Page 1

CongestionSmart  Livable, Safe, Sustainable Projects within Five Years   

TOA’s approach to creating safer, more livable streets using the Congestion Management Process

 

“Solutions that Make a Difference” 


What is CongestionSmart?  It often is a challenge for Metropolitan  Planning Organizations (MPOs) to address  ever‐increasing Federal requirements.  Sometimes we would like to just take a break  from working on the requirements and do  something to provide a benefit to our  communities, especially if safety and livability  benefits could be delivered quickly at a  relatively low cost.  Tindale‐Oliver & Associates, Inc. (TOA) has  worked with many MPO clients throughout  Florida over the years to develop a Congestion  Management Process (CMP) that meets  Federal requirements and, more importantly,  helps MPOs excel at meeting immediate  needs in their communities, such as:  

Reducing congestion 



Making communities safer 



Improving all modes of travel to promote   livability 



Helping member governments address   other State requirements  

Traffic congestion results in wasted time, pollution, and safety  hazards for everyone. As pictured above, it also delays the  response of fire crews responding to an emergency call.  Communities cannot wait to make progress on reducing  unnecessary traffic congestion.  

What’s Inside



The CMP Annual Update Process — page 4



Congestion Mitigation Strategies — page 6



Safety Mitigation Strategies — page 8



What Makes CongestionSmart Different? — page 11

CongestionSmart | Tindale‐Oliver & Associates, Inc. 

CongestionSmart is   TOA’s approach to  implementing and managing   a Congestion Management  Process that can provide   these benefits to   YOUR community. 


The Federal Perspective  The Congestion Management Process (CMP) is a  Federally‐required management system and  process conducted by a Metropolitan Planning   Organizations (MPO) to improve traffic  operations and safety through the use of either  strategies that reduce travel demand or the  implementation of operational improvements.   MPOs are required by the Federal government  to implement a CMP as part of their routine  planning efforts. The public benefits from having  a functional CMP in place, since it often can  improve travel conditions through the use of low ‐cost improvements or strategies that can be  implemented in a relatively short timeframe  (within 5 to 10 years). More traditional capacity  improvements, such as adding additional travel  lanes, can take 10 or more years to implement  and cost significantly more.   Projects identified through the CMP process also  may be added to future updates of the Long  Range Transportation Plan should they require a  longer time timeframe to implement. 

Federal 8‐Step Congestion Management Process  A key element of a successful CMP is to address quickly the  Federal requirements identified above and develop an annual  process that is oriented toward the identification of projects and  programs that reduce congestion and improve safety. 

 

CongestionSmart | Tindale‐Oliver & Associates, Inc.           3 


The CMP Annual Update Process  Phase 1: Congested Corridor Network Identification  During this phase, annual monitoring efforts are developed or used to review the level of service on the roadway  network to identify reoccurring congestion. Roadways that are congested today or forecasted to be congested in  five years are considered for review through the CMP screening process in Step 2. This effort also can be used to  support local concurrency management systems and other analysis required for the Comprehensive Planning  development of annual Capital Improvement Elements. Crash data management systems are used to identify  corridors or intersections with a high frequency of crashes that result in non‐reoccurring congestion. Safety  improvements not only reduce the potential harm to persons in our communities, they also can reduce congestion. 

Phase 2: CMP and Safety Strategy Screening  Once congested corridors are selected for review, they are screened to identify mitigation strategies appropriate to  reduce congestion or improve safety to reduce crashes.  The Congestion Mitigation Process Strategy Matrix (Page  7) is used to address reoccurring congestion and the Safety Mitigation Strategy Matrix (Page 9) is used to address  non‐reoccurring congestion.   The Congestion Mitigation Process Strategy Matrix is typically used in a workshop  setting to quickly review a corridor while the Safety Mitigation Strategy Matrix is applied based on a review of  crash data. 

Phase 3: Project and Program Identification and Implementation  The congestion or safety mitigation strategies that are identified as having the greatest potential benefit are then  evaluated in greater detail based on committee or technical recommendations. During this phase, additional analysis  of potential projects (see p. 10) is undertaken to identify the specific improvement, implementation issues, and costs.  “Programs” such as demand‐reducing programs or policy changes are evaluated to identify recommended action  items. Recommendations then are made for the projects or programs to be implemented. This may result in a near‐ immediate refocusing of existing resources, such as existing rideshare programs or local maintenance crews where  possible, programming improvements in the local agency capital improvement programs, or using boxed funds  controlled by the MPO, and finally may be identified as candidate projects for implementation in future Long Range  Transportation Plans. 

CongestionSmart | Tindale‐Oliver & Associates, Inc. 


1.5

Recurring   Congestion 

1.1

Roadway LOS  Volume/Capacity Analysis

Congested Roadways  and  Intersections

1.2

1.6

Non‐Recurring   Congestion 

1.3

Recurring 

2.1

1.6

Priority Congested  Corridors and Intersections

2.3

Recommended Strategies  by Location

Evaluation  CMP Strategy  Matrix

2.4

3.1

CMP Task  Force Review  and Recommendations

3.2

Conceptual Improvement  Development and Costing

3.3

 

2.2

2.5

Priority Safety Location  (Roads and Intersections)

CMP Task  Force Review  and Recommendations

Corridors and Intersections  with High Crash Frequency  (Safety Issues)

CMP Task  Force Review  and Recommendations

Non‐  Recurring 

2.5

1.4

Crash Locations

CMP Task  Force and Goods  Movement Stakeholder  Review and  Recommendations

Recommended Strategies  by Location

Evaluate with Safety  Matrix

3.4

CMP Task  Force Review  and Recommendations

3.5

Implement Strategies  (Funding and Development)

Prioritize Specific  Strategies and Projects

CongestionSmart | Tindale‐Oliver & Associates, Inc.           5 


Congestion Mitigation Strategies  Developing goals and objectives is a new requirement for  CMPs that was not previously required for Congestion  Management Systems (CMS).  Congestion mitigation  strategies should be directly associated with the goals of  the CMP.  Typically, corridors in urban areas that have a  high level of congestion will look favorably upon Tier 1, 2, 

Goals & Objectives 

or 3 strategies. These tiers are supportive of community  planning efforts such as mobility plans, transportation  concurrency exception areas, multimodal transportation  districts, etc.  Tier 4 strategies to improve roadway  operations usually are favored where congestion is not  extreme and minimal public transportation service exists. 

Strategies 

Goal 1  Reduce vehicle miles of travel (VMT)   per capita 

Tier 1:  Strategies to Reduce Person Trips or Vehicle Miles Traveled 

Goal 2  Increase viability and use on non‐ automobile modes of travel 

Tier 2:  Strategies to Shift Automobile Trips to Other Modes 

Goal 3  Improve and increase transit as a viable  transportation alternative 

Tier 3:  Strategies to Shift Trips from SOV to HOV Auto/Van 

Goal 4  Improve roadway operations to   reduce congestion 

 

Tier 4:  Strategies to Improve Roadway Operations 

Tier 5:  Strategies to Add Capacity 

CongestionSmart | Tindale‐Oliver & Associates, Inc. 


Congestion Mitigation Strategy Matrix   The Congestion Mitigation Process Strategy Matrix is used in Step  2.2 to evaluate all appropriate strategies for a corridor or  intersection. Typically, it takes less than one hour for a committee  to review an entire corridor. This streamlines the process of  identifying strategies and adds credibility to the selection process  early in the evaluation of the corridors.  Committee participants  have indicated that the review process is one of the most lively  and enjoyable workshops in which they have participated. 

  Level of Potential Benefit: Each potential strategy  is evaluated or reviewed during a CMP  Committee Task Force Workshop. This quickly  identifies the potential strategies that may be  appropriate for the specific corridor. Two  columns are provided to identify the potential  differences in  benefit for significant Transit  Corridors versus Non‐Transit Corridors. 

 

4

1.06 

6 8 Existing Planned

Preferential for Free Parking for HOVs:  This program provides an incentive for employees to car‐ pool with preferred of free‐of‐charge parking for HOVs.   

Not  Applicable

4

1.07 

6 8 Existing Planned

1.08 

4 6 8

 

 

10

8 Existing Planned

1

Not  Applicable

3

1

8 Existing Planned Not  Applicable

3

1

8 Existing Planned Not  Applicable

3

2

6 8 Existing Planned

LOW MEDIUM HIGH LOW MEDIUM

No

HIGH

9

LOW MEDIUM

1

Yes 

No

3 5

Comments: 

HIGH

9

LOW MEDIUM

1 3 5

Yes 

No

Comments: 

HIGH

7

LOW

LOW MEDIUM

LOW LOW LOW

7

Yes  Comments: 

9

1 3 5

Yes 

No

Comments: 

7 9

1 3 5

Yes 

No

Comments: 

7 9

1 3 5

Yes 

No

Comments: 

7 9

10

4

5

9

2

6

7

5

10

4

5

9

2

6

7

3

10

4

5

9

2

6

9

1

10

4

5

consideration and what the specific recommended  action item is. Action items may include  coordination with other departments or agencies  to focus on a rideshare program in the corridor or  undertaking a detailed analysis at specific  intersections to identify operational improvements.  Existing Planned

Not  Applicable

7

LOW

2

8 Existing Planned

3

10

Not 

6

7

Recommendations/Comments: Once each strategy 

Negotiated Demand Management Agreements:  As a condition of development approval, local  Applicable is evaluated, the reviewers identify which  governments require the private sector to contribute to traffic mitigation agreements.  The agree‐ ments typically set a traffic reduction goal (often expressed as a minimum level of ridesharing par‐ strategies are recommended for additional  ticipation or a stipulated reduction in the number of automobile trips).  

4

5

1

2

MEDIUM

3

9

10

HIGH

Not  Applicable

No

7

LOW

1

10

2

8 Existing Planned

10

2

6

9

MEDIUM

Safe Routes to Schools Program: This  federally‐funded program provides 100 percent funding to  communities to invest in pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure surrounding schools.  

4

5

9

2

HIGH

8

Not  Applicable

3

Yes  Comments: 

7

LOW

6

8

Not  Applicable

5

10

MEDIUM

4

Existing Planned

1

10

2

6 Existing Planned

HIGH

1.05 

Alternative Mode  Marketing and Education:  Providing education on alternative modes of trans‐ portation can be an effective way of increasing demand for alternative modes.  This  strategy can  include mapping websites that compute directions and travel times for multiple modes of travel.  

Not  Applicable

9

2 4

5

3

Demand   Improvements 

7

LOW

8

MEDIUM

6

HIGH

2 4

Existing Planned

3

10

LOW

Not  Applicable

Not  Applicable

7

MEDIUM

1.04 

Guaranteed Ride Home Programs: These programs provide a safety net to those people who car‐ pool or use transit to work so that they can get to their destination if unexpected work demands  or an emergency arises. 

8

1

Recommendations/Comments 

10

MEDIUM

8

MEDIUM

6 Existing Planned

6 Existing Planned

7

HIGH

4

1.03 

1

10

2

4

5

9

2

1 3 5

Yes 

No

Comments: 

7 HIGH

8

MEDIUM

6

HIGH

2

Not  Applicable

3

10

4

Existing Planned

1

7 HIGH

8

HIGH

Not  Applicable

6 Existing Planned

LOW

Telecommuting:  Telecommuting policies allow employees to work at home or a regional telecom‐ mute center instead of going into the office, all the time or only one or more days per week. 

4

MEDIUM

Alternative Work Hours:  There are three main variations: staggered hours, flex‐time, and com‐ pressed work weeks.  Staggered hours require employees in different work groups to start at dif‐ ferent times to spread out their arrival/departure times. Flex‐time allows employees to arrive and  leave outside of the traditional commute period.  Compressed work weeks involve reducing the  number of days per week worked while increasing the number of hours worked per day.  

Not  Applicable

2

HIGH

Not  Applicable

LOW

Congestion Pricing:   Congestion pricing can be implemented statically or dynamically.  Static con‐ gestion pricing requires that tolls are higher during traditional peak periods.  Dynamic congestion  pricing allows toll rates to vary depending upon actual traffic conditions. The more congested the  road, the higher the cost to travel on the road.  Dynamic congestion pricing works best when cou‐ pled with real‐time information on the availability of other routes.  

MEDIUM

1.02 

Level of Potential Development     Non‐Transit   Transit Corridor  Corridor 

MEDIUM

Level 1:  Strategies to Reduce Person Trips or Vehicle Miles Traveled 

1.01 

Congestion Mitigation Strategy* 

HIGH

Strategy # 

HIGH

Level 

9

10

CongestionSmart | Tindale‐Oliver & Associates, Inc.           7 


Safety Mitigation Strategies  Each year, nearly 3,000 fatalities and 17,000 severe  injuries occur on our roadways just in Florida. Traffic  crashes are the leading cause of death of persons ages 4  to 24. Reducing congestion is important to the public, but  safety is even more important.  It is strongly  recommended that CMP efforts include both congestion  and safety considerations. One of the most successful  programs implemented on many of our interstate  highways in Florida is the “Road Rangers” Program, which  responds to crashes or renders aid to stranded  motorists. An added benefit of the Road Rangers Program  is that accidents are cleared more quickly, which reduces  congestion and, potentially, other accidents.  This is a  good example of how a safety program can reduce some  of the worst types of congestion. 

MPOs are required to address the Safety Emphasis Areas  of the State Strategic Highway Safety Plan in their  planning efforts. This often is performed as part of the  MPO’s Long Range Transportation Planning efforts, but it  is difficult to forecast crashes long into the future, and  addressing existing safety issues should not be  delayed. Including safety countermeasures should be an  important part of the Congestion Management  Process. Preventing a crash can lead to a congestion  reduction, but more severe crashes often take longer to  clear. The Florida Strategic Highway Safety Plan identifies  four “Safety Emphasis Areas” described in greater detail  below.  

Safety Emphasis Areas

Vulnerable Users  These are crashes  involving pedestrians,  bicyclists, or  motorcyclists, who are  more vulnerable to  severe injuries or death. 

Aggressive Driving  These crashes include  impaired driving,  reckless driving, or  other crash types that  often result in more  serious crashes. 

CongestionSmart | Tindale‐Oliver & Associates, Inc. 

Intersections  Intersections are  planned conflict points  and result in the  greatest exposure for  crashes to occur. These  also are ocations where  mitigation activities may  yield the greatest  benefit. 

Lane Departures  These crashes include  head‐on collisions and  run‐off‐the‐road  crashes that result in  serious crashes, and  sideswipe crashes. 


Safety Mitigation Strategy Matrix  Related Crash Type and Frequency  Crash data management systems (CDMS) are  capable of identifying crashes by type and loca‐ tion. These crashes are then mapped or plotted  on intersections to identify concentrations of  specific crash types that would benefit most from  mitigation improvements. 

Safety Emphasis Areas  Each crash types is identified by a safety  emphasis area.  MPOs are required to  address the Safety Emphasis Areas of  the State Strategic Highway Safety Plan  in their planning efforts. 

 

Common Mitigation  These are the mitigation activities  that are most commonly used to  mitigate the crash types identified. 

Recommended Follow‐Up  Based on the review of crashes at the specific  location,a recommended action is identified. In  many cases, this will involve gaining assistance  from the Florida Department of Transportation or  local Public Works Department to evaluate the  safety issue in more detail. Often, improvements  can be made using existing budgets that have  been set up to address identified safety  issues. Existing plans to improve or resurface  roadways also can be modified to include safety  improvements at a lower cost. Additional funding  may be available through Federal safety grant  programs, resulting in more projects being  implemented as a part of the CMP process to  provide benefits to the community. 

CongestionSmart | Tindale‐Oliver & Associates, Inc.           9 


Detailed Analysis  SR 52 at Moon Lake Rd— Recommended Improvements  Option 1 

SR 52

Add 300’ NB to WB   left turn lane (2 total lanes) 

La ke M oo n

ROW Needed: Yes  Feasibility: Medium  Recommended: Yes 

Ro ad

 

Option 2  SR 52

Add 150’ SB‐EB   left turn lane (2 total lanes) 

Add 300’ NB to WB   left turn lane (2 total lanes)  Ro ke La n M oo

´

ROW Needed: Yes  Feasibility: Medium  Recommended: Yes 

ad

 

 

ROW Needed: Yes  Feasibility: Medium  Recommended: Yes 

Moon Lake Road was a deficient roadway operating below the adopted level‐of‐ service standard when Pasco County performed an analysis to demonstrate that they  were meeting State‐required financial feasibility requirements in their Comprehensive  Plan. The fix to restore the level‐of‐service standard was originally identified as  reconstructing all of Moon Lake Road as a four lane roadway, an improvement that  Pasco County could not afford to implement. Through the MPO’s CMP process, TOA  identified relatively minor low‐cost improvements at the intersection with SR 52 that  restored the level of service to an acceptable level. 

10 

CongestionSmart | Tindale‐Oliver & Associates, Inc. 


What Makes   TOA and CongestionSmart   Different?     We identify real projects or programs and how to implement them. TOA identifies specific  improvements for a corridor or intersection and the steps to implement them.  

We focus on project implementation.  Too often, CMP efforts emphasize systemwide  performance evaluation and reporting efforts, where the focus is on a report, not projects.  TOA’s goal is to address the reporting requirements with the least amount of effort possible so  the focus is on supporting the MPO and local agencies to identify projects and programs that  will be implemented in a short timeframe, sometimes at no additional cost. 



We fully consider all mitigation strategies for all modes of travel.  TOA’s approach addresses  the Federal requirement to consider all strategies in an innovative, streamlined, and engaging  format that that receives very positive feedback from MPO committees.    



We address safety issues, not just level‐of‐service and concurrency concerns.  While  congestion on a roadway is a nuisance, being involved in a crash can be a life‐changing  experience.  TOA’s approach identifies safety issues that must be addressed so there is  reduced congestion and our roadways are safer.   



Our approach assists local governments and brings more money for improvements into the  CMP effort.  TOA’s analysis can be used by local governments to demonstrate that they meet  the financial feasibility requirements of the State in the development of their annual Capital  Improvement Elements. Our screening process often identifies lower‐cost improvements that  can be implemented to meet these standards.  This often leads to a desire to locally fund  projects, which adds to the accomplishments of the MPO by serving both the local  governments and the public by implementing more projects or programs.

 

 

Representative Clients 

 



Sarasota Manatee MPO 

 

 

Ocala—Marion County TPO 



Spring Hill/Hernando MPO   

 

West Central Florida CCC 



Pasco MPO  

 

Martin County MPO 



Charlotte County ‐ Punta Gorda MPO 

 

 

CongestionSmart | Tindale‐Oliver & Associates, Inc.           11 


www.tindaleoliver.com  TAMPA 1000 N. Ashley Drive Suite 100 Tampa, FL 33602 Phone (813) 224-8862

ORLANDO 1595 S. Semoran Boulevard Building 7, Suite 1540 Winter Park, FL 32792 Phone (407) 657-9210

BARTOW 545 N. Broadway Avenue Bartow, FL 33830 Phone (863) 533-8454

For additional information on CongestionSmart, please contact William Roll at (813) 224-8862 or wroll@tindaleoliver.com.


CongestionSmart  

CongestionSmart is TOA’s approach to implementing and managing a Congestion Management Process that can provide these benefits to YOUR commu...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you