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Thomas Smith

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Columbia University GSAPP Master of Architecture

Portfolio

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Micro-urbanism 3/14

Site axonometric


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Colophon $

Design

Thomas Louis Smith

Edition

£

Specifications

¥

March 2017

8.5 × 11 in. (215.9 × 279.4 mm)

Typesface

Helvetica Neue Neo-grotesque sans-serif


Code Drawing

Model

Diagram

Render

Text

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Design Colony 6/14

Site axonometric


Content α

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Toilet Cuts

Layout /8

Universal bathroom prototype with minimal footprint

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Coreless Bank

/10

Commercial bank branch defined by circulation

Transitional Geometry

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/8

Fabricated rubber-mold cast rockite tiles

19–26

Framed Gym

/4

Kit of parts gym based on exploratory pathways

Dark Park

Kit of parts gym based on exploratory pathways

Micro-Urbanism Housing

Kit of parts gym based on exploratory pathways

Sauna Unbound

Flexible and rentable living and working space

Design Colony

Flexible and rentable living and working space

27–30

/8 31–38

/16 39–54

/12 54–66

/14 67–80


α Toilet Cuts Jeffrey Johnson, critic

Core I

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β Coreless Bank Erica Goetz, critic

Core II

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In Long Island City, Queens, Coreless Bank redefines the standard commercial bank branch. Program is linked and separated based on circulation and changes in elevation. The building is devoid of standard walls in order to convey a sense of openness and visibility throughout the building. Varied elevations act to divide space by program. The first floor is an open space with stepped floors and ramps creating distinct separation between ATMs, bank teller, and client consultation offices. A perimeter structure holds ramps and staircases with office space glomming onto the interior and meeting and informal space to the exterior. Floors have cuts and voids to create a visual connection while maintaining a sense of privacy and hierarchy between departments. The structural grid along the perimeter allows for the inner workspace to be open and column free. The facade highlights the elevation of the floor, stairs, and ramps.

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β

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13 Study models


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ms Tho Ave on

Queens Plaza

Jac

42nd

Rd

kso

rd

43

Queensboro

nA

ve

e Av Hu

nte

rS

t

Crescent St

Court Sq

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23rd St

th 44

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24th St

Court Sq

Court Sq

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14 Axonometric site section cuts, defining form from urban scale


β L5

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15 Circulation and structure


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16 Structure model


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17 Circulation


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18 Program division by elevation


Îł Transitional Geometry Trevor Watson, critic

Tech Elective

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δ Framed Gym Jeffrey Johnson, critic

Core I

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Set in Manhattanville, New York, this project like the previous one was developed sectionally in order to create separate programs that allowed for the maximum public space. Program included a pool, yoga studio, basketball court, and locker rooms, all of which were lifted from the ground. The locker room was in the center of the site with tunnelling pathways that provide access to the three adjacent programs. Each pathway tunnel is accessible via the inside of the locker room as well as the outside from above. The site also includes several publicly accessible programs such as space for food carts and barbecuing. The landscape is attuned to allow for a variety of activities, such as children’s play space, dog walking, and terraced areas that differ in privacy, visibility,

and size based off of their program. The rendering on the right shows a glimpse of what it is like to walk along a pathway into the elevated dance and yoga studio. New elements are revealed along the way, both inside and outside of the architecture depending on the surface condition of the walls. This ascent is framed with clear glass, opaque translucent glass, and concrete in order creates a backdrop in the studio of the elevated 1 train subway line and adjacent buildings. In the image to the right, green walls and grass combine with concrete and brick pathways to create a cohesive site that blurs program with landscape. Framing of intersecting pathways of varied elevation and changing slope encourage exploration through the site.

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ε Dark Park Jeffrey Inaba, critic

Advanced Studio IV

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Îś Micro-Urbanism Jinhee Park, critic Xiao Xiaoxue, collaborator

Core II

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30% Rented

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30% Rented


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Located in Mott Haven, Bronx this project explores the ideas of creating housing through micro-urbanism. The neighborhood includes a hospital, local franchise businesses, and a community college, which require temporary small- and medium-sized space for meetings, study rooms, and studio galas. By creating flexible living space with sliding doors, individual units can combine with or separated from circulation to create a variety of rentable space. The site consists of three plots, each with a building configured for specific types of amenities (a library, galleries, and a gym). Each apartment unit is made up of modular 8’ × 8’ boxes, which define the building’s structural grid. The building’s users are divided into two categories: residents (in yellow) and patrons (in blue). Apartments have a “front yard,” which is accessible to both residents and patrons, and a “backyard,” which is only for patrons. This separation allows for patrons to enjoy a more private and intimate space, while also allowing them to enjoy the shared amenities with patrons renting space in their respective building.

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UP

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Ρ Sauna Unbound Chris & Dominic Leong, critics

Advanced Studio V

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Ρ

Central Park is the epitome of unnatural nature; an Olmstedian creation in every sense. The site is chosen to represent this discord. At the southern end, Sheep Meadow showcases a hybrid of urbanism and nature. An open field circumscribed by a blanket of trees and a backdrop of glass and masonry skyscrapers. Both background and middleground in a constant state of change and growth. This project creates a reflection of the tableau. The rendering above shows a glimpse of what it is like to walk along a pathway into the elevated dance and yoga studio. New elements are revealed along the way, both inside and outside of the architecture depending on the surface condition of the walls. This ascent is framed with clear glass, opaque translucent glass, and concrete in order creates a backdrop in the studio of the elevated 1 train subway line and adjacent tenement buildings.

8/10

In the image to the right, green walls and grass combine with concrete and brick pathways to

create a cohesive site that blurs program with landscape. Framing of intersecting pathways of varied elevation and slope encourage exploration through the site. As the pavilion is enveloped by the semi-reflective metal and transparent mesh, the form loosens. Shadows from the late autumn sun allow the pavilion to displace itself when the mesh roof casts itself onto the ground. Boundaries are blurred through the infinitum of reflection both inside and out of the pavilion. The thermal qualities of each room bleeds between earth and radiant floor surrounding the amenities. Unsure of what is inside and what is out, visitors are constantly confronted with changes in material, temperature, and spatial quality. While the ground plane is bound, the sky is blurred. The senses are confused in order to allow for a sublime and unprogrammed experience. This kit-of-parts sauna in Central Park allows for guest to relax and enjoy the discord and harmony of architecture and nature.

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θ Micro-Urbanism Chris & Dominic Leong, critics Lin Wu, collaborator

Advanced Studio V

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