November 2022

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Hoopla November 2022

Free

Spotlighting North Texans 55 And Better

Historic buildings on display during Parker County’s Candlelight Tour of Homes

Also inside: • Concert Bells of Fort Worth ready to ring in the holiday season • Azle man restores old bikes and gifts to those in need • Area events guide


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Hoopla: Spotlighting North Texans 55 And Better

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PUBLIC DOMAIN

50 Years Ago: M*A*S*H (an acronym for Mobile Army Surgical Hospital) premiered on CBS. The spin-off series was adapted from the 1970 feature film M*A*S*H, which, in turn, was based on Richard Hooker’s 1968 novel M*A*S*H: A Novel About Three Army Doctors. As you recall, the series followed a team of doctors and support staff stationed in Uijeongbu, South Korea, during the Korean War (1950–53). Episodes varied in style and tone – including broad comedy and tragic drama – which can be attributed to fluctuating writing staff over the life of the show, and the variety of sources contributing to the stories, such as actor Alan Alda and surgeons who served in the Korean War. The series finale movie, titled “Goodbye, Farewell and Amen,” became the most watched U.S. television broadcast in history at that time, with 106 million viewers.

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PLATOON POTTER TRAPPER LIPS DRAMA Platoon COMEDYHawkeye CBS Trapper DOCTORS

HAWKEYE KOREAN MEDICS HOULIHAN KLINGER BLAKE SURGEON HOSPITAL

TRAPPER WAR HOT HUNNICUT Klinger RADAR FRANK Radar ARMY Comedy ROBERT

Word Find

Potter Korea Trapper Medics Houlihan Hunnicut Drama

Blake Frank CBS Surgeon Army Doctors Hospital

Hoopla 817-894-1822 November 2022, Volume 6, Issue 11 © 2022 Hoopla. All rights reserved. Hoopla, published monthly, serves Parker County, Palo Pinto County and Tarrant County. Subscribe at www.hooplamagazine. com. Write us at Hoopla, P.O. Box 305, Weatherford, Texas 76086.


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November 2022

Hoopla: Spotlighting North Texans 55 And Better

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Retiring? Downsizing? Thinking about buying or selling your home?

Hoopla publisher Cynthia Henry can help! As a REALTOR®, Cynthia understands the decision to move can be difficult, especially for seniors. She can help you navigate your choices and wants to serve as a resource and guide. Cynthia can guide you through the process of selling or buying your home, making the transaction less stressful. And, as a senior or a veteran, you may qualify for special financing options. As a business owner that serves Parker, Hood and Tarrant counties, she has vast knowledge of these communities and neighborhoods. Together, we can find the home of your dreams.

Cynthia Henry | CENTURY 21 Judge Fite Company Phone: 817-894-1822

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Each office is independently owned and operated

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Hoopla: Spotlighting North Texans 55 And Better

November 2022

The

White House

RICHARD BETTINGER

RICHARD BETTINGER

The White House at 508 S. Davis Street in Weatherford will be featured on the Parker County Candlelight Tour of Homes.

Bettingers’ home showcased in annual tour of homes by Rick Mauch Hoopla Correspondent

When Chad and Richard Bettinger moved into the house at 508 S. Davis in 2018, it was a dream come true. They’d had their eyes on it for some time. After all, it isn’t every day someone gets a chance to purchase a part of history – though their previous home also had its own unique legacy. But this was the legendary White Home – ironic, since their previous

house became known as The Black House after they painted it completely black. The White Home, also known later as the White-Flanigan House, has roots that go back more than six scores (125 years). “We were always out here on weekends and Richard said, ‘If it ever comes up for sale, we’re buying it,’” Chad said. “We’re both Leos and the doorknobs are lions, so we felt it spoke to us.” “The architecture just has so much character and great detailing I’ve always

loved it,” said Richard. “It was especially enchanting to me when we would pass at night and see it in the full moonlight.” This home, like their previous one, will be one of the highlights of the Candlelight Tour of Homes. The event, presented by the Parker County Heritage Society, is scheduled for Dec. 10. Richard also previously owned the Mary Martin House, named after the actress who portrayed Peter Pan in the original Broadway show, also the mother


November 2022

of Larry Hagman, who played the legendary TV character J.R. on the TV series Dallas. “Our best friends live in it now,” Chad said. “It’s ironic. Their last name is White – no relation to the folks who owned this house.” Richard has been renovating houses in the area for over 25 years. “I’ve always been drawn to older homes because of their history,” Richard said, “the lives they have sheltered in a beautiful way and the patina those lives have left behind in the homes. We prefer updating in a gentle way to preserve the layers of history as opposed to gutting an old home and building something new inside.” The three-story White House is filled with history and takes visitors back in time throughout. Built at the turn of the 20th century, it is a Victorian structure with a large wrap-around veranda. “Some of my favorite things we have ‘inherited’ with this home are photos of the Whites, the family who built the home, spending time on the porches. I have renovated several homes around town and this is the first time I’ve had photos like this,” said Richard. The house was originally built for George Samuel White, a land developer, cattle raiser and banker. The property originally took up the entire block and included a small lake, gazebo and barn, which are all gone today. It is believed to have been the first private residence in the city with electric lights. Carved in woodwork in the parlor area is the letter W in a couple of overhanging gingerbread details, a self-tribute created by the original

Hoopla: Spotlighting North Texans 55 And Better

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Parker County Candlelight Tour of Homes Dec. 10

KIMBERLY BENGE

A street view of 508 W. Davis Street, Weatherford. owners. Even before entering the home, visitors are tempted to take a seat on the front porch swing or relax in one of the chairs in the yard. This time of year, particularly, those are especially inviting. Immediately upon entering, to the right is an elevator to the second and third floors.

To the left is a parlor that takes one back to a time when folks sat around drinking coffee or tea and discussing weighty matters, art, literature and the weather. Downstairs also includes a quaint little kitchen, complete with a touch of tie-dye in some places as at one point it (Continued on P. 6)

The parlor in The White House on Davis Street.

RICHARD BETTINGER

The 39th Annual Parker County Heritage Society’s Candlelight Tour of Home will be held on Dec.10. Tour sites will be open from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. This year’s tour includes five historic homes, each unique in its style and décor. The homes were built from 1889 to 1945 with unique architectural features to enjoy in each. Several are within walking distance of one another. Attendees can also tour the courthouse and a historical church. In conjunction with the tour, the Doss Center is hosting an exhibit called “Hand Crocheted Doilies,” which (according to the Texas Crochet Heritage) tells stories of the women who created them. There also will be activities for the children. Pioneer Cabin Park will be open for tours at the Doss, and Santa will be at the cabins from 2 to 4 p.m. The grounds of Chandor Gardens will be open from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tickets allow access to any place on the tour from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. They are $20 for adults and $12 for children (12 and younger) and may be purchased online at www. parkercountyheritagesociety. com beginning Nov. 7 then picked up at the Doss Center (1400 Texas Drive in Weatherford) on the day of tour. Please bring proof of purchase to claim your tickets. You can also purchase tickets the day of the tour at the Weatherford Chamber of Commerce, located at 401 Fort Worth Highway (Continued on P. 6)


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(Continued From P. 5) in Weatherford or at The Doss. No credit transactions can be performed at these locations, so please bring cash or check. Proceeds from the tour benefit historical preservation projects in Parker County. “A historic home tells a unique story,” said Vice-President of the Parker County Heritage Society and Co-chairman of the Tour Laura Roberts. “Generations of families have lived in these homes during our country’s history when times were very different. These homes are more than just a place to live; they are living history.” Major sponsors for the tour are: Banner Sponsor- DRI Construction- Davidson Reconstruction, Inc.; Title Sponsor First Bank of Texas; Print Sponsor Texas Butane; and Marketing Sponsors: Pee Wee Cray Used Cars and Texas Land and Right of Way. Tour sites include: 109 E. Lee Ave. (Sponsors: Citizen National Bank and Molley Michel-Goosehead Insurance) 507 W. Lee Ave. (Sponsors: Remax Trinity and Holland Lake Rehabilitation and Wellness Center) 609 W. Lee Ave. (Sponsors: Jamie Bodiford-Century 21 Judge Fife Company and Santa Fe Furniture Store) 508 W. Davis St. (Sponsors: Recaptured Charm and Kimberly Benge Photography) 416 Josephine St. (Sponsors: Alamo Title and Lisa Jacobs-Williams Trew Real Estate) 121 S. Waco St: All Saints’ Anglican Church (Sponsor: Plains Capital Bank) Parker County Courthouse 1 Courthouse Square (Sponsor: Rosa’s Café’ and Texas Bank Financial) Doss Heritage and Cultural Center,1400 Texas Drive (Sponsor: Parker County Today Magazine) Chandor Gardens, 711 West Lee Avenue (Grounds Only. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. No House Tour)

Hoopla: Spotlighting North Texans 55 And Better

November 2022

(Puzzle solution is on P. 19)

RICHARD BETTINGER

Snow envelopes the 120-year-old White House at 508 W. Davis Street in Weatherford. (Continued from P. 5)

moved into the hippie generation. In the formal dining room is one of Chad and Richard’s favorite items, a large wall-size canvas painting by Jesse Hernandez. “The Conversion of St. Paul” depicts a stallion with several soldiers – who appear medieval on the ground around it. It’s almost completely black – and it has its own interesting history, Chad said. “This hung in the Kimbell. It’s the only painting to hang in the Kimbell from a living artist,” he said. “A lot of our artwork is Frijon horses, and I was drawn to it because of the nature of the horse.” It’s one of several canvases throughout the house, which, though old, has plenty of light coming through. “This house has a lot of windows, which we love,” Chad said. Most of the furniture, like the house, has an aged charm of its own, such as antique style sofas and chairs, a charming secretary in the corner and even a bed upstairs that was made in Germany in the 1850s. On the way upstairs, hanging on the wall, is a large wooden church organ sculpture hanging on the wall. “The guy before restored church organs,” Chad said. “We think it looks pretty cool.” Indeed, it does, as do the red windows in a

second-story sewing room overlooking the front yard. They were installed by the original owner. “To make red stained glass back in the day they had to roll gold in it. It was a way of showing your stature,” Chad said. The Lincoln Room upstairs, where Richard likes to take naps, overlooks the Leo Garden, as they call it. It’s called so because of the lion statues guarding it. Of course, being Leos, the couple loves lions and thus collects lion art, which is also seen throughout the house. Outside, holiday seasons are celebrated with decorations galore. Their favorite is Halloween, in which they also turn the accompanying carriage house into a carnival atmosphere/circus scene. “Halloween is our biggest thing. Last year we had over 1,500 kids through here,” Chad said. Trees around the house are believed to be up to 200 years old. The residence, at the time, was at the edge of the Weatherford city limits. “It’s amazing when you stop and think of all the history in this house,” Chad said. “It’s everywhere. And we love living in it.”


Crossword (Puzzle solution is on P. 22) 1 2 3 4 ACROSS 1 Pesters 14 5 Bathroom item 17 10 Left on board? 14 Fairytale villain 20 21 15 Biscuit topper 16 Caesar's 57 23 17 Change direction 26 27 18 Braid, as a rug 20 Not budging 32 33 22 Drove round & 37 38 round 23 Lonely place? 41 42 24 Fix, as leftovers 45 26 Movie double, often 48 29 Educator, briefly 52 53 54 32 Barley bristle 33 Confident 59 37 Like some desserts 62 39 Absconded with 65 40 Drone, for one 41 Incompatible 44 AAA service 45 Former "Tonight 67 Cutlass, e.g. Show" host 46 Formal ritual DOWN 48 Driller's dream 1 Astronomer's 51 The Regal sighting Beagle, e.g. 2 Got on 52 Heart of the 3 Lionel, to Drew matter Barrymore 55 Zilch 4 Sunday delivery 59 Dry white wine 5 Tibia locale 61 Superfruit berry 6 Lowest female 62 Angelic feature voice 63 Done to death 7 Crumb carrier 64 Anagram for 8 Bloodsucker "nail" 9 Lofty nest (var.) 65 Black cat, to 10 Guitar pick some 11 Cameo shape 66 Varieties 12 Tear to pieces

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Copyright 2022 by The Puzzle Syndicate

13 In a dead heat 19 Finishes filming 21 Places for rent, briefly 25 Uphold, as the law 26 Wrapped garment 27 Ribbed fabric 28 State of disorder 30 Like a long speech 31 Record holder? 34 Substitute delegate 35 Oracle 36 Like morning grass

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Parasitic person Speaker output It's outstanding Hawaiian "thank you" Rag composer Joplin One of the Fondas Say again Pillow covering Red-tag event Court cry: Var. Freshwater worm Martini liquors Bite


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Hoopla: Spotlighting North Texans 55 And Better

November 2022

Eastman served country, still serving community by Krista Allen Hoopla Contributor

terminology, Jay explains what this job entails. “The plane goes off on a catapult – that’s like a slingshot. It’s called a bridle. As we head into the season of giving thanks, it’s only fitting It comes up underneath the wings then the catapult builds we take a moment to appreciate our veterans for our nation’s up. It pulls up pressure because within 100 yards they have to everyday privileges. For withgo from zero to about 100 miles out their selflessness, courage, an hour. So they’re shot off the and bravery we could not have deck. It was our job to get them the lives we live today. In this ready to go.” month’s edition, we are featurAs exciting as his military exing the life of Veteran Jay Eastman for his Naval service, and perience was, the most memocommunity work in the VFW rable time for him was when he Post 2399. came home from war. This was Jay was born in BigFork, Min- during the 1970s when our sernesota in 1946, where his father vice members did not receive was a pastor. He remarks, “I the love and respect they had was picked on because I was the deserved. Jay recalls several unpreacher’s kid. Although my dad pleasant experiences. “I joined wasn’t a pacifist. I would come a VFW in Malden, Colorado. At my first meeting, two WWII home crying because someone had beaten me up. He told me to veterans stood up and said ‘You don’t belong here. You weren’t go right back out there, which was good for me to stand up for in a real war.’ He remembered myself.” another instance where a young woman in the San Francisco Jay’s father was a huge influence on him as a child into airport threw red dye all over manhood. “He taught the Bible his white Navy uniform while morally, and more ethically speaking profanity. This stigma also made it than most. He believed morals are something that you’re supdifficult for a vet to find a job because their service was conposed to do, whereas ethics is something you do when no one sidered disgraceful. Because is looking. He instilled those of the hardships Jay was bitter ethics in me growing up.” towards his status for almost 30 When asked what made years. However, this didn’t stop Eastman join the military his Eastman from living the Amerifather’s imprint had a lot to do can Dream. He came home, with that choice, and also besettled down, and had eight cause his father had intended to beautiful children. He found join the military as a chaplain employment that was primarduring WWII, but was unable ily police work, gang violence to due to absence of education- investigation, correctional ofal requirements. Jay enlisted ficer, and security. He continued upon graduation from St. Paul to do those genres of careers all High School in 1964 during the through to retirement. Vietnam War. He was an AviaIn 1989, Jay and his wife Anna tion Boatswain Mate. For many got a “breath of fresh air” when readers unfamiliar with the they moved to Mineral Wells,

COURTESY

Jay Eastman served in Vietnam and has spent decades volunteering at the VFW Post 2399 in Mineral Wells Texas. His wife Anna describes our home state wonderfully. “When we talked about Texas, we actually really liked it. It was really nice to bring up your kids where they can go outside, ride their bike, roller skate, or do anything without you having to worry about it.” Jay joined the Mineral Wells VFW Post 2399 in 1997. Jay was impressed by the total change of atmosphere. He wanted to become more involved in the changes they were making in the community. Eastman served as a senior vice-commander for several years and was willing to step down to junior vice-commander in hopes to promote younger generations into that leadership role. Jay also became a chaplain for the VFW as well as hosting several non-profit activities. For example, he has helped support public servants, teacher of the year, policeman of the year, paramedic the year, and

so forth. He is still passionate about our youth, helping with nationally accredited programs like Backpack Buddies, Patri-ONSITE ATT ots Pen, and Voice of Discovery. AVAILABLE MEDICATIO His wife Anna also climbed the ladder to senior president to INCLUDED the ONSITE ATT Auxiliary Club and remainedSOCIAL AN AVAILABLE in that position for 10 years. ACTIVITIES MEDICATIO They wanted to make a differ-3 HOME-CO DAILY INCLUDED ence in going forward in life. Jay AND MORE! SOCIAL AN says, “I’ve always had a passion ACTIVITIES for those who were hurt, both 3Denver HOME-CO mentally and physically.”113 Anna DAILY added, “The VFW isn’t justwww.eaglec beer, AND MORE! bingo and war stories. It’s comradery, community service, and family.” When asked how long113 he Denver plans on devoting himself www.eaglec to the VFW, his response was remarkable. “Till the day I die I will be doing this. The military teaches you discipline that you then carry later into life. You have to continue to have a point in life, with goals to help everyone.”


November 2022

Hoopla: Spotlighting North Texans 55 And Better

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Is a donor-advised fund right for you?

any investment growth is not You can find many ways to support charitable organizataxable to you, the donor-advised tions. One method that’s gained fund or the charity that ultimatepopularity over the past few years ly receives the grant, making your is called a donor-advised fund. charitable gift go even further. Should you consider it? Choose the charities. You can AARETIREMENT ASSISTED LIVING COMMUNITY SENIORAND LIVING COMMUNITY The answer choose grants for depends on your the IRS-approved individual situcharities that you ation, because want to support. by Mary H. McDow donor-advised Edward Jones Adviser You decide when funds are not apyou want the monpropriate for everyone. However, ey donated and how it should be if you’re in a position to make granted. You’re generally free to larger charitable gifts, you might choose as many IRS-approved want to see what this strategy of- charitable organizations as you fers. Here’s how it works: like. And the tax reporting is Contribute to the fund. You relatively easy — you don’t have can contribute to your donor-ad- to keep track of receipts from evvised fund with cash or marketery charity. Instead, you can just able securities, which are assets keep the receipts from your conthat can be converted to cash Y tributions to the fund. quickly. If your contribution Although donor-advised funds is tax deductible, you’ll get the clearly offer some benefits, there deduction in the year you make are important trade-offs to conthe contribution to the fund. Of sider. For one thing, your contricourse, these contributions are butions are irrevocable, which still subject to IRS limits on charimeans once you put the money table tax deductions and whether in the fund, you cannot access it you itemize your deductions. If SITE ATTENDANTS for any reason other than chariyou typically don’t give enough AILABLE 24/7 each year to itemize and plan on table giving. And the investments DICATION SUPERVISION you choose within your fund will making consistent charitable CLUDED SITE ATTENDANTS contributions, you could consider carry some risk, as is true of all CIAL AND RECREATION AILABLE Call Heather Holmancombining today to years’ worth investments. Also, donor-advised multiple TIVITIES 24/7 funds do have investment manDICATION SUPERVISION of planned giving into a single OME-COOKED MEALS schedule your Private Tour agement fees and other costs. So, • Onsite Attendants Available 24/7 donor-advised fund contribuILY CLUDED tion, and claim a larger deduction consider the impacts of these fees D MORE! CIAL AND •RECREATION Medication Supervision Included 817-444-3249 CALL when deciding how you want to year. Thisto move may be Heather Holmanin that today TIVITIES • Social and Recreation Call ABOUT OUR Activities give. especially impactful ifATTENDA you have ONSITE Accepting-VA OME-COOKED MEALS FALLAid & Attendance, In any case, you should conenver Azle Meals Daily •Trail 3 Home-Cooked years with a higher amount of schedule your Private Tour Long TermAVAILABLE Care Insurance and Private Pay MOVE-IN ILY sult with 24/7 your tax and financial w.eaglecrestvilla.com income, with an accompanying • And More! SPECIALS! D MORE! opening a MEDICATION higher tax rate. If you contribute professionals beforeSUP donor-advised fund. And if the marketable securities, like stocks INCLUDED and bonds, into the fund, a subse- fund becomes part of your estate Accepting-VA Aid & Attendance, SOCIAL AND Your Private want to work quent sale of the securities avoids plans, you’ll alsoRECR enver Trail AzleCall Today To Schedule Long Term Care Insurance and Private Pay with your legal advisor. capital gains taxes, maximizing ACTIVITIES w.eaglecrestvilla.com Tour & Complimentary Lunch the impact of your contribution. 3 HOME-COOKED Choose an investment. TypiDAILY cally, donor-advised funds offer professionally managed AND several MORE! This article was written by Eddiversified portfolios where you ward Jones for use by your local can place your contributions. Edward Jones Financial Advisor, You’ll want to consider the level of investment risk to which your Mary H. McDow, 102 Houston Ave., Accepting VA-Aid & Attendance, Suite 203, 817-598-0882. Member fund may be exposed. And asw ww.e agle crestv Long Term Care Insurance suming all requirements are met, SPIC

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Hoopla: Spotlighting North Texans 55 And Better

November 2022

COURTESY

A Christmas Past: the Concert Bells of Fort Worth delight audiences each Christmas season.

Concert Bells of Fort Worth plan concert series If you’re looking for a new way to ring in the holiday season, the Concert Bells of Fort Worth have a few events just for you. The auditioned community handbell ensemble includes ringers from all over North Texas. It all began in 1998, when North Richland Hills resident Karen Thompson founded a steering committee of likeminded directors and handbell ringers. Thompson was elected as the founding

president and is still president today. “After graduating college with a music degree in 1981, I was hired as a church musician for a local church,” Thompson she said. “During my interview for the job, I was asked if I knew about handbells, as the church had a handbell choir. I had never heard

about handbells, but I responded, ‘Sure, I can conduct a handbell choir.’ After all, I had taken conducting classes in college! I read everything I could about handbells, attended local and regional events and my love of handbells was born,” she said. In the 1990s, she continued expanding her knowledge and experience of handbells by attending events all over the U.S. (Continued on P. 12)


November 2022

Hoopla: Spotlighting North Texans 55 And Better

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Hoopla: Spotlighting North Texans 55 And Better

(Continued from P. 10) One event in Tucsan, Arizona had performances by community groups from all over the country. “I was inspired to start a group in Tarrant County as Dallas had a community ensemble but there was a void in Fort Worth/Tarrant County,” said Thompson. Community groups perform in concerts and make recordings and are the top of their game. “Another reason to start a group was so local church directors could actually ring!” said Thompson. “By becoming an excellent ringer, directors become better conductors.” In addition to ringing and conducting, Thompson was also inspired to compose for handbells. Her first handbell piece was published in 2008. Since then, she has published 46 pieces. Thompson has been honored to serve on national commit-

tees and has taught and conducted at events regionally and nationally. She says her two adult children playfully refer to CBFW as her third child. As a founder, she has a lot for which to be proud. In addition to performing two seasons a year in the DFW area, they perform at national events and are considered to be among the top performing groups in the U.S. “It’s been quite the journey!” said Thompson.

Free Holiday Concerts: n Concert at Saginaw Recreation Center, Dec. 3, 3 p.m., 633 W McLeroy Blvd., Saginaw.

n Concert at Hurst Public Library, Dec. 10, 2 p.m., 901 PreNovember 2022 cinct Line Rd., Hurst. n Concert at First United Methodist, Dec. 11, 3 p.m., 800 W. 5th St., Fort Worth. n Concert at Grace Presbyterian, Dec. 17, 2 p.m., 4300 W. Park Blvd., Plano

nSUDOKU Sudoku Difficulty: Easy

Edited by Margie E. Burke

(Puzzle solution is on P. 22)

6 6 2 1 9

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2 3 6 5 8 5 3

HOW TO SOLVE:

2 7 4 1 9 6 1

8 2

9

Copyright 2022 by The Puzzle Syndicate

1

How to Solve: Each row must contain the numbers 1 to 9; each column must contain the numbers 1 to 9; and each set of 3 by 3 boxes must contain the numbers 1 to 9.

Each row must contain the numbers 1 to 9; each column must contain the numbers 1 to 9; and each set of 3 by 3 boxes must contain the numbers 1 to 9. (Answer appears elsewhere in this issue)

November 2022


November 2022

Hoopla: Spotlighting North Texans 55 And Better

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Seniors adopting senior dogs holiday treat taster (my next Dogs can serve as a source article.) of love and happiness for However, older adults aren’t pretty much anyone—but this the only ones who stand to is particularly true for older gain from their adults. There are so many The Dog of relationships with dogs. Senior benefits: Your Dreams dogs do, too. An • Physical older dog could activity - Dogs by Ann Coffey be an excellent need to walk Ms. Fairy Dogmother option when every day, and looking for a companion as it is that rain-or-shine accountusually: ability can help form a lasting • A predictable fit - Choosexercise habit. A low-intensity daily 20-minute walk can iming an older dog takes a lot of prove heart health, lower blood the guesswork out of adoptpressure, and relieve stress. ing the right companion for an • Structure and a daily rouowner’s lifestyle and home. Its size, temperament, and energy tine – A dog, like a human, level are more predictable. thrives on structure; it needs • Civilized - Unlike its to be fed, walked, cleaned and youthful counterparts, a segroomed, played with, and loved at regular intervals. Each nior dog tends to have better day has a routine when owning manners, cutting down the a dog. amount of time and energy • Making new friends - A training takes. Most are housedog is a natural-born icebroken and well-socialized. • Calmer - Older dogs are breaker for everyone from the usually less destructive, and neighbors to perfect strangare more disciplined and foers. There are lots of shared activities for dog owners to get cused. A senior dog tends to involved with, ranging from have a calmer, more mellow doggy play areas and shared attitude. They kind of get how walks to charitable events run life works. by local organizations. As I said in my previous ar• Protection - Having a dog ticle, a senior dog has its own can provide significant securi- age-related needs but also has its own unique charms. ty. A barking dog can ward off For older adults, being a potential invaders and its very canine parent is a promise to presence can be a deterrent to continue being involved in anburglars. • Being in the moment, and other life. It is also the joy of staying mindful – A dog lives having a friend to share in life’s in the here and now, withchallenges. Or maybe the joy is just wakout worry about the future or thoughts about the past. ing up each morning to a wagPlaying or cuddling with a dog ging tail! can help an older adult do the same. Ann Coffey, Ms. Fairy Dog• New interests – A dog is a mother, is a dog trainer and pet great conversation topic, phositter available at 817-668-6229 to/art subject, gardening/yoga or visit www.msfairydogmother. buddy, dance partner, writing/ net for more information. poetry theme, and homemade


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GUIDE Craft Class for Adults features fabric pumpkin sachets, Nov. 1, Weatherford Public Library, 1014 Charles Street, Weatherford, 6 p.m., Free class and supplies. Guided Bird Walk. Bring comfy shoes, water and camera or binoculars, Nov. 5, Acton Nature Center, 6900 Smokey Hill Court, Granbury, 7 to 10 a.m. Free. Guitar For Beginners, Nov. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, Lake Worth Senior Center, 7005 Charbonneau, Lake Worth, 1:30 p.m. Free classes. Generation Gap Band, seniors join musical forces with homeschool student musicians, Nov. 2, 9, 16, Lake Worth Senior Center, 7005 Charbonneau, Lake Worth, 1:30 p.m. Free but seniors must be a member of the senior center. It’s a simple and free process to join. Free Line Dance Lessons, Nov. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30, Billy Bob’s Texas, 2520 Rodeo Plaza, Fort Worth, 7 p.m. Free adnission for ladies. Springtown Senior Center Dances, country/western bands

every Thursday and Saturday night., Nov. 3, 5, 10, 12, 17, 19, 26, Springtown Senior Activity Center, 1070 N. Main Street, Springtown, 7 to 10 p.m. Bands and unanticipated closures listed on Facebook. $5 admission per person. Hood County Senior Center Dances, featuring music by country/western bands every Thursday night, Nov. 3, 10, 17, Hood County Senior Center, 501 E. Moore St., Granbury, 7 p.m., $5 per person. The Promise, last weekend, Nov. 4, 5, Texas Amphitheater, 5000 Texas Dr., Glen Rose. Adults $32, optional dinner bag. Call (254) 897-3926. Happy Hour at the Kimbell Art Museum, live entertainment, Nov. 4, 11, 18, Kimbell Art Museum, Kahn Building (Cafe), 3333 Camp Bowie Boulevard,Fort Worth, 5 to 7 p.m. Free admission. Snacks and beverages available for purchase. Free Admission Friday at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Nov. 4, 3200 Darnell Street, Fort Worth.

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Japanese Festival at the Fort Worth Botanical Gardens with live performances and demonstrations both days, Nov. 5-6, 1700 University Drive, Fort Worth, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (last admission at 3 p.m.) Rides & Coffee, donuts, crazy rides, produce giveaways, tech sessions, Nov. 5, Detail Garage, 1009 Fort Worth Highway, Weatherford, 8 to 11 a.m. Free admission. Cooking Well For the Holidays, hosted by Texas A&M AgriLife Extension, this class includes handson food prep, recipes and tastings., Nov. 9 at 10 a.m., Nov. 10 at 6 p.m. Parker County Extension Office, 604 N. Main St., Weatherford, 6 p.m., $15 per person. Call 817-598-6168 for reservations. Second Thursdays at Amon Carter Museum includes cocktails, creativity and conversation, Nov. 10, Amon Carter Museum, 3501 Camp Bowie Blvd., 5 to 8 p.m. Free event with reservations required. Call (817) 989-5013. Ventriloquist Todd Oliver and the Talking Dog from “America’s Got Talent”, Nov. 11, 12, 13 Granbury Live on the Granbury Square. Matinees and evening shows available. Call (800) 340-9703 for tickets.

Band and Vince Herdman, Nov. 11, Spring Creek Tabernacle, 104 Spring Creek Road, Weatherford, 6 p.m. Free admission. After Hours in the Garden, Nov. 11, Fort Worth Botanical Garden, 1700 University Drive, Fort Worth, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Adult ticket $25 includes one wine, beer or non-alcoholic beverage and light bites. Blankets allowed. No coolers or outside food or drinks. Christmas at Gaylord Texan: 200 pounds of ice have been carved for this event which tells the story of the Polar Express. Other attractions include snow tubing, character breakfast, an adult “ice bar,” escape room, gingerbread decorating and more. Opens Nov. 11. Runs through Jan. 1. The Gaylord Texan Resort & Convention Center, 1501 Gaylord Trail, Grapevine. Hours vary. Also, special events related to this venue require tickets purchased in advance. We recommend you visit https://christmasat gaylordtexan.marriott.com or contact the venue directly before going. Admission price varies by the day but averages $16.99 (ages 4-11) to $25.99 (ages 12+).

DIY Floral Arrangements, Nov. 11, 12, Fort Worth Botanical Garden, BRIT Building, 1700 University Drive, Fort Worth, Friday 6 to 8 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m. to noon. Classes are the same. Choose one. $35. Registration online at https://fwbg. org/education/adults Spring Creek Musical, live music and potluck, the Pat Davis

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g North Texans 55 And Better Tarrant County Veterans Day Parade, Nov. 11, spectators can picnic on the Trinity while viewing the parade on the west side of downtown Fort Worth, 10 a.m. kickoff. Veterans and First Responders Breakfast, Nov. 12, Twentieth Century Club, 321 S. Main St., Weatherford, 7 to 11 a.m. Free to veterans, first responders and their families. Eat in or take out. Veterans Parade, Nov. 12, 10 a.m. To participate in parade, line up at 9 a.m. at the school on South Main St. in Weatherford Allegro Guitar Society performance, coinciding with the special exhibition “Murillo: From Heaven to Earth,” Nov. 12, Kimbell Art Museum, Piano Pavillion, 3333 Camp Bowie Boulevard, Fort Worth, 2 to 3 p.m. Free admission. Drawing in the Garden, personal instruction in mastering line, form, shading, composition, balance and more as you practice in

15 the beauty and tranquility of the gardens, Nov. 12, Fort Worth Botanical Gardens, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., $30. Registration online at https:// fwbg.org/education/adults Lola’s Local Farmers Market, featuring 30+ locally-grown and produced vendors, live music, bar bites and food trucks, Nov. 13, 2000 W. Berry Street, Fort Worth, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Free admission. Texas Country Music Awards, Nov. 13, Billy Bob’s Texas, 2520 Rodeo Plaza, Fort Worth, 3 p.m. Call (817) 624-7117 for tickets. AARP Smart Driver’s Course, get a discount on your auto insurance by completing this course on Nov. 14, St. Matthew’s Lutheran Church, 5709 Wedgewood Drive, Fort Worth, 12:30 to 4 p.m. Call (817) 480-0415. Limited space. Main Street Book Club, discussing Letters Across the Sea by Genevieve Graham, Nov. 15, Azle Memorial Library, 333 W. Main Street, Azle, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Re-

Bob White (seated), Daughter Anita White & Grandson Zack Bellenger

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quest this month’s title at the reference desk (while supplies last). Weatherford Book Club, discussing Our Lady in Moscow by Beatriz Williams, Nov. 15, Weatherford Public Library, 1014 Charles Street, Weatherford, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Request this month’s title at the reference desk (while supplies last). Home for the Holidays includes lunch, speakers, club raffles, baked goods, club country stores and more, Nov. 15, Couts United Methodist Church gym, 802 N. Elm Street, Weatherford, 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Lunch provided. Tickets $12 at the door or call 817-598-6168. Artful Moments for Dementia Patients and Caregivers, exploration of Amon Carter museum exhibits, hands-on activities, Nov. 17, Amon Carter Museum, 3501 Camp Bowie Blvd, 1:30 to 3 p.m. Register online at cartermuseum.org or call 817-989-5013. Jukebox Legends, a tribute to greats from the ‘50s and ‘60s, Nov.

18, Granbury Live on the Granbury Square, 7:30 p.m. Call (800) 3409703 for tickets. Radiance the Ranch: A Holiday Light Spectacular drive-through Christmas experience includes cocoa and treats for kids, Nov. 18Dec. 31, Parker County Sheriff’s Posse Grounds, 2251 Mineral Wells Highway, Weatherford, 6 to 9 p.m. (some nights later). Prices start at $26 on off-peak nights. For more information, visit www.radiance christmas.com/weatherford Book Club discusses Our Woman in Moscow by Beatriz Williams, Nov. 18, Weatherford Public Library, 1014 Charles St., Weatherford, 6 to 7 p.m. Request this month’s title at the reference desk (while supplies last). Hats Off To Education Fashion Show: Shop. See. Sip. Nov. 18, Doss Heritage and Cultural Center, 1400 Texas Drive, Weatherford., 10:30 a.m. Limited space so consider purchasing tickets in advance at The Doss, $35, $50 for VIP tickets.

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Hoopla: Spotlighting North Texans 55 And Better Lightscape, a holiday light spectacular opens Nov. 18 and runs through Jan. 8, Fort Worth Botanical Garden, 5:45 p.m. to 9 p.m. nightly. Marshmallow toasting and cocoa included. Adults $28, children 3-12 $18, infants free. Average tour takes 1.5 hours.

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Generation Gap Band in Concert, seniors join musical forces with homeschool student musicians, Nov. 19, Lake Worth Senior Center, 7005 Charbonneau, Lake Worth, 10:30 p.m. Free. Holiday Markets in Cowtown, Nov. 19, Veteran’s Park, Grand Pavilion, 8901 Clifford St., White Settlement, 8 a.m. to noon. Funky Finds Holiday Shopping Experience offers vintage and homemade items from over 150 vendors, Santa photos, pet adoptions and more, Nov. 19-20, Will Rogers Memorial Center, 3401 West Lancaster Avenue, Fort Worth, 10 a.m. to 5 pm. Free admission but Toys for Tots and Saving Hope Animal Rescue will be there accepting toy and pet food donations. Family and pet friendly. Lola’s Rock ’n’ Roll Rummage Sale, Fort Worth’s largest running outdoor monthly market, features artists, creators and collectors, plus music and food, Nov. 20, 2000 W. Berry Street, Fort Worth, noon to 6 p.m. Free admission. Parade of Lights, Nov. 20, Downtown Fort Worth, 6 to 10 p.m. Parade kicks off at 6 beginning at Throckmorton and Weatherford streets, moves south on Commerce Street to 9th Street, over to Houston St. and north to 2nd Street. It proceeds west on 2nd to Throckmorton, then south to 3rd where the parade will end. Free admission. Reserved seating available (limited) by visiting www.fortworth paradeoflights.org. Check www. fortworthparking.com for assistance with parking. 34th Annual Carol of Lights includes annual street-lighting, fireworks, live performances, crafts and food vendors, kids activities and more, Nov. 21, Grapevine Main Street, 4 to 8:45 p.m. Homemade Pie Workshop, hosted by Texas A&M Extension Of-

November 2022 fice. Make and take class. Bring your own 9” pie plate and choose from pumpkin, pecan, apple, chocolate or coconut pie, Nov. 22, Couts Methodist Church gym kitchen, 802 N. Elm Street, Weatherford, 9 a.m. to noon OR from 1 to 4 p.m., $25 per person. Call 817-598-6168 for reservations. Adults or children with adult accompaniment only. City of Lake Worth’s Senior Thanksgiving Luncheon, free to all seniors, Nov. 23, National Hall, 3316 Roberts Cut Off, Fort Worth, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Night of Lights Christmas Parade, Nov. 25, Granbury Square, Parade kicks off at 6 and winds through the historical district. Free admission. Vendors on square. Mineral Wells Skating Rink opens Nov 25 and continues through Dec. 23, Poston Square, 106 W. Hubbard Street, Mineral Wells. Rink is open to the public everyday except Nov. 28-30, Dec. 5-7 and Dec. 12-14, when private parties can be scheduled. Hours are Sunday-Thursday noon to 8 p.m., Friday 2 to 10 p.m., Saturdays 2 to 10 p.m. Ice skates are provided. Tickets $15 general admission, $10 for kids 14 and under. Merry Wells Christmas Festival and Lighted Parade with vendors, arts, live performances, skating rink, carolers and more, Nov. 26, Downtown Mineral Wells. Festival 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Lighted parade at 6 p.m. Ask about the Merry Wells Driving tour to see the area’s best lights at the Chamber office or go to the Merry Wells Facebook page for a link. Admission is free for the festival. Skating rink requires a ticket. Senior Self Defense Class for all seniors, regardless of mobility limitations, Nov. 29, 12:30 p.m., Lake Worth Senior Center, 7005 Charbonneau Road, Lake Worth, For information, call (817) 237-3281. Janie Fricke in concert, “A Cowgirl Country Christmas,” Dec. 2, Granbury Live on the Granbury Square, 7:30 p.m. Call (800) 3409703 for tickets. Lake Worth Christmas Market includes crafters, bakers and more, Dec. 3, 7005 Charbonneau Road, Fort Worth, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.


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November 2022 Azle’s Christmas Miracle on Main, Dec. 3, Azle’s Main Street, noon to 5 p.m. Parade at 6:30 p.m. A Malpass Brothers’ Christmas, Dec. 3, Granbury Live on the Granbury Square, 7 p.m., Call (800) 340-9703 for tickets. Mark Chestnut in concert, Dec. 3, Billy Bob’s Texas, 2520 Rodeo Plaza, Fort Worth, 10 p.m. Call (817) 624-7117 for tickets. Christmas on the Square, Dec. 3, Downtown Weatherford, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Cowboy Santa and Live Llamas: live llamas dressed in Christmas attire, plus train rides, shopping opportunities and family fun, Dec. 3, 122 Water St., Weatherford, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Weatherford Light the Night Parade starts at the 9th Grade Center and travels north on South Main to Palo Pinto Street then to Waco Street, Dec. 3, Weatherford, 6:30 p.m.

Hoopla: Spotlighting North Texans 55 And Better Art After Hours featuring local musical talent, Dec. 3, Kimbell Art Museum, Piano Pavillion, 3333 Camp Bowie Boulevard, Fort Worth, 6 to 7:30 p.m. Free admission. Cash bar and light snacks available for purchase. Saginaw Christmas Parade and Tree Lightning Ceremony, Dec. 3. Parade starts at Willow Creek Elementary and ends at the Saginaw Switchyard (site of tree lighting). Parade at 6 p.m. Tree lighting follows. Free admission. Christmas Tyme in Aledo, family fun, food, arts and crafts and more, Dec. 3, Downtown Aledo, Craft show open from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Other holiday activities run from 5 to 9 p.m. Free admission. Granbury: A Candlelight Tour of Homes, Dec 3-4. Pick up wristband and book at 201 E. Pearl Street in Granbury, Saturday 1 to 8 p.m. Sunday 1 to 5 p.m., $30 ticket. An Elvis Christmas featuring Kraig Parker, Dec. 8-9, Granbury

Live on the Granbury Square, 7:30 p.m. Call (800) 340-9703 for tickets. Second Thursdays at Amon Carter Museum includes cocktails, creativity and conversation, Dec. 8, Amon Carter Museum, 3501 Camp Bowie Blvd., 5 to 8 p.m., Free event with reservations required. Call (817) 989-5013. Spring Creek Musical features live music by Damon and Valerie Stedifor, plus Jack Simmons. There will also be a potluck. Dec. 9, Spring Creek Tabernacle, 104 Spring Creek Road, Weatherford, 6 p.m. Free admission. Candlelight Tour of Homes, sponsored by the Parker County Heritage Society, Dec. 10, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. (See P. 4-6 for more information.) Saginaw Christmas Market, Dec. 10, 752 S. Knowles Dr., Saginaw, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Christmas at the Castle: Tour the Texas Pythian Home while it’s decorated with Christmas spirit,

17 Dec. 10, 1825 E. Bankhead Drive, Weatherford, 10 a.m. to 6:30 p.m., Free admission. Donations appreciated. William Lee Martin’s Return of the Nutcracker, a night of holiday comedy, music and surprises, Dec. 15, Granbury Live on the Granbury Square, 7:30 p.m., Call (800) 3409703 for tickets. Artful Moments for Dementia Patients and Caregivers, exploration of Amon Carter museum exhibits, hands-on activities, Dec. 15, Amon Carter Museum, 3501 Camp Bowie Blvd, 1:30 to 3 p.m. Register online at cartermuseum.org or call 817-989-5013.

To submit events for consideration, email seniors@hooplamagazine.com or call 817894-1822.

Candlelight

Tour of Homes Saturday, December 10 from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.

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Tickets to visit all 9 historic properties are $20 for adults, $12 for children. Purchase tickets in advance at the Weatherford Chamber of Commerce, The Doss Center, or online at.parkercountyheritagesociety.com at parkercountyheritagesociety.com and pick them up on tour day at the Doss Center. Proceeds benefit community preservation projects.

Sponsored by The Parker County Heritage Society


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Hoopla: Spotlighting North Texans 55 And Better

November 2022

Azle man repairs donated bikes and gives to children in need by Rick Mauch Hoopla Correspondent

The one consistent in Donald Yarberry’s life has been bicycles. From the time he was a young child, born in Paris, Texas and raised in Whitt, wherever he’s gone, it’s usually been on a bicycle. So, as an adult now, he understands how important a bicycle is to a youngster. And he’s doing all he can to make sure every youth in Azle (where he lives now) has one. Don collects old bicycles and those in need of repair, fixes them up, and donates them to youngsters. “Growing up in the country we always had bicycles to ride and plenty of places to ride. We were very poor but always had the things we needed,” he recalled. “So when a bicycle broke, it was up to us to repair them. It just sort of came natural to me.” Don also knew how special it was to have something to call his own. A bike was a perfect way for a young boy to make new friends. “All my friends got to riding around as a group, usually from one friend’s house to another,” he said. “It was during this time that I started pushing myself to ride farther and farther on just my little 20-inch BMX bike. Some days I would ride 10 to 20 miles. I could even convince a friend or a cousin to ride with me. “Many great memories were made during these rides. I also dedicated as much time as could to going to my church and doing church activities. “For many years I fell away from God. But there was always one constant in my life. I always had a bicycle or multiple bicycles,” he said. Then, on the final day of his eighthgrade school year, he found out his dad had passed away from a heart attack. Most of the men on his dad’s side of the family passed away from heart attacks. So in Don’s mind if he rode bicycles it would keep his heart healthy. “I started taking rides sometimes up

to 60 miles or more. Plus, for me riding is almost an escape from reality. I can just meditate and go into a daydream state of mind,” he said. As he got older and started working after high school he used a bicycle as his only means of travel. He rode 10 miles to work every day and 10 miles home, no matter the weather. “In the rain, extreme heat, and even during a few ice storms. I never missed a day. I believed that everyone needed to ride more and drive less,” he said, a philosophy he still subscribes to. Eventully, Don met the love of his life and he and Christine were married. They had a son, Logan, in 2011 and daughter Victoria seven years apart and life got busier. Also, they discovered Logan has autism. He doesn’t share his dad’s love of bicycles and never learned to ride one. However, another love he shared with his father, church, led to the family volunteering in many ways, including with a local Azle nonprofit called Servolution. “Servolution does many wonderful things for our community. It is volunteering with them that started to feel that I was being called to help others. I craved ways to help as many people as I possibly could,” Don said. Including children and bicycles. So he went on Facebook asking for bicycles to be donated to me to fix up and pass along to children. “I truly believe it is my calling. I expected to get a few and ended up getting about 50. I will admit I was a bit overwhelmed at first,” he said. “When I got a few fixed I would find people on Facebook that needed them.” Soon people started contacting him asking if he had “I do as many as I can, but I also work a full-time job plus church,” Don said. “I make no money for this, even though people have offered to pay. Get them for free and give them for free.” Three years ago Don began noticing an increase in homeless people in the

COURTESY

Ever since he was a youth, bicycles have been a part of Don Yarberry’s life. Now he gathers donated bicycles, repairs them and passes them on to youngsters. area. It sparked another idea. “It was winter time and I started seeing so many without ways to stay warm. I talked to my wife and decided to try and collect some stuff for the homeless to stay warm,” he said. “That was our first Helping the Homeless event. We collected way more then we ever thought that we would. So much we had to rent a storage room.” Don and Christine then partnered with a few local groups to give clothing and blankets out to those in need. And now, this year they held their third annual event on Oct. 15. They focus on blankets, socks, warm clothing, sleeping bags and more. They also accept toiletries, food and such. “We unfortunately just don’t have a way to hold and store the items for very long,” he noted, so if anyone is willing to help in that department, contact him on Facebook. Ditto for bicycles. If you have a bike in need of repair, don’t throw it away. Don has a place for it – in the arms and heart of a child.


November 2022

Hoopla: Spotlighting North Texans 55 And Better

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COURTESY

Vets honored

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The Weatherford Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution recently presented certificates of appreciation to veterans at Autumn Hill Manor. Pictured front row, from left, Bobby Long (Army), dog trainer Christine Collins and comfort dog Juno. Back row, from left, DAR Regent Linda Schmidt, Carol Livingston, Byron R. Walters (Air Force), Albie J. Gould (Air Force), Al Breedlove (Army), DAR Flag Chairman Shirley Godfrey. Bob Harper, pictured above, served in the Army and Air Force.

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Hoopla: Spotlighting North Texans 55 And Better

November 2022

On the Road Again To The Christmas Capital of Texas

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here’s no place in North Texas that encapsulates the spirit of Christmas better than Grapevine. Millions of twinkling lights, vintage train rides, boutiques filled to the brim with Christmas cheer, and music on every corner attract visitors from all over the world. The highlights listed below are all within a couple of city blocks. Feel the magic of the season as you bustle along the sidewalks in Historic Downtown Grapevine. And, don’t forget, there’s something for everyone on your list in one of more than 80 locally-owned shops. There are 1,400 events scheduled in 40 days, which is what makes Grapevine the Christmas Capital of Texas.

VISITGRAPEVINEUSA.COM

Grapevine Main Station decked out in holiday cheer.

1. Grapevine Main Station Grapevine Main is more than a rail station. The facility includes a European-style food hall with seven globally-inspired kitchens; and a 150-foot-tall Observation Tower with 360-degree views of the city and beyond all connected to Hotel Vin, a six-story, 120-room Marriott Autograph Collection property and a 552-space parking garage. Parking is free for the first 90 minutes, then $1 after.

2. Grapevine Vintage Railroad ‘Tis the season for holiday cheer onboard the Christmas Wine Trains. These adults-only excursions offer an escape from the hustle and bustle of the season inside the beautifully decorated coaches of the Grapevine Vintage Railroad. Your $45 general admission ticket includes individually

portioned assorted hors d’oeuvres, two complimentary glasses of fine Texas wine served in a souvenir glass and onboard entertainment, including Santa Claus, during the two-hour experience. Additional wine will be available for purchase. There is also a first-class experience that includes dinner for four at a cost of $320. The wine trains run on weekends only. Tickets should be purchased in advance. During the Christmas season, Grapevine Vintage Railroad also runs VISITGRAPEVINEUSA.COM The North Pole Express, All aboard the Grapevine Vintage a ride designed to delight children with a trip Railroad. to the North Pole, but adults are also welcome. To purchase tickets for these and other train excursions, call the Grapevine Visitor Information Center at 817-4103185 or email VisitorInfo@GrapevineTexasUSA.com.

3. Nash Farm’s Victorian Christmas Experience On the first Saturday in December, discover the tradition at Nash Farm’s Victorian Christmas (626 Ball St.). Experience a Texas heritage Christmas where you can sip cider, nibble cookies and see how Grapevine’s earliest settlers celebrated the holidays. Make your own Victorian ornaments to take home. Visit NashFarm.org for more information.

4. Skating Rink This year, Grapevine will unveil an all-new attraction—a 4,500-square-foot outdoor ice-skating rink on Historic Main Street. The rink will be located on Peace Plaza in front of

Th e


November 2022

Hoopla: Spotlighting North Texans 55 And Better

HALLSPUMPKINFARM.NET

Go back in time and celebrate Christmas at Nash Farm. Grapevine Main Station, home to Harvest Hall. The rink will be open to the public from Nov. 18 to Jan. 8. Hours are 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily.

5. The Palace Theatre From country to classic Christmas, Grapevine is the place to be for all your holiday entertainment. Set in the beautifully restored Palace Theatre, you’ll delight at all of the spectacular Christmas music and movie offerings. The theatre will be showing holiday favorites, like “Elf,” “It’s A Wonderful Life,” “Miracle on 34th Street,” “Home Alone,” “Christmas Vacation,” “The Santa Clause” and more. There are also live performances scheduled, including a ballet company performing the Nutcracker, Christmas tribute shows with Elvis, Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin, The Carpenters, variety shows and more. With a different show each day, there’s no room to list every option, so we recommend you visit www.palace-theatre.com to see the lineup and purchase tickets or call 817-410-3100.

VISITGRAPEVINEUSA.COM

The beautifully-retstored Palace Theatre offers something new every day during the holidays.

21


SUDOKU

Edited by Margie E. Burke

Difficulty: Easy

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Hoopla: Spotlighting North Texans 55 And Better

HOW TO SOLVE:

November 2022

Each row must 6 2 contain the numbers n5Find the Frog Picks 1 9 2n Live 7 1 Theatre to 9; each column Congratulations to Lyn Bushouse! She must contain the 4 found the frog2 in last3 month’s issue. He was numbers 1 to 9; and hiding on page 22 in the TruGreen adver6 5 8 1 each set of 3 by 3 tisement. boxes must contain Winners of the hidden frog contest 5 9 3 the numbers 1 to 9. have their choice of tickets from several live theatres area. 6 8Enterinthisourmonth’s (Answer appears elsecontest by SUITE SURRENDER HOLMES FOR THE HOLIDAY where in this issue) emailing to tell us where you found 1 Theatre Off the Square Popcorn Players the frog in this issue (example above)! Email Ticket Info: 817-341-8687 114 Porter Drive, Azle 9 1 entries to2 seniors@hooplamagazine.com. Tentative Dates: Dec. 2 - 18 Ticket Info: 817-238-7529

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Copyright 2022 by receive The Puzzle All contestants a Syndicate free e-subscription to Hoopla and a chance to win the grand prize. Make sure you pick up next month’s issue to see if you’ve won! Winners must contact Hoopla within 30 days to claim their prize.

n Solutions Solution to Sudoku: 2 7 5 1 9 4 8 3 6

1 8 7 4 3 9 6 9 3 5 6 2 8 1 4 6 8 1 9 3 2 8 2 3 9 7 4 5 6 5 2 8 4 7 3 3 7 1 5 6 2 8 7 1 4 2 5 6 9 5 9 6 7 8 1 4 1 5 7 2Solution 4 9 to3Crossword:

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Synopsis: Two of Hollywood’s biggest divas have descended upon a luxurious hotel. Everything seems to be in order for their wartime performance...that is, until they are somehow assigned to the same suite. Mistaken identities, overblown egos, double entendres, and a lap dog named Mr. Boodles round out this love note to the classic farces of the 1930s- 40s.

Tentative Dates: November 11-20 Synopsis: William Gillette, famous for his portrayal of Sherlock Holmes, invited friends to his home for a holiday party. When one guest winds up dead, Gillette has to summon every ounce of Sherlock to solve the mystery. This play will keep you laughing and guessing whodunit until the end.

IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE: THE RADIO SHOW

MIRACLE ON 34TH STREET: THE MUSICAL

Parker County Theatre Company Faith Presbyterian Church, 301 Bailey Ranch Road, Aledo Ticket Info: Admission is FREE! Reserve seats at https://parkercountytheatre.com Tentative Dates: Nov. 25 - 27 and Dec. 2 and 4 (7 p.m.) Synopsis: This beloved American holiday classic comes to captivating life as a live 1940s radio broadcast. With the help of an ensemble that brings a few dozen characters to the stage, the story of idealistic George Bailey unfolds as he considers ending his life one fateful Christmas Eve.

Granbury Opera House 133 E. Pearl Street, Granbury Ticket Info: 817-579-0952 Tentative Dates: Dec. 2 - 23 Synopsis: Single mother, Doris Walker, doesn’t want her six-year-old Susan’s head filled with romantic notions. Their neighbor, Fred Gailey, tries to woo Doris by charming Susan and taking her to see Santa Claus at Macy’s, where Doris works. Doris is not impressed, but when it turns out that Macy’s Santa may, in fact, be the real Kris Kringle, a wave of love spreads across New York City that melts even the most cynical hearts.


November 2022

Hoopla: Spotlighting North Texans 55 And Better

Life in Grace by Lara Cook North Side Baptist Church

Regeneration When you pass through the waters, I will be with you; And through the rivers, they will not overflow you. When you walk through the fire, you will not be scorched, Nor will the flame burn you. Isaiah 43:2 A forest will grow back greener and more plentiful after a forest fire has ravaged all the existing life. Fires, although devastating, can actually help to clean up forests and keep them healthy. They burn away all the underbrush and sometimes the upper level of the trees too. This allows the sunshine to reach the earth and purify the soil. The sun gives warmth and energy that plants need to survive and regenerate. Forests will evolve in the presence of fire and even adapt to it. Forrest Hall, a physicist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center explained that wildfire is an integral part of the forest ecosystem. Hall also said Fire is the mechanism by which the forest is continually regenerated. Fires consume dead, decaying vegetation accumulating on the forest floor, thereby clearing the way for new growth. The trials we experience in life can be like these fires. We can have everything singed away taking us down to the raw core of our being. At this point we are generally wide open to allowing God to do whatever He wants to do with us. He purifies us, revives and rejuvenates us. We become completely vulnerable and weakened, ready to

be molded by His caring and capable hands. We adapt to the trials and come out a little scarred and then we adapt to the scars, and they become a part of who we are – a part of our story. New life comes out of the ashes of our trials. Some things we can remember when we are in the fire: Trust God God is in control even in the midst of the fire. Trust in His good, acceptable, and prefect will. He loves us and wants the best for us. He will take this fire and use it for

good! Trust That God Will Be With You In The Fire There is a popular story in the Bible about three men who were thrown into a fiery furnace because they chose not to bow down and worship a false god which had been ordered by the King. They would only bow down to the One True God, so they were thrown into a fiery furnace to burn up. Mysteriously in the midst of the furnace there appeared four men instead of three. God was with these men in the fire. He will be by

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our side, walking with us and giving us strength, and carrying us when we can’t go on. God Will Deliver You Storms don’t last forever, and fires eventually burn out. God will not leave you where you are forever. Although it is often hard to understand why we are even there in the first place, He will use if for good. Treasure the scars you walk away with because they were very costly to acquire, but the return will be huge. The wisdom and life lessons gained are always priceless to those who realize the value.


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