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Ready-Ed

PHOTOCOPY MASTERS

Publications

40 Great

For all Primary Levels

40 Great

For all Primary Levels

LESSONS

LESSONS

and Ideas

and Ideas

This book is written for the busy teacher and contains a wealth of tried and tested ideas for all ages.

!Presenting

a selection of practical, user-friendly ideas for the primary classroom. !Includes teachers’ notes, lesson plans and photocopy master pages for all subject areas.

Extensive teachers' notes are included as well as lesson ideas, games and student activity sheets across all subject areas. Most of the activities require little preparation and are also ideal for relief teachers and last minute time-fillers. There are even activities for the whole school to take on board. More importantly, the lessons, games and ideas provide satisfying and valuable learning experiences for both the students and teachers. 40 Great Lessons & Ideas ISBN 978 186 397 670 1

9 781863 976701

By

Paul Larkin


Ebook Code REAU7006

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. For all primar y le vels primary lev

Great

LESSONS and Ideas

Presenting a selection of practical user-friendly ideas for the primary classroom. Includes teachers’ notes, lesson plans and photocopy master pages for all subject areas. Written by Paul Larkin. Illustrated by Terry Allen. Published by Ready-Ed Publications (2006) Š Ready-Ed Publications - 2006. P.O. Box 276 Greenwood Perth W.A. 6024 Email: info@readyed.com.au Website: www.readyed.com.au

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COPYRIGHT NOTICE Permission is granted for the purchaser to photocopy sufficient copies for non-commercial educational purposes. However, this permission is not transferable and applies only to the purchasing individual or institution.

ISBN 1 86397 670 1


This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.

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Contents

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' Whole School Drama / Games book preview. Introduction ..................................... 4

Alphabet Mime................................. 5 Coordination Skills (Wake-Ups) .......... 6 Mobile Madness ............................... 7 It’s Not a Chair! ............................... 8 Rhythm Clapping.............................. 9

Maths Giant Geometric Design .................. 10 Giant Geometric Design: Flower ....... 11 Graph It......................................... 12 The Shopping Game ....................... 13 Beat the Odds ................................ 14 Tables Poems - 1 ............................ 15 Tables Poems - 2 ............................ 16 Tables Poems - 3 ............................ 17

Literacy Do U H8 2 Text 2? ......................... 18 Top 20 Spelling Ideas ..................... 19 Spelling Activities ........................... 20 The Backwards Boots ..................... 21 Spelling Challenge .......................... 22 Categories ..................................... 23 Categories: Student Sheet ............... 24

Outdoor Activities Memory Game ............................... 25 Beanbag Golf ................................. 26 Beanbag Golf: Score Card Templates.... 27 Ice-Breaker .................................... 28 Ice-Breaker: Description Statements .... 29 You’re a Star! ................................. 30 Bin Ball ......................................... 31

The Great Debate ........................... 32 The Great Debate: Topics ................ 33 The Monthly Bugle ......................... 34 Talent Quest ................................... 35 Peer Groups ................................... 36 Foolproof Fundraising ...................... 37 Foolproof Fundraising Sheet ............. 38

Art / Craft And Now for the News .................... 39 Silhouette Profiles ........................... 40 Calligraphy in Chalk........................ 41 Sauce Bottle Writing ....................... 42 Mother’s Day Quilling ..................... 43

General Ideas A Real Beanstalk ............................ 44 A Real Beanstalk: Leaf Template ...... 45 Me - Who Am I? – Project ............... 46 Project Brief - 1 .............................. 47 Project Brief - 2 .............................. 48 A-Z Ideas ....................................... 49 A-Z Ideas: Student Sheet ................. 50 The Talking Stick ............................ 51 Pen Can Do.................................... 52 Pen Can Do: Belt Templates ............ 53 Pen Can Do: Teacher Chart .............. 54 Jigsaw ........................................... 55 Secret Sound ................................. 56 Giant Pictures ................................ 57 Graduation Placemats ..................... 58 Famous Aussies ............................. 59

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IntroductionPublications' This is a Ready-Ed book preview. “40 Great Lessons and Ideas” is a smorgasbord of practical user-friendly ideas for teachers. They were selected from over 100 ideas that have been developed or acquired over 23 years experience in the classroom.

The ideas have been categorised into a number of areas ranging from general classroom ideas, drama, literacy, maths and whole school ideas. There is a mix of black line master pages and general teaching and extension ideas which can be implemented in the classroom or throughout the school. The main point I would like to make is that all of these ideas work – they have been tried and tested and provide for many satisfying and valuable learning experiences for children and teachers. I’ve enjoyed writing a number of educational books for teachers over the past decade but this has been the most enjoyable by far. It’s the sort of book I look for when the ‘reps’ cover the staffroom table in educational resources. I hope you enjoy using it as much as I enjoyed writing it.

Paul Larkin

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Teachers’ Notes

Subject: Drama/Games

Level: 8–12 years

Alphabet Mime This is a Ready-Ed Publications' Instructions book preview. For this activity two teams of three children are chosen. You will need to write the alphabet letters out on single pieces of paper and place them into a container. Team One stands out the front. The teacher picks a letter out of the container, e.g. “T”. Each member of the team has five seconds to mime something that begins with a “T”. The class calls out the word when they think they know the answer. A successful result scores one point. Scores are kept on the board. Each team has two or three rounds depending on how much time you have.

Variations Another version requires the person miming to perform for his or her own team. This is a bit more challenging. For older children another variation is to choose a letter and a theme. For example, “T” and sports. Other themes could be animals, birds, clothes, etc.

T

A K

L Go F to www.readyed.net P 5


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Teachers’ Notes

Subject: Drama/Games

Level: 5–12 years

Coordination Skills This is a Ready-Ed Publications' (Wake-Ups) book preview. Wake-ups are so named because they are intended to do just that – get the blood flowing and the brain simulated. A wake-up activity should only last for two minutes and should be conducted just after a long period of inactivity, i.e. 30-40 minutes.

Instructions: For this activity children stand behind their desk. Instruct students that left hand holds nose, right hand crosses left arm and holds left ear. Now swap hands. Do slowly at first to give children a chance to master it and then pick up the speed. After 20-30 seconds start to march at the same time. Continue marching and then blink one eye at the same time. Continue to march and blink one eye and now poke tongue in and out whilst doing all of the above. At first it will cause much laughter but children become very adept at this great exercise in coordination. It really gets the brain going and is also great to throw in during those long staff meetings!

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Teachers’ Notes

Subject: Drama/Games

Level: 9–12 years

Mobile Madness This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. A great resource for this activity is a real mobile phone – not working of course.

Children are very good at providing the material for this activity based on their experiences of mobile phones but you can get it going with the dinner setting, as described below.

Instructions: You will need a table and four chairs. Four children are selected to sit at the table. The children are told to engage in a conversation as if they are out to dinner. Nothing special here but what happens when someone’s phone rings and they start having a conversation about nothing important? The other three students try to continue amongst themselves but the phone person dominates with phrases such as “Oh, really?” and “Wow!”, which distracts and frustrates the others. The children can decide where to take it and for a great laugh the other three can receive calls until all four students are talking to their phones. This is a good activity to use as a stimulus for social skills and personal development discussions. Other variations on the theme can be: • The Staff Meeting • The Supermarket • The Bank • Places suggested by children from their own experiences.

Children are very good at being given an idea and going away for five minutes to plan and then improvise the scenario.

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Teachers’ Notes

Subject: Drama/Games

Level: 8–12 years

It’s Not Publications' a Chair This is a Ready-Ed book preview. The enjoyable aspect of this activity is the fact that it includes or attracts those shy children who never want to participate in drama.

Instructions: Use one of the students’ chairs and hold it up for all to see and say: “This is not a chair!” This, of course, invites many comments. Once you have their attention again, repeat the statement followed by: “See if you can guess what it is”.

This is not a chair!

Then bend over the chair, undo the petrol cap, push the primer, adjust the lever, pull the cord and start mowing. By this stage every hand is up and there’s always a few excited kids yelling: “It’s a mower!” Then say: “Who can turn this chair into something else?” You should have no trouble in attracting children to participate. The only problem is trying to finish the activity in the allotted time!

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Teachers’ Notes

Subject: Drama/Games

Level: 11–12 years

RhythmPublications' Clapping This is a Ready-Ed book preview. This is a good activity to slot in when attention levels are declining. It only takes 2-3 minutes but is an effective brain stimulus.

Children stay seated but move chairs away from their desks/tables. Teach the rhythm pattern as follows:

2 pats on thighs 2 claps together 2 clicks left hand 2 clicks right hand = 8 BEAT SEQUENCE Practise until children can effectively master the rhythm then introduce the “Pass it on” pattern. On the first two clicks say your name twice. On the second two clicks say the name of the person you are passing it to twice. E.g. pat pat clap clap Paul Paul Tim Tim pat pat clap clap Tim Tim Sue Sue Continue until someone loses the rhythm, which often happens, until they get better at maintaining the pattern. It’s a good idea to initiate the start of each game to keep it moving and to send it to children who might not usually be included.

Variations: Variations can make this came more challenging. For example: •BOY/GIRL – when sending the pattern have it go boy to girl. •TURBO – start the pattern slowly then pick up the pace until it moves quite fast (usually results in much laughter). •NO REPEATS – you can’t send the pattern to anyone who has already been mentioned (good memory test). These games are not only good to use in the classroom but also at those awkward moments outside whilst waiting for the bus or going to sport, etc.

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Teachers’ Notes

Subject: Maths

Level: 11–12 years

Giant Geometric Design This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. This is a good maths extension activity, suitable for upper primary children. It relates to the space strand in the 2D shapes learning area. Most children will be familiar with creating geometric designs using a compass. It would be good to revisit the design provided for this activity on paper first. The problem can then be posed of how to reproduce this design on a larger scale, e.g. circles of 4 metres in diameter. Children may be familiar with using a length of string and a stick to draw a circle. If not, this can be introduced as the problem-solver. A plan can be set out on the black board and ideas discussed regarding materials and a location.

Materials: • A length of strong string or rope • A stick or piece of dowel • A writing tool, e.g. chalk or paint • A suitable location is preferably a large, flat concrete area or paved area.

Instructions: One child is the stick holder and emphasis is placed on keeping the stick very still. Another child makes the circle. Pairs can be rotated for each circle. Make the rope about 2 metres in length which will create a circle with a 4 metre diameter. The rope must also be kept taut. For this design 7 circles are drawn involving 14 children. The flower design on the inside (see page 11) can also be coloured in involving more children. This is just one design and there are many to choose from. Children enjoy creating designs in the classroom and seeing them come to life on a larger scale outside the room. It is also possible to do these designs in paint but this is a bit more challenging.

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10


Giant Geometric Design: Flower

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.

8m Go to www.readyed.net 11


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Teachers’ Notes

Subject: Maths

Level: 8–12 years

GraphPublications' It This is a Ready-Ed book preview. Graphs form an important part of the Maths curriculum but teachers tend to make the same old graphs with their classes. Whether it be pie, bar, column, line, picture or other, here are 20 ideas to keep children’s interest levels up. Some graphs may require gathering data first, which only adds to the interest level.

1. How do you get to school? 2. Students’ pets

Students’ Pets

3. Favourite TV shows 4. Favourite movies 5. Favourite songs 6. Favourite foods 7. Favourite drinks 8. Sports 9. Hobbies 10. Types of transport on a nearby road 11. Numbers of siblings 12. Holiday destinations 13. Favourite subjects

I am so popular!

14. Pizza toppings 15. Populations of classes 16. Brand or colour of family car 17. Game consoles in families 18. Hair colour

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19. Eye colour

20. Nationalities of children or parents

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Teachers’ Notes

Subject: Maths

Level: 8–12 years

The Shopping Game This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. The main resource for this activity is derived from shopping brochures and junk mail, so needless to say, there is an endless supply.

Instructions: Depending on the level of the children, cut out five or six pictures of toys from a toy catalogue, e.g. Target or Big W. The price of the toy is covered up with a piece of black cardboard which is ideally stuck to the catalogue using Blu-Tack®. Then, two children are selected to come out the front and must attempt to order the toys from the lowest to highest in value ($). Students write the prices on the board. The two students can discuss their decisions and listen to the audience. When they are happy with their order, peel off the black cardboard. This can also be done out of order to add to the suspense. A variation is to have two teams going against each other with a small reward to add to the pressure and excitement.

$5

?

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Teachers’ Notes

Subject: Maths

Level: 8–12 years

Beat thePublications' Odds This is a Ready-Ed book preview. This is a good hands-on activity to demonstrate the frequency or odds of numbers being rolled on a dice.

Teams and Materials: A team of 11 children are selected to participate. Each child holds a sheet with a number written on it from 2 to 12. They stand as shown in the diagram. An outside area needs to be marked out in chalk on concrete or pavers as shown here. Another child is selected as the roller and two large dice are used.

Instructions: The object is simple: when a student’s number comes up, that child takes one step forward towards the finish line. First to the finish line wins. There is usually a number of complaints at this stage because 2 and 12 are so close to the finish line and 7 is miles away. No explanation is necessary as that is the exact point of the game. As games only take a few minutes, several can be played in a row and other children rotated so that all of the class can participate. After a few games the children can suggest reasons for the starting positions of the participants and hence, make a statement or generalisation relating to the frequency of numbers coming up on the dice.

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Teachers’ Notes

Subject: Maths

Level: 7–8 years

TablesPublications' Poems This is a Ready-Ed book preview. Most teachers will agree that one of the best ways to learn tables is still by rote. There are many resources for singing and chanting tables.

Instructions: The two poems provided are for learning the 2 x tables and 10 x tables and also require an additional skill-sequencing. The children have to cut out the 10 sections of each poem and arrange them in the correct order. They then paste it onto their page (or pages, if using a standard exercise book). The poems have a great rhyming beat and do not take long at all to learn as a class. They also go down well at school assemblies and presentations too. Each poem can also be recited by ten children saying one verse each. A challenge for older students might be to write a similarly-paced poem for the other tables. Photocopy the rhymes on the next two pages for the students.

Five 2s are 10, A big fat hen.

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Teachers’ Notes

Subject: Literacy

Level: 10–12 years

Do U H8 2Publications' Text 2? This is a Ready-Ed book preview. This is an interesting lesson in exploring evolving forms of language and one in which the children have prior knowledge.

A good starting point is to discuss the advent of mobile phones and text messaging (SMS). The main point to reinforce is that this has become an adapted form of language because it is faster and more convenient than standard English. It is not what we are condoning for everyday classroom use.

Instructions: First, ask the children to think of letters of the alphabet that can also represent words, e.g. b = be. As a whole class, list all the letters with their corresponding words and the same for numbers. This is a safe limit to go to in order to avoid exploring some of the more bizarre text symbols and messages. Once you have brainstormed all the available words and numbers, put them on a chart which can be used at any time. Ask children to write some simple sentences, e.g. ICUR here 4T, using the correct English, i.e. I see you are here for tea. We then move onto simple combinations:

e.g. H8 = hate

CUL8R = see you later.

Here is a general guide: B = be

C= see/sea

G = gee

I = I/eye

K = Kay

O = oh

P = pee

R = are

T = tea

U = you

Y = why

1= one/won

2= to/too/two

4 = for/four

8= ate/eight

Ask children to then have a short written ‘talk’ with a partner using this new language. It also works well having two children do this on the board or overhead projector so the rest of the class can watch. It’s a bit different but opens up other ways of using language to communicate. It’s gr8.

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Teachers’ Notes

Subject: Literacy

Level: 10–12 years

Top Spelling Ideas This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. Many teachers use a weekly spelling list as a homework standard. Children tend to get bored doing the same activities each week so it’s worth trying different options. This list can be used for upper primary classes and can be adapted for lower classes.

Instructions: The children are asked to select three of the activities each week with their spelling list and try to choose different activities each week. The sheet lists the 20 activities with a brief example next to each one. They keep it in their homework/spelling book and it can be reduced to half A4 size.

Rainbow Words

Word Chain

Codes

the spelling actvities on page 20. GoHand tooutwww.readyed.net 19


Spelling Activities

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. 1. 2. 3.

Rainbow words: Choose five words and trace over each word with three different colours. Spellamadoodle: Write your list in the shape of one of the words. Backwards Words: Choose five words and write the words backwards.

4.

Letter Patterns:

5. 6.

Alphabet Order: Put your words in alphabet order. Antonyms: Choose five words and then, for each word, write a word with the opposite meaning. Synonyms: Choose five words and then, for each word, write a word with a similar meaning. Homonymns: Choose five words and write a word that sounds the same but is spelt differently. Word Find: Put your list words into a word find. Definitions: Choose five words and write the meaning of each word. Short Story: Use as many of your list words as possible in a short story. Grammar: Sort your list into nouns, verbs, adjectives and adverbs. Poem: See how many words you can put into a poem. Questions: Write down five questions where the answers are in your list. Plurals: Choose 10 words and write the plural of the word. Smaller Words: Choose five words and find smaller words inside those words. Word Chain: E.g. H E L P A See how many interlocking words you can find.

7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17.

= little letter = stem letter = tail letter e.g. pattern =

18. Fonts: Choose five words and write in different fonts. e.g.

LOVE

S T

I

M E G G

PEACE

19. Syllables: Choose five words and break them into their syllables. E.g. per / for / mance 20. Codes: Choose five words and work out their numerical value. First work out a code: E.g. A = 1, B = 2, ... Z = 26. Then see what each word is worth: E.g. DOG: D = 4, 0 = 15, G = 7 4 +15 + 7 = 26

Rainbow Words

Word Chain

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20

Codes


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Teachers’ Notes

Subject: Literacy

Level: 9–12 years

The Backward Boots This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. With the increased emphasis on producing more factual texts, sometimes children don’t get to write enough good old narratives which should really have them using their imagination.

This story is called The Backwards Boots and is a fantastic stimulus for creating a great narrative. Children love writing about it and most of all, sharing it with the class. Here is the basis of the story which can be filled out by the teacher with lots of imagination and colour.

A boy goes fishing one day and hauls in a pair of boots. He takes them home, puts them on and his mum asks him to do two jobs – one is to put the washing on the line and the other is to feed the cat. The boy gets a funny feeling when he puts the boots on and while he means to do the right thing, he ends up pegging the cat on the line and feeding the washing! He gets sent to his room and throws the boots outside in disgust. The boy’s sister sees the boots and puts them on. The same thing happens and she mixes up her chores. Then the father tries them on and finally the mother. At the end the boy takes them back to the beach and throws them into the ocean.

The beauty of this story is that you can brainstorm with children both situations and chores that are not funny by themselves but when interchanged, are hilarious. e.g. Mum tells dad to paint the fence and mow the lawn. Mum has to put the garbage out and empty the dishwasher. And one of the funniest: Mum has to bake a cake in the oven and clean the toilet!

After a while the children predict what is going to happen and it’s interesting to watch as children ‘click’ at different times. It’s also a great topic to motivate children who usually have trouble putting pen to paper.

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Teachers’ Notes

Subject: Literacy

Level: 8–12 years

Spelling Challenge This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. There are hundreds of spelling games but this is one of the best and most popular with kids. It is based on a TV show (which is probably why the kids like it).

Instructions: Two teams of three students are chosen and they then stand out the front of the class. Each team has a section of board to write on and the scores are kept on another area of the board. Each team is given six words to spell – two per child. Team 1 is given three words then Team 2, then repeat and so on. Highest score wins. Each child can choose the level they would like. • Level One (worth 10 points) has 4 or 5 letter words • Level Two (worth 20 points) has 6 or 7 letter words • Level Three (worth 30 points) has 8 or more letters You will find that children want to score more but are wary of choosing too hard a word. The teacher selects the words from a word bank or spelling list. It often goes down to the wire and can be a lot of fun. If scores are all locked up at the end, one player from each team is chosen for a ‘sudden death’ playoff. Try to maintain calm in the room when this happens!

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Teachers’ Notes

Subject: Literacy

Level: 8–12 years

Categories This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. This activity is based on the well-known game and is useful for fast finishers or as a good learning activity in its own right.

The student sheet, as shown on page 24, is copied for each child. It’s handy to keep a pile for children who finish early – a completed sheet earns a lolly, sticker or a ticket in the weekly raffle. In the left hand column a word of up to 7 letters is written vertically. The children then have to make 8 words from each letter to go with the category. Emphasise that it is alright to have gaps. It’s also a good idea to have a blank master that can be put on an overhead transparency. You can then get the children to provide the answers. This is a useful activity for building vocabulary and developing general knowledge. The student sheet can be used as a template with the students filling out the word for each table down the left hand side each

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This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.

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Teachers’ Notes

Subject: Outdoor Activities

Level: 8–12 years

Memory Game This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. This activity has three levels so you can adopt it to whatever class you have.

Instructions: • For Level 3 you will need three different coloured beanbags.

Level 1 Children stand in a circle – the teacher can join in too. One beanbag is introduced and given to a child to start the game. The child throws the beanbag to someone in the circle saying the child’s name as he/she throws it to them. The thrower then bobs down. This continues until all children have had a go. Everyone stands and the teacher asks the children to point to the person they received the beanbag from and the person they to whom it was passed. Repeat the activity and try to do it a bit faster. If necessary repeat it a third time making sure the student says the name of the child they are throwing the beanbag to.

Level 2 This level introduces a different coloured beanbag. A different child is asked to start and he/she must throw it to a different person than the first round. Repeat so that children remember who they received the beanbag from and who they threw it to. The activity then progresses with both beanbags in action. Before commencint, it’s a good idea to point to their first two people and then their second two people. It may take a few attempts but this is quite within the range of middle primary children.

Level 3 At this stage, introduce a third coloured beanbag and simply follow the same steps as the first two levels. This stage is definitely aimed at upper primary level and is excellent for team building. Children do not bob down until they have passed all three beanbags.

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Teachers’ Notes

Subject: Outdoor Activities

Level: 9–12 years

Beanbag Golf This is a Ready-Ed Publications' Equipment: book preview. • 9 witches hats • 9 hoops • 1 beanbag per child

Mark out the course as follows:

1

2

5

6

7 3 9

4 8

Instructions: Children play in pairs. Child One stands at the first tee (hat) and throws his/her beanbag. Child Two throws his/her beanbag. They each have three throws to get the beanbag into the hoop for a par.

Scoring: These rules are discussed in the classroom before going outside. The goal is to score a par, i.e. 3 throws. If it takes more than three shots then the number of shots taken is written in the score column (see the score card templates on page 27). Shots: Birdie = 2, Par = 3, Bogey = 4, Double Bogey = 5 Note: This applies to the first 8 holes – for the last hole add one (1) to each category. Once a pair has finished a hole, the next pair can tee off. The last hole is longer so this is a par 4. The distance between holes is about 30 metres, however, this can be altered to suit the playing area. Students can have input on designing their own course layouts and there are plenty of follow-ups for maths lessons. Issue each child with a score card. Children swap cards at the start and score for their partner. They sign the card at the end when both agree on the final score.

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26


Beanbag Golf Score Card Templates Name: Partner: This is a Ready-Ed Publications' Hole Score 1book preview. 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Signed:

Total:

Name:

Partner: Hole 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Score

Go to www.readyed.net Total:

Signed:

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Teachers’ Notes

Subject: Outdoor Activities

Level: 10–12 years

Ice-Breaker This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. This activity could be done indoors but a larger outdoor area is preferable. It is an excellent activity for the first day of the school year or for classes where social problems are prevalent, e.g. cliques forming, new students, students not mixing, etc.

Materials: Each child requires a copy of the description statements on page 29 and a pen. A book to lean on or clipboard is also required.

Instructions: The children are asked to move around the group asking their peers questions from the sheet. The only rule is that students can’t repeat a person’s name. When everyone is finished the children sit in a circle and everyone reads one statement out. To keep it interesting, each child reads a different statement. If there are more children than statements, then simply return to the beginning. Children can also be involved in creating the description statements. This activity is good to do at the start of each term. It’s also interesting to include the teacher.

Have you ridden a horse?

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28


Ice-Breaker Description Statements

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' Student’s name: book preview. 1.

Is an aunt or uncle

_________

2.

Is the eldest in the family

_________

3.

Is the youngest in the family

_________

4.

Plays golf

_________

5.

Collects something as a hobby

_________

6.

Knows how to surf

_________

7.

Has a birthday in July

_________

8.

Is an only child

_________

9.

Has the same favourite TV show as you

_________

10. Likes to sleep in

_________

11. Has come from another school

_________

12. Has always been at this school

_________

13. Knows sign language

_________

14. Is good at maths

_________

15. Is a great speller

_________

16. Has been overseas

_________

17. Loves camping

_________

18. Can play chess

_________

19. Speaks another language

_________

20. Has ridden a horse

_________

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Teachers’ Notes

Subject: Outdoor Activities

Level: 7–10 years

You’re Publications' a Star This is a Ready-Ed book preview. This is a great activity for promoting a healthy self-esteem in junior to middle primary children.

Instructions: Children stand in a circle on a hard surface, such as concrete. One child is chosen as the ‘STAR’. The teacher can demonstrate the activity first. The STAR takes his/her place in the middle of the circle. They clap a simple rhythm which is copied by everyone in the circle. This rhythm is then repeated. The STAR then stamps a different rhythm on the ground which is repeated by everyone. These two steps are repeated. The two patterns are then put together with the STAR going first and everyone else copying him/her. The STAR then chooses someone else to be the STAR and the activity is repeated. There is usually no shortage of potential STAR to take to the centre. This activity can also be integrated with music.

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Teachers’ Notes

Subject: Outdoor Activities

Level: 10–12 years

BinPublications' Ball This is a Ready-Ed Equipment: book preview. • 2 rubbish bins • 1 medium-sized rubber ball • 4 witches hats • Chalk / skipping rope (optional)

Instructions: Bin Ball is played in a rectangular area approximately 16 metres x 5 metres. The rubbish bins stand at each end with witches hats as corner markers. A centre line can be drawn in chalk or a skipping rope can be used if playing on grass. Two teams take up their places on either side of the court. Teams can have up to 15 players but 10 is a more suitable number. One team starts with the ball. The object is to hit the rubbish bin at the other end. If a person gets hit by the ball then that person is out. A player may catch the ball on the full, however, the person is not out. The game continues until there are only two or three players left. It sometimes gets down to one player on each side. Players may move with the ball before they throw it. This is a fast moving game and can be played with a sponge ball. If a hard ball is used, it is suggested that the rule be changed to ‘below the waist’ hitting the players with the ball. A variation is to introduce another ball and then a third ball. Teams can play to 5 or 10 minutes depending on the time available.

5m

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Teachers’ Notes

Whole School

Level: 10–12 years

The GreatPublications' Debate This is a Ready-Ed book preview. Many teachers may steer clear of debates because they think the rules are too complicated or that they might not be able to run one properly. This is unfortunate because debating provides a multitude of benefits to children, apart from the obvious one of public speaking.

The following instructions outline a simple debating program which is easy to organise with straightforward rules. It involves children in upper year levels but middle primary students are encouraged to watch the debates, in order to prepare for them in the future. The Debating Program The debates are held once a week and a ‘draw’ is made with topics advertised and results published. Points are given for a win or draw and while it sounds competitive, a scoring system does add to the value of the program. This program was developed at an Australian primary school and has been tried and tested with positive results. It involved four upper primary classes with approximately 24 children in each class. This allows for eight teams of three children per class and 32 teams in all. Each week four debates take place, with each debate only running for approximately 10 minutes. The rules are kept very simple and children should definitely improve as they watch other children in action and pick up valuable pointers. RULES: 3 team members: 1. Speaker 1 – Introduces topic, states case and makes 1-2 points to support case; 2. Speaker 2 – Reinforces case and makes 2-3 new points; 3. Speaker 3 – Backs up first speakers, adds 1 or 2 more points and concludes with final statement. The teams alternate speakers but no refuting is done until ‘open time’. This is where team members can argue a point with the opposition and is usually where a team wins or loses the debate because points have to be made spontaneously. The chairperson, a teacher, scores points and announces the result at the end. The whole debate usually lasts for 10 minutes and it is up to the chairperson to keep things moving and call a halt if the debate is not moving smoothly. The draw can be made to include semi-finals and a final, with a trophy presented at the end. The skills covered and level of enjoyment by the children is worth the effort.

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Teachers’ Notes

The Great Debate: Topics This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. Start up a suggestion box for debate topics and also brainstorm for topics in the classroom. The list below contains 20 topics for starters.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Students should not have to wear uniforms to school. There should be no P.E. or sport at school in summer. We should have lolly/cool drink machines at school. The canteen menu should include junk food. We should get to choose what subjects we want in upper primary. 6. Upper primary students should have a Common Room. 7. Teachers should have to wear uniforms. 8. Homework should be banned. 9. Mobile phones have become a social curse. 10. Handwriting is a waste of time today because of computers. 11. We would learn better in single sex classes. 12. One day a year should be set aside so children can swap roles with parents. 13. All children should have a compulsory set menu. 14. Television causes harm to how children think. 15. Computer games influence children’s behaviour. 16. Girls Vs Boys. 17. There should be separate beaches for different nationalities. 18. All sharks should be wiped out. 19. Children should learn a second language in primary school. 20. We should be able to drive at 16 years of age.

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Teachers’ Notes

Whole School

Level: 5–12 years

The Monthly Bugle This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. This is a great idea for publishing children’s writing for a purpose at whole school level. With the huge shift towards factual forms of writing, e.g. procedures, expositions, reports, recipes, and so on, using a monthly newsletter-style publication is a meaningful and relevant way of getting students to write with something to show at the end.

Obviously, not all written pieces can be published, but during the course of the four school terms, if should be possible to produce at least three ‘papers’ each term. That is, a total of 12 papers per year so two to three students can be represented in each paper per class. The stories can include narratives, recounts, family holidays and other newsworthy events, e.g. a new baby, a change of school, Dad’s new job, achievements in dance, sports, culture, clubs, and so on. It requires very little effort to collect the published works from each class. A standard front page can be designed and then reused, and is a fantastic vehicle for senior students to showcase their I.T. talents. Such a publication will not work if one person has to organise everything. A typical newspaper relies on a number of departments to produce each section of the paper. In this way it works best if there is a coordinating teacher to oversee the different classes and one or two senior children responsible for collecting content from each class. The newspaper is best produced on A3 paper because this effectively gives each class 4 x A4 pages. The paper can even be ‘sold’ at a rate to cover production and to make it more appealing, e.g. 20c per copy. A competition can be initiated at the outset for the naming rights and to explore newspaper names, e.g. Star, Bugle, Advocate, Times, Daily, etc. For senior classes, such a project provides limitless options in writing avenues such as crosswords, letters to the editor, comics, recipes and puzzles. The frequency of publications can be adjusted to suit your school – maybe two per term is more realistic. Either way the children love to see their written efforts in print.

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34


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Teachers’ Notes

Whole School

Level: 5–12 years

TalentPublications' Quest This is a Ready-Ed book preview. A school talent quest is a great way of connecting a classroom activity to a whole school activity. It gives a lot of purpose to drama, music and P.E. lessons as well as other areas. Each level can run their own heats and come up with a final three, giving twelve acts in the final: E.g. Junior Primary – 3 acts, Middle Primary – 3 acts, Upper Primary – 3 acts. Posters can be drawn up by the school’s student representatives or whoever will be in charge of promoting the event. The talent quest can be given a big push at weekly assemblies. Parents love to watch these events so invite them. Teachers should be encouraged to monitor the types of items for the talent quest, so that a situation where you have 20 dancing acts is avoided. Below is a list which may be helpful in broadening the range of acts, making for a more interesting finale. • Mime a song on CD

• Play an instrument

• Dance: jazz, tap, rap, waltz

• Gymnastics

• Circus act (e.g. juggling or swing hoops)

• Read a poem

• Magic act • Send up a commercial or TV show • Make up a bloopers segment for reading the news or weather • Mime a sport • Retell a nursery rhyme where letters get mixed up, e.g. Back and the Jeanstalk

• Tell a joke or two • Hypnotise someone • Skits (2 min limit) • Sing a song • One man (person) band • Interview a famous person • Send up a fashion parade • Ventriloquist act

Acts can have more than one person in them, but should have a set time limit. The audience also gets a big laugh if a couple of teachers ‘perform’ a really bad act. Judges can include parents, teachers and students. A trophy is optional.

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Teachers’ Notes

Whole School

Level: 5–12 years

Peer Groups This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. Although peer groups have been operating at many schools for a number of years, they are still considered a state of the art concept. The system outlined below is based on one school’s peer group program which has been successfully running for over 20 years. The concept is very simple. A peer group consists of one upper primary (final year) student leader and one member from every other class in the school. This varies according to the number of student leaders and classes in the school but is basically very easy to organise. At the beginning of the year the student leaders have training for 1½ to 2 days where they are given specific skills to prepare them as peer group leaders. This training can include visiting speakers, e.g. police officers, politicians, business owners, etc. as well as teachers. Topics cover ice-breakers, games, planning a session, communication skills, leadership skills, coping with problems, and many others. Peer group sessions are held once every three weeks and are timetabled on the school calendar. A session lasts for 30 minutes but can go longer depending on the activity. One classroom usually has three groups operating in it. The teacher only plays a supervisory role and will only intercede if a leader cannot cope with a problem. The activities in a session usually coincide with special calendar events – Father’s Day / Mother’s Day, Anzac Day, Clean Up Australia Day, Easter, etc. The peer group leaders have a planning session and each leader is given a folder to hold resources, notes, list of names of group members, and other necessary details. The main benefit from the use of a peer group program is not just the interaction in the group itself, but that it also provides a valuable learning and leadership experience for the final year students. It has been noted many times that some of the more ‘challenging’ older students actually shine in their roles as peer group leaders. The program also negates many bullying situations as younger children feel they have someone to turn to on the playground, as they will know students in the older year levels. A good idea is to dedicate some lunch time sessions to peer groups by having students eating their lunches together.

Go to www.readyed.net

A simple concept but a fantastic learning experience for the whole school.

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Teachers’ Notes

Whole School

Whole School

Foolproof Fundraising This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. While school fetes are a lot of fun they are also a lot of work. This fundraising idea below is very easy to organise with a high rate of return and is still a lot of fun.

Walkathon This walkathon is a walkathon with a difference. It involves a walk along a section of any scenic route that is available near your school (e.g. along a section of the beach if you live in a coastal area). There are no checkpoints, hand stamps, etc. Everyone walks the same distance and parents are invited to join in. At the end, a sausage sizzle can be held as well as a group competition, e.g. sandcastle building (if you’re on a beach!), and basically it’s just a fun day. Children are sponsored a set amount for completing the walkathon (e.g. $2) and must try to get as many sponsors as possible.

Preparation In advance, buy two prizes per class for the highest money raiser and a lucky dip for anyone who has at least one sponsor. These prizes are ‘the carrot’ and they work wonders. One idea is to put the prizes in a wheelbarrow – toys, games, etc. and for a few weeks prior to the walkathon, student representatives can parade them around the school, reminding students to get a list of sponsors. Each week at assembly the walkathon can be promoted by the school leaders. Give this event a catchy name such as “Supathon” or “Megathon”. Print the letters of the name on large pieces of cardboard and get children to come out individually to the sound of “We Will Rock You”. One trick is to prearrange for students to misspell the name and make funny words before finally getting it right. There’s lots of noise and hype and, of course, the prizes are on display.

Fundraising This walkathon idea has been used in a town of 300 people and usually raises over $6000 each time. Out of these funds come the prizes ($300) and depending on the school – sausages and buses. Whether the money raised goes to the school, or charity, or both is up to the school. The lucky dip ensures that children that only raise $1 still have a chance at a prize.

Go to www.readyed.net

37


Foolproof Fundraising Sheet

ThisClass:is a Ready-Ed Publications' Amount Sponsor Paid book preview. Promised Name:

Go to www.readyed.net Total: 38

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Teachers’ Notes

Subject: Art/Craft

Level: 7–10 years

And Now for the News This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. This activity is a great way to promote confidence in public speaking. Many junior and middle primary classes include “daily news” or “show and tell” sessions as part of their oral language programs. One of the problems with these sessions is that there are usually several children in a typical class who rarely, if ever, get up to speak. And there are those children who don’t want to stop speaking …

Here are a few tried and tested ideas that might help: 1. Use a sand timer or stop watch to limit children to two minutes. 2. Decide on a specific topic to talk about for a week. 3. Have a framework for reluctant speakers, i.e. a series of questions to stimulate talking. E.g. “Where did you go on Sunday?” “Who went?” “What did you like/dislike?” 4. As a class art/craft activity make a television from a large box. Cut out the screen and bottom of the box. Decorate the outside with paint, pictures, crepe paper – anything to dress the box up. Children then step inside and present the news. It’s a good idea to make it so that the box is supported in some way. You should find that this box definitely attracts reluctant children to share their news.

And now...

Go to www.readyed.net 39


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Teachers’ Notes

Subject: Art/Craft

Level: 8–12 years

SilhouettePublications' Profiles This is a Ready-Ed book preview. This is an excellent integrated activity when discussing how unique we all are. No two people have exactly the same profiles – unless, of course, they’re twins ... or triplets!

Materials You will need a large piece of art paper (at least A3), black paint and one other colour (preferably a lighter colour such as yellow, light blue, pink or green) and an overhead projector. The art paper is attached to the board or a wall. A child stands side on to the art paper with the overhead projector shining onto the board or wall. This casts a shadow and the child is moved until their profile is centred and focussed. The teacher then traces around the outline. This process takes about one minute for each child. Students then paint the inside of their profile black taking extra care around the line of their face. It’s a good idea to let the black paint dry before adding the background colour around the silhouette. The contrast between black and the other colour is most effective and the final display can be quite striking. What is most interesting is how the children enjoy identifying their classmates by their profile. This activity is best done over a few sessions to allow for the tracing, the black paint and finally the outside colour. Senior students can experiment with mixing colours for their background colour using shades such as peach, aqua or lime.

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Teachers’ Notes

Subject: Art/Craft

Level: 8–12 years

Calligraphy in Chalk This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. A simple idea that only requires a bit of practice to bring your blackboard to life.

By snapping a piece of chalk into a piece about two centimetres long you now have a tool for writing in calligraphy. There are many styles to be found in lettering books or on the Internet, however, the Foundation style is the easiest to begin with. Hold the chalk at a 45° angle and be careful not to move the angle. Write with the side of the chalk and try these patterns. Once you can do these basic shapes you can move onto letters and beautiful headings for your board. Patterns can also be used. For larger headings use longer pieces of chalk.

Step 1 Angle of chalk doesn’t move so you can create thick and thin shapes.

Step 2 Try the s shape

Step 3 Try basic lettering.

Step 4 Now try a heading

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It’s fun, looks good and is very therapeutic.

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Teachers’ Notes

Subject: Art/Craft

Level: 8–12 years

Sauce Bottle Writing This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. A handy way of dispensing paint has always been to use plastic tomato sauce bottles (cone-shaped). They are also great for writing with in paint. Use them to make large signs either in the classroom, for assemblies, and even for outside of school, e.g. birthdays and special occasions. The main skill is to keep a consistent amount of paint coming out and a flowing form of ‘running writing’ looks best. Borders and curls and swirls can be added for effect. Children absolutely love to use these sauce bottles too, so, after a few pointers, have the children use them for book covers which can then be covered in clear Contact ®. These covers will be unique and guarantee a high degree of success. Restrict the paint to the three primary colours and choose a design of three wandering lines. The paint actually sits off the paper and takes up to 24 hours to fully dry. Sauce bottles are great for producing quick, appealing signs as well as being a useful tool for all children to create quality art.

Book Cover Large Sign

Go to www.readyed.net 42


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Teachers’ Notes

Subject: Art/Craft

Level: 8–12 years

Mother’s Day Quilling This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. Quilling is quite a difficult skill but this activity is good for introducing basic quilling skills with great results.

Materials: • 1 x A4 sheet white paper • • •

or cardboard 24 x strips of coloured paper or cardboard (1 cm wide x 20 cm long) Half polystyrene cup (vertical half) Wood glue

Step 1 A strip of coloured paper is wound around the end of a pencil. Take it off then glue outside strip to coil. This is the centre of the flower. Make two more and glue onto the A4 sheet.

Step 3 Each flower has six petals so make 18 petals and glue around centre of flower (see diagram below).

Step 4 Glue three stems. This is just a strip of paper glued on its side. Hold while drying.

Step 5 Glue polystyrene cup covering base of stems. Optional leaves can be added. Repeat Step 2 but pinch both ends of circle to make

Step 2 To make petals, repeat Step 1 but allow coil to unwind a bit then glue outside strip to coil. Now pinch one side of coil to create this shape. Paint or add stickers to vase

Go to www.readyed.net 43


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Teachers’ Notes

Subject: General Ideas

Level: 7–9 years

A Real Beanstalk This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. Junior primary classes often cover the story of Jack and the Beanstalk or a theme on giants. A great focal point for children is to create a lifelike beanstalk in the classroom or perhaps in the area outside the room, e.g. wet area or corridor.

To begin, take a fairly long length of rope and cover it with green crepe paper. The children then cut out the leaf from the leaf template provided on page 45. This can be either copied onto green cardboard or painted green. The most important part is being able to attach the rope to a point on the ceiling (help may be required from groundsmen or another staff member). A ladder will be necessary. Once the rope is secured, attach the leaves to it with sticky tape. At the top, tie about five or six white and blue balloons to look like clouds. This also adds to the mystery because children can’t see the end of the beanstalk. Ask the children to bring in a selection of dolls and toy figures. Select a suitable “Jack” and a “Giant” and attach them to the beanstalk in a climbing position. Cotton is suitable to tie with and is barely visible. Remember the scale of toys and make sure it is clear how big the giant is compared to Jack. The beanstalk should prove to be a great source of interest in the classroom including visitors. There is of course, only one rule: “DON’T TOUCH THE BEANSTALK!”

Go to www.readyed.net

44


A Real This Beanstalk: is a Ready-Ed Publications' Leaf Template book preview.

Go to www.readyed.net 45


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Teachers’ Notes

Subject: General Ideas

Level: 11–12 years

“Me–Who Am I? Project This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. This project has become an institution at our school for the final year students. Ideally, a whole term should be devoted to it and many teachers believe it is the most important thing they will do at primary school.

The project is done in five parts (see guide) and students are asked to bring their project in every two or three weeks so teachers can check their progress. It’s also a good idea to have past students’ projects on display so that the children can see what is expected of them. The project is basically a detailed summary of the student’s life to date including details of his/her achievements, family, pets, holidays, school years, pre-school, and so on. The end result is a valuable collection or souvenir of his/her life so far. Teachers who have successfully implemented this learning program know for a fact that many children add to their project over the high school years. Time is given during school time, however, most of the work should be done at home. For this reason it is recommended that no other homework demands are on at this time. The project is best done in Term 3 and attracts huge interest in the classroom during Term 4. There are mixed views as to whether it should be an assessment task and this is best left up to the individual school. Teachers who have implemented this project in their classroons tend not to mark it out of 100 or give it a grade (e.g. A to D), instead opting to provide each student with a detailed comment sheet.

Go to www.readyed.net

Pointer: Tell children that one day when they’re 30 or 40, they’ll look back at their project and say: “I’m glad I did that!”

46


“Me-Who Am I?

Project Brief-1

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. PROJECT DUE:

End of term

PRESENTATION:

Project book or loose leaf folder

AIMS:

1. To discover and research things about yourself and your heritage. 2. To produce a project that you will be able to keep and look back on in future years.

OBJECTIVES:

1. To 2. To 3. To 4. To

SOME HINTS:

•Proofread your work. •Plan carefully before you start. •Use frames, borders and so on, to decorate your work. •Make sure your writing is neat and tidy. •Paste in carefully. •Use plenty of colour.

PROJECT GUIDE:

Remember that this is a guide only. You should be able to think of many more areas to write about.

interview your family and relatives. record, organise and illustrate information. use a variety of lettering, headings, borders, etc. grow in appreciation of those who love you.

Part A: Birth to about 5 years old. • • • • • •

What is your name? What does your name mean? Why were you given this name? Where and when were you born? What did you look like? Tell about your birth and other events, e.g. christening. • When did you first crawl, walk, talk, get your first tooth, etc?

• What special things happened to you during these years? • Favourite toys? pets? pre-school? • Include copies of any records you can find e.g. birth certificate, baptismal certificate, swimming certificate.

Go to www.readyed.net ANT • VERY IMPORT IMPORTANT – Include a family tree.

47


“Me-Who Am I?

Project Brief-2

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' Part D: The Future Part B: School Years book preview. • Where did you go to school?

• List teachers, friends, favourite subjects, school photographs, reports, etc. • Have you changed schools? • What are your leisure activities?

Part C: The Present • How old are you now? • Have your likes and dislikes changed over the years? • What school subjects do you like best? • How do you add something special to your family? • What has been the saddest/ happiest/most memorable event in your life so far? • What are your plans, hopes and dreams for yourself this year? • Include here all the details about yourself now, e.g. your height, fingerprints, family, a piece of your hair and so on.

• What are your plans, hopes and dreams for your future?

• What jobs are you interested in? • What future education will you need to fulfil these ambitions? • What are your hopes and dreams for your children? • What kind of a world would you like your children to live in? • Draw your future family and home. • How do you think the world will change as you grow older? • Can you imagine a different environment when you are a grandparent?

Conclusion • Enjoy the project and think of yourself showing it to your grandchildren. • Think of some people you might want to thank, e.g. your parents. • Always remember: I am me I am special I am loved

Go to www.readyed.net 48


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Teachers’ Notes

Subject: General Ideas

Level: 8–12 years

A-Z Publications' Ideas This is a Ready-Ed book preview. Children generally love to do the A-Z activity whether it be part of a class topic or as a fast finisher activity. A variation is to score extra points for extra words, e.g. Theme “Boys’ Names”: A= Andrew, Aaron (2 points)

Sometimes it can be hard to come up with a topic off the top of your head so here’s some starters:

The Top 50 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25.

Environment Space The Ocean Movies TV Shows Clothes Cars Christmas Boys’ Names Girls’ Names Australiana Communications Books Food Chocolate Bars School Transport Towns/Cities Countries Colours Music/Songs Maths Kitchen Items Supermarket Items Drinks

26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50.

Fish Birds Australian Animals Insects Sports Occupations Inventions Toys Games Housing Plants Footwear Ice-creams Boats Flying Machines Types of Shops Celebrations Musical Instruments Dog Breeds Fruit Vegetables Monsters Body Parts Hobbies/Crafts Furniture

Go to www.readyed.net 49


A-Z Ideas-Student Sheet

ThisTheme: is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. Points:

Points:

A

N

B

O

C

P

D

Q

E

R

F

S

G

T

H

U

I

V

J

W

K

X

L

Y

M

Go to www.readyed.net Z

Total Points: 50


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Teachers’ Notes

Subject: General Ideas

Level: 9–12 years

The Talking Stick This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. The “talking stick” can be used in two ways:

As a drama stimulus, and

As a discussion controller.

The actual stick can be anything, it doesn’t even need to be a stick. A squeezy ball would work. The object is simply used to represent something else. In this case the only person who may talk is the one holding the “talking stick”.

1. During drama lessons, the stick can be used to engage those children who are reluctant to contribute or are a bit shy. The rule is when you receive the stick you have to talk about anything. To get students started, place some suggestions for topics on the board, such as sports, hobbies, movies, holidays, etc. The only stipulation is that students must speak for between 30-60 seconds. 2. As a discussion controller, the talking stick serves as a great aid to stop those children who always call out. For example, if your class is having a discussion in Society and Environment (HSIE / SOSE), Science or anything in particular, the talking stick is handed to a child with his/her hand up. When the students has had his/her say, he she passes the stick to someone else who would like to contribute. With practice there becomes little need for the teacher to ‘control’ the discussion so much as to supervise it. It is helpful if the stick is something special – perhaps a smooth or carved piece of wood with an Aboriginal design on it. This adds to its importance and helps children respect it as a valuable classroom tool.

Go to www.readyed.net

51


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Teachers’ Notes

Subject: General Ideas

Level: 8–12 years

Pen Can Do This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. This idea was developed a number of years ago as a desperate, yet successful, attempt to motivate untidy handwriters.

Wait until midway through Term 3 to introduce “Pen Can Do”. The concept is very simple and appeals to the children’s fascination with martial arts. The children attempt to work their way from white ‘belt’ to black ‘belt’. Not everyone gets to black belt because that demands consistently neat handwriting in all areas – not just handwriting lessons. The main advantage is that children compete against themselves – if they improve or maintain a good standard they go up a belt. The belts (see photocopy master on page 53) are photocopied onto yellow, blue and red cardboard. A black belt is a white belt with a black cardboard background. It might be an idea to have a special pencil or pen to go with it. Also included is a display chart (see photocopy master on page 54) which can be reproduced onto an A3 sheet of paper. This chart should be placed on a class display board with the names of the children written in the appropriate column. “Pen Can Do” is highly recommended as a successful and motivational tool to develop handwriting in children. Note from the author: I usually witness one or two miraculous improvements with ‘Pen Can Do’ and it happened recently in a Year 2 class. I had just about given up on one boy whose handwriting required deciphering. One day he brought his book up and I said, “Whose work is this?” He was languishing on a white belt – I make sure all children at least get a white belt – and I immediately jumped him to blue belt and made a huge fuss. He now has to prove he can maintain this level and I’ll drag it out for a while to ensure his new writing becomes a habit.

Go to www.readyed.net

52


Pen Can Do: Belt Templates Pen Pen Pen ThisPen is a Ready-Ed Publications' Can Can Can Can book preview. Do Do Do Do Handwriting Award

Handwriting Award

Handwriting Award

Handwriting Award

PRESENTED TO

PRESENTED TO

PRESENTED TO

PRESENTED TO

Pen Can Do

Pen Can Do

Pen Can Do

Pen Can Do

Handwriting Award

Handwriting Award

Handwriting Award

Handwriting Award

PRESENTED TO

PRESENTED TO

PRESENTED TO

PRESENTED TO

Go to www.readyed.net 53


White

This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.

Pen Can Do

The Ancient Art of handwriting Yellow Blue Red Black

Go to www.readyed.net 54


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Teachers’ Notes

Subject: General Ideas

Level: 10–12 years

Jigsaw This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. This activity is based on an adult version but works equally well with upper primary students. It can be used in any subject area but ideally suits Society & Environment (HSIE / SOSE), science or literacy learning.

The children are put into five or six groups with five (or six) students in each group. Each child is given a number 1-5 or 16 depending on group size. This is the base group and students need to remember this group. The teacher then asks all number 1s to get together, all the number 2s and so on. A circle on the floor is the easiest format. In this group the teacher has a passage or list of questions to be discussed. The passage or content depends on the lesson. Each group covers a different aspect. The children have about 10 minutes to learn what they can before the teacher calls them back to their base group. Each child then reports back to the others and take it in turns to explain what he/she has learned or discussed. The other students may take notes if required. This activity works very well and is based on the premise: “We learn best by teaching others”.

Go to www.readyed.net 55


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Teachers’ Notes

Subject: General Ideas

Level: 8–10 years

Secret Publications' Sound This is a Ready-Ed book preview. While this listening skills activity is directed at junior and middle primary levels, upper primary students are sure to gain from it too.

The activity is based on a radio competition called “Secret Sound of the Coast”. A mystery sound is played for a split second and people then ring in to try to identify the sound. It’s recommended that you build a bank of sounds – at least 20 – to play for the class. Ask the children to put their heads down and close their eyes tight. Make the sound and then count to five (to allow for time to put the object away). Students then write down what they think made the sound. (Note: Spelling is not important for this activity). If 20 sounds feels like too many, then stick to 10 and then repeat the activity, giving students another opportunity to guess sounds they were stumped on. The list below is just a sample and there are hundreds of sounds you could use. Children can also be asked to provide their own sound and get the others to guess what it is.

20 SOUNDS •Snap some scissors •Tear up paper •Scrunch paper up •Shake rice in a jar •Spin a coin •Roll dice •Vibrate a ruler on desk •Click a stapler •Let air out of balloon •Shake water in a bottle

•Sticky tape – tear off dispenser •Pencils banging on the desk •Sharpen a pencil •Rattle some pins •Clap •Whiste •Click fingers •Shut a drawer •Open a window •Tear foil off a roll

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Teachers’ Notes

Subject: General Ideas

Level: 5–12 years

Giant Pictures This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview. Children love being immersed in a great theme and it’s a wonderful way to integrate learning across the curriculum.

Here’s an excellent method to create giant pictures for your next theme and put them anywhere in the room – blackboard, display board, windows, etc. First, find a picture of desired topic, e.g. giant, circus, pirate, ocean, dinosaur, and so on, and photocopy onto an overhead transparency. These should run straight through the photocopier. Place the transparency onto an overhead projector and shine onto desired area. The further you move the projector away, the bigger the picture will appear. Now trace the picture and there you have an accurate outline to colour or decorate. Simple, but effective.

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Teachers’ Notes

Subject: General Ideas

Level: 11–12 years

Graduation Publications' Placemats This is a Ready-Ed book preview. Most schools these days seem to recognise their final year primary students with a graduation dinner.

It’s a nice gesture to present these students with a special souvenir at their graduation dinner. This placemat activity will result in a very simple, but special, signed memento of students’ classmates. On one side of the placemat is the student’s own signature and on the other, their names are written or printed in a special font. The placemat is then laminated and placed at their table at the graduation dinner.

Year 6 2002

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Famous Aussies

ThisName is ofayourReady-Ed Publications' famous Aussie: book preview. 5 Facts Achievements • _________________ __________________ • _________________ __________________ • _________________ __________________ • _________________ __________________ • _________________ __________________

__________________ __________________ __________________ __________________ __________________ __________________ __________________ __________________ __________________ __________________

Why do you admire this person? ___________________________________________ ___________________________________________ ___________________________________________ What lesson can this person teach us today? ___________________________________________ ___________________________________________

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This is a Ready-Ed Publications' book preview.

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40 Great Lessons and Ideas, for all primary levels