Page 1

PRICELE$$

November/ December 2012

Interview with a Veteran A Student’s First Thanksgiving

Style 4 Less Thanksgiving Manners 101

Inspiring Parents, Motivating Kids, Celebrating Life

www.WiseFamilyMagazine.com


Family Album

Harrison and Henry Oberg running through the wildflowers on the land that their great, great, great, great grandparents settled in 1859 in Chico, TX.

Not what we say about our blessings, but how we use them, is the true measure of our thanksgiving. ~ W.T. Purkiser DECATUR TIRE STORE & SERVICE CENTER B.W. Stone, owner

A GOOD DEAL ON A GREAT TIRE ®

Convenient Store Hours Mon.-Fri. 7:30 am - 5:30 pm Sat. 7:30 am - noon 940.627.3657 2

WISEFamilyMagazine.com • 940.210.1769

1201 N. Hwy. 81/287, Decatur


(BPT) - The holidays are full of fun activities, tasty treats and plenty of celebration, but being busy and eating all the extras can quickly lead to weight gain. With a few key strategies, it’s surprisingly easy to enjoy the season to the fullest and still avoid Santa’s extra bulge. Dr. Christopher Mohr is a fitness and nutritional expert who consults for television, print and radio outlets throughout the country. He understands the difficulties of staying health-focused during all the festivities. Mohr offers some good reminders and unique insights on how to avoid gaining extra weight during the holidays. Eat quality calories ‘Too many people think that to avoid weight gain you need to avoid calories. In reality, you need to eat calories to stay healthy, but you need to focus on quality calories,’ says Mohr. ‘Choose foods that are packed with vitamins and nutrients, rather than just empty calories.’ Seek out ‘real’ foods for snacks and meals over processed junk foods full of salt, unhealthy fats, and sugar. The fresher the better, because when foods are minimally processed, they typically retain higher levels of vitamins and minerals. For example, skip the bag of chips and snack on fresh fruits and veggies. When possible, cook meals at home where you can control the ingredients and reduce unhealthy extras like butter, salt and oil. Manage stress and focus During the holidays, people tend to try to do too much. This quickly leads to stress, which can have many unhealthy consequences, including overeating and weight gain. Being extremely busy also can lead to convenience eating, where you hit up the nearest fast food restaurant to save time, rather than head home to cook a nutritious meal. ‘Remember to stay focused during the holiday season and take breaks,’ reminds Mohr. ‘If you’re too stressed, you will be more likely to eat unhealthy foods and get less sleep. That combination may compromise your immune system. The last thing you want is a few

extra pounds and a bad cold at the conclusion of the holidays.’ Support a healthy metabolism ‘In order for your metabolism to function as efficiently as possible, you need to fuel your body regularly,’ Mohr explains. ‘That means you need to eat balanced meals and take supplements that support your metabolism.’ He advises to never skip breakfast, no matter how busy you are. Breakfast jumpstarts your metabolism and helps it function well all day. Additionally, consider taking a fish oil supplement that supplies the body with essential omega-3 fatty acids. “Studies show that omega-3s support a healthy metabolism,” Mohr says. “People generally know about the health benefits of omega-3s to brain and cardiovascular health, but they are surprised to find out a high-quality fish oil supplement, like Ultimate Omega-D3 from Nordic Naturals, helps keep your metabolism functioning well.” Indulge strategically ‘Deprivation isn’t a good weightloss strategy, and it certainly isn’t much fun during the holiday season. Instead of avoiding all the candy, cookies, and rich foods served at festive gatherings, think of your own personal strategy before you go to an event,’ Mohr says. He suggests picking just one item you love, such as Granny’s apple pie or Aunt Jude’s stuffing, and let that be your one-time no-guilt holiday indulgence. In exchange, cut out other extras you don’t like as much. Remember, just because it’s being served doesn’t mean you need to eat it. Cut out high-calorie items like sauces and gravies, and holiday beverages like cocoa and eggnog. You’ll get to enjoy that one item you look forward to all year and, by avoiding others you care less about, you won’t risk holiday weight gain. Celebrating the season to the fullest doesn’t mean you need to end the year with a few extra pounds. Follow these expert tips and you’ll enjoy the holidays and start 2013 looking and feeling healthy. ■ 940.210.1769 • WISE

Health Wise

Simple secrets for dodging holiday weight gain

FamilyMagazine.com

3


Manners Minute 4

Thanksgiving Manners 101 By Sharon Pate

T

hanksgiving signals the beginning of the holiday season, and it’s a special time of feasting with family and friends. We’re often so consumed with the dinner details that we just assume our children know how to act when the company comes. So, how do we prepare our children for this special day? Below are ten behaviors for a children’s refresher course on Thanksgiving Manners 101 that if practiced by children and adults as well will make the holidays fun for all. 1. Remember the magic words. “Please” and “Thank you” and “You’re welcome” work wonders with adults and are met with positive attention. Answer, “Yes, Ma’am” or “No, Sir,” when adults ask questions. Not all adults expect this courteous response, but almost all are impressed. 2. Show respect by using good greeting manners and introduction skills. Failing to acknowledge another person’s presence is a sign of disrespect. Instead, children should: • Smile, stand tall, look the person in the eye, and say, “Hello,” in a pleasant voice. • Shake hands if the person extends a hand. All children need instruction in how to shake hands—neither too hard nor too limp. • Listen to what the person says and answer courteously. 3. Lend a Hand. Be available to help carry packages or dishes of food into the house. Hold the door open for family members or guests. When it’s time to be seated at the table, pull out the chair for the ladies or elderly guests. 4. Accept compliments with grace. Guests and relatives usually compliment a child on how much they have grown or how they look. Children should receive the compliment with a smiling, “Thank you.” It’s disrespectful to contradict a complimentary remark. When a child is told she looks pretty in her outfit, she shouldn’t reply that she hates it and her mom made her wear it anyway. This implies that the person complimenting her is wrong. 5. Stand up for adults. Children should always rise from their seats when an adult they haven’t greeted enters the room. They should acknowledge the older person with eye contact and a smile. It is always courteous to greet people cheerfully, turn down the

WISEFamilyMagazine.com • 940.210.1769

TV or music, and share the space on the couch or at the table. 6. Avoid annoying behaviors. No gum chewing, roughhousing, or yelling where adults are congregating. Instead be happy and pleasant to be around. 7. Ask to be excused. Though adults often linger at the end of the meal, most children can’t sit that long without fidgeting. When a child has finished eating and has visited a reasonable amount of time, they should ask, “May I please be excused?” Their polite request should be honored. 8. Stay off the phone. Cell phones should not be brought to the table, nor should a phone conversation be held in the room where people are visiting. If a child must talk on the phone, he should go to a private place and talk briefly so he can rejoin the group. 9. Text messaging and visiting don’t mix. Children truly believe they can carry on a polite conversation and send or receive text messages at the same time, but when their attention is divided, they aren’t respecting the other person. Ask your child to put their phone away for the day. When everyone has gone home, they can talk and text as much as they want. 10. Take out your ear phones and turn off your IPOD. You can listen to your IPOD later, but for now, spend time talking and sharing with the people who really care about you. Practice makes perfect, so start practicing with your child today. By Thanksgiving, their manners will be as natural as breathing. ■ Editors Note: Originally printed in Parker County Youth Magazine November 2009. Found it fitting for the season and know we can all learn something.


DID YOU KNOW?

• Around 280 million turkeys are sold for Thanksgiving. • Fifty percent of Americans put the stuffing inside the Turkey. • Twenty percent of cranberries eaten are eaten on Thanksgiving. • More than 40 million green bean casseroles are served on Thanksgiving.

Need Help With Your Turkey? The Butterball®Turkey Talk-Line® experts are available to answer questions and offer advice on preparing a turkey. The Butterball Turkey Talk-Line experts are available to help both new and experienced cooks put the golden touch on holiday celebrations by providing useful turkey and holiday cooking tips.

Talk-Line History

• In 1981, six home economists responded to 11,000 phone calls during the inaugural year • In 2012, more than 50 professionally trained turkey experts plan to help more than 1 million cooks this November and December via Facebook, Twitter, Live Chats, Butterball.com, emails and calls

First day of school for Levi Step. Son of Jim & Erica Step (Krum) Grandson of Janice & Roy Millican (Decatur)

Readers…

Send your photos of friends, family and events to pics@wisefamilymagazine.com!

Facebook/Twitter/Pinterest:

“Like” and follow Butterball for real-time advice, turkey prep information, culinary inspiration and special savings

Butterball Cookbook Plus™ App

Download the Butterball Cookbook Plus App for iPad®, iPhone® and iPod touch® from the App StoreSM to get easy access to gold-standard recipe ideas, how-to videos, upcoming Butterball promotions and cooking advice at your fingertips

Website

Log on to www.Butterball.com or m.Butterball.com to get cooking tips from the Butterball Turkey Talk-Line experts

Other features include:

Recipes: Enjoy recipe ideas to appeal to everyone’s taste buds – tried-and-true contemporary recipes How-To Videos: Step-by-step instructions on how to thaw, roast, stuff, carve and more to prepare your Butterball turkey to perfection Turkey and Stuffing Calculators: Take the guesswork out of how much to buy, when to buy and how long to cook Conversion Charts: Metric, temperature and traditional weight and measurement conversions 1-800-Butterball Phone lines open November 1, 2012 Bilingual assistance available (English and Spanish) 940.210.1769 • WISE

FamilyMagazine.com

5


On The Cover: Nov/Dec, 2012 In our 8th year of ‘Making A Difference’

Kayden Cortez of Bridgeport. Photography by Monica Martinez Photography

P.O. Box 521 • Boyd, Texas 76023

940-210-1769

Founder: Kim Tinkham 1957 - 2010

Publisher & Parent Company . . . . . . . . . . . TinkInkPublications.com Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Scott@tinkinkpublications.com Graphic Artist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sara Sparrowgrove Email . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . sara@tinkinkpublications.com Distribution Guys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Scott and Don Tinkham Office Dogs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Max and Buddy Our Reason For Doing This . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . YOU! Advertising Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ads@wisefamilymagazine.com To submit: Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . info@wisefamilymagazine.com Photographs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pics@wisefamilymagazine.com Wise Family Magazine is published monthly by Tink Ink LLC and distributed free of charge through local merchants. Wise Family Magazine reserves the right to edit, reject or comment editorially on all material contributed. Opinions expressed by the contributors are not necessarily the opinions of the publication. Tink Ink LLC assumes no liability or responsibility for any claims made by advertisers in the magazine. Reproduction in whole or part without express written consent of the Publisher is prohibited.

In This Issue: Health Wise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Thanksgiving Manners 101 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Dave Says . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-9 Women’s Occupational Workshop . . . . . . . . . . 10 Student’s First Thanksgiving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Like Skills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Interview with a Veteran . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 A Simplified Home . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Style 4 Less . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Fun & Games . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

BE A PART OF OUR NEXT ISSUE!

Proud of your child, team or association? Want to share a picture with the rest of the county? Send your high resolution color picture with caption to

pics@WiseFamilyMagazine.com

Find Doright in the magazine (it’s not easy), email us at contest@wisefamilymagazine.com. You will be entered in a drawing for a prize. Proudly sponsored by our Decatur

EMERGENCY NUMBERS:

Wise County Sheriff . . . . . . . . . . . . . 940 627 5971 Severe Weather Updates . . . . . . . www.weather.com Emergency Preparedness Info . . . . www.redcross.org www.MissingKids.com . . . . . . . . . . 1-800-843-5678 National Child Abuse Hotline . . . . . . 1-800-422-4453 National Poison Control Center . . . . . 1-800-222-1222 National Substance Abuse Hotline . . . 1-800-662-4357 National Runaway Hotline . . . . . . . . 1-800-786-2929

Readers...

940/627-2519

“Do Right and Fear No Man”

Wise Family Magazine believes that texting and non-hands free cell use are dangerous to everyone involved. Use your head not your hands!

We need your help! Do you have an event or organization you would like to share with the county? Please take some time out of your busy day and drop us a line. What do you want to get out of your Wise Family Magazine? Please send comments, questions and feedback to sara @tinkinkpublications.com or by snail mail to Tink Ink Publications, PO Box 521, Boyd, Texas 76023. The more pictures and stories you send, the better YOUR magazine will be! 6

WISEFamilyMagazine.com • 940.210.1769


Better Student – Better Future

@ Your Library

Area Libraries

Alvord Public Library 940-427-2842 • W,TH, F . . . . . . . . . 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. • SA . . . . . . . . . . . 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon Boyd Public Library 940-433-5580 • M, W, F . . . . . . . . 10:00 a.m.- 3:00 p.m. • TU . . . . . . . . . . . 10:00 a.m. -7:00 p.m. • TH . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Bridgeport Public Library 940-683-3450 • M,W,F . . . . . . . . . 10:00 a.m.- 6:00 p.m. • T,TH . . . . . . . . . . 10:00 a.m - 7:00 p.m. • SA . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:00 a.m.- 2:00 p.m.

Scott and Mitzi Reaves-XTO Company Picnic at Cowboys Stadium

Chico Public Library 940-644-2330 • M,F . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m. • T,W,TH . . . . . . . . . . 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. • SA . . . . . . . . . . . 9:00 a.m.-12:00 noon Decatur Public Library 940-627-5512 • M,T,TH . . . . . . . . . 10:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m • W,F . . . . . . . . . . . 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. • SA . . . . . . . . . . . 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m Newark Public Library 817-489-2224 • M,T,Th,F . . . . . . . . . 3:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. • Sat . . . . . . . . . . . 9:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. • Sun & Wed closed Rhome Public Library 817-636-2767 • T-F . . . . . . . . . . . 1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. • Sat . . . . . . . . . . . 10:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.

940.210.1769 • WISE

FamilyMagazine.com

7


Dave Says

Working vs. learning Dear Dave, My son is a freshman in college. Do you think he should work during his first year in school or focus all his attention on his classes? - Ben Dear Ben, I don’t think there’s anything wrong with either direction during their first year of college. But as a parent, I’d urge you not to fall into the trap of thinking that a kid’s grades will go down if they work while in school. Research shows that kids who work while in college carry higher grade point averages than those who don’t. To me, the reason for this is pretty simple. If you’re working and going to school at the same time, you have to learn how to manage your life and your time effectively. Lots of kids could pay their way through college, and not have to worry with student loans, if they just used the time they spend on social activities and watching television at a job. I never required my kids to work during the school year. But they all have good work ethics, and they’re definitely not bums. During the summer, though, there was no such thing as sitting around. They had jobs. My youngest just finished his sophomore year, and he’s already started a job. Being a vegetable for the entire summer is useless, and we don’t do useless in our family. But the philosophy of not wanting a kid to work so they can spend all their time studying is misguided. For the most part, kids who work while they’re in school will make better grades and develop into more mature and well-rounded individuals. And besides, if they’re working they can’t waste all their time playing beer pong! - Dave Hollywood dreams Dear Dave, I plan to move to Los Angeles to chase my dream of working in the television and film industry. I’m not married, have no kids, and I have $2,500 saved to live on until I can pick up a couple of jobs. I may have to finance a car, though. I’m not sure mine will survive the trip. Under these circumstances, how much of an emergency fund should I shoot for? - Cameron Dear Cameron, So, you’re looking at moving to California with $2,500 in your pocket, a car payment, and no job waiting. This is a disaster waiting to happen, my friend. Don’t get me wrong. I want you to live your dream, but I don’t want it

8

WISEFamilyMagazine.com • 940.210.1769

turning into a nightmare. There’s no way I’d take a car payment to California. And you’re going to need a lot more than just $2,500, unless you have a job lined up. Even if there’s work waiting for you, $2,500 will disappear in about 20 minutes in Los Angeles. Slow down and take your time. Plan a trip to the coast and figure out what your living arrangements and expenses are going to look like first. Then, line up a job that will pay you enough to cover your expenses. In the meantime, save up enough money to fix your car, or if it’s in really rough shape, to buy a good, used one. Once all this is done, then you make the move— without a car payment. Moving when you’re broke with no job prospects and a car payment hanging around your neck is a recipe for disaster! - Dave This is about manhood Dear Dave, My son has worked and saved all through school and will be graduating this year with a degree in electrical engineering. He has a job waiting for him when he finishes, and he wants to move out on his own then. I think he should continue to live at home and save up more money. What do you think? - Sue Dear Sue, Honestly, I think he should move out. This situation isn’t about money as much as it’s about your son becoming a man. At this point in his life it’s going to be really good for him, emotionally and spiritually, to stand on his own two feet. It sounds like you’ve got some good ideas about saving and financial responsibility, and he needs to take some of Mom’s advice in those areas. But it’s time he had his own place and started paying his own bills. It’s time for this one to leave the nest, spread his wings, and fly. Here’s something else to think about. He’s going to look a whole lot better to the world if he’s out there standing on his own. I think lots of young ladies, not to mention their parents, will be much more impressed by a guy who’s making his own way rather than living at home with mom. He’s at a point where he’s reaching for dignity and trying to make his way in the world. Let him do it. I’ve got a feeling he’ll make you proud! - Dave Whole life for adult kids? Dear Dave, My husband and I have about $50,000 in debt. It started piling up several years ago when one of our sons was injured.


Dear Lori, You’re not responsible for the final expenses of a 33-yearold or a 23-year-old. And the fact that they’re your sons doesn’t change anything. Whole life insurance is a horrible investment. The rate of return is almost nothing. When someone dies with these policies, the extra money you paid to create the cash value is wasted, because the insurance company keeps the cash value. They only pay out the face value! That’s not what I call smart investing. If it were me, I’d cash in both of the policies immediately. Now, if either of them has become uninsurable and you want to transfer a policy to them, that’s fine. Otherwise, they both need to take care of their own insurance and other financial needs. You guys are staring at a lot of debt, and $21,000 will go a long way toward cleaning up that mess. Cash them in! - Dave

$50,000 is probably a little much. I’d look at a number somewhere in the $20,000 to $30,000 range for an emergency fund. Then you could throw the remaining cash at the house. I mean, let’s face it. If you did that, with your income, you could roll up your sleeves and pay off the house by Christmas! - Dave Impulsiveness is not faith Dear Dave, My husband and I would like for me to be able to quit my job and stay at home with our kids. We’ve got a little money saved up, but we’re not sure we could make it on just his salary. The money would be very tight. In your mind, how do we know the difference between being financially responsible and relying on God to provide? - Michelle

Dave Says

He’s 33, his brother is 23, and we’ve got whole life insurance policies on each of them. The combined cash value of the policies is about $21,000. Should we sell them in order to help pay down our debt? - Lori

Dear Michelle, This is a great question! I admire the desire to be at home with your kids, and that you realize you can’t just act impulsively and call it faith. This is a concept that’s misused and misunderstood a lot. If you can’t make it on just your husband’s salary, then you’ve got to develop a game plan that involves a written monthly budget and some lifestyle changes. If you do this No emergency fund means living on the edge with diligence and sacrifice, chances are you’ll be able Dear Dave, to make this happen and not bankrupt your family. This My husband and I are in pretty good shape financially. We could also mean that you start a small business on the make about $250,000 a year with about $50,000 in the bank side—something you could do from home—to offset the and no debt, and we’ve set aside money for our children’s difference. college funds. Currently, we owe $70,000 on our home. I Having faith that God will provide requires study of want to use $40,000 of our savings to pay down the house the Scriptures. But God also tells us that you need the then rebuild our emergency fund. My husband disagrees. maturity and wisdom to plan your direction. The Bible says, What do you think? “The diligent prosper. He who is impulsive exalts folly.” - Kelly Folly is a fool in action. It’s kind of like the guy who closes his eyes, jumps in the pool, and hopes there’s water in Dear Kelly, there—and calls that faith. You’re right about one thing. You guys are in really good I love the idea of you coming home to be with your shape financially, partly because of planning and wise kids, Michelle. Just make sure you develop an intelligent choices. The problem I see is this: What if you have an plan, and mix intellect with faith. emergency but no emergency fund? You’re living on an - Dave ■ income of a quarter million dollars a year, and that’s fantastic, too. But I don’t like the idea of you sitting there with just $10,000 in savings. In your world, $10,000 isn’t much at all. Baby Step 3 of my plan says that you set aside three to six months of household expenses. You guys could cheat a little bit, down to the three month side of things, but I still Dave Ramsey don’t think $10,000 will cover three months of expenses in your household. For more financial help, please visit daveramsey.com In my opinion, $10,000 is too low. But to be honest, 940.210.1769 • WISE

FamilyMagazine.com

9


Women’s Occupational Workshop 10

Developing an Attitude of Gratitude “Let us be grateful to people who make us happy; they are the charming gardeners who make our souls blossom.” - Marcel Proust

G

ratitude is a learned behavior. It would be wonderful to believe that the art of thanksgiving and recognition in others would always come naturally. But, sadly, that is not the case in the average person. However, gratitude can be taught, exampled and reinforced so that it becomes second nature and can greatly influence your world. This has been a year of gratitude for me. Having experienced dramatic health-challenging opportunities, I am filled to the brim with gratitude. First, for life itself and second, for recovery to a stronger place - this year has changed my perspective of gratitude for little things. I take divine pleasure is hearing children’s laughter and the light in their eyes over the smallest of unexpected discoveries. I am enjoying waking to the sound of birds singing their gratitude for daily provisions. I find comfort in the movement of my hands and body as I reach out and move toward new experiences. I treasure the time spent with family and friends simply talking and listening and sharing their hopes and plans. I’m trying new foods. I am exploring new places in my daily walk. I enjoy turning new corners and finding new ways to accomplish everyday tasks. I am grateful for the smiles of strangers so I make a deliberate effort to smile first. I am learning to ask the question, “How are you?” and then to wait for an answer. I dance when I hear music and I don’t worry who is looking. I sing because I cannot be quiet. I enjoy the sound of silence and the symphony of conversation. Gratitude has become my garden and I desire to share the fruits of its production. It has also become my desire to example this before others. Each of us possesses the ability to change our world from doom and gloom to joy and happiness. It is as simple as making the decision to live as we were intended. To love

WISEFamilyMagazine.com • 940.210.1769

caring for those around us, to teach by our actions a better path to follow and to desire the change we want in others to begin in ourselves. We must decide to look out of our pressures, obligations and pain to see the beauty of the world around us. We must desire to be grateful and to express it, even if undeserved. The world does a fine job of pointing out our flaws and failures. It could do with less help from us. We should decide to celebrate not condemn. We should rejoice not ridicule. And then the world will begin to change. In the words of Emerson, “..to laugh often and much, to win the respect of intelligent people and the affection of children, to earn the appreciation of honest critics and endure the betrayal of false friends, to appreciate beauty, to find the best in others, to leave the world a bit better, whether by a healthy child, a garden patch…to know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived. This is to have succeeded!” And as you seek to succeed, express gratitude for the wonder around you and the blessings of those in your life. Also consider the words of John Kennedy, “As we express our gratitude, we must never forget the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them.” I’m heading out to plant seeds of gratitude. I believe I hear music…let the dance begin!■ Keitha Story-Stephenson, Ph.D.

Keitha Story-Stephenson, PhD, director of BlueSky Wellness Center, provides private consultation for individuals and corporations in Nutritional Wellness, Weight Management, ADD/ADHD Nutritional Management and other Alternative Health Care. Available by appointment in Decatur, Texas ay 506 West Walnut. You may phone 817-239-9525 or visit us at www.BlueSkyWellnessCenter.com for more information. Follow us on our blog, www.DrKeitha.com or www. MerchantsCircle.com Keitha also serves as CEO of SkyBlue Family Ministries. You may reach the ministry by email at DrKeitha@me.com. Tune in to Christian Radio, KDKR 91.3fm, on Saturdays at 1:30pm, for “Feeding the Family-Mind, Body and Spirit”. Or tune in through live streaming at KDKR.org for our broadcast.


Family Album

Twins Noah and Loralai Lee won Patriotic Prince and Princess at chico fest Oct 20th. Contestants in the 3-4 yo age group at chico fest. Paris Laney, Noah Lee, Loralai Lee, and another lovely contestant.

940.210.1769 • WISE

FamilyMagazine.com

 

11


Family Album

Decatur Black baseball team after fall tournament.

Wise Pediatrics

940-626-4400 A Specialist for your children as they grow!

Leslie Hollis, MD

Board Certified in Pediatrics since 1999 Fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics

Accepting Most Insurances Call if you have any questions

609 Medical Center Dr., #2300 Decatur, Texas 76234 Attached to Wise Regional Hospital www.WisePediatrics.com

12

WISEFamilyMagazine.com • 940.210.1769

Stephen Starnes of NTKA-Bridgeport and his students that competed in the 2012 AKATO Karate Championship in Richardson, TX. on Oct. 27, 2012 bottom row... left to right; Harrison Oberg, Andy Bistko, Veronica Valdez, Matthew Bistko top row...left to right; Nikole Wright, Trey Horne, Krista Rickey and their instructor, Stephen Starnes.


WANTED Family Friendly Events for our December issue

Please give us the what, where, when, who and how much of the event as well as contact information. Please email your organization’s family friendly event to info@ wisefamilymagazine.com

Listing is Free!

If you are reading this, you’re probably not the only one!

Place your ad here and it will get read, too!

940.210.1769 Easy to see ads – delivered to prominent places. Call today and reserve your space in

940.210.1769 • WISE

FamilyMagazine.com

13


Exchange students to experience their first American Thanksgiving

T

he SHARE! High School Exchange Program has 185 students who will have the chance to spend a traditional Thanksgiving dinner with their American host families, composed of volunteer families throughout the Southwest. SHARE!’s international students are in America for five to ten months and celebrating traditional holidays like

Alisa made the apple pies for their Thanksgiving Day Celebration.

Thanksgiving is part of why students sign up to be an exchange student to the United States.  “Sitting down at a table laden with the famous turkey, stuffing, pumpkin pie and surrounded by family and friends is something that our students can only experience first-hand, not through television shows and movies”, says Yvette Coffman of SHARE!. “The host families and students both really enjoy it, and as a result they learn what cultural sharing is truly about,” she said. “Families often get as much out of it as they give to the students,” she added. Lyn Claus, a host mother in Spring, Texas said she and her family have hosted four exchange students since 2009 and when they celebrate Thanksgiving with international students it is great. Lyn includes her students in the preparation and teaches them how to make typical American Thanksgiving Day dishes. “The students cannot believe how

much food we make for just one Thanksgiving meal,” said Lyn. Since Thanksgiving is unique to the United States, Coffman said it is a perfect chance for host families and student to exchange cultural differences and learn how each celebrates holidays differently.  Claus and her family not only enjoy Thanksgiving with their students but Thanksgiving Day football games and Black Friday shopping the following day.  “They really seem to enjoy it and find it exciting”, she said.  If you would like to share your heart and home, have an interest in other cultures, an extra bed (students may share a room), SHARE! would like you to become a host family!  The SHARE! High School Exchange Program is seeking volunteer host families -with or without children-  (empty nesters and single adults make great host parents too!) to share their heart and their home, customs and culture with an international teen this coming spring semester.  And often these exchanges results in international lifelong friendships! All SHARE! students are carefully screened, speak English, have insurance, spending money and a desire to learn what it is like to live with an American family.  For more information, call Yvette Coffman at 800-941-3738 or visit sharesouthwest.org. ■

Alisa Schroeter of Germany (right) and Simona Mackova of Slovakia (left) celebrating Thanksgiving with their host mother, Lyn Claus (center).

As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them.  ~ John Fitzgerald Kennedy 14

WISEFamilyMagazine.com • 940.210.1769


Family Album

Jacoby & Jamie Gentry with their son’s Maverick and Courgar

It’s the growing season… and planted

inside every Woodhaven branch are people who make your banking experience a pleasure, whether you’re growing a business or a family. We’ve never had to work very hard at treating you like an individual — it just comes naturally. Visit one of our branches today.

Member FDIC Independent Locally Owned

www.woodhavenbank.com

Woodhaven National Bank 800 Hwy 287, Suite A Rhome • 817.638.5111 Woodhaven National Bank 6750 Bridge Street Fort Worth • 817.496.6700 Mansfield Community Bank 1700 E. Broad Street Mansfield • 817.473.5979 Ridglea Bank 3325 Fairfield Ave at Camp Bowie Fort Worth • 817.731.3361 Woodhaven Bank Northeast 4607 Colleyville Blvd. Colleyville • 817.656.7755 Mercantile Bank 2229 A Park Row Arlington • 817.277.2225 Woodhaven Bank 6301 N. Beach Street Fort Worth • 817.489.6500

940.210.1769 • WISE

FamilyMagazine.com

15


Family Album

Levi & Tatum Step in their Halloween costumes.

16

WISEFamilyMagazine.com • 940.210.1769


Life Skills

10 Qualities of a Gentleman

B

eing male does not guarantee a boy will grow up to be a gentleman and the current self-absorbed culture is not likely to model or promote the qualities of a gentleman. It is a process for a boy to become a man and develop into a gentleman. Parents invest a great deal of time and resources to develop their son’s academic, athletic, or artistic talent, with little or no thought as to what is required for him to mature into a gentleman. A gentleman understands that his appearance, behavior, and way of communicating provide others with valuable insight into his character. He knows that he did not acquire his true strength at the gym. Rather, he demonstrates true strength through his strong character and integrity. The traits of a gentleman include: A gentleman is generous with his time, wisdom, and resources. He willingly serves others and extends a hand to those in need. A gentleman possesses a positive outlook on life. His humor and consistent encouragement attract others to him. A gentleman is a lifelong learner. He maintains a teachable posture and embraces change for the better. A gentleman models civility in how he treats others. He demonstrates respect, restraint, and personal responsibility in all his interactions. He is honorable, and values and respects others. A gentleman is well-mannered and knows what is appropriate. He is able to navigate various social and professional settings with ease and proficiency. He embraces all people – those from other cultures, as well as individuals from various social and economic backgrounds. A gentleman possesses a strong work ethic. He takes pride in his labor and strives to give his very best. He is

trustworthy, loyal, and people speak well of him. A gentleman is confident. His posture and body language communicate a strong personal presence. A gentleman is well-dressed. He knows how to select clothing that is appropriate for any occasion and that will assist him in accomplishing his goals. He is well-groomed and practices good hygiene. He understands that his personal appearance - the way he chooses to dress, groom, and carry himself – opens doors to new opportunities. A gentleman is well-spoken and a generous listener. He knows how to effectively connect with others and communicate his message. A gentleman is known for his integrity. He is a man of his word and follows through with his commitments, whatever the cost. His actions reflect who he has chosen to be and are not based upon the opinions of others. Our society is a case in point for the need to embrace the understandable and, ultimately, achievable principles of being a gentleman. The art of being a gentleman is relevant for today, and it is accessible to every man - young and old. ■

Deborah King, AICI CIP Deborah King is President of Final Touch Finishing School, Inc. which she founded in 1989 in Seattle. As a certified image professional, with over 30 years of experience, she presents her programs nationally and internationally for youth and corporate clients. She is co-author of “Image Power” and “Executive Etiquette Power” and developer of several education tools. www.finaltouchschool.com.

The Logic of Grandchildren... My young grandson called the other day to wish me Happy Birthday. He asked me how old I was, and I told him, 62. My grandson was quiet for a moment, and then he asked, ”Did you start at 1?” A grandmother was telling her little granddaughter what her own childhood was like. “We used to skate outside on a pond. I had a swing made from a tire; it hung from a tree in our front yard. We rode our pony. We picked wild raspberries in the woods.” The little girl was wide-eyed, taking this all in. At last she said, “I sure wish I’d gotten to know you sooner!” 940.210.1769 • WISE

FamilyMagazine.com

17


I

n honor of Veterans’ Day Governor’s Ridge Retirement & Assisted Living in Decatur is featuring an interview with one of their current residents, Donald Brown, a 98-year old resident at the local community. Donald, a decorated WWII Veteran shares some very interesting details in the interview regarding that very trying time in the history of our great country. Following is the transcript of that interview conducted by Bob Bounds of HomeTown-TV for Wise County. You can view the view the entire three-part video interview by going to the Governor’s Ridge website at www.GovernorsRidge.com and clicking on the YouTube link there.

The interview excerpt:

Q: Donald you are wearing a vest with some interesting patches and metals, and as well your cap says you are a WWII veteran. Tell me about that? A: I was four years in the service, we trained in the United States then went overseas, we were there before D Day, General Patton had was with the troops in North Africa. Everyone was wondering what he was going to do in the “D” Day operation. I was actually in England when he made that famous speech in a little theater. That is was the actual speech that was portrayed in the movie “Patton”, he made that same speech to four other divisions, but had made it to the officers first. It was a salty speech address of course, and I have a little book that says about his speech, but it doesn’t say in it what I heard or impressed with, “when you attack the enemy turn on your fire power, and if that doesn’t make them run, fix your bayonets and start after them so and so’s”. Q; You have even met some presidents, going back to whom? A: I remember President Wilson’s death in 1918, when I was just a youngster. then the next one -- I had graduated from high school, I saw President Hoover. Then after that I went to school at Texas A&M, took a picture of Franklin Roosevelt when he was down there. And John Kennedy, I was working in Dallas at Lone Star Gas. He was coming to town. I saw Kennedy on Harwood when he turned on Main and I was at the corner when he turned and went by and I waved at him. it was a terrible time. I walked back by the library on the way to the office, and later heard that he had been shot. My brother was working at the FBI at the time in Dallas. He told me that there would be all kinds of theories going on, just like Lincoln, but there was no other persons involved but Oswarld. 18

WISEFamilyMagazine.com • 940.210.1769

Q: You have really seen some history and your time in the service, you served during a critical time in America and you folks are referred to as the greatest generation. A: Well I was involved involved in the invasion of Normandy, and I have this thing on my vest that represents serving at the invasion. Q: Have you had a chance to go back to Normandy? A: Yes, my second wife and I had a chance to go the 40th anniversary of D- Day, and the ceremony was at Utah Beach, which was the beach that I went in on. They were reviewing all the parades at the stands and there were eleven heads of state there, including President Ronald Regan and Nancy, Queen Elizabeth, Margaret Thatcher, President of France Mitterand and others. Q: What about coming up as a kid in Decatur, Texas? A: My mother and Dad had a farm down there north of Boyd on the river. That was where I was born, but I moved from there when I was 20 months old, they moved to Decatur in 1916. I started first grade here in Decatur in 1920, when I was six. I went on through high school, then went through college at Decatur Baptist College. One time while in high school, I saw Ameilia Airheart come over in her autogyro on her way out west and stopped at Ranger, TX and filled up at our Lone Star gasoline plant and her flight was written in the history of our company. Q: When she flew over, did she tip her wings? A: Laugh, all I know is where she came over, on the high school grounds, and she was just south of it and old Sammy Renshaw lived down there and I told him that she flew over their house. Q: Were you the Decatur Eagles back then? A: Yes, and I was number 8 on the football team. Q: You moved from the farm, we can hardly call you a city slicker here in Decatur A: Well, my dad was a school teacher. Then he became a rural mail carrier. My father went White House to the mail carriers convention and met saw President Hoover in 1932. Q: You have a private apt here, but you have your own privacy and I believe I saw you at bingo… A: (Chuckle)…yes and I won one game…I’ve been amazed about this place. How you can assemble such a nice group of people and give such good service. I was over a department of 110 people and I know how hard it is to do the job right and they have done that here -- and they take care of you and everything works! ■


THE PERKS OF A SIMPLIFIED HOME

A

4 Treasures Gained From De-cluttering

lmost every home owner I know talks passionately about wanting to simplify and slow down, and truly there are a host of pathways to get there. So what stops us from taking that first step? Maybe it’s that we haven’t first fully explored the payoffs for simplifying. In Organized Simplicity (2010), expert Tsh Oxenreider explains that in addition to gaining freed up storage, there are all sorts of additional perks from tossing out needless stuff. The Big Payoff The following are four side effects of simplifying she mentions in the book: 1. More Time for Others. A home filled with lots of stuff can often leave us feeling unfulfilled. For example, a home high in square footage is also high in maintenance. Getting behind in housework can mean less time for social connections or entertaining. In contrast, by streamlining and living with less, we are rewarded with more time for those things which matter most. Oxenreider says “It’s a bummer when being responsible means being chained to your stuff and your schedules, instead of enjoying relationships in a slower-paced way.” 2. Improved Health. Simplifying allows the focus to be on what is most important, including health. When the objects we own work for us instead of the other way around, suddenly home becomes a haven. Cluttered lives filled with excess can take a toll on mental and physical health because of the stress created by clutter. Too many extracurricular activities and long work hours can lead to compromised health as well. Oxenreider reminds that when we feel stressed, we often lose sleep, and “Not enough sleep means an increased chance of depression, weight gain, high blood pressure, and perpetual grouchiness.” 3. Financial Well-Being. This is an obvious and glorious side effect of more simplistic living. With less stuff to store, water, maintain, and buy, we are rewarded with happier wallets. De-cluttering has a domino effect. A de-cluttered kitchen is easier to clean, more inviting to cook in, and saves us money because we are more likely to want to eat in. Less eating out will likely mean consuming less calories, and skinnier versions of ourselves may lead to savings in healthcare costs. 4. It’s Environmentally-friendly. When our households have less stuff, we simply don’t need as much space. Less space means lower utilities, which is both financially savvy and ecologically sound. We will use less electricity, less gas, and less water to keep our places running. Ideas for De-cluttering Start de-cluttering where it will help the most. Self-proclaimed

clean freak blogger Clean Mama says if it’s your kitchen that is up for grabs, start there. “Too many clothes that don’t fit or aren’t your style anymore? Start with your closet. Stepped on a Lego for the last time? Start with the kids’ toys.” She says successful de-cluttering leads you to de-clutter other spaces. Don’t buy new organizing stuff. Clean Mama recommends using what you already have to get organized so you aren’t adding more objects to the mix. She says “Re-purpose a basket or box to organize your magazines in lieu of buying a new magazine basket.” Ask these 10 questions. Oxenreider recommends these 10 questions to assess what stays and what goes: 1.    Is it something I use regularly? 2.    If not, do I love it? 3.    Am I keeping it out of obligation? 4.    Am I holding on to it because I think I should love it? 5.    Am I saving this just in case? 6.    Do I have multiples of the same thing? 7.    Could something else I own do the same job? 8.    Am I holding on to a broken item to fix one day? 9.    Is this item worth the time cleaning/storing it? 10.  Could I use this space for something else? Think “small chunks.” You don’t have to save the world in day. Professional organizer Samantha Buck suggests setting a timer for yourself. “I like to set a timer for 30 minutes and work fast as I can to complete de-cluttering projects. You’ll be amazed at how much you can get done by using the clock to challenge yourself.” Pay attention to what you toss. Organizing guru and author of When Organizing Isn’t Enough (2008), Julie Morgenstern, says “The process of throwing things out forces you to recognize what your attachment is.” Noticing will help you limit what you bring home so it won’t be necessary to invest in more storage items (or a bigger house!). We have so much to gain from losing the unnecessary! Everything truly meaningful will suddenly come into greater focus as the things that don’t matter grow dim. ■

Michele Ranard, M.Ed. Michele Ranard has a husband, two children, and a master’s in counseling.

940.210.1769 • WISE

FamilyMagazine.com

19


Family Album

Blase Gaona at UNT game

Payton Millican dressed up for Halloween Daughter of Terry Millican (Ponder Granddaughter of Janice & Roy Millican (Decatur)

Decatur Women’s Health Center Who do you TRUST

with your OB/GYN care?

Your health and well-being as a woman are our concern. We offer a full range of obstetrical and gynecological care. Our emphasis is on making You feel comfortable, confident and reassured.

Douglas Kyle, M.D.

Call today to schedule your next appointment.

940-627-4216

1713 S. FM 51, Suite 101 • Decatur, Texas 76234

20

WISEFamilyMagazine.com • 940.210.1769


Style For Less!

4 easy ways to update your wardrobe for $25 or less way to extend the life of your wardrobe. For example, a bold red cardigan is great year-round: in vogue for fall, festive for the holiday season, and cheery over dresses and tanks during warmer months. If you have $25, you can find a colorful, comfy cardigan that will brighten up an office outfit, or keep you chic and cozy when paired with jeans on the weekends.

(BPT) - When you look in your closet, are you inspired by what you find, or has your personal style become bland? If you want to update your wardrobe, you don’t need a complete overhaul and a bottomless budget. By adding a few key pieces you can instantly breathe life into your existing collection of clothes - and the best part is you can do it for $25 or less. Here are four must-have items that can help make any woman’s wardrobe look modern, fun and trendy: Scarves: More than a simple neck accessory, a scarf is perhaps the ultimate fashion-meets-function wardrobe essential. Not only does it keep you warm on cold days and protect you from the sun when it’s hot, it’s also a beautiful accessory that livens up any outfit. Tend to shy away from bright clothing? Scarves are an ideal way to introduce a pop of color, especially if you typically wear black or gray. Rich hues like deep purple, evergreen and royal blue are popular during cooler months. Wear a scarf like a shawl, draped around your shoulders; tie it loose around the neck for a relaxed, airy look; or knot it tight for a tailored appearance. Plus, you can find scarves virtually everywhere for as little as $10.

Jeans: A great pair of jeans goes with anything - from a structured career jacket to a slouchy sweater. If you purchased your last pair of jeans years ago and only wear them when you know you aren’t leaving the house, you’ll love how a new pair can revitalize your look. Skip the $200 boutique jeans and opt for fashionable and affordable options from Signature by Levi Strauss & Co., available at Walmart. For less than $20, you’ll find the perfect style to fit your body type - from skinny jeans to mid rise boot cut and even options for women with curvy figures. For the ultimate in comfort and style, try the Simply Stretch Pull On Skinny jeans that feature a slimming pull-on waist band and high stretch denim to shape and smooth any figure. Jewelry: Add a splash of personality with a statement piece of jewelry. Big beaded necklaces or long intricate chains are great go-to pieces when you want to add a little pizzazz to an outfit. Silver is the on-trend metal this year, spotted on the runways of Fashion Week. Costume jewelry has never been more popular, giving today’s woman an affordable way to indulge. If you like to craft, you can save even more by creating one of a kind pieces yourself with supplies from your local craft or bead store. With $25 you have multiple ways to update your wardrobe so you look great all year long. From the perfect jeans to classic tops to funky accessories, your closet will never be boring again.■

Cardigan: It’s easy to update any outfit when you have a colorful cardigan on hand. Whether your personal style leans conservative or you prefer a more creative approach to dressing, a cardigan is a versatile complement to any outfit. Solid colors never go out of style, so adding one or two to your closet is a great 940.210.1769 • WISE

FamilyMagazine.com

21


Fun & Games

Across

4 Famous holiday berry 5 Bird of this holiday 6 First Thanksgiving guests 11 Crop picking time 13 Indians called it Maize 14 Early mattress stuffing 16 Early Thanksgiving state 17 Pilgrim destination 18 Landed at Plymouth 22 Rock Pilgrims landed on 23 Pilgrims came from here 24 Horn of plenty 25 Day for counting blessings

22

WISEFamilyMagazine.com • 940.210.1769

Down

1 Your relatives 2 Good pie on holidays 3 Pilgrims ship 7 Thanksgiving month 8 Inside roasted turkey 9 Do with a tractor 10 Supper 12 After Wednesday 14 Giving to others 15 Crack and eat these 19 Kind of squash 20 Count these and be grateful 21 Pilgrims sought freedom of


Name

Wise Merchants Association Membership Benefits The Wise Merchants Association was founded in June 2009 by Kim Tinkham to help local businesses weather the recession. The goal of this Association is to allow merchants to share ideas, problems and solutions with other merchants. Our Association meetings are structured to provide information, education, and motivation for business owners, as well as networking opportunities. We believe in having local merchants support each other and in keeping shopping dollars local. Our Association does not compete with the local Chambers, and actually partners with them on occasion for special events. We are a unique Association with the only goal of providing business owners information they need to grow their business! Membership Benefits: • Motivational speakers • Training • Informal meetings • Networking opportunities • Excellent sponsors • Supportive members • Business owner focused

Additional Business Benefits: • Highly recognized by the Wise County Clerk and Wise County Attorney • Recommended by many local organizations • Discounted advertising in Wise Family Today Magazine • Discounts on member’s products or services

Our meetings have included training for business owners in  marketing, networking, social media, business goal setting, sales training, and business etiquette. We also have informal, after-hours Mixers that are a great opportunity to bring guests. Thank you to our members and we encourage you to take advantage of all of your membership benefits. If you are not a member, we invite you to join us at www.wisemerchants.org!

Company

Website

Ruby & Michael Carreiro A Day Away Retreat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.adayawayretreat.com Cathy Morris . . . . . . . . . . Aesthetic Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.TexasCosmeticDoc.com Kathy Redwine . . . . . . . . Aflac . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.aflac.com Jim Tumlinson . . . . . . . . . All-American Water . . . . . . . . . www.allamericanwatersofteners.com LaDonna Koerner . . . . . . Avon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.youravon.com/lkoerner Greg Roberts . . . . . . . . . . AWL Home Inspections . . . . . . . . . . www.awlhomeinspections.com Keitha Story-Stephenson DS .BlueSky Wellness Center . . . . . . . . . www.blueskywellnesscenter.com Debbie Johnson Crall . . . Boot Camp Academy 101 . . . . . . . . www.bootcampacademy101.com Laura Marshall . . . . . . . . . Bright Ideas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.brightideastx.com Jack Cannon . . . . . . . . . . . Cannon Realty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.cannonrealty.net Ruth Bucher . . . . . . . . . . Celestine Therapy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.celestinetherapy.com Cher Tilghman . . . . . . . . Cher Realty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.CherRealty.com Christi Shields . . . . . . . . . Christi Shields Accounting Michael Dunham . . . . . . . Computer Rhino . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.computerrhino.com Cut & Grow . . . . . . . . . . Cut & Grow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . cutandgrow.com Ida Mae Burnett . . . . . . . Decatur EDC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.decatur-edc.com Glenn Walker . . . . . . . . . . Decatur Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.decaturmusic.com Deborah Reynolds . . . . . . DediKated Resource . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.dedikatedresource.com Teresa Littlejohn Fanning Designs by Tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . designsbytree.com / vin-trad.com Don Dixon . . . . . . . . . . . . Dixon Fine Woodworking Sandy Hall . . . . . . . . . . . . Dinners on Demand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.dinnersondemand.biz Karen Turner . . . . . . . . . . Double K BBQ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.doublekbbq.com William Shea . . . . . . . . . . Everprint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . everprint.biz Chris Miller . . . . . . . . . . . Farmers Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.chrismillerinsurance.com Dora Trejo . . . . . . . . . . . . Farmers Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.chrismillerinsurance.com Deborah King . . . . . . . . . Final Touch Finishing School . . . . . . . . . www.finaltouchschool.com Phillip K Flusche . . . . . . . Flusche Auto Repair Susan Boston . . . . . . . . . . Gold and Silver Perfection . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.numisnetwork.com/ goldandsilverperfection Karen St. John . . . . . . . . . Hampton Inn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.hampton.com Dave Jackson . . . . . . . . . . Jackson Excavation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.jacksonexcavation.com Jack Bullion . . . . . . . . . . . Juice Plus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.jackjuiceplus.com Bonnie Kohnert . . . . . . . . K-Double-K Promotional Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . kdoublek.com Lynn Self . . . . . . . . . . . . . Karl Klement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.klementdecator.com Deborah L. Mann . . . . . . Mann Refrigeration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.mannair.com Laura M Shaffer . . . . . . . . Mary Kay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.marykay.com/LauraShaffer Lisa Chapman Brown . . . Mary Kay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.marykay.com/lbrown Melissa McAlister . . . . . . Mary Kay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.marykay.com/mmcalister John Lanier . . . . . . . . . . . Parker Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.parkerpropertiestexas.com Kathy Fisher . . . . . . . . . . Parker Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.parkerpropertiestexas.com Sherry Williams Layton . . Parker Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.parkerpropertiestexas.com Misti Pearman . . . . . . . . . Pearman Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.pearmanins.com Maria Carrillo . . . . . . . . . Photography by Maria . . . . . . . . . . . . www.photographybymaria.com Peggy Powell Lampkin . . . Powell Insurance Concepts Dennis Emett . . . . . . . . . Pre-Paid Legal . . . . . . . . . . . www.prepaidlegal.com/hub/dennisemett Karla Maxwell . . . . . . . . . Premier Designs Jewelry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.premierdesigns.com Robin Miller . . . . . . . . . . Robin Miller Tax Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.robinmillertax.com Brenda C. Morgan . . . . . . Sagebrush Steakhouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.stagecoachsteaks.com Bandy Hicks . . . . . . . . . . Scentsy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.scentedchick.com Suzanne Smith . . . . . . . . . Smith Investment Group Debra Smith . . . . . . . . . . Smith Seminars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.smithseminars.com Cary Bohn . . . . . . . . . . . . State Farm Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.carybohn.com Steven M. Williams . . . . . Steven M. Williams, Attorney . . . . . . . . . www.stevenmwilliams.com Shawn Mitchell . . . . . . . . Swimming Instructor Mickey Doyle . . . . . . . . . . Synrge Marketing Strategies . . www.SynrgeMarketingStrategies.com Tammy Kelly . . . . . . . . . . Tammy Kelly Photography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.tammykelly.com Kathy O’Dell Hughes . . . Tastefully Simple and Celebrating Home Dawn Taylor . . . . . . . . . . Taylor Made Graphics & Signs . . . . . . . www.taylormadegraphics.org Texas Insurance Agency . . Texas Insurance Agency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.texasins.net Debi Porter . . . . . . . . . . . The Edge in HR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.theedgeinhr.com Kayla Prock . . . . . . . . . . . Timeless Graphics & Signs Matt Kramer . . . . . . . . . . Voice Mapping For The Life You Want . . . . . www.mkvoicemap.com Debbie Males . . . . . . . . . . Warner-Radio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.warner-radio.com Paula Null . . . . . . . . . . . . Willow House . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.paulanull.willowhouse.com James Stainton . . . . . . . . Wise County Attorney . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.wisecountylaw.com Sherry Lemon . . . . . . . . . Wise County Clerk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.wisecounty.org Tayler Ponder . . . . . . . . . . Wise Family Magazine . . . . . . . . . . . www.wisefamilymagazine.com Valerie Dickerson . . . . . . . Workforce Solutions-North Central Texas . . . . . . . www.dfwjobs.com

940.210.1769 • WISE

FamilyMagazine.com

23


Wise Family Magazine November 2012  

Wise Family Magazine inspires parents, motivates kids and celebrates life in Wise County, Texas.

Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you