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Summer is Coming What’s the delay? I’m Ready for shows and touring

INSIDE THIS ISSUE: Inside Story

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February Meeting February 22,2014 8:00 AM Blue Dolphin Restaurant Apalachin. Breakfast meeting order from menu.


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TIOGA

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The Lesser Understood Classes AACA has close to 40 classes for restored cars in their car shows. It is not hard to understand the basic concept behind the various classes. The simple explanation for the classes and the judging on the national level are that cars are classed by years and in some instances by make. Each car then will advance in their class by three basic steps, Junior, Senior, and Preservation. The process is designed to recognize the completeness of and the accuracy of the restoration that has been accomplished on the car. These steps are the reward the owner receives for returning his or her faithfully recreated

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vehicle to the original specifications of the manufacturer.

own cars that we desire to use and enjoy on the road The overall goal of in as close as possible that their origirestoration is the nal owners did. That recognition of a does not mean that well planned and executed operation. we do not feel the pride of ownership Many of the cars that their first ownthat have been reers did, we just stored suffer the want to experience indignity of never the same thrill that again transporting their owner on the their first owner did when they first open road, the expense of the resto- sat behind the ration prohibits the wheel. owner from enjoy- “They are original ing the feel of his or only once” is the her automobile motto of those cruising on the who choose to preopen road. What a serve our cars shame that the feel while continuing to of these vehicles on enjoy them on the the road as they road today. Most of were in their hayus have also experiday is now lost to enced the feeling of the very person rejection that who so lovingly re- comes when one of turned it to it’s the officials at a naglory! tional show greet Some of us though us with


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Classes (Continued) “That car belongs in the parking lot”, or “You plan to show that car, WHY?” Recently AACA created two show classes just for those of us who want a collector car that we can drive to the show and then also occasionally drive to the grocery store or other personal enjoyment. AACA created H.P.O.F. (Historic Preservation of Features) and D.P.C. (Driver Participation) classes to permit us to keep that original patina while owning a piece of history that the public can only hope to see in passing. How many though of our members understand the regulations of these two classes? AACA publishes the OFFICIAL JUDGING GUIDELINES book which you all can purchase from their online

store for the sum of $5.00, you also will receive it free if you attend a “Judges school” at a national meet. This book is the bible of judges in all national meets. This publication is 86 pages of instructions on how to judge shown cars. The details also include the requirements for nationally approved judges. Is it any wonder that with these guidelines there is a need for so complete a guide for the judges and us the car owners? There can be no mistaking the confusion that all these rules cause for our members, but the confusion is made even more intense by the fact that there are only two pages in this book that deal with the classes H.P.O.F. and D.P.C. The two classifications mentioned above are not considered judged classes but there are

special four man teams that evaluate rather than judge at national meets. Both classes are for cars that are at least 25 years old, and have been driven onto the show field. Under the currant rules, H.P.O.F. class is for cars that have never been restored, but are in their original as manufactured condition. They must retain “significant original features” to allow them to remain in this original condition. They are not point judged. They do however if qualified receive an H.P.O.F. badge, H.P.O.F. Board, and H.P.O.F. chip signifying the acceptance by A.A.C.A. as recognized show cars in their “Original As Manufactured Condition.

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Classes Wrap Up D.P.C. Class is for those of us who own completely acceptable but not show quality cars that are at least 25 years old. Our cars are not point judged but are driven on a more or less regular basis. These cars might be slightly modified to make them more road worthy as long as they have not been modified in appearance. The D.P.C. car is the ideal car for touring and parade work as the owner has not spent the thousands of dollars needed to bring the car to concours condition and thus is not concerned that the vehicle has to be washed both before and after each outing. These cars also are used a limited amount just to drive for the owner’s satisfaction. True any of these cars will also draw attention and comments such as, “I remember my uncle owning this car.” or “This is just like my first new car!” The D.P.C. car is a car that is owned with pride and shown not only at car shows but also on the road on a weekly basis throughout the summer.

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A small ding on the fender, or a small dent in the hood will not cause us to call the nearest body shop even if we feel like we hurt our first born. Our cars were built to be driven and it would be a crime to hide them in a trailer on the way to a car show. The D.P.C. car is looked at by four judges at a national meet for as manufactured condition without major modifications, but there is no concern that the engine compartment glistens or the interior has no wear and tear. Yes we who drive a D.P.C. car try to keep them in clean and attractive condition, but we also DRIVE our cars and enjoy being in a part of history as we progress through the humdrum series of motorized boxes that occupy our modern highways. The D.P.C. car then is a car that is fulfilling its destiny as a representative of our past being enjoyed on the road today! The best of both worlds!!!


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Congratulations! Rhoda’s v-8 Pontiac is that she has to document the authenticity of the engine each and every time she shows it in a national meet.

Congratulations go to Rhoda Sheret for the fine four page story found in the February 2014 issue of Auto Restorer magazine about her unique 1932 Pontiac. In an era when most car makers made their 8 cylinder

cars with straight 8 engines, Pontiac used a v8 design that was developed in 1916 by it’s sister car the Overland. By 1933 Pontiac had replaced the v-8 with a straight 8 that would not disappear until 1954. The trouble with

The Sherets joined Tioga Region last year and are also long time members of Iroquois Region. If you are one of our members who go on one of our tours you will see Bernie and Rhoda in their black1956 Ford 4 door. Bernie owns the Ford, but The Pontiac is Rhoda’s, Bernie only is the driver and mechanic.

Inner Club Help We owe both Iroquois Region and Crusin’ Buddies a big THANK YOU for their help in finding locations for our flea market this year. A member of Iroquois Region contacted Bob Connely on

our behalf to open the Show Place in Binghamton for our market. Not to be left our Don Salsburry who is also President of Crusin’ Buddies, contacted Adam Cole

Owner of Cole Auction Building in Tioga Center who also agreed to open his building for our use. The next two pages show our fliers for these events.


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Notice how our Matt Vaglica managed to make the two flyers fit together as a single picture for those who might want to keep a copy for their automobilia collection! We are thrilled to have new and younger members who care about the future of our club. NEWSLETTER

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Back Page Story Headline This story can fit 175-225 words.

Your New Officers

to refer your readers to any other forms of communication that you’ve 607-785-8867 h 607-761-0897 created for your organization.

President...Bob Klingensmith c kbasketmakIf your newsletter is folded and mailed, this story will appear on the er1@aol.com You can also use this space to remind So, it’s a good idea to Joe make Vaglica it readers to mark their calendars for a Coback. Vice President 607-760-9200 joeyv@stny.rr.com easy to read at a glance. regular event, such as a breakfast Co Vice President Brett Nichols meeting 607-972-9362 ram81ta@yahoo.com for vendors every third A question and answer session is a Secretary Kathleen Esser 607-607-687-5085 Tuesday of the month, or a biannual good way to quickly capture the atcharity auction. h 607-725-6548 tention of readers. You can either Treasurer Charlie Kuhlman 607-754-6861 compile questions that you’ve received since the last edition or you can summarize some generic questhatcan are frequently askedhas aboutbeen Astions you see there your organization.

If space is available, this is a good place to insert a clip art image or some other graphic.

two changes to the line up with Brett Nichols replacing Howard Seymour in the Co-Vice President slot and Kathleen Esser replacing A listing of names and titles of managRich McConnell in the Secretary position. ers in your organization is a good way to give your newsletter a personal touch.thrilled If your organization small, I am to see isour newer and younger members stepping up to fill more of the you may want to list the names of all leadership positions as they are all full of ideas that will bring a fresh look to our employees.

club. The business of running Tioga Region has seen some improvements in the last If you have any prices of standard year thanks to the of these younger members and we can look forward to an products or services, you ideas can include a listing of those here. You may want even greater success in the years to come thanks to their leadership. Question; Who is the most important member of our club? Answer; YOU ARE! No club or other organization can exist without the membership. The life of any club comes from the support of the membership. This year there will be many opportunities to meet and enjoy the friendship of our other members, you will determine the success or failure of each and every outing and event. Your officers can make all the plans for a tour or show but if you are absent there will be no success in the event. Your leadership is only successful if you support their efforts. In a time when demands on our time are greater than they have been in the past, you can either make or break the efforts of our organization.

Your Support of Tioga Region Will Keep Us Strong!


February 2014  
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