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This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. Ready-Ed Publications

Title: Australian History Series – Book 3 Community and Remembrance © 2011 Ready-Ed Publications Printed in Australia Author: Lindsay Marsh Illustrator: Melinda Brezmen, Alison Mutton

Acknowledgements i. Clip art images have been obtained from Microsoft Design Gallery Live and are used under the terms of the End User License Agreement for Microsoft Word 2000. Please refer to www.microsoft.com/permission. ii. Corel Corporation collection, 1600 Carling Ave., Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1Z 8R7. iii. istockphotos

Copyright Notice The purchasing educational institution and its staff have the right to make copies of the whole or part of this book, beyond their rights under the Australian Copyright Act 1968 (the Act), provided that: 1.

The number of copies does not exceed the number reasonably required by the educational institution to satisfy its teaching purposes;

2.

Copies are made only by reprographic means (photocopying), not by electronic/digital means, and not stored or transmitted;

3.

Copies are not sold or lent;

4.

Every copy made clearly shows the footnote, ‘Ready-Ed Publications’.

Any copying of this book by an educational institution or its staff outside of this blackline master licence may fall within the educational statutory licence under the Act. The Act allows a maximum of one chapter or 10% of the pages of this book, whichever is the greater, to be reproduced and/or communicated by any educational institution for its educational purposes provided that

educational institution (or the body that administers it) has given a remuneration notice to Copyright Agency Limited (CAL) under Act. For details of the CAL licence for educational institutions contact: Copyright Agency Limited Level 19, 157 Liverpool Street Sydney NSW 2000 Telephone: (02) 9394 7600 Facsimile: (02) 9394 7601 E-mail: info@copyright.com.au Reproduction and Communication by others Except as otherwise permitted by this blackline master licence or under the Act (for example, any fair dealing for the purposes of study, research, criticism or review) no part of this book may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, communicated or transmitted in any form or by any means without prior written permission. All inquiries should be made to the publisher at the address below.

Published by:

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ISBN: 978 1 86397 822 4 2


Contents

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. Teachers' Notes National Curriculum Links

Section 1: LOcal Indigenous Groups Who Lived in Australia First? Teachers' Notes Activity Human Fossils Teachers' Notes Activity Indigenous Artefacts Teachers' Notes Activity Local Dreaming Stories Teachers' Notes Activity Local Language Groups Teachers' Notes Activity 1-2

Section 2: Local Changes and Continuities Early Colonial Australia Teachers' Notes Activity The First Local Colony Teachers' Notes Activity Exploration and Transportation Teachers' Notes Activity Local Transport Teachers' Notes Activity How Schools Have Changed Teachers' Notes Activity Parks and Gardens Teachers' Notes Activity Entertainment Teachers' Notes Activity

4 4

6 7 8 9

10 11 12 13 14 15-16

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Local Diversity Teachers' Notes Activity The Chinese Teachers' Notes Activity 1-2

36 37

38 39-40

Section 4: Special Days, symbols and emblems

Australia Day Teachers' Notes Activity ANZAC Day Teachers' Notes Activity Sorry Day Teachers' Notes Activity The Coat of Arms Teachers' Notes Activity Floral and Faunal Emblems Teachers' Notes Activity The Flag and Other Emblems Teachers' Notes Activity The National Flag Teachers' Notes Activity The Australian Aboriginal Flag Teachers' Notes Activity The Torres Strait Islander Flag Teachers' Notes Activity The Eureka Stockade Flag Teachers' Notes Activity Emblem and Symbol Box Memory Game

42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63

Section 3: Development and Character of the Local Community Religion and Beliefs Teachers' Notes 30 Activity 1-2 34-35

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Teachers’ Notes

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. Community and Remembrance is written for students living in Australia who are studying History in Year 3. It is divided into four clear sections which connect to the National Curriculum. •

The first section gives students the opportunity to examine Indigenous Australians and use sources to understand where they came from and why they place so much importance on country and place. Students will identify a local indigenous language group to help them understand and develop an appreciation of local indigenous culture.

The second section encourages students to trace important changes and continuities in their local area, dating back to early colonial Australia. They will investigate local changes and continuities in relation to work, transportation, education, parks and gardens and entertainment.

The third section is entitled Development and Character of the Local Community. The activity pages in this section have been designed to help students explore the cultural diversity of their local area and assess how different cultures have influenced Australian communities in relation to religion, beliefs, architecture and festivals.

The fourth and final section of this book allows students to identify and discuss the origins and importance of special days celebrated and recognised by all Australians, and explore local and national symbols and emblems.

The activities in this book have been carefully constructed to help students develop their historical knowledge and skills. Students will be asked to develop historical inquiry questions, identify, analyse and compare a range of sources, sequence parts of the past, use appropriate terminology and create charts, models, mindmaps, pictures, stories, and presentations to explain history.

National Curriculum Links Historical Knowledge and Understanding ACHHK060 – The importance of country and place to Aboriginal and/ or Torres Strait Islander Peoples who belong to a local area. ACHHK061 – One important example of change and one important example of continuity over time in the local community, region or state/territory; for example, in relation to the areas of transport, work, education, natural and built environments, entertainment, daily life.

ACHHK063 – Days and weeks celebrated or commemorated in Australia and the importance of symbols and emblems. Historical Skills ACHHS065 & ACHHS066 – Chronology, terms and concepts. ACHHS067 – Historical questions and research. ACHHS068 – Analysis and use of sources. ACHHS069 – Perspectives and interpretations.

Go to www.readyed.net ACHHK062 – The role that people of diverse backgrounds have played in the development and character of the local community.

4

ACHHS070 & ACHHS071 – Explanation and communication.


Section 1:Publications' This is a Ready-Ed Local Indigenous Groups book preview.

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Teachers' Notes

Who Lived in Australia First?

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. • Ask your students who they think are the traditional owners of the land and why. (Indigenous Australians because they were the first people to live in Australia.) Ask students to record this on their activity sheet. • Ask your students if they know how Indigenous Australians arrived in Australia. (It is believed that they travelled on foot from Asia to Australia across a land bridge which is now underwater.) Ask students to illustrate this on their activity sheets. • Ask students to suggest when Indigenous Australians arrived in Australia. Record all suggestions on the board. Explain that we are still not certain exactly when they arrived in Australia, but we think that it was between 40,000 and 60,000 years ago. Ask them to record this information on their sheets. • Brainstorm as a class how we find out about the past. Ask them how we know that Indigenous Australians lived in Australia first and how we know approximately how long they have lived on the land for. Record all suggestions on the board. (Human fossils that have been dug up at indigenous burial sites and have been tested and identified as belonging to indigenous people and as being up to 40,000 years old, rock engravings and paintings found at indigenous rock shelters, remains of meals, such as oyster and cockle shells found at midden sites.) • Ask students to label the historical sources on their sheets, indicate what type of sources they are and draw one of their own sources. (All primary sources.) They could also say at what sites the sources were likely to have been found.

Extension Activities:

• Discuss why we can’t be certain about the date that Indigenous Australians arrived and why there are differing opinions about what happened in the past. (Tests done on artefacts and fossils are becoming more advanced and more accurate, tests vary, new fossils and artefacts are being found all the time, there may be artefacts and fossils that we haven’t found which date further back than we think, artefacts can be damaged etc.) • Ask students to find out if any fossils or artefacts have been found in their local area. They could bring a picture of the historical source in to class to show others. The sources may indicate when Indigenous Australians inhabited their local area. • Set up sand trays around the classroom to simulate an archeological dig. • Set up trays around the classroom to simulate a midden site. Cover stones, bones and shells with leaves, soil and twigs. • Discuss the importance of the land to Indigenous Australians, who have been here for so long and have a very strong sense of belonging. • Take students to local rock shelters to see rock engravings and paintings, or to museums which tell them about local indigenous people.

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Section 1: Local Indigenous Groups


Activity

Who Lived in Australia First?

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. Write

The traditional owners of Australia are I________________ A______________ because __________________________ ________________________________________________ .

Draw

 How did they get here?

 When did they arrive?__________________________________________  We know approximately when Indigenous Australians arrived because of historical sources. Label the sources that help to tell us about the original inhabitants of Australia, then draw one of your own.

© 2005 Dr Ellen K. Rudolph www.drellenrudolph.com

Name of source: ______________ ___________________________

Name of source: ______________ ___________________________

This is a primary/secondary source.

This is a primary/secondary source.

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Name of source: ______________ ___________________________

Name of source: ______________ ___________________________

This is a primary/secondary source.

This is a primary/secondary source.

Section 1: Local Indigenous Groups

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Teachers' Notes

Human Fossils

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. • As a class define fossil. (Traces of an organism from the past, such as a bone or a shell.)

• Draw students’ attention to the pictures of the human fossils on the activity sheet. Explain that the first picture is of a human fossil known as the Mungo Man. He was found in 1974 in Lake Mungo in New South Wales, Australia. He is identified as being an Indigenous Australian. Experts believe he is 40,000 years old. Ask the students to complete the information on him. • Discuss with students how this human fossil not only tells us that Indigenous Australians inhabited Australia at least 40,000 years ago but it also tells us about indigenous traditions. The body was sprinkled with red ochre (naturally tinted clay) which was a traditional indigenous burial practice. Ask the students to create this effect with crayon. • Tell the students that the Mungo Man is locked in a vault at the Mungo National Park. This vault can only be opened if two keys are used. One key is controlled by archaeologists, the other by local Indigenous Australians. Ask the students to cut out the flaps around Mungo Man to create a vault. For fun, they can create two keys from plasticine. Discuss why it is so important to protect and preserve

these fossils and therefore control access to them.

• Draw students’ attention to the second picture. Explain that this is Mungo Lady who was found in 1969 in Lake Mungo. She is believed to be between 40,000 and 68,000 years old, making her the oldest fossil in Australia.

• Her remains are not in good condition, because it is believed that after she died, her family burned and smashed her body so that she would not come back to haunt them. This tells us that the indigenous clan that she belonged to believed in spirits. The shaded area indicates the parts of her skull that have been dug up. Ask students to fill out the museum card for her. • Locate on a map where Lake Mungo is in relation to the students’ local area. Look at the fossils found in the students’ local community, region, state or territory. They can find a picture of one of these fossils and write a sentence about it on their activity sheets. Each student could be given a different fossil to look at and take turns in presenting their fossil to the class. This will help students understand who lived in their local area first and that they arrived a long time ago and had a special relationship with the land.

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Section 1: Local Indigenous Groups


Human Fossils

Activity

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Fill out the information for each fossil and create a vault for Mungo Man.

fold

fold

Name: ________________ Age:

________________

Found: ________________

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Mungo_Man.jpg

Name:________________________ Age:_ ________________________ Found:________________________ Distinguishing features:___________ ____________________________

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My Fossil

 Write one sentence about your fossil.

________________________________________________

________________________________________________ Section 1: Local Indigenous Groups

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Teachers' Notes

Indigenous Artefacts

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. • Tell students that indigenous artefacts are objects from the past that have been made or modified by humans. Artefacts are therefore different to fossils. Artefacts help us to understand the way that the traditional owners of the land lived and help us to appreciate their relationship with the land. Artefacts are primary pieces of evidence. • Brainstorm as many indigenous artefacts as possible with the class. (Boomerangs, spears, stone axes, woomeras, coolamons, digging sticks, fishing nets, clap sticks, bullroarers, paint brushes made of human hair and sticks, etc.) Ask the students to write the word artefact in the rocks. • Tell the students that most Indigenous Australians were huntergatherers, which means that they survived by hunting and gathering their food from the land. This means that they relied on the land to survive and believed that it was precious and sacred. Discuss the kind of food that they would have

gathered and hunted, and discuss the tools (artefacts) that they used to gather and hunt. Discuss how they had to move around a lot as different foods were available at different times of the year in certain areas of the land.

• Ask the students to complete the matching activity on their sheets by matching the foods to the artefacts. (Answers: A boomerang was used to hunt kangaroos, possums and birds. A spears was used to hunt fish. A coolamon was used to gather water. A digging stick was used to gather seeds, vegetables, fruit and witchetty grubs. A fishing net was used to gather crabs, oysters and turtles.)

Extension Activity: • Take students to local museums where indigenous artefacts are displayed. An Elder may be available to talk about how indigenous people used the land as a resource.

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Section 1: Local Indigenous Groups


Indigenous Artefacts

Activity

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Write the word artefact in the rocks.

 Match the gathering and hunting tools (artefacts) with the foods. Boomerang

Spear

Coolamon

Digging Stick

Fishing Net

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Teachers' Notes

Local Dreaming Stories

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. • Explain to the students that the term Dreaming (or Dreamtime) refers to stories passed on from one generation to another through dance, music, storytelling and art.

• The Dreaming stories are about the Earth’s creation. They tell stories of Ancestral Beings or Spirits moving around the Earth in human form creating animals, plants, rocks and other forms of the land that we know today. The Spirits are then believed to have transformed into stars, rocks, trees, watering holes and other objects. These are regarded as sacred by Indigenous Australians.

Indigenous Australian's way of life, beliefs and practices.

• Alternatively they can explain the relationship that Indigenous Australians have with the land through drawing.

• The Dreaming helps us to understand the unique relationship that Indigenous Australians had with the land as they believed that it was sacred and should be looked after. • Read some local Dreaming stories to the children or let them listen to some at 4www.dreamtime.net.au/ main.htm Some of these stories will relate to their local area. You may be able to invite a local Elder into the school to talk about the Dreaming and its significance in the local area. • Ask the students to explain a local Dreaming story in picture form on their sheets. The best way to do this might be through a storyboard or a sequence of pictures. Tell them that local Dreaming stories tell us a lot about the past. They tell us about

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Section 1: Local Indigenous Groups


Local Dreaming Stories

Activity

 Explain a local Dreaming story by drawing.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.

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Dreamtime

 What my local Dreaming story tells me:

________________________________________________

________________________________________________ Section 1: Local Indigenous Groups

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Teachers' Notes

Local Language Groups

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. Sheet 1

• Explain that indigenous families who travelled to Australia joined together to form bands. Bands would join together to form clans. Clans could consist of as many as 500 people. Clans spoke the same language and were known as language groups. Some clans spoke the language of other clans who lived nearby. Before colonisation, there were over 250 different language groups in Australia. Today there are a lot less and many are in danger of being extinct. • As a class, identify some indigenous language groups in your local area. • Students can choose one language group to research further in groups or one language group can be studied as a class. • Ask students to record whether their chosen language group is extinct or is still spoken. • Ask students to find out the name of the clan who spoke their chosen language group and any nearby clans who they associated with. • Ask students to try to find out the

clan band family

words for: hair, eye, kangaroo, tree and bird in their chosen indigenous language.

Sheet 2

• Ask students to find out where their language group first settled. This will have affected how they lived and what they ate. For example, language groups on the coast would have mainly survived off fish and would have spent a lot of time in makeshift canoes and relied on the ocean/river for trade as well as food. Language groups who lived inland would have had a different diet and different contacts. • Ask students to find out what relations were like between their language group and the colonisers. There may have been some famous battles between them which they can document. • Students can record one of their chosen language group's beliefs. (For example: the Noongar people of Perth believed that a serpent called the Wagyl created the Swan River and in return for this gift, they became the custodians of the land.) • Students can create the profile of a famous member of their chosen language group or of another local well-known Indigenous Australian. (For example: Yagan was a wellknown member of the Noongar language group.)

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Section 1: Local Indigenous Groups


Activity

Local Language Groups 1

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Some indigenous language groups in my local area are:

____________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________

 My chosen language group is:

____________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________

 Is this language still spoken or extinct?____________________________  My language group belonged to a clan known as:

____________________________________________________________

 Nearby clans were: ____________________________________________ 

These are the words for:

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Activity

Local Language Groups 2

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Where did your chosen language group first settle?

_______________________________________________________________

 How did their location affect the way that they lived and what they ate?

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

 What were their relations like with the colonisers?

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

 Write down one of their beliefs.

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

 Create a profile of a well-known member of the language group. Name: Famous for:

.................................................................................. ..................................................................................

Other information: ..................................................................................

..................................................................................

..................................................................................

Go to www.readyed.net Draw a picture of the person who you have chosen. 16

Section 1: Local Indigenous Groups


Section 2:Publications' This is a Ready-Ed Localbook Changes and Continuities preview.

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Teachers' Notes

Early Colonial Australia

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. • Help the students to sequence key changes in early colonial Australia by drawing lines to match the dates with the events. The dates are in order. Read out the information below to help them complete the task step by step. After, they can shade the information relating to their state or territory.

Background Information

18

The First Fleet consisted of eleven ships. The ships set sail from Portsmouth, England in May 1787. The ships are said to have transported 750 convicts, 299 marines and their family members, 269 crewmen and 14 officials safely to the shores of Botany Bay in New South Wales, Australia. The fleet was commanded by Captain Arthur Phillip.

It took the ships nearly nine months to make the journey. They arrived in January 1788.

Captain Phillip declared that Botany Bay was too open and lacked fresh water and fertile soil for it to be established as a colony. So the fleet travelled 12 kilometres north and settled in Sydney Cove, Port Jackson on 26th January 1788. This date is remembered and celebrated every year on Australia Day.

In March 1788 Governor Phillip sent a small party to Norfolk Island, 1,268 kilometres east of Australia to create a second colony.

The Second Fleet, carrying mainly convicts and much needed supplies, arrived in 1790. This became known as the Death Fleet as many of the convicts arrived too ill to work and help develop the colony.

The Third Fleet consisted of eleven ships and arrived in 1791. The ships carried convicts, military personnel and notable people to fill important positions.

The first ‘free settlers’ (people who chose to live in Australia) arrived in 1793.

The first Tasmanian colony was established in 1803.

The first Queensland colony was established in 1824.

The first Australian Capital Territory colony was established in 1824.

The first Western Australian colony was established 1829.

The first Victorian colony was established 1835.

The first South Australian colony was established 1836.

The first Northern Territory colony was established 1869.

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Activity

Early Colonial Australia

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' January 1788 book preview. ď ą Use lines to match the dates with the events. The dates are in order.

Tasmanian colony established.

26th January 1788

First Fleet arrived in Botany Bay.

March 1788

Queensland colony established.

1790

Northern Territory colony established.

1791

First colony established in Sydney Cove in Port Jackson.

1793

Australian Capital Territory colony established.

1803 1824 1824

South Australian colony established. Second colony established in Norfolk Island. Second Fleet arrived.

1829 Third Fleet arrived.

1835 1836

Victorian colony established. Western Australian colony established.

1869 to www.readyed.net Go Free settlers arrived. Section 2: Local Changes and Continuities

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Teachers' Notes

The First Local Colony

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. • Draw students’ attention to the pattern of colonisation in their local community, region, state or territory.

• Ask the students to place the word 'continuity' beside a job which still exists in their local community today.

• Ask them to write underneath the colonist who established the first colony in their local area, for example, Captain James Stirling.

• Ask the students to draw and label a job which existed in colonial times in their local area but does not exist today or is not as popular today. Example: whalers (stopped in 1979 because of changing attitudes towards these animals), cameleers (due to developments in transport), bushranging (died out in the 1900s, as more police, improvements in rail transport and communication technology made it difficult to avoid being captured). Tell the students that these are examples of change.

• Ask them to lightly shade the area where they live on the map. • Ask them to write inside the map the name of the first colony in their area, for example, Swan River Colony. • Ask them to name who lived in the colony. For example, was it home to convicts or free settlers? • Raise the question, “How did the colonists in the local area make a living?” Tell them that the location of the colony would have played a large part in determining employment. For example, if the colony was on the coast, whaling, sealing, pearl and oyster farming and fishing might have been the main industries. If the colony was not on the coast, agriculture and mining may have been the main industries. Ask them to draw and label three ways that people would have been employed in the colony in their local area.

• Explain that during times of war in Australia, men and women, regardless of where they lived in Australia, undertook new jobs. Many men served in the wars as soldiers and many women worked in factories.

Extension Activity: • Students can locate sources which record what was said about their local colony and identify what relations were like between the colonists and Indigenous Australians.

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20

Section 2: Local Changes and Continuities


Activity

The First Local Colony

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' Write! book preview. Name of colony:

________________________________ Home to: ________________________

ď ą Draw and label how people made a living in this colony.

Change ď ą Draw and label a job which existed years ago but doesn't exist today.

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21


Teachers' Notes

Exploration and Transportation

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. •

Ask students how early colonists in their local area would have explored the land (on foot, by horse and by makeshift boats). Ask them to record their suggestions on the sheet.

Ask the students how we can be sure about these early methods of transportation used for exploration. (Primary sources: pictures of explorers on their horses and in boats and written records such as diary entries.) Ask them to look at the two sources provided on their sheets and write next to each one what it tells them about early transportation and exploration methods. The students can then label the sources 'primary' or 'secondary'.

Explain that exploring the land on foot and by makeshift boats was very dangerous and that many colonists lost their lives and suffered hardships on their travels. Some were helped by Indigenous Australians who had endured the harsh conditions for years. They helped them find food and survive extremes of temperatures.

Discuss the adventures of an old or recent explorer in the students' local area and ask them to fill out the profile. They could cut out and display their profiles in the classroom and find a picture of the explorer to accompany the text. Students could be given different explorers to research.

Extension Activity: •

Write a diary entry from the point of view of a recent explorer.

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Section 2: Local Changes and Continuities


Activity

Exploration and Transportation

 List three ways that early colonists would have explored your local area.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Look at the sources below. What do they tell you about how early colonists explored the land?

Source 1

Method of transport: ___________________________ Type of source: ___________________________

Source 2 Method of transport: Dear Diary, At three o'clock, the horses were so tired that we stopped under a rocky hill for the evening. Matthew Hamilton (Famous Explorer)

___________________________ Type of source: ___________________________

 Fill out the profile of a local explorer. Name:

..................................................................................

Where explored:

..................................................................................

How explored:

..................................................................................

When explored:

..................................................................................

Famous for:

..................................................................................

Travelled with:

..................................................................................

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Other information: .................................................................................. Section 2: Local Changes and Continuities

23


Teachers' Notes

Local Transport

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. • Ask the students to record the main changes in methods of transportation in their local area by drawing or pasting pictures or writing in the flow chart. Give them some background information first, which may differ slightly from area to area. Example: between 1885 and 1940 Melbourne had horse drawn cable trams.

Some background information: In the 1850s, camels replaced horses and became the main method of transportation in Australia. Camels were more suited to the Australian climate and harsh conditions than horses. You could look at pictures of camels and Australian cameleers from this time and read out some cameleer diary entries to the students. Camels were taken over by cars, trains and planes. In 1854 Australia's first trains began operating. First there were steam trains, then diesel locomotives, then electric trains. In 1910 planes were introduced in Australia.

• Ask students to colour red the transport methods that are still used in their local area today and write 'continuity' above them. • Ask students to choose one means of transport unique to, or commonly used in their local area. Draw it and write a sentence about it.

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Section 2: Local Changes and Continuities


Local Transport

Activity

ď ą Complete the flow chart to show how transport changed in your local area. The earliest form of transport should go in box 1.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. 1

2

3

8

7

4

6

5

ď ą Draw and write a sentence about one form of transport unique to, or commonly used in your local area.

Transport in My Local Area ................................................................. .................................................................

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................................................................. .................................................................

Section 2: Local Changes and Continuities

25


Teachers' Notes

How Schools Have Changed

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. • Ask students to guess when schools started to appear in Australia, given that the first colony in Australia was established in 1788. Write students’ guesses on the board.

• Tell them that in the early 1800s there existed a few schools which were set up by churches. Only children whose parents could afford to pay the fees attended. Schooling was not compulsory and what was taught was not prescribed. Some of the wealthier children in the country were tutored by the wives of local professionals. (Students can complete the first and second questions on their activity sheets.) • By the 1830s schooling was made available to all children. (Students can record this information on their sheets.) The government established non-paying schools as they believed that educating children would produce a more orderly, well-behaved and less ignorant society and would decrease crime. The church-run schools still operated outside of the government system. Even though the curriculum was prescribed, schools were not compulsory and many children attended for less than two years. Some schools were poorly managed and teachers were as young as 15. A typical day for a girl included sewing, knitting and darning. A typical day for a boy included geometry, geography and

arithmetic. The day started with the pupils being inspected for hygiene.

• Education was made compulsory in the 1870s but was difficult to monitor. (Students can record this information on their sheets.) In the 1890s there were many key changes made to education. Teachers had to be trained and more technical education was made available as there was a shortage of skilled workers. Certificates were introduced. The system remained very much the same up until the 1950s. • Today, changes to the curriculum and examination methods happen all the time. A greater range of subjects is available and attendance is strictly monitored. The introduction of calculators and then computers to the school room was a key change. • Ask students to create a school timetable for either a boy or girl in the 1870s and compare it to their own timetable.

Extension Activity: • Compare old and new pictures of the students' school. Note down key changes and discuss what parts of the school building has stayed the same.

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26

Section 2: Local Changes and Continuities


Activity

How Schools Have Changed

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. 1. When did schools start to appear in Australia?

_____________________________

2. Colour who usually attended school.

3. When was schooling made available to all children?

________________________

4. When was education made compulsory?

________________________

ď ą Create a school timetable for either a boy or a girl in the 1870s. Compare it to your own.

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27


Teachers' Notes

Parks and Gardens

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. • Ask students to name as many parks • Individually or in groups, students can find two pictures. One of the and public gardens as they can first park/garden in its early years think of in their local area. They can and one of it now. They can note record the names on their sheets. key similarities and differences. • Students discuss in small groups/ pairs what roles parks and public gardens play in community life. Students can record their answers on the mind map. (Possible answers: provide entertainment and recreation, places to meet and socialise, places to be active, to walk the dog, to have picnics and eat, to appreciate fauna and flora, places to hold social functions/events and bring the community together, free places for everyone to enjoy, places to help you connect to the past and learn about the area’s cultural and historical significance, places of natural beauty.) • Tell them that the first national park to be established in Australia was in 1879. It was the Royal National Park in Sydney. The development of many other public parks and gardens followed. Students can find out the name of the first park/ garden in their local area and whether it is still there. They should record the name of this park/garden and when it was established on their sheets.

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Section 2: Local Changes and Continuities


Activity

Parks and Gardens

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Name some parks and public gardens in your local area.

 List some of the roles that parks and public gardens play in our lives.

 Write the name of the first park or public garden in your local area. Write one important fact about this park/garden as well as the date that it was established.

Name of park/garden:_______________________________

Important fact:_ __________________________________

_ ______________________________________________

Date established:__________________________________

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 Find a picture of this park/garden when it was first established and another picture of it today. Paste them next to each other in your exercise book and note similarities and differences. Section 2: Local Changes and Continuities

29


Teachers' Notes

Entertainment

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. • As a class, decide on a definition of entertainment (e.g. what people do outside of working hours – is usually passive so involves people watching or spectating). Make a list of the types of things that the students do for entertainment on the board to help them further understand the term. • Tell students that entertainment existed in Australia before colonialism. Ask them to think of buildings in their local area which still exist and were used for entertainment in the past (sports stadiums, race tracks, live saving clubs, picture theatres etc.). Ask each student to pick one building to research. They can begin by creating four historical inquiry questions about the building on their activity sheets. For example they could ask: When was the building built? Who used it? What was it used for? They can write the answers to their inquiry questions on the back of their activity sheets.

and the pictures, students can present a one minute talk about the building. (Example: Subiaco Oval was built in 1908 so it is over 100 years old. It has provided entertainment for many generations of Australians. It has hosted AFL matches, concerts and was also used in the early days as a picture theatre. Today it is the home ground of the West Coast Eagles. AFL is a popular form of entertainment in Australia and has been for a very long time. It is Australia’s national sport. The pictures show that today there is a larger seating area and most seats are undercover. One similarity is that there is still a standing area.)

• Students can draw or paste two pictures/photographs of the building; one when it was first built and one showing how it is now. They can identify similarities and differences. Encourage them to date the drawings/pictures/photographs. • Using the answers to their questions

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30

Section 2: Local Changes and Continuities


Activity

Entertainment

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. A local building in my area is:

 My four historical inquiry questions are:

Question 1:_________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ Question 2:_________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ Question 3:_________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ Question 4:_________________________________________ ___________________________________________________

Old and New

 Paste or draw your pictures below.

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Date:_ _______________________ Date:_ _______________________  One difference is _ ___________________________________________  One similarity is _____________________________________________ Section 2: Local Changes and Continuities

31


Section 3: This is a Ready-Ed Publications' Development and Character preview. ofbook the Local Community

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32


Teachers' Notes

Religion and Beliefs

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. Sheet 1

Sheet 2

• Since colonisation, people from diverse backgrounds have made Australia their home and played a large part in the development of local Australian communities.

• Ask the students to draw three religious buildings in their area which show the diversity of people and religion in their community.

• Religion has been very much influenced by new migrants. Help students to make the connection between religion and migration, and understand that there are so many religions practised in Australia because it is so culturally diverse. • Help them complete the matching activity on the sheet. (British settlers were generally from Anglican or Catholic backgrounds. Those of German decent were associated with the Lutheran church and those of Italian descent were mainly Catholic. The discovery of gold in the 1850s attracted Chinese Buddhists to Australia. Buddhism also grew with the later immigration of South-East Asians. Jewish settlers who arrived with the first Europeans in 1788 introduced Judaism. Hinduism was introduced by Indian crews who came to Australia on trading ships soon after 1788. Later, people from Fiji, Sri Lanka and South Africa were responsible for the growth of Hindus in Australia.)

Extension Activity: • Take students to the local church, mosque or temple to find out more about religion in their local area and its connection to migration. There may also be a number of museums in the area which will help them understand a particular religion and a culture, such as the Jewish museums in Melbourne and Sydney.

• Ask the students to identify their religion and background/ancestry on the sheet. • Students can discuss and record Australia's views of religion (everyone is free to practise whatever religion they choose as long as they obey the law. Australians are also free not to have a religion).

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33


Activity

Religion and Beliefs 1

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' British book preview. ď ą Match the religions to the cultures who introduced them to Australia. Buddhism

Judaism

Anglican

Catholic

Lutheran

Hinduism

German Italian Chinese Jewish Indian

About Me

I live in ____________________________________ and my religion is ___________________________. My background is ___________________________.

ď ą Explain Australia's views of religion.

_______________________________________________

_______________________________________________

_______________________________________________

_______________________________________________

_______________________________________________

34

Go to www.readyed.net Section 3: Development and Character of the Local Community


Activity

Religion and Beliefs 2

ď ą Draw and label three religious buildings in your local area which show the diversity of people and religion in the community.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.

Hindu Temple, Bayswater, Melbourne

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35


Teachers' Notes

Local Diversity

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. • Explain to students that some buildings in their local area will reflect different cultural groups in the local community and their influence over time. Try to find examples of some of the following:

• Ask students to draw one building in their local area which shows the influence of different cultural groups in their community.

-- Old colonial buildings - built between 1788 and c.1840. These types of houses/ buildings were mainly built by convicts and were similar in style (Regency and Georgian) to those in Britain. They show British influence. -- European buildings - built between 1840 and c.1890. These types of houses/ buildings show European influence. (Example - Italianate, Gothic.) -- You might also like to look at houses/buildings in the local area which show Indian and Egyptian influence. (The Hobart Synagogue is an example of Egyptian architecture and was built in 1845.)

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Section 3: Development and Character of the Local Community


Local Diversity

Activity

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. Important building in my local area:____________________ Location:________________________________________

ď ą Draw or cut and paste.

Here is a picture of an important building in my local area.

ď ą Answer the questions about the building that you have chosen. 1. What cultural group has influenced its design? ______________________________________________ 2. When was it built?______________________________

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3. Who uses it today?______________________________ ______________________________________________ Section 3: Development and Character of the Local Community

37


Teachers' Notes

The Chinese

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. • Ask the children why they think Australians celebrate the Chinese New Year. (There are many Chinese living in Australia who are part of Australia’s multicultural society.) • Tell them that the Chinese first came to Australia in large numbers during the 1850s and 60s to look for gold. • On their activity sheets, students can identify some Chinese buildings, places or museums in their local area which tell them about Chinese immigration. (Examples: Chinese Museum in Melbourne, Golden Dragon Museum in Bendigo, Chinatowns in most Australian cities.) • Ask them when the Chinese New Year is celebrated. (First day of the lunar calendar.) • Ask the children to match the symbols with the Chinese New Year traditions.

Extension Activity: • Students can research the food and drink consumed during the Chinese New Year (significance of dumplings and Jiu), the decorations made, red packets given, dragon and lion dancing and the lantern festival.

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Section 3: Development and Character of the Local Community


The Chinese

Activity

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. Write or Draw

 Chinese Buildings/Places in My Local Area

 Draw lines to match the words with the pictures. The whole house should be cleaned on New Years Eve. Cleaning done on New Year’s Day is bad luck as it means that good fortune is cleaned away. Firecrackers on New Year's Eve represent destroying the old year and welcoming the new. At midnight on New Year's Eve, all doors and windows must be opened to let the old year out and the new year in. Everything borrowed should be returned by New Year’s Day or it means that you will be borrowing all year. If you wash your hair on New Year’s Day, you wash away your luck for the year.

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Wearing red will bring you a happy and bright future.

Section 3: Development and Character of the Local Community

39


Start

17

16

e If you ar d, re wearing ain. throw ag

15

1

2 19 You have broken 3 New Year traditions. Return to Start.

14

3

20

Firecrackers are being set alight. Go ahead 4 spaces.

13

4

It is New Year's Day and you haven't returned that CD you borrowed. Go back a space.

12

5

You have cleaning to do. Miss a turn.

11

Happy New Year

Chinese New Year Board Game

't You haven finished Go cleaning. ces. a back 5 sp

6

It is N Da ew Yea have y and yo r's your n't wash u h ed a forw ir. Move a spac rd 2 es.

8

9

7

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Y o u have forg otte n t o all th open ed o o r w s and i n d ows. R to st eturn art.

10

Section 3: Development and Character of the Local Community

40

18

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.


Section 4:Publications' This is a Ready-Ed Specialbook Days, Symbols and Emblems preview.

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41


Teachers' Notes

Australia Day

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. • Ask the children the date of Australia Day. Ask them to record this on their sheets.

• Ask what event took place on this date in 1788. (Establishment of the first colony in New South Wales by European colonists.) • Ask the students to look at the source (slogan) and think about why some Australians object to Australia Day being celebrated on 26th January (because it celebrates the day that Indigenous Australians started to lose touch with their culture and marks the decline of their traditional ways of life). You could tell the children that in 1988 on January 26th, Indigenous Australians and white supporters marched five kilometres in protest of the ‘celebration’. • Tell the students that Australia Day was originally known as Foundation Day and has been celebrated since 1808. Records show that early on, it was usually celebrated by small family dinners and some drinking and dancing! Ask them to interpret the poem by the colonist Charles Tompson, using their own words. Extension Activity: • List on the board all the different ways that the students celebrate Australia Day. Ask them to think what else Australia Day does or should celebrate apart from the anniversary of the first colony (multiculturalism, reconciliation, etc).

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Section 4: Special Days, Symbols and Emblems


Australia Day

Activity

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. Australia DAY is Mourning DAY Australia Day is on the

___________________________ This date marks the anniversary of what event?

___________________________

___________________________

 Why would Australia Day be a day of mourning for some?

____________________________________________________________

 Why do some Australians want to change the date of Australia Day?

____________________________________________________________

Australia Day Poem This is the joy-inspiring day That gave these blessings to our lot Then let us share the social rites Join hands, all malice be forgot! This little star, once marked by none Now shines a bright - a BLAZING SUN! Charles Tompson 1824

_ What is Tompson saying about Australia Day? _

________________________

_

________________________

_

________________________

_

________________________

_

________________________

Go to www.readyed.net _

________________________

_

________________________

Section 4: Special Days, Symbols and Emblems

43


ANZAC Day

Teachers' Notes

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. • Ask the children what ANZAC stands for. (Australian and New Zealand Army Corps.) They can record this on their sheets. • Ask them when ANZAC Day is. (25th April - first celebrated in 1916.) • Ask them who we remember on ANZAC Day. (Today we remember all soldiers who have fought in all wars. ANZAC day was first created to remember those who fought in World War I. Tell them that Australians and New Zealanders were sent to Gallipoli in 1915 to capture the Galliopli peninsula, an area almost completely surrounded by water, so that they could secure a point from which to capture Constantinople and knock the Turkish out of the war. They landed in Gallipoli on 25th April and fought the Ottoman Turkish army. The fighting lasted for eight months and over 8,000 Australians were killed.)

• Students can fill in the information on their activity sheets. • Discuss ANZAC day in your local area and ask the students to fill in the information.

Extension Activities: • Students could visit local ANZAC memorials and museums. • You could ask an ANZAC to come in and talk to the students. • Look at ANZAC artefacts, such as uniforms, badges, etc. and ask the students to tell you what these artefacts tell them about the past.

Useful Website:  www.anzacday.org.au/ interactives/childhood puzzles/ main.html This site has interactive ‘click and drag’ puzzles displaying images relating to ANZAC Day.

• Ask students to colour the Gallipoli peninsular marked on the map. Ask them to draw a red line between the Gallipoli peninsular and Constantinople so that they understand the aim of the ANZACS. They can shade the surrounding countries.

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44

Section 4: Special Days, Symbols and Emblems


ANZAC Day

Activity

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. Complete

A_ _____________ N________Z_ __________ A___________C_ _________

 Colour the Gallipoli peninsular on the map.

Draw a line between the Gallipoli peninsular and Constantinople.

RUSSIA

Austria hungary

serbia

albania

romania bulgaria

greece

Constantinople (Istanbul) Sea of Marmara Gallipoli

turkey syria

iran

iraq

 What were the ANZACS trying to do?

______________________________________________________________

Questions  When is ANZAC day?_ ______________________________________  Why is it on this day?_ ______________________________________  How many Australian soldiers were killed?______________________  How long did it last?________________________________________  How are the ANZACS remembered in your local area?

_________________________________________________________

 What do people do in your local area on ANZAC day?

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_________________________________________________________

 On the back of this sheet paste or draw a picture of a war memorial in your local area. Section 4: Special Days, Symbols and Emblems

45


Teachers' Notes

Sorry Day

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. • Ask the students when they think Sorry Day is. Write this date on the board. (May 26th every year.) • Ask them to whom we are saying sorry to. (Traditional owners of the land/Indigenous Australians.) Write this on the board.

• Ask them why we are saying sorry. Write responses on the board. (For not respecting indigenous cultures and helping them to grow and survive after colonisation. For trying to force Indigenous Australians to become European. For the laws and policies put in place which disadvantaged Indigenous Australians. For the Stolen Generation.) • Ask them what we are trying to achieve by Sorry Day. Write responses on the board. (The healing of our nation, reconciliation, unity and harmony.) • Ask them when the first Sorry Day was and why we haven’t had a Sorry Day before this time. Write this information on the board. (1998 – previous Australian governments have refused to say sorry.) • Show the students images created for previous Sorry Days. Discuss as a class how they show unity, healing and how they say sorry. (The joining of hands, using Aboriginal colours, written text, symbols of Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians side-by-side, feet walking together, bridges, bandaids, etc.) • Ask students to create their own Sorry Day image to market Sorry Day. They should include some of the information that is already on the board and include a caption, such as, Healing the Nation. • Discuss what happens in the students’ local area on Sorry Day. Ask students to record the events that have happened by writing and/or drawing. • Ask the students to create an invitation to their own Sorry Day celebration, using the information on the board. Extension Activity:

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• Students could also examine NAIDOC Week, National Reconciliation Week and MABO Day.

46

Section 4: Special Days, Symbols and Emblems


Sorry Day

Activity

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. My Sorry Day Image

 Create your own Sorry Day image to market Sorry Day. Include a caption.

Caption:___________________________________________

Write or Draw

 Write or draw the things that happen in your local area on Sorry Day.

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 Use the back of the page to create an invitation to your own Sorry Day celebration. Section 4: Special Days, Symbols and Emblems

47


Teachers' Notes

The Coat of Arms

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. • As a class look at a picture of your state’s/territory’s coat of arms. If your state or territory does not have a coat of arms, look at Australia’s coat of arms. • Students can draw and colour the coat of arms, copying carefully from another picture. • Ask them to fill in the information about their state’s/territory’s coat of arms on their sheets. If they want to talk about more symbols, they could use the back of the sheet.

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Section 4: Special Days, Symbols and Emblems


Activity

The Coat of Arms

 Draw and colour your state’s/territory’s coat of arms. Copy it carefully.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.

_ Who granted the coat of arms?__________________________________ _ What date was the coat of arms granted?__________________________

List five things which are important on the coat of arms and say why they are symbolic.

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49


Teachers' Notes

Floral and Faunal Emblems

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. • As a class identify your state’s/territory’s floral and faunal emblems. (Students in Tasmania could look at the unofficial animal emblem of their state in place of a faunal emblem – Tasmanian Devil.) Some states and territories will have two faunal emblems (a bird and an animal). The students can draw the additional emblem on the back of their sheets. • Ask the students to draw and colour their floral and faunal emblems, copying carefully from another picture. • Ask them to fill in the information about their state’s/ territory’s floral and faunal emblems on their sheets. Extension Activity: • Look at Australia’s floral and faunal emblems.

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Section 4: Special Days, Symbols and Emblems


Activity

Floral and Faunal Emblems

ThisFloral is aEmblem Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Draw and colour your state’s/territory’s floral emblem. Copy it carefully.

Name: ......................................................

What does it look like? ................................................................... ................................................................... Where was it first found? ...................................................................................................................... Where is it found today?....................................................................... When did it become the emblem?........................................................  Draw and colour your state’s/territory’s faunal emblem. Copy it carefully.

Faunal Emblem Name: ...................................................... What does it look like? ................................................................... ................................................................... Where was it first found? ......................................................................................................................

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Where is it found today?....................................................................... When did it become the emblem?........................................................ Section 4: Special Days, Symbols and Emblems

51


Teachers' Notes

The Flag and Other Emblems

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. • As a class identify your state’s/territory’s flag.

• Ask the students to draw and colour their state’s/territory’s flag, copying carefully from another picture. • Ask them to fill in the information about their state’s/ territory’s flag. • Identify other emblems of your state or territory (fossils, stones, mottos and/or fish). Ask the children to draw and fill out the information about this other emblem on their sheets.

Extension Activities: • You could explore some national emblems not explored in this book, such as the national gem stone (opal), the national colours (green and gold) and the national floral emblem (golden wattle). • You could also explore some additional local symbols and emblems such as club emblems and school logos and discuss their origins and significance as a class.

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Section 4: Special Days, Symbols and Emblems


Activity

The Flag and Other Emblems

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Draw and colour your state’s/territory’s flag. Copy it carefully.

 What date was the flag granted? _ _______________________________  What is symbolic about the flag?_________________________________

____________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________

 Draw and colour another emblem of your state or territory.

Emblem Name: ...................................................... What does it look like? ................................................................... ................................................................... Where was it first found? ......................................................................................................................

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Where is it found today?....................................................................... When did it become the emblem?........................................................ Section 4: Special Days, Symbols and Emblems

53


Teachers' Notes

The National Flag

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. • Ask students to draw and colour the Australian National Flag on their sheets. To help them, show them an image of the flag and ask them to copy it carefully. • Ask students to say what each main part of the flag means. (The Southern Cross represents Australia’s geographical position in the Southern Hemisphere as you can’t see this constellation from the Northern Hemisphere. The Commonwealth Star represents all the different states and territories in Australia and the Union Jack symbolises early colonisation of Australia.) • Ask who, they think, created the flag. (Ivor Evans, a14 year old schoolboy from Melbourne, Leslie Hawkins, a teenager from Sydney, Egbert Nuttall, an architect from Melbourne, Annie Dorrington, an artist from Perth and William Stevens, a ship's officer from Auckland, New Zealand. They all won a design competition as their entries were almost identical and shared the £200 prize money.) • Ask the students to create a poster advertising one or more of the winners of the flag competition. The winners were announced and the flag flown for the first time in 1901. • Ask the students if they know the rules associated with the Australian Flag. They can write or illustrate one or more of the rules on their sheets. (The flag must always be flown in a superior position to any other flag if flown in Australia or on Australian territory. It can be flown on every day of the year. It should not be flown/displayed upside down. It is not to be placed or dropped on the ground, or used to cover an object. Faded flags should not be displayed.)

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Section 4: Special Days, Symbols and Emblems


Activity

The National Flag

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. ď ą Draw and colour the Australian National Flag. Copy it carefully.

Southern Cross: _____________________________________ Commonwealth Star: __________________________________ Union Jack: _ _______________________________________

My Poster

Flag Rules

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55


Teachers' Notes

The Australian Aboriginal Flag

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. • Ask students to draw and colour the Australian Aboriginal Flag on their sheets. To help them, show them an image of the flag and ask them to copy it carefully. • Ask the students to say what each colour symbolises on the flag. (Yellow represents the sun and yellow ochre. Red represents the red earth which symbolises the people’s relationship with the land and red ochre. Black represents the Aboriginal people.) • Ask the students when it was designed and who designed it. (Aboriginal Elder Harold Thomas in 1971.) • Identify places where the Aboriginal Flag is flown in the students’ local area. Students can record this information on their sheets.

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Section 4: Special Days, Symbols and Emblems


Activity

The Australian Aboriginal Flag

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Draw and colour the Australian Aboriginal Flag. Copy it carefully.

Flag Colours Yellow: ____________________________ _________________________________ Red: ______________________________ _________________________________ Black: _____________________________ _________________________________

Questions  Who designed the flag?______________________________________  When?____________________________________________________  Where is the Australian Aboriginal Flag flown in your local area?

__________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

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57


Teachers' Notes

The Torres Strait Islander Flag

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. • Ask students to draw and colour the Torres Strait Islander Flag on their sheets. To help them, show them an image of the flag and ask them to copy it carefully. • Ask the students to say what the main colours and the two objects on the flag symbolise. (Green represents the islands or land, the blue represents the waters of the Torres Strait and the black represents the people. The head-dress also symbolises the people and the five pointed star represents the five main island zones. The star could also represent navigation as they are a seafaring culture.) • Ask the students who designed the flag and when it was first flown. (By Islander Bernard Namok in 1992.) • Check that the students understand that Torres Strait Islanders are indigenous people of the Torres Strait Islands. Ask the students to mark the Torres Strait Seas and Islands on the map. It is part of Queensland, Australia.

Extension Activity: • There are many famous Torres Strait Islanders, such as Christine Anu and Eddie Mabo. Ask your students to complete a profile of a well-known Islander.

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Section 4: Special Days, Symbols and Emblems


Activity

The Torres Strait Islander Flag

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Draw and colour the Torres Strait Islander Flag. Copy it carefully.

Colours & Symbols

Black: ___________________

Green: __________________

_______________________

_______________________

Head-dress: ______________ _______________________

Blue: _ __________________

Star: ___________________

_______________________

_______________________

Questions _ Who designed the flag? ________________________

_ When was it first flown? _

Indonesia

_

Papua New Guinea

________________________

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_ Mark on the map where the Torres Strait Seas and Islands are by circling the area. Fill in the missing places.

Section 4: Special Days, Symbols and Emblems

59


Teachers' Notes

The Eureka Stockade Flag

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. • Ask students to draw and colour the Eureka Stockade Flag on their sheets. To help them, show them an image of the flag and ask them to copy it carefully. • Ask them to record what the stars and the cross are believed to symbolise. (Stars: Southern Cross. Cross: unity among the miners.) • Ask the students if they know why the Eureka Stockade Flag was created. (It was created by Australian gold miners. They were angry at the government who made them pay for licences before they began digging for gold. Many miners believed the licence fees were too high and protested in a street battle against police known as the Eureka Stockade in 1854 in Ballarat, Victoria. This is where the flag was first flown. The miners were defeated and many were injured. The battle lasted 10 minutes and the flag was left in tatters. Gold licences, however, were abolished soon after.) • Ask the students to illustrate the history of the flag in storyboard form.

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Section 4: Special Days, Symbols and Emblems


The Eureka Stockade Flag

Activity

 Draw and colour the Eureka Stockade Flag. Copy it carefully.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.

Questions _ What are the stars believed to symbolise? _

_________________________________________________________

_ What is the cross believed to symbolise? _

_________________________________________________________

The History of The Eureka Flag

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61


Activity

Emblem and Symbol Box

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.  Decorate the box by following the numbered steps.

1

2

3

Emblems & Symbols 4 1. Draw your state's/ territory's coat of arms. 2. Draw your state's/ territory's floral emblem. 3. Draw your state's/ territory's faunal emblem. 4. Draw your state's/ territory's flag. 5. Draw another emblem from your state/territory.

Once you have decorated your box… • Cut out the box and fold tabs along the dashed lines.

5

• Glue the sides together to create a box about your state! Another Idea

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62

• Keep something that symbolises your local area inside the box.

Section 4: Special Days, Symbols and Emblems


Memory Game In pairs, cut out the cards and turn them face down. Take turns turning each card over to create a pair. You can create your own cards to add to these.

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.

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63

Australian History Series: Book 3 - Community and Remembrace  

Community and Remembrance is written for students living in Australia who are studying History in Year 3. It is divided into four clear sect...

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