TI 15 - November 2021

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PATRÍCIA FERREIRA Valérius Hub CEO

“WE WANT TO BE SUSTAINABLE AND TRANSPARENT” P 8&9

FOTO: RUI APOLINÁRIO

DIRETOR: MANUEL SERRÃO MENSAL | ASSINATURA ANUAL: 30 EUROS

OPINION

CIRCULAR ECONOMY

WHAT WILL THE RECOVERY AND RESILIENCE FACILITY BE USED FOR?

HALF OF LMA'S COLLECTION IS ALREADY SUSTAINABLE

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P 10

COMPANY

INNOVATION

TRADE SHOWS

SM SENRA: "RETURN TO PHYSICAL FAIRS MAKES ALL THE DIFFERENCE"

INOVAFIL IS STUDYING NON-NEWTONIAN FLUIDS

AT MODTISSIMO, BUSINESS RECOVERY WAS IN THE AIR

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E-COMMERCE

CASUALWEAR WILL HELP MARJOMOTEX GROW 30% P 14

P3

N U M B E R 1 5 N OV E M B E R 2 021

P 12

INDUSTRY

INOVARTEX GROWS WITH MY SHIRT AND BETS ON QUALITY P4

I N T E R N AT I O N A L DIRETOR: MANUEL SERRÃO


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GROUP

www.spormex.com

Events • Exhibitions • Conferences • Fairs • Stands • Tents

THE STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIP THAT ELEVATES YOUR BUSINESS ANYWHERE IN THE WORLD.

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comercial@spormex.pt

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33 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE IN ASSEMBLING EVENTS AND EXHIBITIONS:


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n EDITORIAL By: Manuel Serrão

A PRETTY FACE

INOVAFIL IN A CONSORTIUM THAT STUDIES NON-NEWTONIAN FLUIDS

At a time when the Portuguese textile and clothing industry has all the reasons to frown, nothing better than having a pretty face on the cover of this edition. It will not make us forget the increases in electricity and gas prices, nor all the problems of the last two years. Nor is it because of her beauty that Patrícia Ferreira brightens the cover of this edition. At 28 years of age, much more than a pretty face, the CEO of Valerius Hub is one of the faces of change to which our industry is committed to. She doesn’t mince her words, showing an emancipation that her father (José Vilas Boas Ferreira) should be proud of. Patrícia made each question a launching pad for a world of information never browsed before. The poster girl of a new generation on the Portuguese textile and Clothing Industry, Patrícia Ferreira knows that there are no well-kept secrets. What the future asks for – and what she asks for the future – is more and more shared successes, celebrated by those who deserve them. t

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Inovafil, in partnership with CeNTI and CITEVE and in a consortium led by TMG, is studying non-Newtonian fluids, known for their flexibility. The goal is to insert them inside textile fibres for personal protective equipment and workwear. Non-Newtonian fluids have a viscosity that varies according to the pressure applied to matter. “Non-Newtonian fluids work like sand: if you stick a finger in it, it gives in, and the finger penetrates the material. However, if we punch it, it becomes rigid

when subjected to that impact”, explains the CEO of Inovafil, Rui Martins. This technology is already being applied to football shin guards or motorcyclists' protections, which are flexible, but become rigid on impact, providing protection. Now, the goal of the consortium is to apply this technology to textile fibres. “This could mean great progress in the field of protective textiles. More comfort to articles that necessarily have to be rigid to be secure. A military man told us some time ago: the policeman already

has a bulletproof vest. The bullet no longer enters and kills the police. Now the problem is that the policeman has to run with a very heavy vest, which is more difficult, and the thief might get away”, jokes Rui Martins. The future, according to the CEO, is to develop a vest with a textile structure, or a textile with an associated polymer, using non-Newtonian fluids, which will allow it to be thinner, lighter and, consequently, more comfortable, but ensuring the same ballistic protection. t

Property: ATP - Associação Têxtil e de Vestuário de Portugal NIF: 501070745 Editor: Mário Jorge Machado Director: Manuel Serrão Adress: Rua Fernando Mesquita, 2785, Ed. CITEVE 4760-03164 Vila Nova de Famalicão Telephone number: +351 252 303 030 Email: tdetextil@atp.pt Subscription e Advertising: Cláudia Azevedo Lopes Telephone number: +351 969 658 043 - mail: cl.tdetextil@gmail.com ERC Provisional Registration: 126725 Circulation: 1000 copies Print Shop: Grafedisport Adress: Estrada Consiglieri Pedroso, 90 - Casal Santa Leopoldina - 2730-053 Barcarena Legal Deposit Number: 451405/19 Editorial Status: Available in: http:// tjornalinternational.com/editorial-statute/

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EURATEX: TRANSPORT AND ENERGY THREATEN RECOVERY The latest economic data confirms the recovery of the European textile and clothing industry, but Euratex warns that this path could be interrupted. The current problems in supply chains and the unexpected increase in costs associated with energy are a threat, says in a statement the European federation, of which ATP is part. “The fragile recovery is hampered by higher transport costs and rising raw material and energy prices. The cost of energy, in particular gas, rose sharply – with a strong impact on the industry's competitiveness. The recovery is also threatened by other factors that limit production, such as the shortage of labor and equipment”, according to Euratex.

"Like food, textiles must have detailed labelling on the benefits and harms of the garment"

SALSA AND MIGUEL OLIVEIRA JOIN FORCES

Jean brand Salsa has teamed up with MotoGP rider Miguel Oliveira to create a capsule collection. In addition to the characteristic denim, present in jeans and jackets, the line also features T-shirts, sweatshirts and sportswear jackets, full of patches, listed patterns and many other elements of the sports universe. Salsa's designers sought inspiration from Miguel Oliveira's running attire, such as competition suits, helmets, shirts and polo shirts with the sponsors' emblems. t

INOVARTEX GROWS WITH MY SHIRT AND BETS ON QUALITY After a few years focused on fast fashion production, Inovartex decided to reposition production, and invest in added- value products. This change led the company to reach a turnover of half a million euros, 95% coming in foreign markets. Gil Ferreira, administrator and owner of the company, explained that Inovartex – initially dedicated only to shirt production, but diversified into several other products – took a real leap forward when it decided to bet on quality. For that, the creation of a new business area was fundamental: a technological package that allows customers to see the product from sample to the final product. “With digital technology, we use 3D for the catwalk and 4D for

modelling, and can do the total collection management”, explained Gil Ferreira. Generally speaking, the proposal follows four essential steps: modelling; prototyping; data sheets and collection portfolio; and consulting. In addition to private label, which accounts for around 80% of the turnover, Inovartex also has its own brand, My Shirt – for online sales – which is also on the rise. United States, Canada, France, Belgium, Netherlands and United Kingdom are the company’s main export markets. And if the US market is doing comparatively better than the rest, the UK, despite the Brexit, is also in good shape. And it would be better if the Portuguese customs were not blocking orders from the United Kingdom, explains Gil Ferreira. t

WAY 2 TEX WANTS TO BRING TOGETHER PORTUGAL AND BRAZIL The enormous size and potential of the textile sector in Brazil still has few links with its Portuguese counterpart – customs fees are the most visible impediment – and the role of Way 2 Tex, from Febratex group, is to bring business people from both countries closer together. “We manage internationalization of the textile sec-

tor in both directions: from Brazil to Portugal, the gateway to the European Union, and from Portugal to Brazil”, Giordana Madeira, executive director of the Febratex Group, told T Jornal. “Our intent is to identify new opportunities to link the two textile sectors” and increase the capacity for internationalization – even in

the face of the Covid-19 pandemic. “The resilience of the Brazilian industry is a guarantee that the economy of the largest country in South America continues to function”, said Giordana Madeira. Febratex, the largest textile fair in the American continent and the third largest in the world, will take place between August 23 and 26, 2022.t

Hugo Miranda Adalberto’s Innovation Director

TINTEX TEXTILES ENDS SEASONAL COLLECTIONS It is a concept that has long been discussed in the textile and fashion industry: the end of the autumn-winter and spring-summer collections, traditionally subject to a seasonal calendar. A paradigm shift that Tintex Textiles is now taking from theory to practice with the ‘This is not a collection’, the company’s new statement. We are talking about timeless and versatile textiles, which no longer follow a seasonal calendar, and that for the CEO of Tintex Textiles, strengthens the ties between companies and the final consumer. “It is essential to be closer to customers. In this sense, it is necessary to adapt the mesh to any place, any climate, without season or gender, stimulating a reduction in consumption”, considers Ricardo Silva.

75

millions were Farfetch's profits in the second quarter of 2021

ROSA STUDIO PARIS NEW COLLECTION IS COLOURFUL AND GENDER-FREE The newly created Rosa StudioParis has just launched the new Aqua and Poporn collections, made up of colourful coats, in shades of pink, blue, green, orange, and gender-free. All pieces are made in reduced quantities, with attention to finishes and detail, to guarantee exclusivity. The 404 Error Collection, on the other hand, features the brand's first shorts, pants and t-shirts. The materials used are sustainable, such as fabrics made from plastics collected from the ocean, Tencel that comes from wood and cellulose, plants such as bamboo, aloe vera, orange trees and algae.


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TRIPLE MARFEL IS BETTING ON NEW PRODUCTS AND ON THE ONLINE CHANNEL About to complete its 75th anniversary, Triple Marfel announces a new strategy based on the digital channel, and on a new range of products. The historic brand, known for decades for its men's shirts, will expand to polos, t-shirts and loungewear. The launch of the online channel is scheduled for 2022, an important step towards reaching other markets and conquering younger generations, at a time when the brand is already reaching the American, European and African markets.

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"In 2012 we depended on a single customer by 80%, today it is around 25%" Sanuel Costa Sonix administrator

DFT30, THE ALL-IN-ONE PRINT SOLUTION FROM MTEX NS DTF 30 is the most recent proposal from MTEX NS for the textile sector, a differentiating technology that in a single equipment provides printing, powder application and transfer film fixing, besides being environmentally friendly. The company presents the new model as “a multifunctional differentiating technology, with two distinct printing heads – CMYK and White”. MTEX NS also explains that the "process of personalization of textile parts through the Direct to Film technique is now available to small and medium-sized companies at controlled costs, which will revolutionize the way many companies work”.

SM SENRA: THE RETURN TO PHYSICAL FAIRS MAKES ALL THE DIFFERENCE The return to face-to-face fairs has catapulted SM Senra's business to a new level that was 'asleep' during the pandemic – and the presence at the last edition of MODTISSIMO, following Munich Fabric Start, makes all the difference. Sílvia Senra, administrator and owner of SM Senra, is peremptory: in the first hours of MODISSIMO she had already “transformed low expectations into strong business prospects”: the abundance of potential customers cemented the belief that the face-to-face contact with customers makes all the difference. Always, but especially in this post-pandemic phase. The good results achieved at Munich and MODTISSIMO lead Sílvia Senra to “believe we will exceed our turnover at the end of the year” – an amount of 1.5 million euros that suffered some setbacks with the pandemic. Working exclusively under a

private label regime, SM Senra produces for the mass market, but also for more sophisticated and value-added clients. Working solely with foreign customers, Sílvia Senra revealed that it is “working very well with the Norwegian and Danish markets, but also the German and

Frenchmarkets”. On the other side is the Spanish market, “which has slowed down during the pandemic, and has not yet recovered”. However, SM Senra is not considering leaving this important market, and will wait until the agents can rebuild their businesses. t

BLANKY EXPANDS FROM THE IBERIAN MARKET TO EUROPE With one foot in Portugal and the other in Spain: that was how Blanky was born, the first heavy blanket created by two Portuguese – Pedro Caseiro and Ricardo Parreira. In September 2020, the duo launched on the Iberian market an innovative and clinically proven solution to improve sleep quality, based on the Deep Touch Pressure (DTP) method. The next step is to sweep Europe off its feet. Pedro Caseiro, the brand's Marketing and Sales director, explains the reason for the ex-

pansion: “Since the beginning, our project had the ambition of being international. That's why we launched Blanky simultaneously in Portugal and in Spain. So, it makes perfect sense to extend the distribution to Europe”, he emphasizes. And adds: "For the first time we are going to find stronger competition in some markets, but it encourages us to know that we are going to enter this competition with a better quality product at hand. Although the heavy blanket is a recent solution in the

Iberian mass market, in countries such as Sweden, Denmark, the United Kingdom, France and Germany it has been used for therapeutic purposes for over 15 years”. The extra weight of the blankets relaxes the body, like a massage – an effect that provides a more restful and peaceful sleep, and also serves to calm people suffering from stress or anxiety. The turnover in Portugal in the first 12 months of activity tripled the initial predictions, and by 2022 the brand expects to exceed one million euros in sales.t

MÖM(E) AWARDED AT JUNIOR DESIGN AWARDS The Best Children's Eco Fashion award of the Junior Design Awards was given to the Portuguese brand Möm(e). The now awarded SS21 collection is entitled 'a.v.o', and is inspired by the designer's grandmother. The line won the jury with its simplicity, good taste and sustainable character. The results were published on the page of the British magazine Junior Design, which highlights the “simple silhouettes, soft tones and softer fabrics” of Möm(e)’s collection. The judges also emphasized the work of the experienced artisans and seamstresses that gave life to the collection, defying fast fashion, but above all working out of love and devotion. Inês Camanõ Garcia, founder of Möm(e), is proud to see her brand “praised abroad, and to see that it reflects the quality of the product, and of the Portuguese workmanship”. “This award is not mine, it belongs to my children who inspire me, to those who work with me every day and also to our clients, who have given us so much love and support”, the founder said. Last year’s Autumn-Winter 2020 collection of Möm(e) was also awarded, with the bronze medal in the same category, Best Children's Eco Fashion. t


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n INTERVIEW Patrícia Ferreira At the age of 28 and trained in Economics, the person in charge for Valérius Hub has gathered more and more skills, and also coworkers – in a project to which they added modernity, innovation and flexibility in a sector that is excessively stuck to values that are losing efficiency

PHOTO: RUI APOLINÁRIO

"WE HAVE A 30 PEOPLE TEAM THINKING ABOUT INNOVATION EVERY DAY"


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aving sustainability as keystone, Valérius Hub sought to assemble a multidisciplinary team with the textile sector in its origins and that embraced innovation, targeting digitalization and e-commerce. The objective is to have such a variety to enable presenting all areas with companies operating in different types of products. Valérius Hub has a pioneer concept. I would like you to summarize its goals.

It was created in 2020 and what we wanted to create was a set of companies which defended the same type of ideas. One thing is having each company individually trying to reach a goal and a completely different thing is trying to reach a group goal. We tried to bring together people with the same ideas and a similar know-how but evidencing trading difficulties or other needs that could be complemented. We tried to set up a multidisciplinary team that had the textile sector in its origins and combined innovation, which we believe to be digitalization and e-commerce – one of its foundations. And, of course, having sustainability as the keystone of the company. Is it an internal or external group?

It is both internal and external... There is innovation in that…

Yes, bringing together people that aren’t part of our day-to-day is important for us. There were areas that we didn’t dominate but that we wanted to include: acessories, hats, home textiles, all areas we didn’t master. It is, therefore, a sort of physical Marketplace, formed by both internal and external companies to the group. Was it hard to make the project understandable and find companies to integrate it?

In fact it was easier than we thought. We drew a sort of KPI [performance measurement tool] of what we felt a company needed to accomplish in order to integrate the group. And the next step for one company to be part of this hub it must cater for a set of needs in terms of skills, sustainability, social audits and some key points – which our customers consider to be the minimum. What companies are with you at the moment?

In paper we have Ambar, in shoes we have Camport, in knitwear we have Vestire, in Home textiles we have Colmaco, in export textiles we have Erius, Valérius, Junius, Supercorte, Sartius and then we have a series of companies that operate in different product fields. It was important for us to have a variety to enable us to present all the areas, even those that weren’t part of our core.

Are you still keen on joining more companies to the hub?

Yes, we are continuously looking for it. For example, we are now looking for people in the denim area – we feel that’s a product that we wear all year long, which doesn’t have the same seasonality of other products. Even among the already represented areas, when we feel that the companies that joined us have reached the limit of their capacity, we look for others. Regarding its size, what type of companies are you looking for?

We aren’t restraining in terms of size, we are restraining in terms of the keystones we consider to be the basis. One of the keystones is sustainablility, the wish to integrate our 360 thread, treats well employees, has all the social certifications and presents delivery capacity suitable to what we call” fast to the market”. There must be an ideal dimension after which Valérius Hub won’t be able to grow any further, right?

We are going to move our facilities because we are growing. In the beginning we were just three people, and now we are 15. We only had one person in sustainability and now there are five. We are growing and introducing new business units that are only possible with this initial investment. We want to be sustainable in the entire chain of value and as transparent as possible. We have the possibility of tracing the entire chain, from the fibre to the finished product. We are continuously creating teams and we are growing with these teams in order to provide an external service of quality. How is the response to this project on the market’s side?

It has been very good. Before the pandemic we felt that e-commerce brands would take a leap but we didn’t imagine it would be so fast. The pandemic accelerated our predictions in five years. As we were prepared – we had an e-commerce study – we reduced costs and introduced speed in the delivery of goods, supported by a logistics department and a warehouse which enabled us to do the shipping to the final B2B point in the United States. In the past we sent goods to the United States, the customers paid 15% taxes at the entrance and then sent the goods back to their distributors in Europe – which was insane both in terms of distances and shipping. At the moment we define which items are destined to Europe and which go to the United States and we do direct shipping – in some cases directly to the shop. Here we have a powerful accelerator. We feel there is a need towards this speed and e-commerce only works if our warehouses are near to our final client’s ones. We are doing partnerships with warehouses and integrating them directly. We are in the United Kingdom, the United States and Poland to serve neighbouring countries. That also enables us to manage returns... Is it a very complicated problem?

Yes. In Germany, for instance, returns represent 50% to 60% - this happens because

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people buy two or three sizes, try them on and then return the ones that don’t fit. The German government forced all shipping and returns to be paid by companies. Therefore, we are selecting partners in Germany to collect returns and send them to Portugal. A part of the success also has to do with the design team, which has a strong role in the choice of innovative raw materials and in the support to new techniques, and new market trends. Does so much diversification allow the company to defend itself from an excessive exposition to the client?

That’s our goal. We are always looking for new clients – but ones who are framed in the type of clients who we like to work with. The project started in 2020 but it must have a first balance in terms of numbers, right?

Valérius will invoice around 38 million euros. Valérius Hub doesn’t have direct invoicing but we can say that in 2020 it brought around 10 million euros in new businesses from new clients that were introduced through the hub. The project is inserted in new European guidelines for the sector: reindustrialization and shorter supply chains. Did you think about that before you started the project?

We thought about merging two worlds: a project that allows us to get closer to the final client and shortening time, we try to add innovation every day. We have a 30 people team working on that. Our focus is to be the first to solve a problem. We have people working so that by 2030 Valérius is a carbon zero company. In practical terms in what is this 30 people team working on at the moment?

We have, for instance, a team working on a system to enable the factory to respond, in three days, when an order arrives. We have been analysing the needs in terms of raw materials, we have a selection of chassis and a production line available which will have stamping, embroidering and will only produce what is ordered, not producing stocks. We are working to reduce 90% of water and chemicals in dying. We have a team who only works in waste reuse. There is another working in chemical recycling to remove contaminants in mechanic recycling. Lastly, there is a team who only works with influencers to anticipate the following year’s trends.

the questions of José Vilas Boas Ferreira President of the Valérius Group How does the new generation see older salespeople and how do they sell made in Portugal?

At the moment there are many people leading to a purchase. On the other side, the buyers side, there is great youth and other interests which require a different approach. When face to face with a customer I don’t ask for orders: I ask whether they are available to start a project. In the past we worked based on price, but now we work on a differentiated service. Sustainability or customization, which of these vectors will have more added-value in the future?

Sustainability will not be an added-value but an obligation. And customization will make the difference. The closer a brand is to the final consumer, the bigger the induction to new purchases and loyalty. Maybe in two years-time I will say that customization is already an obligation.

José Pedro Ferreira CEO Valérius 360 How does the new generation in the leadership analyse their predecessor’s management in TCI?

In a company experienced people who convey comfort, security and experience shall coexist with the generation that brings innovation, flexibility and new ways to approach the market. Only the junction of both generations may allow us to have an explosive company.

Can you build a brand?

Easily. In order to launch a brand a minimum investment of 500 thousand euros is needed. As we have the entire process already developed we can dissolve this cost throughout the entire chain. Was the quality image of the Portuguese textile Sector important for the project?

Yes, it is one of the key-factors for clients to trust our work. The image that foreign clients have of Portugal is that we are a country that presents quality both in raw materials and in manufacture. This works as an opening door – but if we don’t deliver service and continuity, clients exit the same door he entered. t

How are traditional brands adapting to this new digitalization era, specially with the entrance of influencers?

There are brands that will end up disappearing under the influence of influencers. They have two options: either they adapt themselves and use influencers in what can be their added-value or they will end up disappearing. One must be very careful as these new business ways are stealing market share from traditional strategies without them realizing it.


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FFF INVITED TO THE LONDON AND BUENOS AIRES JURY The growing external visibility of the Fashion Film Festival resulted in the invitation of the event's CEO, Manuel Serrão, to be a part of the jury of similar competitions in London and Buenos Aires. The invitation results from the good synergies that have been created with the Portuguese team throughout the editions. Last year, London Fashion Film Festival was the official partner of the only event dedicated to fashion cinema in Portugal, and Bueno Aires Fashion Film is the guest of this 8th edition.

"Somelos has always been an university. Those who leave, always leave with much more skills" Paulo Melo Somelos Administrator

ARTEFITA CELEBRATES MAXIMUM SALES

Not all are present, but this group represents the 112 elements of Artefita's team, which came together to celebrate the highest monthly sales record in the company's 27-year history, which was reached in July. Artefita's production has already reached 35 markets all over the world and crosses very different sectors. With a turnover of around 7 million euros in 2019, the company directs 87% of its production to export markets such as Sweden, Germany, the United Kingdom and the United States of America. t

HALF OF LMA'S COLLECTION IS ALREADY SUSTAINABLE It is a young and dynamic company with an ambitious goal: to present a 100% sustainable collection by next year. At the moment, half of LMA's products are already eco-friendly. “I really want that one year from now whoever enters one of our stands only finds sustainable products”, reveals the company's CEO, Alexandra Araújo. This new statement and strategy also aims to simplify communication with customers. “The client will no longer need to ask if we have sustainable products, because everything will be sustainable”, explains the CEO, at a time when about half of the articles already incorporate environmental and circular principles.

LMA is also optimistic for the Portuguese textile sector, which in Alexandra Araújo’s opinion will benefit from its proximity. "There are many customers of big brands that, for example, only made socks in Portugal. Now, with the issue of freight and the difficulty of setting delivery dates from Asia, they are reinforcing and diversifying the product lines made in Portugal", she explains. Proof of this are the contacts established by major European brands at international fairs such as Première Vision and MODTISSIMO. “Buyers like Portugal, trust us, and begin to value our skills and service more than ever”, she concludes. t

TOP BRANDS TURN TO PORTUGUESE PRODUCTION Changes in supply chains and transport costs, but also the fact that the Portuguese production did not shift from its commitment to circularity and sustainability, turned Portugal into the place where the big international luxury brands are converging. To the question "why are the top brands turning to Portugal?", Page magazine publishes an extensive work, concluding that “textile production in Asia has not declined since the pandemic, but exports have been a problem in addition to the lack of quality production. Portugal has positioned itself as the "capital of the sustainable textile industry at a time when fashion is changing”.

98%

of A Penteadora’s production is for export

SPOMAN LAUNCHES TUKO, THE NEW BRAND FOR DOGS AND CATS

SONAE SELLS CB4 TO NORTH AMERICAN GAP Gap, one of the US largest apparel brands, bought CB4 from the Sonae group, an artificial intelligence (AI) software company that developed a program that improves the consumer in-store experience. CB4's software uses machine learning and advanced AI algorithms to identify the products that are most demanded in stores. When a

product fails to sell at expected levels, CB4 sends an alert to the store manager, and suggests ways to fix it. “This solution increases new net sales between 0.5% and 2%, improves customer experience, and makes it easier to find products”, reads the statement. Sonae, which through Sonae IM had entered the capi-

tal of CB4 in 2019, following an international round of financing. Thus it definitely leaving the AI company. CB4 now belongs to GAP, “whose strategy is to invest in technology that promotes growth and innovation, and that has an impact on the company’s entire brand portfolio”, says the North American group in a statement. t

It was with the goal of creating a range of pet products, combining functionality and design that the textile company Spoman launched Tuko. The new brand dedicated to the pet sector has just hit the market with a collection for dogs and another for cats. Resistance, quality, safety, ease to clean, and handcrafted construction are the main characteristics of this brand, 100% made in Portugal.


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2. MARJOMOTEX WAS IN CHARGE OF REVAMPING THE STAFF. DENIM WAS HIGHLIGHTED IN THE CHOICES OF THE APPAREL MANUFACTURING COMPANY

PHOTOSYNTHESIS by: Bebiana Rocha

1. WITH THE RETURN TO ALFÂNDEGA, THE AFFLUENCE OF BUYERS CAUSED COMMOTION AT THE ENTRANCE OF MODTISSIMO58

RECOVERY IS IN THE AIR Projected by MODTISSIMO, the return flight to good business has transformed into an excellent take off to the recovery of the Portuguese textile sector, returning to contacts, and affirming the Portuguese TCI as a privileged quality supplier. The 58th edition was marked by new records, both in the number of exhibitors, which even occupied corridors, and in the number of buyers, around 4 thousand, always with the focus on sustainable proposals.

7. THE AFFLUENCE TO LMA STAND DIDN’T GO UNNOTICED TO CAMERAS. CEO ALEXANDRA ARAÚJO WAS HAPPY WITH THE TRUST IN THE MADE IN PORTUGAL

6. THE COLOURS OF CONCRETO CAUGHT THE EYE, WITH THE PROPOSALS OF CRISTINA FERREIRA BRAND

12. A. SAMPAIO & FILHOS WAS ALSO BUSY. ITS KNITTED FABRICS ATTRACTED FOREIGN BUYERS

11. NEW CLIENTS AND NEW GEOGRAPHIES VISIT LIMA & COMPANHIA, WHICH WAS IN HIGH ROTATION IN THE TWO DAYS OF THE TRADE FAIR


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4. BIGGER AND WITH MORE QUALITY, ITECHSTYLE GREEN CIRCLE SHOWED ONCE MORE HOW OUR TEXTILE AND CLOTHING INDUSTRY IS PIONEER IN SUSTAINABILITY

3. THE NEWS OF ÁUSTRIA AS A GUEST COUNTRY BORE FRUITS. THE NUMBER OF AUSTRIAN EXHIBITORS TOOK OFF WITH THE SUPPORT OF ADVANTAGE AUSTRIA

5. THE NEW PRINTS MADE FROM MINERAL PIGMENTS WERE A BET WHICH ATTRACTED ATTENTION TO ADALBERTO’S STAND

9. INNOVATION AND SUSTAINABILITY ARE FEATURES OF ITECHSTYLE SHOWCASE. HAND FEEL IS VITAL TO ASSESS FABRICS

8. TAKING INTO ACCOUNT THE SMILE AND GOOD MOOD THERE IS NO DOUBT THAT EXCELLENT CONTACTS WERE MADE AT CRISTINA BARROS STAND

10. FOCUSED ON CUSTOMIZATION SANTOS CAMISEIROS CHOSE MODTISSIMO58 TO RETURN TO THE DYNAMICS OF PRESENTIAL TRADE FAIRS

14. AT SOMELO’S STAND CUSTOMER CARE COULD BE SEEN AT A DISTANCE. THERE WAS A CONSTANT FLOW OF CUSTOMERS

13. ON LIPACO’S SIDE THE FEELING WAS ALSO OF MISSION ACCOMPLISHED. VÍTOR SILVA, HEAD OF MARKETING, DIDN’T STOP

13. FOR FUTURE MEMORY LENDZING PRINTED T-SHIRTS WITH A PATTERN ALLUDING TO PORTO AND MODTISSIMO. THE RETURN TO THE NEW NORMAL WITH TEXTILE ON TOP AGAIN


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HOW PORTUGAL IS CHANGING THE STANDARDS OF LUXURY IN SNEAKERS Although Italy is setting the stakes, “Portugal is the country that, staying away from fast fashion, is filling the gap in quality production for luxury brands, at more affordable prices”. The conclusion comes from Forbes, which explains how four made in Portugal brands are changing world standards for luxury sneakers. Using as examples the manufacturers Wayz, Koio, Marita Moreno and R3 Concept, the influential magazine shows that quality and sustainability of Portuguese producers are breaking grounds for the future sneaker fashion.

6 million ADALBERTO'S MINERAL PIGMENTS DAZZLES

In these new post-pandemic times, nothing better than innovation materialized in a book with a very appropriate name: "The New Eden" by Adalberto, a set of prints developed from mineral pigments in a colour palette aligned with nature, is arousing the curiosity of many buyers. “We have a perfect world that we were spoiling”, reflects Carlos Araújo, fashion team leader at Adalberto, noting that it’s the industry's obligation to present more sustainable alternatives. t

CASUALWEAR WILL HELP MARJOMOTEX GROW 30% Under the motto “don’t mess with mother earth”, the new Marjomotex collection, with options in denim, but also twill, corduroy, velvet and Tencel, is all about sustainable raw materials. “We work with organic and recycled materials, and are GOTS certified. Very soon we will also have OEKO-TEX certification. All of this is very important because our customers care a lot about the environment, a concern that is also in line with our company’s values”, underlines Marjomotex’s general director, Mónica Afonso, who works 100% for exports, and has England and Germany as its main destinations. Having registered a growth of around 30% in 2020 – leveraged by internationalization and client diversification strategies that be-

gan about four years before the pandemic paralysed the world. For 2021 the general director's forecast is to grow another 30%, with the help of the online market, and the casual wear trend. “Our strategy was to not depend on anyone. With more customers, even if some stop or experience difficulties, which is what happened during the pandemic, there are always others who continue to work, and so do we. Even because many of these clients work very well online, a market that has grown a lot recently. And the fact that our products are casual, one of the great current trends, is also contributing to our success”. France, Spain, Austria and Belgium are just a few of the 14 countries where Marjomotex is present. t

was the investment made in recent years by JF Almeida in environmental improvements

COLTEC DEBUTS NOVELTIES IN HOME TEXTILES, WORKWEAR AND SPORTWEAR Coltec has just presented a new line of thermo-resin solutions, new effects and foils for the fashion area and for the home-decor sector, such as pillows, upholstery or sofas. The novelties also extend to new types of gluing for various areas, as tri-laminates for sectors such as protection, security or sports, with two fabrics connected in the middle by a waterproof polyurethane membrane. Tiago Goiana, sales director at Coltec, also highlights the items made for home textiles in recyclable organics and natural fibres, such as pillows and mattress covers.

"At Impetus Group we want to be vertical, sustainable and transparent" Susana Serrano Acatel CEO

NEW BUREL DECOR DESIGNED FOR WINTER

RIOPELE STRENGTHENS PRESENCE IN THE US To reinforce its presence in foreign markets, especially the American one, it is now the goal of Riopele: since September, the company is presenting its collections in the company’s New York showroom, close to Times Square. The opening of this new space will allow the company to be closer to its customers and potential buyers: "in this space, the customer feels that he is at Riopele, despite the distance,

and finds our entire offer, without intermediaries”. It's a clear commitment to diversification, in order to serve an audience that is also much diversified. Tina Guimarães, responsible for this market, notices a clear distinction between clients on the East Coast, who “privilege a more relaxed and casual style”, and those on the West Coast, where “a more formal and sophis-

ticated style stands out”. Riopele has been gradually investing on the American market. The company has been exporting to America for three decades, an approach of exclusivity and sustainability, concludes Tina Guimarães: “in the initial phase, the focus was on large-scale production, but for a decade now we have evolved into a high-end market segment”. t

Inspired by nature and by the typical landscape of Serra da Estrela, Burel Factory launched a new décor line, just in time for winter. The traditional burel fabric, 100% pure wool, is once again used in a creative and unique way, where the textures and three-dimensional effects stand out. Cushions, two-tone slippers with fur lining, and rugs are some of Burel's suggestions, together with vases and blankets with tile patterns made in traditional looms and finished by hand.


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OPINION WHAT WILL THE RECOVERY AND RESILIENCE FACILITY BE USED FOR? Pedro Ferraz da Costa President of the Competitiveness Forum and Member of ATP’s Advisory Board

THE TEXTILE ART CAN’T BE LOST Paulo Pereira Textile Engineer

We have recently held a seminar on the effects of European funding for the Portuguese economy. Over the last years we have been focused in the analysis of the weak Portuguese economic growth and in ways to overcome it. The former legislative elections, by extending a period of parliamentary dependency on extreme left-wing forces had a very negative impact regarding this objective. We have analysed the necessary structural reforms to boost RRP investment and the remaining European funds as well as a reduced list of changes in licensing, fiscality and justice towards increasing the average dimension of companies and their external competitiveness, increasing productivity and income, making our tax level less off-putting to individual effort and foreign investment. We also discussed the role of the private sector and banks, namely the investment bank and the role reserved to the Development Bank, the longest launch in the Portuguese Banking History. We didn’t discuss what is not in the RRP – a strategic vision to Portugal. The redesign of world economy opens great opportunities for a country which, with the accumulated debt, must build its future in the necessarily anticipated changes. The cooperation renewal, both European and Portuguese, with the United States brings strategic advantages to exploit with decision and precision.

The governmental initiative that aims to restrict outsourcing from companies who have appealed to collective dismissal or dissolution of the job may be excessive and will pose difficulties. Employees have been considered by the majority of companies as a cost to be reduced. However, at the same time, we hear entrepreneurs complaining that they can’t find workers and technicians to guarantee operations. The lack of seamstresses, weavers, tuners and other technicians is well known. With a few exceptions the textile industry in Portugal has been looking for more international competitiveness through cost reduction, production outsourcing and a bigger capacity to respond to clients. The strategy seems correct and consistent but is threatened by the Asian ability to deliver the same service with higher production volumes and better prices. To compensate for the lack of competitiveness we have been betting in the geographic proxi-

We need a clear and stable framework for corporate activity but we only know PAN’s proposals in what concerns the 2022 State Budget. The fact that so many fundings from Portugal 2020 remained untouched – almost half – is a bad indicator. Too much bureaucracy, fractionated tenders open without good publication, as if to favour insiders or the desertion of investors due to constant degradation, even if slow, of the remuneration conditions of corporate risk. Aren’t future tenders going to be discussed? It isn’t possible for the current RRP and will only two or three ministers make the choices? What about 2030? Recent studies have clearly demonstrated that the funding isn’t aimed at sectors targeted at the exterior nor to companies with bigger probability to contribute for global development of economy or that have already benefited, even for the ones that closed shortly after receiving funds. We mainly want to contribute to a modernization climate in which the necessary reforms will be compensated by higher levels of well-being. We are living a period in which, facing the lengthening of problems that have characterized the last years, we may easily fall into a climate of resignation and discouragement. With so many findings and undeniable progress we can’t give up from getting a much better future. t

mity and resorting to the North of Africa for those productions we can’t make in Portugal either because of its price or due to the absence of response ability. We have also failed to understand that our clients have changed to more sustainable strategies. In truth, entry level brands only exist on some European countries as in the rest of the world they are usually high-end brands and are positioning themselves as such. Therefore, we need to change mindsets. The geographic proximity that enabled us to maintain textile must now include a personal proximity. In a small world where everything is near, ephemeral and only a click away, we can’t follow a path of fake personal interactions or a simple customer support manual. We must establish long-lasting relationships with all the people who are part of the company’s ecosystem. We shall not forget that the village is now called world. In Italy, that for many is an example in

the textile, artisans are valued. And an artisan is much more than the one who manufactures handcrafts, but the one skilled to do it. I can tell the story of an Italian architect that decided to come to live in Porto and needed to put some wallpaper in his house. He tried to hire someone in Portugal but he couldn’t. People were so focused in optimizing their contracts that they didn’t have time to serve the client or do a smaller scale work. The solution found was to bring someone in from Italy, in his words, an artist, who travelled together with him and stayed in his house. Around here we have companies that organize themselves around a commercial and planning structure, placing production in external units, almost in a random way, as if who does what were indifferent. Personal relationships and the appreciation of knowledge and experience must matter to prevent us from being overrun by giant Asians with procedure manuals that simulate them in a disposable way. t


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