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PHOTOGRAPHY & IMAGING

20 NYU TISCH B FA C ATA L O G


contents

Karolina Lajch

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Wenjie Yi

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Sammy Ray

12

Liu Liu

16

Luke Parker

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Taylor Bissey

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Robin Takami

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Jay Arora

32

Angelica Negron

36

Jack Seidenberg

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Ellen Shuan

44

Fiona Tam

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Mark Wei

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Ari Adams

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Dani Loya

60

Hao Wang

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Anna Betts

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Mariel Llano

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Matthew Reiser

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Nina Dietz

80

Erica Palmieri

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Nick Whiteford

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Raafae Ghory

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Melody Yu

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Sophia Berger de Souza

100

Junyan Hu

104

Katerina Voegtle

108

Wenyu Li

112

Katie McGowan

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Phoebe Nakry Lincoln

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Denise Tien

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Gigi Santo Pietro

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Karolina Lajch

Pamiȩtasz?

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“Pamiȩtasz?â€? (translation: Do You Remember? ) is an exploration of the reliability of human memory, specifically the unreliable nature of my own. Even when armed with about seven years worth of prints from my family archives, I still found it difficult to disentangle my earliest memories into distinct individual events. Photographic documentation that was meant to jog my memory just added to the mess inside my head. I came to the realization that the perceptions we have of ourselves, especially at such an early age, stem from the way we interpret things such as childhood photographs or stories told to us by parents. To me, this was incredibly frustrating in itself, and even more so given the fact that I have absolutely terrible memory. I decided to relinquish my obsessive need for order and comprehension. I found myself creating new memories, or rather, new interpretations of my past. These compositions attest to the murky and layered ways in which memory and artifacts operate as well as to our ability to manipulate and present data however we please.


Pfützen This project explores the passing of time, memory, and space. My photography is a metaphor. Plants have a small life span, so their changes are easily detectable. My mom saw me after a year, hugged me, and said, “You haven’t changed.” But people do change. Diving into memories is like swimming in a pool of time, in a submerged room deep down the hole. Experiences in life have inevitably shaped one’s mind. Survival is conditional. Organic matters decay and fade away. Impacts evolve. Traces remain. What happened is irreversible. The only thing I cannot fight is time. A fresh white in dyed water turns blue in one week. The flawless rose wants to survive, then absorbs the dye. She cannot stop drying, dying, changing. She is choked in the bottle. The more she struggles, the more she becomes the blue. Little by little, the decay is silent, a slow death, a definite one.

Wenjie StudentYiName

A fish is choked without water, tied up, cold as ice. At the market entrance, it is another piece of meat. The fish stares straight: what is the rule of living in another galaxy?

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WHAT DO I TAKE?

WHAT CAN I OFFER?

Sammy Student Ray Name

WHAT DO I BRING?

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Images make up our understanding of the world, each other, and ourselves and when viewing an image there is a unique intersection of perspectives. The world of the imagemaker meets with the world of the model in a picture’s creation, and once shared, a viewer now interprets this meeting however they wish. At this intersection however, many of us are already very likely to have some informed ideas about what we’re looking at, whether or not we know it. As an installation of handmade LED Panels, this work breaks down the image to its base pixel form, forcing viewers to reckon with the limitations of imagery as a medium, an object. Paired with randomizing video portraits as well as shifts in color and sound, this installation seeks to illuminate the limitless nature of the photographic subject that exists beyond the captured moment.

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Liu Liu

This is not a statement, but this series of pictures captured what I have learned from these past four years in New York. If it were not for New York, I probably would have never come to NYU; throughout these four years, I was flooded with information left to right. This is a collection of photos that I believe best represents my understanding of this place.

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Luke Parker Student Name

amazingly enough,

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nothing happened

today with the countless things that can be done just on your phone, sitting back and doing nothing feels like a crime, and yet when everything you create will one day be surpassed or forgotten, it can seem pointless. one day a time will come where of all the things you’ve done in your life, it’ll be as if you did nothing. and in a world where everything feels like an empty distraction from overwhelming anxiety that comes with nothingness, why do anything if nothing is going to happen anyways?


but even in these nothing moments, there’s a true sense of beauty that lies inside these brief escapes from expecting something to happen.


CHARRERÍA This project aims to document the charrería, the equestrian tradition of Mexico, within San Antonio, Texas in the United States. The figure of the charro traces back to the Spanish conquistadores and Mexican haciendas. Following the Mexican Revolution, and the division of many haciendas, the Charros sought to maintain tradition through establishing the Asociación Nacional de Charros in 1921 and then establishing the charreada (seen as the equivalent, and forerunner of the American rodeo) as Mexico’s national sport in 1933. Asociación de Charros de San Antonio was established in 1947, the first in the United States, as a way to preserve and honor charrería for future generations. The charros compete in a series of events at the charreada to show the skill of the rider and the horse. While many of the events in the charreada are dominated by men, the women ride in intricate choreography at a gallop side saddle

Taylor Bissey

in an event called escaramuza.

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WHITEBOX This is a portrait series about the role of the individual in large systems of labor, and the medium of portraiture itself. When complexity becomes obfuscated by necessity and functionality— ranging from the devices in our pockets to the mass systems of infrastructure surrounding us—the process is called “blackboxing.”

Robin Takami

This series re-approaches environmental portraiture by invoking the conventions of studio and formalized portraiture—the resulting stark composition not only situates the subjects in their work atmosphere, but transparently presents the studio technique used to create the image. Whitebox thus reverses the notion of blackboxing to emphasize the role of the individual and anatomize studio iconography.

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BIG

Kruger National Park is one of Africa’s largest game reserves and an exotic wildlife safari destination. Located in South Africa, it covers an area of 7,523 square miles and is home to a high

Jay Arora

density of mammals, birds, and reptiles. People visit Kruger to see the Big Five: lions, leopards,

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G AM E

rhinos, elephants and buffalos. The park’s goal is to allow people to observe these animals in their natural habitat while ensuring the safety of the animals and the visitors. Endangered species are carefully watched and tracked to ensure their safety from poachers and hunters. In this series of photographs, I wanted to capture the beauty of the Kruger and its unique population. Over a 6-day period, I covered numerous miles on foot while I tracked animals and their breeding grounds. I spent hours on the ridge to capture the perfect shot of an animal as it approached a lake or relaxed under a tree. I found myself focusing on endangered species such as the White Rhinos and the Wild Dogs.

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Angelica Negron


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Seven Stars Before I first picked up a camera, the closest thing that I could do to keep myself tethered to reality was to read Japanese literature. I was far from comfortable in my head so why not indulge in some attempted escapism by reading Dazai, Murakami, Mishima, and Soseki? As a result, Tokyo became a romanticized place for me to fantasize about being existentially confused in. I went on a search to find the isolation and emotional alienation described in Murakami or Dazai’s Tokyo. I was quickly taken by the sense of purpose people had on the streets. With my rangefinder, I traversed the city to see if I could learn anything about the human condition by reflexively taking photographs.

Jack Seidenberg

I could not tell if the frantic energy on the streets was people running towards their destination, or a way of escaping themselves. But how much of my existential woes and anxiety was I projecting onto my subjects? By running to Tokyo, was I just trying to run from my lack of purpose or was it an honest attempt to open up emotionally in a different context? With the sensibility of a flâneur, I captured the urban strangeness and characters I passed while contemplating those questions.

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Ellen Shuan

JACKSON HEIGHTS

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A part of the Northwestern part of Queens, Jackson Heights is one of the most diverse neighborhoods in New York City with the inclusion of a group of distinct individuals. I tried to explore and pinpoint some of the historical monuments of Jackson Heights, and capture the interactions among people that happen around these locations to help viewers understand what Jackson Heights is like today. I think the medium of black and white film photography works well with the project because when I am walking around in New York City it makes me feel as though I am traveling back in time. Overall, I hope to be able to capture more of the historical aspects of Jackson Heights, and engage with as many subjects as possible to have them connect with the camera, which could help lead me to a richer understanding and connect to the unspoken culture of Jackson Heights.


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Nightshade

Fiona Tam

This series is an illustration of the familiar made unfamiliar, it is anything but what it is. These images may seem distorted at first, but they were not altered in any way. I intend to blur the line between reality and imagination. This is done by introducing negative space. The negative space removes them from their familiar settings, dramatizes and discards any assumptions one may have. As a photographer, my job is to help the viewer see by revealing and masking, choreographing the interplay of light and shadow. On the other hand, I will not tell the viewers what to see and what not to. I do not want to determine or put a frame around the subjects I shot, I leave this work to the viewers. We are the director of our own imagination, we see what we want or expect to see.

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Déjà Rêvé I’ve only had a handful of moments where I truly felt as if I knew what I was doing with my relationships, with family, friends, or partners. There have been, however, a select few instances that have felt as though they were pulled straight from my deepest reveries. These rare moments, when I have a sense of prescient command over my decisions are by far outnumbered and swept away by the circumstances of my life’s routine.

Mark Wei

My lucid dreams act as a sandbox where I can test out different decisions that I might want to perform in real-life situations, without risking any damages. However, no matter what choices I made in these dreams, the results never satisfied me. Leading me to believe that finding a throughline in the convoluted puzzle of life is impossible. Carrying the weight of this melancholic finding as I find myself slowly washed away by the tides of my life. Life becomes grim and dull.

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Nevertheless, instead of proactively trying to make decisions that would alter the outcome, being a passenger and letting life take over does not seem too unsettling. When moments in my lucid dreams show up in real life, making the same choices leads to surprising outcomes. It is these precious fragments of sweetness that we try to cling to and that is what makes life meaningful. It does not matter which path one takes, the outcome is never the same and that is what makes us human. Memories.

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Euskal Herrian A Documentary Photo Project

Euskal Herrian is a documentary photobook

struggling for its independence from Spanish

in which modern leftist and independentist

the defeat of the Spanish Republican Army

by Ari Adams. The book documents the ways Basque youth display their cultural identities through the revival of traditional displays

of public performative arts such as dancing,

playing music, and singing poetry. Additionally, a central part of Basque youth leftism

is frequent public engagement, demonsta-

tion, manifestation and greater participation in Basque politics through a multi-faceted

politically oriented financial system created

through bar-hopping and protest attendance. The Basque Country, which is a semi-autonomous region of Northern Spain, has been

rule for more than one hundred years. After

by the Spanish Nationalist Army in 1939, the Basque language--the oldest spoken lan-

guage in Europe--was outlawed from being spoken in public and came under threat of

becoming extinct. With little political power to fight for independence under the fascist

regime of Francisco Franco, a violent struggle was launched by the extremist group ETA, which caused fear among and terrorized

both Spanish and Basque citizens. After the

death of Franco in 1975, however, the legality of speaking Basque was restored as well as

political autonomy. With this, peaceful forms of protest be-

came common place in Basque society and the voicing of local politics and the embracing of local traditions can now be seen in every corner of the

region. The photographs from Euskal Herrian do not show a new form of civic unrest or engagement in the Basque

Country but rather intend to

Ari Adams

highlight how public displays

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of politics are a part of how

young leftist Basques engage with both their culture and

their history through acts of

mixing politics and pleasure.


Left Unsaid Daniela Loya’s project Left Unsaid is about healing and coming to terms with past mistakes. Using her mouth as the physical camera, Daniela apologizes for the hurtful words once spoken and captures the moment when what has been left unsaid for so long is finally expressed.

Dani Loya

These images portray the people she holds closest and the damaged relationships that have just begun to mend.

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The abstract dark aesthetic of the portraits alludes to the conflicting feelings, painful history, and heightened tension that surround these memories and relationships.

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Hao Wang

The Recreation of Adam

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Freedom is a profound word. People are always fighting for freedom, but what is real freedom? The definition of freedom from google is “the power or right to act, speak, or think as one wants without hindrance or restraint”. Most people are still stuck in human society. They enjoy the convenience provided by human society while in the meantime they long for the primitive life that liberates them from all rules. They are obsessed with the idea of “nature”. Modern people like natural things. They eat organic. They wear clothes made from “natural materials”. They sincerely believe that anything that is artificial or in another

word made by humans is harmful or generally less good than what is “natural”. However, in the meantime, people do not really want to leave this artificial world. They are sitting on the artificial toilet writing a post on an artificial device complaining about the artificial society and saying they really want to go back to the grand nature. In this case, the idea of nature consists of the idea of freedom. People hate rules and public opinions that set requirements for them and ask them to do something they do not like. But the question is, whether human beings now can manage the freedom they are asking for. My point is that I hope that people can really go out to see this huge world.

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Love & Rage

Anna Betts

The New Faces of Activism

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Throughout history, young people have been at the forefront of political activism, and with the rise of social media, young people have been

introduced to political issues outside of the traditional realms, therefore providing more opportunities for new voices to be heard. Due to these

online platforms, young activists have been granted a place within mainstream popular culture, often gaining thousands of followers such as

16-year-old Climate Activist, Greta Thunberg, who gained over seven million followers on Instagram in just over a year.

My project focuses on the young activists who are becoming the face of

the Climate Crisis Movement by leading, founding and becoming members of organizations namely “Fridays for Future”, “XR Youth”(extinction

rebellion youth), “The Sunrise Movement”, and many more. Photography

has frequently been adopted throughout history as a tool of and for activism, as images play a fundamental role in portraying and shaping the world we live in. By documenting these events and subjects, I aim to make these activists, and the work that they are doing, known and heard. I aim

to illustrate and exhibit their frustrations, courage, competence, potential, dedication, and optimism that thankfully persists through this uncertain and bleak political climate.

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Mariel Llano

BEHIND THE MASK

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Mexico’s version of professional wrestling is one of the country’s biggest spectator activities today. Characterized by colorful masks, flamboyant personalities, a whole lot of Spandex and sequins, it’s an edge-ofyour-seat spectacle unlike any other. Mexican wrestling uses masks as a homage to the Aztec warriors of ancient times, as they frequently donned masks during rituals and religious ceremonies. Using masks allows wrestlers to serve as a blank canvas that fans could project emotions and stories onto.

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MATTHEW’S GARAGE

In “Matthew’s Garage,” auto enthusiast Matt Reiser reviews a series of vehicles from previous decades and explains what makes them more intriguing than vehicles produced today. Through a variety of images and videos, Matt makes a case for

Matthew Reiser

current vehicle designers and manufacturers to harken back

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to the craftsmanship, materials and aesthetics of a bygone era. He includes first-person accounts of vehicle owners who reveal their enchanting stories and share insights into their passion for owning a car from a previous decade.

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Nina Dietz

NEW YORK CLIMATE: 2020

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New York City has 520 miles of coast line. It is composed of 70% non-permeable surfaces, making it that much more susceptible to flooding. New York City’s geography makes it uniquely vulnerable to the existential threat of Climate Change. Some areas of New York are already seeing the effects. Many neighborhoods along the New York City coast are at sea level, and some are already inundated multiple times a month at king tide events and with every storm surge. The areas hit hardest by Hurricane Sandy in 2012 are also facing the most bracing aspects of the Climate

Crisis. Southeast Queens, Jamaica Bay, South Brooklyn, and eastern Staten Island, are all facing destruction, either from the creeping sea level rise that will see much of the area below projected sea levels by 2080, or from the next Sandy, a storm that is still very much present in the lives of people living in these areas, where recovery is still underway. As we contend with the inevitability of Climate Change, it is necessary to take a moment to recognize the consequences that have already begun and appreciate the full scope of impact should we act or allow it to go unchecked.

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Erica Palmieri

Chrysalis

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Chrysalis is a personal reflection of the artist’s adolescent years. Erica Jordan Palmieri developed an inner critic that stemmed from her psychological diagnoses, social pressures, and crippling fears. Her goal for this series is to face these challenges head on, overcoming shame through self-discovery and ultimately connecting her past to her future. Erica utilizes her memories, childhood journals, and old and new images to create visual representations of her experiences. As a result, the creation of this series has put the past where it belongs. Erica honors these formative years as a guide to the happier, healthier person she is today.


Nick Whiteford

Nothing At All Happened Today Yet it is Sickening

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“Nothing At All Happened Today Yet it is Sickening� is a parafictional exploration of a New England town through American facades and landscape. The work is a composite resulting from my own Images, my great grandmothers, and archival images. Through the interaction with my own familial history with the mundane in the town, I hope to achieve a deeper interrogation of the American landscape and psyche.

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Hajji This book is a reflection on my experiences while performing the Umrah, one of two Islamic pilgrimages, in early 2019. Being there, despite its crowds, feels idyllic, elevated, serene. People flock from every corner of the world. Who you were before didn’t matter. Who you were in that moment was paramount. I was fascinated by the machinations of this sacred paradigm. The infrastructure. The extreme wealth. Where exactly it flowed, all the places that it didn’t. While performing my pilgrimage, I found myself perplexed by the modernity of a land I imagined to be chiefly historical, if not holy.. A single bird of a feather, trying to uncover meaning from history while simultaneously undergoing the experience in the present. I began to reckon with my own relationship to Islam. Growing up during the Information Age, I’ve always found religion, as a concept, to be intricately difficult.

StudentGhory Raafae Name

Despite this, I opened myself up to surrender.

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The experience was transcendent.

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Melody Yu

THE BROKEN WINDOW

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For this project, I used large format to make im-

movement that marks Chinese history that

ages inspired by the Chinese cultural revolution

even people born after the 80s who have nev-

propaganda posters made during 1966-1967. The

er experienced it always hear about it and are

cultural revolution was a sociopolitical move-

very familiar with the propaganda posters.

ment initiated by chairman Mao in 1966 to cel-

ebrate communism. A lot of posters were made

ey, and life all have changed tremendously af-

during the movement with an anti-bourgeois

ter the termination of the cultural revolution

sentiment. They indicated that people would

under the influence of capitalism. I followed

have a bright future if they believe in chairman

the vintage aesthetic but made the details

Mao and work collaboratively in agriculture and

and contents of the images different from

production without class hierarchy. Mao’s ef-

the posters by using contemporary elements

forts turned out to cause much painful struggle

such as recently written fiction, credit cards,

and heritage losses. It was such a monumental

and so on to reflect modern ideology.

However, our ideas about society, mon-

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Looking for Sophie

Sophia Berger de Souza

In the late 1800’s, my great-great-grandmother, Sophie Oppitz, then two years old, migrated from Falkenau, Bohemia to the south of Brazil with her parents, looking for a better life. Thirty-five years later, she would decide to leave her family and migrate once again, this time to New York City. Because of her audacious and atypical decision, most of the next generations ostracized and excluded her from family narratives.

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Looking for Sophie questions this narrative created for her and attempts to understand her reasons for leaving Brazil and what happened to her once she arrived in the United States. Having moved to New York City a century after her own passage and sharing the same name apart from one letter, I have imagined a connection with her. Thinking about this connection, I begin to fill the gaps and answer questions about her whereabouts and reasons, while also posing new ones through old family photographs, documents, and archival footage.

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Junyan Hu

bioclast.co

autocorrelations

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autocorrelations


@bioclast

bioclast.co

autocorrelations

autocorrelations


COTIDIANA

VIDA

LA Katerina Voegtle 108

Cuba captures the imagination in polarizing

they pass on the street, the cobalt of workers’

ways. Couched in the language of the Cold War,

jumpsuits, and bodies pressed together on the

the island is forever elevated, but also reduced,

guagua. It is the echo of a man selling coffee

to a symbol. For some, it’s a socialist utopia.

down the streets and the pulse of the clave

For others, it’s a threat, a warning. Time and

leaking from cracked doors on Sunday after-

again, Cuba is simplified to the Revolution, or

noons. Evading sensationalism, I focused my

to salsa and cigars. While these are all part of

camera on the smaller details, the mundanities

the island, what does it mean to reduce the

of daily life in order to focus on the everyday,

nation to such broad strokes? Beyond this,

and on the complexity and joy with which life

Cuba is the nod of one santera to the other as

is lived on the island. 109


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I SPY WITH MY LITTLE EYES Few people in my life have ever fully understood my obsession with the beach and amusement parks. As someone who grew up in a metropolis, I experienced the struggle of living every day at a fast pace and constantly seeking a breath inside of the concrete jungle. After I came to New York, Coney Island became my escape land, the place where I take the pressure of Manhattan off for a little while. Every time I go, I am drawn to taking pictures of children. They are laughing, running around and enjoying the beach with their families, not affected by the stressful environment of the city. This is a medium-format project I shot from 2018 to 2019 about children on Coney Island during many visits. Coney Island serves as a get-away for me as well as a place to document these pure souls having their joyous moments. I have never figured out the reason I take children as my primary subjects given the fact that I’ve never considered myself a kid person. It could be that I have come to realize I am vicariously living through their experiences with my lens, or maybe it is

Wenyu Li

as simple as they remind me of myself and that

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I used to seek the same liberation as a child. In the process, it dawns on me that there is nothing more profound than the fact that their innocence represents the escape from adulthood that I am pursuing and have not yet had a grasp on.


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NO VACANCY Each state in the United States has its own identity, both idealistic and stereotypical. These identities are manufactured divides and arbitrarily imposed borders, breaking up the continuity of the physical landscape. They act on immigration, access to guns, access to abortion rights,

Katie McGowan

determine political representation and even provide some with a solid, well-known identity. In an era

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of extreme political divisiveness, rote landscape is a way to connect on a plane beyond political affiliation. These landscapes can help to recall the familiar, though it might be in an area of different ideologies or a place they have never seen. The qualities of land claimed by states transcends their borders, both national and continental. Flora and fauna with weeds and grasses coat the topographical base of America. Despite the land’s subjugation to human manipulation, it all returns to the same sort of equilibrium. Cleared land grows back and blends together across the greater landscape of our country. 117


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Phoebe Nakry Lincoln

A PERSON, A PLACE

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As we go through our daily lives, we are unintention-

these places that make an imprint. When displaying

ally creating a map. Maybe not one discernible to oth-

these photographs together, this exhibit shows the

ers, but to us it means something, a personal map.

variety of people I have photographed, as well as my-

“A Person, A Place” explores people and the loca-

self. I had to visit all the locations, but they directed me

tions that are significant to them. I asked the question

to them. Using a camera to create double exposures

“what’s your favorite place?” to several people. Some

on film, the final result is often a mystery. The devel-

could tell me right away, but for others it took time to

opment of the final image allows part of the person to

think of one. I got varied answers that ranged from a

be hidden or part of the location to be hidden, blended

specific spot to a general area. This led me to believe

together. This result leads me to wonder, when visit-

that as much as a place influences the memories we

ing a place, do we leave part of ourselves behind? Do

make, it’s also the people we are with when visiting

we bring part of the location with us?

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Denise Tien 124

SIDEWALKS

The architecture, design and diversity of New York City present interesting relationships between environments and expressions of individuals. This collection of street photographs shows the hustle and bustle of the city, but also the quieter moments and individual experiences. It shows the structure of the city and the way living beings move through it, including how clothing is advertised and how people present themselves to the public. For the majority of the images, Tien captured these moments without approaching her subjects directly. She finds beauty in the way individuals hold themselves when they are not aware they are being photographed. Tien walked the streets of Manhattan with no direction in mind, allowing the flow of the crowds to lead her. She was new to New York City when these photographs were taken, and there is an aspect of loneliness to them. In the future, Tien would like to roam the streets with her camera once again, this time with the sense of community she has gained from living in Manhattan. It will be interesting to see if the new images will reflect her new perspective.


128 129

Gigi Santo Pietro


Ulrich Baer Caitlin Berrigan Wafaa Bilal Terry Boddie Isolde Brielmaier Kalia Brooks Sandrine Colard Yolanda Cuomo Thomas Drysdale Cate Fallon Nichole Frocheur Snow Fu Mark Jenkinson Melissa Harris Elizabeth Kilroy Lili Kobielski Astrid Lewis-Reedy Elaine Mayes Ari Melenciano Editha Mesina Diana McClure Charles Nesbit Lorie Novak Paul Owen Karl Peterson Christopher Phillips Shelley Rice Joseph Rodriguez BayetĂŠ Ross Smith Jeffrey Henson Scales Deborah Willis Cheryl Yun-Edwards

staff

faculty

2016-2020

Mark Bussell

Edgar Castillo Niki Kekos Patricia McKelvin Mary Notari Adam Ryder Caleb Savage

Profile for NYU Photography & Imaging

NYU Photography & Imaging - Senior Catalog 2020  

The DPI Senior Catalog is an annual publication produced by and featuring the works of the entire graduating Photography & Imaging class.

NYU Photography & Imaging - Senior Catalog 2020  

The DPI Senior Catalog is an annual publication produced by and featuring the works of the entire graduating Photography & Imaging class.

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