S N OW S H O E I N G This is a beautiful 56-kilometre bike path that links Niagara-on-the-Lake and Fort Erie. It’s fairly straight and it runs parallel to the Niagara River, and passes some beautiful sights along the way, including numerous points of interest for tourists, such as the Floral Clock, Fort George and the Butterfly Conservatory.

FRIENDSHIP TRAIL S N OW S H O E I N G This path runs sixteen kilometres across Fort Erie, and winds through farmland, villages, watersheds and residential areas. Parking is available on Ridge Road, Crescent Road, and Lakeshore Road.

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WAT E R F R O N T T R A I L C R O S S C O U N T RY S K I I N G & S N OW S H O E I N G The Waterfront Trail stretches from Niagara-on-the-Lake to Quebec, following the shores of Lake Ontario. The Niagara portion begins in Niagara-on-the-Lake and goes through St. Catharines, Lincoln and Grimsby. The trail varies between off road paths and streets in residential neighbourhoods. It is a multi use trail and is good for various winter activities. Trail maps are available online from the Waterfront Trail official website.

G R E AT E R N I AG A R A CIRCLE ROUTE C R O S S C O U N T RY S K I I N G & S N OW S H O E I N G This multi-use, paved trail makes its way through Niagara, linking Lakes Erie and Ontario, as well as the Welland Canal with the Niagara River. It passes through historic Port Colborne, where in addition to historic sites, you will pass various shops, attractions and restaurants. >>

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THE HOUSE OF F R A N K E N ST E I N Filled with abominations that move and scare at every chance they get. Have a good scare from monsters lurk in the House of Frankenstein. Located at 4967 Clifton Hill. More info at houseofrankenstein.ca

HAUNTED HOUSES T H E H AU N T E D H O U S E

H AU N T E D ASY LU M

Test your bravery, challenge your nerves, and try to take a walk along the darker side of Clifton Hill. Located at 4943 Clifton Hill. More info at falls.com

This haunted house features many deadly monsters, killer clowns and some of Hollywood’s most notorious slashers. Located at 5930 Victoria Ave.

NIGHTMARES FEAR FAC TO RY

S C R E A M I N G T U N N E L S H AU N T E D HOUSE

One of the scariest haunted houses in the area, boasting over 140,000 people who’ve chickened out so far…will you be one of them? Located at 5631 Victoria Ave. More info at nightmaresfearfactory.com

Named after Niagara Region’s own real-life Screaming Tunnels. This haunted house features many deadly monsters, killer clowns and some of Hollywood’s most notorious slashers. Located at 5930 Victoria Ave. More info at screamingtunnels.com

Editorial Credit: GagliardiImages /Shutterstock.com

D R AC U L A’ S H AU N T E D CAST L E Recent winner of “Haunted Attraction of the Year”, there are 3 levels of fear for you to explore. Located at 4933 Clifton Hill. More info at darkinthepark.com

N I AGA R A’ S H AU N T E D H A L LWAYS One of Niagara’s newest and spookiest haunted houses. See if you have the stomach to make it through. Located at 6455 Fallsview Blvd. More info at niagarafallsfunzone.com >>


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Hours of water fun, rain or shine. The Fallsview Indoor Waterpark offers 16 slides - some up to 6 storeys high, a huge aqua play structure with a 1,000 gallon tipping bucket, hot tubs, outdoor activity pool and a full size wave pool. Located at Falls Avenue Resort and Clifton Hill.

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INDOOR FUN GREG FREWIN T H E AT R E Check out a show by the best magician in the world! Enjoy dinner while you watch the show. Located at 5781 Ellen Ave. More info at gregfrewintheatre.com

S KY LO N TOW E R Enjoy the ride to the top and the indoor and outdoor observation decks. Also view the 3D/4D movie, The Falls. More info at skylon.com Located at 5200 Robinson Street.

Photo by: Mike Farkas

Editorial Credit: Kotsovolos Panagiotis / Shutterstock.com

B U T T E R F LY C O N S E RVATO RY Thousands of colourful butterflies float around in this rainforest setting. Located right on the Niagara Parkway. More info at niagaraparks.com

T H E C RYSTA L CAV E : A MIRROR MAZE A DV E N T U R E Get lost in a maze of mirrors, but make sure you don’t end up lost‌forever! Located at 4967 Clifton Hill. More info at crystalcaves.ca >>


TODAYMAGAZINE.CA 47


BIRD KINGDOM You’ll see tons of different birds during a visit to this free flying aviary. Located at 5651 River Road. More info at birdkingdom.com

WAV E S I N D O O R WAT E R PA R K

LO U I S T U S SAU D’ S WA XWO R K S

Enjoy a wave pool, slides, hot tubs and more. Located at 8444 Lundy’s Lane. More info at americananiagara.com

You will get to view an impressive collection of famous faces with some new addition for 2013. Located at 5709 Victoria Ave. More info at ripleysniagara.com

RIPLEY’S B E L I E V E I T O R N OT !

R I P L E Y ’ S M OV I N G T H E AT R E

This museum of the absurd has over 700 exhibits of various oddities, curiosities and illusions. Located at 4960 Clifton Hill. More info at ripleysniagara.com

This state of the art simulator ride will take you on the ultimate adventure. Located at 4960 Clifton Hill. More info at ripleysniagara.com >>


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U P S I D E D OW N H O U S E Defy gravity and explore the topsy turvy upside down house! Fun for the whole family. upsidedownhouseniagarafalls.ca

CA P TA I N JAC K ’ S P I R AT E C OV E

Enjoy 40,000 square feet of fun! Arcades, rides, mini golf and more. Located at 4955 Clifton Hill. More info at piratescoveniagarafall s.com

W E L L A N D CA N A L C E N T R E

FUN SEEKER L AS E R TAG If you want to feel like a kid again (or if you have kids you need to entertain), why not sign up for a exciting game of laser tag? It’s not just about running around the room, shooting people with lasers, it’s about defending your base and coming up with a strategy to win. You can form alliances, you can play with a team, but the main objective: be the last man or team standing.

B R O N TO’ S A DV E N T U R E P L AYLAND

Learn all about the Regions marine history and watch as ships make their way through the canal. Located at 1932 Welland Canal Parkway, St. Catharines. More info at stcatharines.ca N I AGA R A I M A X

Take in the movie Niagara: Miracles, Myths & Magic and also check out the daredevil museum. Located at 6170 Fallsview Blvd. More info at imaxniagara.com G U I N N E S S WO R L D RECORDS MUSEUM

Meet the world’s record setters

for everything you can imagine! Located at 4943 Clifton Hill. More info at falls.com

THE FUN HOUSE

Clifton Hill’s newest and biggest outdoor/indoor attraction. Ballcity, jungle gym and more. Located at 4943 Clifton Hill. More info at falls.com

This is Niagara’s only fun house! You’ll be climbing, crawling and more! More info at falls.com Located at 4943 Clifton Hill.

Z A P ZO N E N I AGA R A

O H CA N A DA E H

This place is located in downtown Niagara Falls, and is played in a 2500 square foot arena. It’s dark, smoke swirls, lights flash, and music plays. It’s some of the most fun you’ll have on your vacation. Visit their website at zapzoneniagara.com

Enjoy some dinner theatre and sing along with a huge cast of Canadian characters. Located on Lundy’s Lane. More info at ohcanadaeh.com

N I AGA R A FA L L S F U N ZO N E

FA L L S V I E W I N D O O R WAT E R PA R K

Their Galaxy Guest Laser Tag arena is a 2000 square foot space with a space battle theme. It allows for a great way to have fun with friends or family when you are on vacation. More info at niagarafallsfunzone.com

Canada’s largest entertainment resort with 16 slides, hot tubs, wave pool and more. Located at 5685 Falls Avenue. More info at fallsviewwaterpark.com

C L I F TO N H I L L

ROCK LEGENDS

If it’s fun you are looking for, then look no further than Niagara Fall’s “Street of Fun”, Clifton Hill! The carnival like atmosphere appeals to the kid in all of us, and it is full of arcades, rides, fun houses, haunted houses, mini golf, gift shops, restaurants, bars and more. If it’s late night entertainment and dancing you seek, you’ll find somewhere on Clifton Hill to party all night. A Clifton Hill Fun Pass is available for purchase on cliftonhill.com and you can receive a discount by purchasing the tickets online in advance.

Enjoy wax figures of the best in the music industry. Located at 5020 Centre Street. More info at rocklegendswaxmuseum.com

N I AGA R A F R E E FA L L I N D O O R S KY D I V I N G Defy gravity! Try a highflying indoor skydiving adventure. Located at 6357 Stanley Ave. More info at niagarafreefall.com >> TODAYMAGAZINE.CA 51


THE STRATEGIST E S CA P E R O O M S The popularity of escape rooms in Niagara only continues to grow, and luckily for us here in Niagara (and those visiting), we are home to some pretty great ones. These games are real life interactive puzzles that you and your team work to solve so you can escape the room in under an hour. Each room usually has a story or a theme involved as you work your way through the game in stages.

A DV E N T U R E R O O M S Located in downtown Niagara Falls, they currently have two games available: The Missing Finger and The Collector. Visit their website at adventurerooms.ca to book.

CA P T I V E E S CA P E R O O M S They currently have two games: Dracula’s Library and Cabinet of Curiosities. Located on Lundy’s Lane in Niagara Falls. Book online at captiverooms.com.

TH E C R U X E S C A P E R O O M S The Crux Escape Rooms: Currently has one game: Dead Air. Located at Victoria Ave in Niagara Falls. More info at thecrux.ca.

QUBE ESCAPE ROOMS Currently has three games: Grandpa’s Study, Homeroom & Synergy. Located on Queen Street in Niagara Falls. Book online qubeemporium.com.

THE HOUR This is the only escape room in St. Catharines and is located in downtown St. Catharines. They have four different games going on, all with very different themes and stories. Currently, the games are: Emma’s Disappearance, Jailbreak, Mutiny At the Hour and The Lost Ones. More info at the hourstcatharines.com. O


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Celebrating ice wine

// /H HE ER RE E .. S SE EE E .. D DO O .. /

LIKE NOWHERE ELSE By Gabrielle Tieman

Celebrating winter like no other destination, each January, Niagara focuses their attention on the sweetest fruits of their labour; transforming the region into a wintry wonderland for a three week long celebration of all things icewine. Held January 13-29, this premiere icewine festival is only the tip of the iceberg; from the abundance of local produce and world-class wineries to countless fine dining kitchens, Niagara is a year-round veritable feast for aficionados of all things culinary – all of which join to create more than one reason to visit Niagara during the colder months. Though icewine’s roots can be traced back to centuries old German winemakers, the sweet wine has come to be known as one of Canada’s most luxurious trademarks. Guided by nature and born from a recipe that combines patient wine makers with the quick snap of winter’s bite, this popular dessert wine is produced from grapes left on the vine well into the winter

months to freeze and concentrate in order to intensify their flavour and create a thick, rich and sweet beverage. Regional highlights at this year’s festival include the annual transformation of Niagara-on-the-Lake’s historic old town into the storybook icewine village and the Scotiabank Convention Centre into a winter wonderland, the luxurious Xerox Icewine Gala and the diamond studded Sparkle and Ice Gala. “January has come to be known as the month of icewine,” says Janice Thomson, Executive Director of the Niagara-onthe-Lake Chamber of Commerce & VCB and an active member of the IceWine Festival for over 15 years. “We get thousands of visitors that come to Niagara in January because of it. They come because they want to learn about icewine for the first time. But you also see a lot of people beyond the visitors - like locals meeting up with friends and meeting up on the streets and returning visitors who know it’s the time to come to Niagara in January. For me that is a wonderful part of it.”

Participating wineries will also host their own individual events in conjunction with the three weekend festivals held in different communities within the region. “One of the purposes of the festival and our goal is to not only get people sampling the wines out on the streets but then to encourage them to go out to the individual wineries where they have the organized tours and an education component,” said Thomson. “People can learn about the production of icewine and the harvesting of the grapes, how it works, etc.” This list is only a few of the extravagant events held throughout January as rich and lavish as the wine the region is celebrating. >>

TODAYMAGAZINE.CA 55


THE XEROX ICEWINE GALA Fallsview Casino Resort, Niagara Falls I January 13 | $185 +Tax

Famously considered one of Ontario’s most luxurious wine and culinary events, the festivities begin with the Xerox IceWine Gala which has helped to kick off the month of icewine for over 20 years. Since its inaugural gala in 1995, the event has helped promote VQA icewine and premium red, white and sparkling wines from over 35 local wineries alongside the Fallsview Casino Resorts’ top chefs as they create mouthwatering dishes that are as beautiful as they are delicious. The icewine festival says countless hours have been spent deciding on the theme for 2017 – with the team finally resting on Casino Royale to mimic it’s backdrop of the Fallsview Casino. The transformation of the Grand Hall sets the stage for a glamorous black tie affair; from the colours and textures of the décor to the masterfully crafted and seasonally appropriate ice sculpture centerpieces. Live entertainment includes music by Sandy Vine and The Midnights and piano great Frank Krahn. An auction will as well be held featuring items for bid associated with the Casino Royale theme.

SPARKLE AND ICE DIAMOND GALA Courthouse, Niagara-on-the-Lake I January 20 I $95 + Tax

Tiara Restaurant at Queen’s Landing, Trius Winery at Hillebrand and Zees Grill at Shaw Club Hotel & Spa. Stations will be set up within the courthouse to accompany the passed around hors d’oeuvres allowing people to sip, sample, wander and enjoy live entertainment throughout the entirety of the night. The evening closes with a trip out onto the streets where NOTL’s IceWine Village will await. An icewine sample will then be enjoyed in a glass made of ice as fireworks are set off in order to toast the beginning of the back to back weekend events.

ICEWINE VILLAGE Heritage District, Niagara-on-the-Lake January 23-24; 30-31 | Free admission

Niagara-on-the-Lake’s historic Queen Street transforms into an unforgettable winter wonderland as the town shops come together with Signature Kitchens and NOTL wineries to play their part in wine country’s annual celebration of icewine. Admission to Niagara-on-the-Lake’s Icewine Village is free but there will be lots of stalls and stations set up for you to spend your hard earned money at. Amongst the stalls, wandering musicians and entertainment will be present as well as local craft breweries and cider makers. “We are celebrating not only the icewine industry but the beauty of Niagara after the snow falls,” said Thomson. Warm up stations will be set up along the street with campfires and chairs arranged that encourage leisurely lounging and enjoyment of the festival.

Celebrating the wine makers and chefs of Niagara-on-theLake, the annual Sparkle and Ice Gala helps kick off the icewine festivities held within the historic old town. The event is intimate, with only 200 tickets available, but FLASH & PANACHE with intimacy comes luxury; each attendee is entered into a ICEWINE COCKTAIL COMPETITION draw to win a diamond – to go hand in hand alongside the Queen Street, NOTL I January 23 I Free admission Sparkle and Ice theme. 28 wineries will host their VQA wines paired with inspired tast- Niagara-on-the-Lake’s top mixologists compete in the much ings from the Signature Kitchen Chefs who work together to cater anticipated annual cocktail competition. One of the highlights the lavish event. This collaboration of kitchens includes chefs from in the NOTL village, admission is free, but participants are world-renowned kitchens Bistro Six-One, Cannery Restaurant at encouraged to sample and purchase cocktails after the compePillar & Post, The Epicurean, Escabèche Restaurant at Prince tition to judge for themselves who should take home first prize. The competition is judged by visiting sommeliers and truly of Wales, Ginger Restaurant, Hob Nob Restaurant & Wine Bar, innovative cocktails have emerged from the event over the years LIV at White Oaks, Peller Estates Winery Restaurant, Ravine – and later become staples on local bar menus. Vineyard Winery Estates, Restaurant Oban Inn, Riverbend Inn,

WHITE ON ICE DINNER Queen Street, NOTL I January 28 I $100 + Tax

Held outdoors on historic Queen Street in an extravagant heated tent, this is the first year this annual event has been opened to the public and it has been very well received. This two hour event will feature live entertainment, VQA wines – including but not limited to icewine – and catered by Signature Kitchen Chefs. This year’s event will feature micromeals as the culinary star instead of the traditional samples and hors d’oeuvres the event has seen in past years. “Rather than have samples catered around, the chefs will present a micro meal,” said Thomson. “This allows chefs to present what they do so well.”

NIAGARA FALLS ICEWINE FESTIVAL Scotiabank Convention Centre I January 27-29 I Prices Vary

The Scotiabank Convention Centre will once again transform into a winter wonderland for the 2017 Niagara Falls Icewine Festival. Cozy-up as you sip your way through premium VQA Wines and Icewines from over 20 of Niagara’s wineries paired with savoury dishes prepared by ten of Niagara’s Top Culinary Chefs. Live entertainment will be present to keep the dance floor alive but if the party gets a little too toasty, the outdoor Icewine Winter Wonderland will be available for a stroll through to cool down; complete with ice sculptures, light displays and the beauty of Niagara Falls in the winter. This ticketed event includes two package options: a General Admission ticket that includes access to three hours of sampling, a commemorative glass and the live entertainment. Tickets start at $39 dollars for early birds but go up as the event approaches; tickets will be $75 dollars at the door of the event. A VIP Admission ticket is also an option for visitors looking for a more exclusive experience. This package includes all general admission perks, an extra one-hour early access, wine tasting passes to a selection of local wineries, a dedicated VIP area and a commemorative gift. Tickets start at $55 dollars for early birds but go up as the event approaches; tickets will be $90 dollars at the door of the event. O


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FRIDAYS JAN. 6 - 27, 2017 | 9PM | QUEEN VICTORIA PARK Canada’s longest running fireworks series. As part of the Winter Festival of Lights schedule, come enjoy a spectacular fireworks display in Queen Victoria Park. Please note that fire-

JAN. 27, 2017 | 7PM | NIAGARA-ON-THE-LAKE Join us for our 3rd Annual White on Ice Dinner. An outdoor dinner with delicious VQA wines and mouthwatering cuisine from the Signature Kitchen Chefs. Located in a heated tent on Queen St right in the heart of the Hertiage District. This will be a night to remember with live musical entertainment and dancing under the Winter sky! Call 905-468-1950 or visit niagaraonthelake.com for more details.

FAMILY DAY

works displays are weather permitting.

WINTER WONDERLAND FOOD TOUR FRIDAYS, SATURDAYS & SUNDAYS, JAN. 6 - MAR. 26, 2017| 1PM NIAGARA-ON-THE-LAKE Winter in Niagara-on-the-Lake can be magical. Bundle up and join us for a a perfect blend of history, culture and of course culinary delights! Our professional and highly entertaining guide will lead you on a visit to a few hidden gems in the heart of Old Towne Niagara on the Lake. You may have a bit of Irish stew, sip on a little hot cocoa, visit a beautiful Inn near Lake Ontario and have an entirely enjoyable and tasty afternoon. This tour is approximately 2.5 hours long and we meet at the Irish Harp Pub and end a block away on Queen Street. The tour is a 2 km stroll at a leisurely pace. For tickets and information: niagaraculinarytours.com

SHOP, SIP, SAMPLE AND SAVOUR JAN. 27 - 28, 2017 | QUEEN ST. NIAGARA-ON-THE-LAKE Held outdoors on Queen St. in the heart of the Heritage District, a chance to combine several favourite Niagara-onthe-Lake experiences all at once! Wine, culinary and retail therapy. Held over two days, 11am to 5pm, Saturday and 12pm to 5pm on Sunday. Outside the shops, enjoy Icewine and VQA table wines poured by the wineries, beer and cider from the local brewers all accompanied with culinary samples from the Signature Kitchens of Niagara-on-the-Lake. Call 905-468-1950 for full details or send an email to chamberevents@niagaraonthelake.com

JAN. 28, 2017 | PARTRIDGE HALL FIRST ONTARIO PERFORMNING ARTS CENTRE ST. CATHARINES The cast that performed for Mamma Mia bring you the live musical production of Abba, the Bee Gees & Adele. For more information visit firstontariopac.ca or visit the artist website at tributebands.com

FEB. 20, 2017 | VARIOUS LOCATIONS IN ST. CATHARINES Come join us at the St. Catharines Museum & Welland Canals Centre, Dunlop Drive Older Adult Centre, Seymour-Hannah Sports & Entertainment Complex and the St. Catharines Kiwanis Aquatics Centre for lots of family focused activities to participate in! Intergenerational programming, cultural activities and interactive games will be happening at the various facilities.

FABULICIOUS FEB. 23 - MAR. 2, 2017 | NIAGARA-ON-THE-LAKE Come and experience the culinary artists of the Signature Kitchen collection as they shine during Fabulicious. This event is a veritable feast for connoisseurs of all things

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DINNER IN THE DARK FEB. 26, 2017 | 5:30PM | WATERMARK ROOFTOP 6361 FALLSVIEW BLVD., NIAGARA FALLS

Restaurant |

Take your senses to new heights with the Watermark’s Dinner in the Dark culinary adventure. Without sight, all of your other senses become enhanced. While blindfolded,

enjoy succulent dishes using only the aroma and your taste buds as your journey’s guide. Call 1-888-370-0700 for reservations.”

VEGAS STYLE - NEW YEAR’S EVE 2016

DEC. 31, 2016 | GREG FREWIN THEATRE MUSIC BY JONSEY Join the Greg Frewin Theatre as they present a spectacular evening featuring International Grand Champion of Magic, Greg Frewin. You will be spellbound and amazed! We cap the evening to ring in the New Year with dancing to the classics of the 70’s, 80’s & 90’s with Jonesy - Ontario’s premiere pop/rock cover group. Covering bands from Maroon 5 to Fleetwood Mac, and Imagine Dragons to The Police, Jonesy manages to play the biggest hits from the biggest artists, pleasing virtually everyone in the crowd. Expect all the trimmings of a festive and exciting Las Vegas style New Year’s Eve.

The evening starts with a cocktail reception at 6:30 PM. Indulge in our delicious premium buffet dinner starting at 7:30PM and our Las Vegas style WILD MAGIC Show will commence at 9:00PM. We ring in the New Year with Jonesy at 11PM as they play your favourite hits of the 70’s, 80’s and 90’s! Book now for the BEST New Year’s Eve celebration Niagara has to offer! For Tickets and any further details please visit gregfrewintheatre.com Note: There will be a $15.00 on-site parking charge per car for this particular event. Parking fee paid upon arrival.

FIRST NIGHT NEW YEAR’S EVE DINNER & DANCE DEC. 31, 2016 | 8PM - 1AM The St. Andrews Society invites you to a New Year’s Eve Dinner & Dance Kick off 2017, the 150th anniversary of Canada’s Confederation, with a traditional St Andrews Society Hogmanay party at the Courthouse in NOTL. Start time is 8pm and the cost is $75 per person. More info contact: dlpenman@cogeco.ca or rayguy9@gmail.com or go to visitniagaracanada.com

image: Shutterstock

culinary allowing everyone to celebrate the joys of local, seasonal artisan cuisine. Offering terrific value with Prix-Fixe 3-Course Menus consisting of an appetizer, main course and dessert, Fabulicious is a great opportunity to sample culinary delights from 14 local fine-dining establishments. Lunch is $25. Dinner is $39. Call 905-468-1950 for menus and information on participating restaurants.


TWENTY VALLEY’S WINTER WINEFEST

JAN. 12, 2017 @ 8:30PM | FALLSVIEW CASINO RESORT

JAN. 13 - 15, 2017 | JORDAN VILLAGE

With an esteemed catalogue of over 1,000 songs, acclaimed singer songwriter Jewel brings to the stage, at Fallsview Casino Resort, her biggest hits such as “Foolish Games”, “Who Will Save Your Soul”, “You Were Meant For Me”, “Intuition” and “Hands”. Buy your tickets at Fallsview Casino Resort’s Box Office (open Noon on show days) or at all Ticketmaster locations. For any further details please refer to fallsviewcasinoresort.com

This annual Winter WineFest brings together Niagara’s top winemakers, chefs and premium VQA wines. Offering great food, premium wines, sparkling and Icewine served outdoors on the streets of pretty little Jordan Village. Sample delicious wines from more than 20 of Twenty Valley’s premium wineries, sample craft ale & artisanal cocktails and savour yummy bites from our top culinary talent! Live entertainment and warm cozy fires will enhance the charming winter village. For any further details please refer to 20valley.ca/site/winter-winefest

XEROX “SUGAR AND SPICE AND EVERYTHING ICE” ICEWINE GALA JAN. 13, 2017 FALLSVIEW CASINO RESORT This spectacular evening showcases wines from over 35 Niagara wineries and features Canada’s largest tasting of internationally acclaimed VQA Icewines and table wines. Combined with exemplary Niagara cuisine prepared by Fallsview Casino’s top chefs as well as outstanding entertainment, this will be unforgettable evening. The theme for the Gala evening has become a highlight that is highly anticipated by guests. Countless hours are spent on the smallest of details, and slowly the vision comes to life. From the colours and textures of the décor, to the masterfully crafted ice sculpture centerpieces, the transformation of the Grand Hall sets the stage for a glamorous black tie affair. Join us for this all-inclusive evening of elegance, fine wine and the best in Niagara culinary. Please visit niagarawinefestival.com for more information.

DONNY OSMOND JAN. 13 - 14, 2017 | FALLSVIEW CASINO RESORT Donny Osmond will be performing live at Fallsview Casino Resort for 3 shows only. With a successful career spanning over 40 years including a talk and game show host, record producer and author. In the mid-1960s, he and four of his elder brothers gained fame as the Osmonds. Osmond went solo in the early 1970s, covering such hits as “Go Away Little Girl” and “Puppy Love”. Buy your tickets at Fallsview Casino Resort’s Box Office or at all Ticketmaster locations.

ICEWINE DINNER WITH JAMIE KENNEDY JAN. 13, 2017 | WINDOWS BY JAMIE KENNEDY FRESH GRILL & WINEBAR Celebrate Niagara’s “Liquid Gold” at Windows By Jamie Kennedy Fresh Grill & Wine Bar. Precious and sweet, Icewine is weaved like a gold thread throughout the menu which showcases the best ingredients Niagara has to offer. An exceptional blend of culinary delights and decadent Icewine leads to a fine dining experience designed to excite the palate. To reserve and for any further details please see fallsavenueresort.com/culinary.

SHA NA NA JAN. 17 - 20, 201 | FALLSVIEW CASINO RESORT Rising to stardom with their portrayal of Johnny Casino and the Gamblers in the movie Grease, acclaimed doo-wop rock n’ roll group Sha Na Na perform their hit singles such as “Alley Oop”, “Book Of Love”, “Teen Angel”, “Get A Job” and “At The Hop”, at the Fallsview Casino Resort Avalon Ballroom. Buy your tickets at Fallsview Casino Resort’s Box Office or at all Ticketmaster locations. For any further details please refer to fallsviewcasinoresort.com

NEW YORK-DEC 4: Singer Jewel attends the 81st Annual Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree Lighting Concert on December 4, 2013 in New York City. (Image: Shutterstock)

JEWEL

CLAUDIO BAGLIONI JAN. 21 - 22, 2017 | FALLSVIEW CASINO RESORT For two nights only, Italian pop legend Claudio Baglioni performs his award winning singles such as “Questo Piccolo Grande Amore”, “E Tu”, “Strada Facendo” and “Sabato Pomeriggio” at Fallsview Casino Resort! Buy your tickets at Fallsview Casino Resort’s Box Office or at all Ticketmaster locations. For any further details please refer to fallsviewcasinoresort.com

VOCA PEOPLE JAN. 25 - 29, 2017 | FALLSVIEW CASINO RESORT Experience a symphony of sounds as the Voca People combine the phenomenal art of a cappella and modern beatbox without using any instruments, while seamlessly moving between musical genres. Eight extraordinary musician-actors bring a unique framework of comedy, music and theatre alive on stage at Fallsview Casino Resort. Buy your tickets at Fallsview Casino Resort’s Box Office or at all Ticketmaster locations. For any further details please refer to fallsviewcasinoresort.com.

BOBBY BAZINI FEB. 10 2017 | SCOTIABANK CONVENTION CENTRE Bobby Bazini took the trip of a lifetime when he grabbed his guitar, packed up his car and left a small Montreal suburb for the Golden State to record with legendary producer Larry Klein. Five days later, he was in Los Angeles having breakfast with the iconic producer and jumping right into the recording process at the renowned Village Recorder that has hosted some of Bazini’s heroes – Bob Dylan, Marvin Gaye and Johnny Cash. What resulted is a collection of live-sounding Folk/Country and Soul songs. (Text courtesy of: bobbybazini.com). More info fallsconventions.com/theatre-box-office.html

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BLUE SUEDE SHOES FEB. 14 - 19 2017 | SCOTIABANK CONVENTION CENTRE MGI presents - Blue Suede Shoes - “The King, The Colonel & The Memories!” - created by Chris Mcharge & Colin Stewart The King of Rock n’ Roll explodes onto the Scotiabank Convention Centre’s Theatre stage in this pulsing tribute to the performer who transformed a generation. Told through the eyes of Elvis’ business manager, Colonel Tom Parker, the show shakes, rattles and rolls through Elvis’ humble beginnings at Sun Records to the Hollywood years and on to the near-mythical comeback and flamboyant Las Vegas residency. With over 40 songs and dozens of costume changes, the show details the days when Elvis was the King of both stage and screen. Elvis will be in the building!

A CULINARY TOUR OF MARCHE APRIL 7, 2017 | THE RAINBOW ROOM Join Chef Massimo Capra and Executive Chef John Casciato at the Rainbow Room on A Culinary Tour of Marche, one of Italy’s most underrated yet spectacular regions. Marche is bordered by Umbria, Abruzzo, Tuscany, and Lazio and has long been overshadowed by its more wellknown neighbours. But this spectacular evening will bring the wine and cuisine of Marche to the forefront with a five-course dinner menu and wine pairings from Garofoli Winery. Marche is located on the coast of the Adriatic Sea, offering an abundance of delicious seafood dishes, while also serving as a significant wine-growing region that produces stellar wines like Rosso Conero DOC and Verdicchio dei Castelli. Explore the culinary wonders of Marche with Chef Massimo Capra and find out what makes this hidden gem of Italy so remarkable.

A CULINARY TOUR OF CALIFORNIA MARCH 3, 2017 | RAINBOW ROOM California’s famous Napa Valley is home to some of the finest vineyards and wineries in the world and has been influential in shaping today’s thriving Italian-American culinary scene. Chef Massimo Capra and Executive Chef John Casciato will be taking guests on a culinary journey through the legendary Napa Valley by offering up trendy west coast-inspired dishes accompanied by some of the very best wines from Robert Mondavi Winery. It will be a truly spectacular evening featuring fresh seasonal dishes, expertly-selected wine pairings, served in the Rainbow Room complete with a magnificent view of the thundering Niagara Falls.

NIAGARA FALLS ELVIS FESTIVAL MAY 19 - 21, 2017 | GREG FREWIN THEATRE Officially sanctioned by Elvis Presley Enterprises, Inc. | Graceland, Niagara Falls is about to experience the King like never before! Imagine three full days of non-stop Elvis celebration held at a premiere Las Vegas style venue including: • Must-See Elvis Gala Shows • 3 Day Elvis Competition; Grand Champion to be crowned on Sunday • The Elvis Dealer’s Room • Delicious Food • Fun times & cool surprises. O

Image: Vadim Koval / Shutterstock.com


All You Can Eat Beef brisket • Pork ribs • fried Chicken Burgers • Sausage • baked beans Potato Bar • salad bar • corn bread

frontierniagara.com 6519 Stanley Ave, Niagara Falls, ON L2G 7L2 +1 289 296 6367 frontierniagara | frontier_niagara

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On The Boulevard Winter 2016/2017  

On The Boulevard Winter 2016/2017  

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