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GILBERT WOMAN

KINDLE THE SPARK

FROM FIREPITS TO FIREPLACES, FLAMES TAKE THE FUN OUTSIDE

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october 18

FEATURES

PLAYING WITH FIRE

Gilbert homeowners don’t need a drastic plunge in temperatures as an excuse to crank up their outdoor fireplaces and fire pits - just the hint of a cool breeze, something in the low to mid-70s. If you’re still rocking a chiminea, check out all the creative ways your neighbors are toasting their marshmallows now.

18

By Mike Butler

24

6-MONTH FIGHT AGAINST BREAST CANCER

When Maria Bernard, 53, found out she had breast cancer last February, maintaining a positive attitude turned out to be the best medicine. “It’s a journey, and having the right outlook and support system goes a long way,” says Maria’s medical oncologist, Dr. Sumeet Mendonca. By Christina Fuoco-Karasinski

30

PICTURE PERFECT

Gilbert resident and arts activist Elaine Kessler discovered she had a gift for photography when she became a mother and started taking pictures of her children. “I have an inherent belief that everyone is beautiful,” she says. “It just depends on how you see them.” By Srianthi Perera

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26 COVER PHOTO BY Will Powers, Gilbert Woman Staff Photographer 4

GILBERT WOMAN MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

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DDS • LVIF • BSC • PC

Cosmetic and Neuromuscular Dentist

G

JOHN A. GARZA DDS, LVIF, BSC, PC

Voted #1 Dentist in Gilbert

ilbert cosmetic dentist, Dr. John Garza is a dental pioneer who has introduced the latest techniques, and best materials to his patients. As an instructor for Cerec technology and creator of the “Crane” a dental crown removal tool, Dr. Garza has become one of the most recognized cosmetic dentists in the valley, and as a cosmetic dentist with more than 23 years of serving friends, neighbors, and celebrities, he has become a household name in the community. Born in Hayward, CA. Dr. Garza grew up in the Bay area near San Francisco. He has never stopped in his pursuit of dental excellence. After completing his undergraduate education at The University of Oklahoma in Norman receiving a Bachelor of Science degree in 1990, he pursued dental training at the University of Oklahoma in OKC, where he received his DDS in 1994. He is a dentist who believes you should never stop learning, and since receiving his DDS he has added thousands of hours of continuing education to his knowledge base. Along with traditional dental concepts, Dr. Garza has always sought to push the boundaries of dental excellence by emphasizing cosmetic dentistry, complex dental reconstruction, and the treatment of head, neck, and facial pain. In recognition of his tireless pursuit of dental knowledge, Dr. Garza received his fellowship from the Las Vegas Institute for Advanced dental studies in June of 2015. The LVIF designation is given for work specifically in dental and facial cosmetics, and neuromuscular dentistry. This includes TMJ, Bruxism, Migraines, and Jaw pain. Although Dr. Garza is committed to integrating the most advanced technology into his practice, he never forgets that technology is only a tool and is never a substitute for the personal attention and relationship every patient deserves. Additionally, Dr Garza believes in giving back to our Gilbert community. Four times a year, he provides free care to the under privileged and under insured. In his free time, John enjoys scuba diving. He earned his PADI Master Instructor recently and enjoys teaching others how to scuba dive. He is an ambassador to the ocean respecting the ecosystem.

754 South Val Vista Drive, Suite 106 • Gilbert, AZ 85296 480.539.7979 • info@johnagarzadds.com

WWW.JOHNAGARZADDS.COM GILBERT WOMAN MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

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october

DEPARTMENTS

14 8

UPFRONT

DRIVING SUCCESS

Gilbert engineer Maritza Grijalva says instability in the corporate world nudged her to a back-up plan, Club Z In-Home Tutoring Services.

34

12 SUCCESSFUL BY A HAIR 14 TRENDING THREADS: LAYERS 15 HAUTE ITEMS 16 BEYOND THE WORKOUT

FIVE METABOLISM-BURNING DIET TIPS

34 DIVINE DIVA

BERNADETTE PETERS

38 THE SIGHTS AND SOUNDS OF FALL

50

38

44 A BLESSED FAMILY

46 TRAVEL

UTAH’S FAMOUS SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL Cedar City in Southwest Utah, population 30,000, is the improbable home to one of the oldest and largest Shakespeare festivals in the country. But what began in 1962 on a $1,000 budget has blossomed into a $7 million, four-month theatrical extravaganza attended by more than 100,000 people.

44

50 FOOD & WINE

WILD GINGER ASIAN BISTRO

56 IN SEASON 58 WHAT’S COOKING 60 5 GREAT DATES 62 LOOKING GOOD

46 6

GILBERT WOMAN MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016


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Pull Your Credit Report While divorce doesn’t directly impact your personal credit rating, your actions and those of your spouse can impact it. For example, if you have a joint credit card that your ex was supposed to be paying and they fail to pay. The non-payment negatively impacts your credit. While it isn’t the best case scenario, you may be the one who has to pay minimums just to keep your credit in good standing. Pull your credit report to make sure you’re addressing all outstanding accounts and balances. Most, if not all, should have been addressed in the divorce decree. Change Names on Accounts After you’ve pulled your credit report, compare it to the divorce decree. There are likely accounts that you need to change to your name only or your ex needs to change. Creditors don’t know and don’t care if accounts are listed in the wrong name. They will come after you for payment if your name is listed on the account. Don’t Spend Retirement Money Part of many divorce settlements is the splitting of retirement accounts. It may seem like a good idea to spend that money but it’s not. You want to have that money later when you actually retire. That money is designated as retirement and is taxed differently if you take it today versus when you are of eligible retirement age. Instead of spending, roll it over to a retirement investment account in your name only.

Review Finances with a Professional Just because you’re in transition doesn’t mean your financial future is on hold. Contact Heritage Financial Strategies at 480-397-1184 for a free account review where we can discuss where you are today and where you want to be in the future when it comes to investing. That includes choosing investments for your rollover retirement investment account. If you are contemplating or going through a divorce, and would like additional information and support, we welcome you to our monthly event, Second Saturdays. For more information or to register, go to http://heritagefinancialaz.com/event/secondsaturday. Here’s to a bright future for you! Shanna Tingom is an independent financial professional and co-founder of Heritage Financial Strategies, 207 N. Gilbert Road, Ste. 007, Gilbert, AZ 85234. On the web: at heritagefinancialaz.com or call 480-397-1184.

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upfront

TRENDS | PEOPLE | CULTURE | STYLE

DRIVING

Success HONEYWELL ENGINEER PRACTICES WORK-LIFE BALANCE BY SRIANTHI PERERA

As an engineer, Gilbert’s Maritza Grijalva has perfected time management to a T. Without that skill, her life would be a bit chaotic. The engineer at Honeywell Aerospace recently bought a franchise, Club Z In-Home Tutoring Services, which she runs with the help of her husband, Brent Mangiapane, and 18 employees. Additionally, she makes time to parent 6-yearold Isabella, although she concedes that’s hardly a chore. “My favorite thing to do is spend time with her,” said Grijalva, of the first grader at Riggs Elementary. Gilbert Woman Magazine recently caught up with Grijalva at a local event where she shared her educational and professional journey with would-be engineering students. Her words of

encouragement to future women engineers were to forge on despite difficulties, because the reward is worth the effort. A self-professed math lover, Grijalva followed her passion with bachelor's and master's degrees in industrial and systems engineering. For 17 years, she has worked for different companies, countries and industries in electronics, automotive and aerospace. A career highlight, she said, was working as a quality engineer in Mexico for a Detroit-based automotive supplier, where she helped launch the original Ford Fusion. Later, she moved to Detroit, where she worked on the GM Corvette, Mazda 6 and Ford Mustang. “The energy, passion and professionalism of the automotive industry is unique,” Grijalva said. Even though she’s in a field many young women aspire to, and that offers high levels of Continued on page 10

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GILBERT WOMAN MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016


Maritza Grijalva is trying to instill organization and time-management skills in her daughter, Isabella, a first-grader at Riggs Elementary.

GILBERT WOMAN MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

9


upfront upfront

TRENDS | PEOPLE | CULTURE | STYLE TRENDS | PEOPLE | CULTURE | STYLE

Maritza Continued from page 9

Fighters employability, she and her husband decided to additionally Continued page 9 that would give them a contingency plan invest in from a venture should their situations change. “Nowadays, stability is not a given in the corporate world. So having a second plan in hand and being ready” seemed wise, she said. population. ThroughTutoring the project, he speaks withindividualized the homeless Club Z In-Home Services provides population and photographs them, giving them back their names tutoring to students in the security of their homes, often and dignity in the process. more convenient for parents. Its premise is providing a “The inspiration for the project’s title came from Chuck comfortable and non-competitive environment for learning Ridgeway, the first homeless man he photographed as part of that eliminates the pressure of a classroom setting and allows the project,” says Zibert. “When Linton introduced himself students to focus on the lesson at hand. andBecause asked Ridgeway for his in name, the man said, weeping, ‘You she specializes running operations and making have no idea how long it’s been since someone has cared to systems work, there was no need to reinvent the wheel with ask my name.’” the turnkey operation. Zibert shared the project on social media, and her sister-inlaw, inspired, reached out to Linton. “She told Linton that Summer—a preemie—came into the world too soon and left it too soon. Her daughter had a name, and no one wanted it to be forgotten,” says Zibert. Eventually the entire family, including Zibert and her daughter, got involved in the project, and are still avid supporters. Linton, in turn, held a fundraiser to bring Summer’s remains home to her family and pay for her memorial. “He even unveiled an art installation at the MonOrchid in 2015 dedicated to Summer. Then just this past February he unveiled another, this time dedicated to all of the homeless, like Summer, who lost their lives on the street,” says Zibert, who spoke at the opening in honor of her family and all who havelost their loved really ones tohelped homelessness. “That me fast track getting the business Zibert and her going,” she said. daughter also found a calling in Summer’s memory—working to help local homeless population. Maritza has lived inthe Gilbert for eight years with her Already on the family selection committee with Habitat for husband. Humanity in the Valley, Zibert and Kelsey also began volunteering “We chose the southeast corner of Gilbert because for One True Love this year. we loved the view of the San Tan Mountains and its “One TrueWe Love is a nonprofit including a food truck quiet nights. instantly fell in love with the beautiful that serves those in need in the Valley,” says Zibert, who sells neighborhood,” Grijalva said. lemonade from the truck to help raise funds for the local The neighborhood peace is calming, but work—and homeless population.can “Our is to serve the fiheart, mind, business—pressures addmission up. She sometimes nds herself and body of human beings in need through the distribution of walking that idiomatic tightrope. food, educational classes and community building events.” Fortunately, the ready support of her husband and that of Among theirofactivities with the food in addition to other members her extended family aretruck, available. raising money through sales, is to rescue food waste from food Among life lessons they teach Isabella are the organization trucks and grocers throughout the Valley and transform it into and time management skills Grijalva has honed for years. healthy meals for those in need. It’s estimated they’ve helped to “Our daughter is our No. 1 one priority. No matter how busy life gets, we stay focused on spending quality time as a family,” she said. “I find often that I apply many of the engineering concepts I have learned in my professional experience for “Our mission is to serve the heart, managing my personal time effi ciently andmind, effectively. “I like to fi nd ways to make things faster and body of human beings in need ...” by creating standard work procedures and reducing wasted time, like watching TV,” she said.

Nowadays, stability is not a “given in the corporate world. So having a second plan in hand and being ready

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upfront

TRENDS | PEOPLE | CULTURE | STYLE

SUCCESSFUL

by a

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GILBERT WOMAN MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

Hair


TRENDS | PEOPLE | CULTURE | STYLE

upfront

THICKENING TIPS ARE DESIGNED TO ASSIST WOMEN WHO HAVE THINNING HAIR BY CHRISTINA FUOCO-KARASINSKI

Thinning hair is a problem that plagues women of all ages, but, according to stylist Kelly Taylor-Newbould of Tribeca Salon in Signature Salon Studios, there are easy fixes for that. Licensed for eight and a half years, TaylorNewbould offered Gilbert Woman tips on how to thicken hair. Want more information? Visit TaylorNewbould at the salon, 1714 W. Guadalupe, Suite 113, Gilbert 85233. To make an appointment with Kelly Taylor-Newbould, call 480-570-7487. BIOTIN AND MULTIVITAMINS

The supplement Biotin helps consumers regrow their hair or make it fuller. Taylor-Newbould says her clients can attest to this. “It’s a little longer term and it’s harder to see results right away. A general multivitamin can do the same.” Available in most drug stores. ECLIPSE HAIR FIBER

The Warren, Michigan-based product uses microfiber technology to create an instant bond with the natural hair to eliminate the appearance of thinning hair. Stylists or clients can shake the fiber over thinning areas and, within seconds, it bonds with natural hair. “You can buy the product in your hair color,” Taylor-Newbould says. “It’s a little bit more natural looking. It’s not a permanent fix, but if you’re going out, it makes hair look thicker right away.” Visit eclipsehair.com for a list of locations.

with a serum that uses menthol that encourages blood flow to the area. “That causes hair to grow,” Taylor-Newbould says. Pricing depends on product; http://bit.ly/2cgXUWP DRY SHAMPOOS

Dry shampoos not only freshen your look, but some brands create the illusion of having more hair. Bumble and Bumble sells hair powder in three colors—white, “brownish” and “blondish”—that temporarily gives the appearance of thicker hair. $36; bumbleandbumble.com MOROCCAN AND COCONUT OIL

They may not thicken hair, per se, but it prevents more breakage that may lead to the appearance of thinning hair. “Remember we used to do VO5 hot oil treatments? I tell my clients to do that, but use coconut oil instead. Just warm it up and apply it. Getting it warm will open cuticle pores on the scalp. It feels so good when you’re done.” Moroccan Oil: Starts at $15; moroccanoil.com Coconut oil: Available in area drug stores

NIOXIN

Nioxin offers shampoos and conditioners that stimulates hair growth. Available at salons or stores like Beauty Brands or Ulta, Nioxin products come

GILBERT WOMAN MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

13


upfront

TRENDS | PEOPLE | CULTURE | STYLE

TRENDING

THREADS BY KELLY POTTS

With October comes pumpkin everything, cooler temps and, finally, layers. Layer lighter pieces in the first few “warmer” fall days until the real fall temps arrive.

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1. Light, lean and long cardigans are always a fall staple. Classic Boyfriend Cardigan Loft $49.50

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2. Because what says fall better than a scarf? Elijah Neckerchief Chico $39 3. This sweater is perfect for cool mornings and warmer afternoons. V-neck shirttail dolman sweater New York and Company $46.95

14

GILBERT WOMAN MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

3.


TRENDS | PEOPLE | CULTURE | STYLE

HAUTE

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Visit us online: www.MyAmericanFurnitureGalleries.com GILBERT WOMAN MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

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upfront

TRENDS | PEOPLE | CULTURE | STYLE

Beyond the

Workout

FIVE METABOLISM-BURNING DIET TIPS BY JULIE LEMEROND

We can spend hours in the gym each day, but if our diet is suffering, so is our waistline. Here are five solid ways to continue boosting your metabolism, simply by eating and drinking. Add these to your diet, and watch the results pour in. FIBER

Fiber is a key addition to a metabolism-burning diet. Our body can’t digest fiber, yet the body tries to, meaning increased caloric burn is taking place while your body is busy working on the inside. Lucky for us, fiber comes in many forms— everything from split peas and lentils (homemade soup anyone?) to raspberries, pears and apples. Artichokes pack a lot of power, but broccoli and Brussels sprouts aren’t far behind. Another great way to add fiber is to throw some flax and/or chia seeds into your daily smoothie. Start looking for ways to add fiber to each meal, and watch your waist start to whittle down. COFFEE AND GREEN TEA

This will come as good news for many of us. Can our coffee habit actually be a good thing? Science shows us that yes, indeed it is. All in moderation, however. Keep in mind that adding sugars and creamers will add calories to your favorite morning drink, but the caffeine in both tea and coffee can be a good thing for your metabolism. WHOLE GRAINS

Processed grains, such as white bread and pasta, are easy for the body to break down, but whole grain breads and pastas require more work, upping our metabolic rate. Steel-cut oatmeal, brown rice, quinoa, breads with sprouted grains, and whole grain pastas all make the cut when it comes to kicking our metabolism into high gear. 16

GILBERT WOMAN MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

WATER

We hear it all the time, but that’s because it’s true—hydrate, hydrate, hydrate. Keeping our bodies ahead of the dehydration curve puts us in the best position for our metabolism to do the work for us. Make sure you are drinking at least half of your body weight in ounces of water per day, and eating foods that are high in water give an added hydration boost as well. EAT MORE

Yes! Best advice ever! Jumpstarting your metabolism begins by actually eating food first thing in the morning. Otherwise your body has to work on its reserves to build energy, and a cycle begins of metabolism slowing down. Just make sure your breakfast is filled with any (or all!) of the above items, and you are putting yourself on the fast track to success. Snack well throughout the day, too—almonds and nuts are another metabolism booster, so keep them around for when hunger pangs hit between meals.


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call 480.833.5200 www.drboll.com 2034 East Southern Ave. Suite Y, Tempe AZ, 85282 GILBERT WOMAN MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

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Playing with 18

GILBERT WOMAN MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016


Iron doors hide and protect a 55-inch TV atop this focal point fireplace in Michelle and Brian Yorston’s Gilbert backyard. Troy Grondahl designed and built the project in five days so it would be ready for an outdoor birthday celebration. Photo/Terra Vida Landscape Design/Build

OUTDOOR FIREPLACES ARE NATURAL AND FUN GATHERING PLACES FOR FRIENDS AND FAMILY THIS TIME OF YEAR. THEY’RE A VALUABLE ADDITION TO ANY GILBERT PATIO. BY MIKE BUTLER

Feel that nip in the air? So do your Gilbert neighbors. You can hear the whoosh of sliding glass doors as couples rush outside, to their extended living rooms. There’s the occasional scrape of outdoor wicker and metal patio chairs being arranged just so. You hear laughter, lively conversation, maybe the faint clink of ice cubes against glassware. Then quiet, as the ancient rite begins. Fire. GILBERT WOMAN MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

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The family backyard bonfire today is more likely to be fueled by natural gas than a stack of wood, but the ritual is no less important. A great number of Gilbert homeowners are toasting their marshmallows over custom outdoor fireplaces and fire pits. They’re throwing old, wobbly, propane towers and chimineas in the dumper. “I can’t tell you how many beehive chimeneas we’ve torn out in the past couple of years,” says Troy Grondahl of Terra Vida Landscape Design/Build in Gilbert. Grondahl says he’s doing five to six fireplaces in the East Valley per year, and about 20-25 firepits. Basic fireplaces cost about $5,000-$7,500. The average 4-foot round or square fire pit can be built for $1,500 to $2,000, which is about what many homeowners spend on ready-made fire pit tables. Although more portable, a fire pit table will burn through a 20-pound propane tank

A roof, four pillars and a fireplace “wall” help define this outdoor den and promote a cozy ambiance. Photo/Terra Vida


This backyard fire pit is a natural gathering place for a patio that also features a wellappointed outdoor kitchen. Photo/California Pools & Landscape

pretty quickly. Most East Valley homeowners tend to gravitate toward stone finishes for their fireplaces and fire pits, says Grondahl. Residents often take their design cues from the stone trim used on their home’s exterior walls. In the case of fireplaces, homeowners often skip the surround, opting for a more clean, contemporary look. Often, homeowners want to replicate the fireplace/flat-screen TV set up they have in the family room. Some choose to make the fireplace the focal point of an outdoor “den” furnished with deepcushioned patio furniture. Although a pergola isn’t really needed for shade during the fall and winter months, it

helps define the seating area and promote a cozy ambiance. Brian and Michelle Yorston, who recently moved to Gilbert from Houston, worked with Grondahl to create a

Homeowners can build a simple fire pit and a permanent bench for what they might spend on a ready-made fire pit table. Photo/Terra Vida

GILBERT WOMAN MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

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These East Valley residents wanted to be able to see their striking, contemporary gas fireplace from the house and patio. Photo/Terra Vida

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GILBERT WOMAN MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016


A surround and hearth of contrasting tiles draws extra attention to this substantial outdoor fireplace. Photo/Terra Vida

magnificent stone fireplace, topped with a stucco enclosure that hides a 55-inch TV. Five comfy chairs gather around the hearth, and there’s plenty of extra seating available on long, built-in benches. Brian says he and Michelle had 45 people milling about the backyard for his dad’s 80th birthday party. “We love having friends and family over,” he says. “We watch movies, the Cardinals, the Diamondbacks. We

enjoy it.” Grondahl says he tries to talk homeowners out of wood-burning fireplaces and fire pits. “You might lose half your winter nights due to no-burn days,” he says. On cool winter days and nights, weather conditions can trap wood-smoke emissions close to the ground and prompt the Maricopa County Air Quality Department to issue a no-burn day. Fines

range from $50 to $250. It can be a serious health issue for children with asthma, the elderly and people with respiratory issues. No-burn day bans include manufactured logs. You can always find out if it is a no-burn day by visiting CleanAirMakeMore.com. Grondahl says adding natural gas to fireplaces, fire pits and fire pots only adds about $500 to the job if the homeowner already has a stub. GILBERT WOMAN MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

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6DIAGNOSIS DIDN’T SIDELINE OPTIMISTIC GILBERT WOMAN BY CHRISTINA FUOCO-KARASINSKI

When Maria Bernard found out she had breast cancer, the first thing she told her teenage children was that this wasn’t going to take her life. “That took the scare factor out of it,” says Bernard, 53, who moved to Gilbert from Illinois 10 years ago. That comment wasn’t just lip service. Bernard has a positive attitude about the journey that started last February. She admits that she cried initially, but turned her energy toward something more fulfilling. “I was focused on the fact that I was going to be getting new breasts,” she says with a laugh. “My surgeon had to say to me—more than once—this isn’t a boob job. This is an amputation. I hadn’t thought about it that way. It’s an important distinction.”

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GILBERT WOMAN MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016


GILBERT WOMAN MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

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NEW BATTLE Bernard was diagnosed with stage 2 breast cancer—invasive lobular carcinoma—in her left breast after a series of tests, starting with a mammogram. Upon her diagnosis, she did what every doctor discourages: She went to the internet. “I found a lot of good information that had me relieved,” she says. “I picked up my lab results at the hospital. I went into the lobby and learned I had invasive lobular carcinoma. I Googled it and got the information I needed.” It was fortuitous that the mammogram showed an abnormality, as the carcinoma typically doesn’t form a lump. Instead, there is a change in the breast that feels like a thickening or fullness in one part that is different from surrounding tissue. “I’ve always had lumpy breasts and I’ve had a problem with cysts,” Bernard says. “I needed one aspirated once. But when I went for this mammogram, I thought, ‘Here we go.’” After her mammogram, a follow-up ultrasound was ordered because of the concerns raised. Then the radiologist immediately ordered an MRI. That test showed an abnormality as well. “The radiologist said, ‘There’s a bit of a shadow, a little guy, that’s starting to grow,’” she recalls. “That’s when I felt pretty optimistic that it wasn’t a big deal. I felt that it hadn’t been there for a long time.” Dignity Health and Ironwood Cancer and Research Centers, working in tandem, arranged for her to see several specialists in one sitting. “These professionals met before my appointment, reviewed my case and together agreed on a recommended course of action that they shared with me at this appointment,” she says. “Normally, a woman has three different appointments and they relay the information to each practitioner in turn. With this process, they were consulting about me even before they talked to me.”

SIGNS OF

According to the American Cancer Society, any of the following unusual changes in the breast can be a first sign of breast cancer, including invasive lobular carcinoma: • • • • •

Swelling of all or part of the breast Skin irritation or dimpling Breast pain Nipple pain Redness, scaliness, or thickening of the nipple or breast skin • A nipple discharge other than breast milk • A lump in the underarm area. The National Breast Cancer Foundation says 40% of diagnosed breast cancers are detected

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GILBERT WOMAN MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

by women who feel a lump. Clinical breast exams are recommended, every one to three years starting at age 20 and then annually starting at age 40, the foundation reports. A clinical breast exam may be recommended more frequently for patients who have a family history of breast cancer. However, women should perform breast selfexams at any age, in the shower, in front of a mirror or lying down. The foundation offers two apps: Beyond the Shock, an educational resource with informational videos, stories from breast cancer survivors and a community Q&A; and Early Detection Plan, which helps women detect the disease in the early stages.


WE ARE CONFIDENT THAT ALL OF THE CANCER WAS REMOVED AND, WHILE I DID NOT RECEIVE CHEMO OR RADIATION, WE ARE CONFIDENT THAT THE CHANCES OF RECURRENCE ARE MINIMAL.”

One of the physicians was Dr. Sumeet Mendonca, a medical oncologist working through Ironwood Cancer and Research Centers. “This approach makes it easier for the patient to be treated in a timely fashion, to have care expedited and to have doctors in communication with each other, as far as management is concerned,” Mendonca says. “It’s important that the providers have had chances to discuss the case and be on the same page.” Bernard’s positive attitude is everything, the doctor adds. “It’s a journey, and having the right outlook and support system goes a long way,” Mendonca believes. “With all these different treatments that we do to get patients from point A to point B, the important thing that makes the process work is the patient’s attitude.” AN ‘INVASION’ According to the American Cancer Society, more than 180,000 women in the United States are diagnosed with invasive breast cancer each year. The organization goes onto say that “invasive” means that the cancer has “invaded” or spread to the surrounding breast tissues. Lobular indicates that the cancer began in the milk-producing lobules, which empty out into the ducts that carry milk to the nipple. Carcinoma refers to any cancer that begins in the skin or other tissues that cover internal organs. Based on her research and her doctors’ opinions, Bernard opted to have a double mastectomy with immediate reconstruction on March 29 instead of a lumpectomy. “I did hear somewhere in my course of action that they wanted to start with a lumpectomy,” she says. “I didn’t like the sound of that.” In August, doctors took out expanders and put in implants. She will have nipples tattooed in the coming months. “We are confident that all of the cancer was removed and, while I did not receive chemo or radiation, we are confident that the chances of recurrence are minimal,” she says. Instead, of traditional chemotherapy or radiation, she is taking Letrozole, an oral medication that

DRIVING FOR A

Cure

COULTER INFINITY OFFERING FREE OIL CHANGES, SALON SERVICES IN OCTOBER Coulter Infinity of Mesa is hosting its fourth annual Driving for Dollars throughout October. The dealership is donating $100 to breast-cancer research for every new vehicle purchase. Those who wear pink will receive a free oil change. Last year it gave away close to 200 oil changes. Anyone who test drives a new vehicle is handed a $25 Rolfs gift card. On Oct 7, Rolfs will turn Coulter Infinity into a salon for the day, providing makeovers and hair styling for service customers, walk-ins and women who have appointments with Mobile On-Site Mammography. Coulter Infinity is located at 6225 E. Test Dr., Mesa. For more information, call 480-396-1500.

GILBERT WOMAN MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

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MY EXPERIENCE REALLY HASN’T BEEN THAT BAD. AT LEAST IT WASN’T AS BAD AS IT COULD HAVE BEEN.”

decreases the amount of estrogen made by the body, for five years. This slows or reverses the growth of breast cancers that are fed by estrogen. Bernard says her only side effect is “fogginess.” “It’s a hormone blocker, so it’s cutting off the cancer’s food source,” she says. “It can’t survive.” Bernard says she feels fortunate that it was caught early. Doctors checked the lymph nodes closest to the cancer and everything was clear. However, there’s always the possibility that the cancer can hide in a cell that wasn’t eyed. So far she feels good. Her energy level isn’t quite where she hoped it would be by now, but she hasn’t had the pain or the pressure that bothers many patients. Bernard, who works in the insurance business with her husband, Chris, only took two and a half weeks off for the first surgery, and spent three days at home following the second. She credits her team of doctors for the success so far in her battle against breast cancer. “My experience really hasn’t been that bad,” she says. “At least it wasn’t as bad as it could have been.” A former D cup, Bernard is now between a B and C. “My breasts have taken some time to get used to,” she says. “It feels like a pillow attached to me. But I’m getting more and more used to it. Its becoming a natural feeling.” 28

GILBERT WOMAN MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016


OFFERING

‘Hope’

SARAH ELLERY BRIGHTENS THE DAY OF BREAST CANCER SURVIVORS WITH MY 'HOPE BAG' BY SRIANTHI PERERA It’s hard to describe the fear that clutches at a woman’s heart when she hears the doctor uttering the two dreaded words: “breast cancer.” Sarah Ellery heard those words in Gilbert some years ago. Despite members of her family being present, she remembers feeling alone. And later during treatment, the medical professionals were emotionless and detached. “There was just no hope,” she says. With her personal experience of the disease behind her and happy with a positive outcome, Ellery set out to help others. My Hope Bag was born. The premise is simple: My Hope Bag is a charitable organization that offers a lifeline of hope to women diagnosed with breast cancer. At its center is a tote bag filled with comforting items, such as a hand-made heart card, greeting card, bracelet and blanket, a knitted cap (“because heads get very cold during chemotherapy”), a notebook with survivor

stories and, perhaps the most important, a list of helpful resources. Often, My Hope Bag connects the patient with a survivor of the same type of breast cancer, and that may result in visiting the patient in the hospital during crucial times. Five years and 800 tote bags of hope later, Ellery and her group of volunteers continue to console and comfort women. Those in the Valley get a personal visit from one of the eight “Hope Sisters” while those outside receive it in the mail. Ellery, a branch office administrator for Edward Jones in Gilbert, sometimes delivers the bag herself after a day of work. “It’s just amazing. I leave feeling so good and knowing that I took some of my time out of my day just to bring a little joy to someone and it’s just so rewarding,” she says. The organization needs about $10,000 each year, and raises the funds via three annual events:

a benefit called Bingo for Boobies, the Breast Cancer Resource Expo and a golf tourney. Royal Neighbors of America, a fraternal life insurance company that provides services focused on women, makes a quarterly donation as well. Volunteer-run My Hope Bag fields about five calls a week and its biggest challenge is getting the word out. Without a paid staff member, marketing is sporadic and a grant writer could work wonders as well. Meanwhile, Ellery’s family, husband Brian, daughters Beckie and Lizzy, and son Dan serve on the board and each helps out in various ways. “There’s so much information out there, but unfortunately, a lot of women don’t know how to get it,” Ellery says. “And we don’t want anyone to be alone.” Contact My Hope Bag at 480-987-6898 or myhopebag.org.

GILBERT WOMAN MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

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PICTURE

Perfect In a bit of a juxtaposition, the many faces of Gilbert photographer Elaine Kessler are captured through the lens of another photographer. CREDIT: Cheryl Haselhorst/Gilbert Woman

ELAINE KESSLER SEES THE WORLD THROUGH A DIFFERENT LENS BY SRIANTHI PERERA

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Gilbert resident Elaine Kessler’s maternal grandmother was the village fortune teller in Udorn, Thailand, where she used tarot cards, palms and numerology. Kessler doesn’t use the same work tools, but she, too, makes a living by seeing— through a photographic lens. And although Kessler isn’t exactly a seer, she listens to intuition and has recorded and collected her dreams in a box since childhood. "Some of them I feel like have come true, and I feel like they portend the future," she says. “So when I had this feeling that my descendants were calling me, I listened. And it’s been the best thing ever.” Kessler is referring to motherhood, and how she came by it.

GILBERT WOMAN MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

When she married bank analyst William Johns 17 years ago, they decided not to have children because “there were too many kids in the world.” “Then the tsunami hit Southeast Asia and entire family lines were wiped out,” she says. “My family was fine because they were on the east side of the country, but I felt like my descendants were saying, ‘We need you to have children so that we can exist.’” So along came Adele, who is now 10 years old. And then came Elise, now 7. “They’re both beautiful and they’re brilliant in their own capacities,” Kessler says. They’re also remarkably independent


GILBERT WOMAN MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

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The work of Gilbert photographer Elaine Kessler.

and adult-like, and assemble most of their meals, even if it sometimes means ice cream for Sunday breakfast. “We take care of them, but it’s more like we provide the resources for you to take care of yourself,” she says. “My goal for them is to be brilliant and self-sufficient.” Kessler was an only child for 11 years. She thought of the family dog, a German shepherd called Hutch, as her brother until her real brother came along, both because she didn’t have siblings and because her father loved it like a son. Being the only child for that long, there was always the pressure and expectations on her to excel, she says. Her father was in the U.S. Air Force and it meant constant uprooting and dealing with new environments. Her father met her mother when he was stationed in Thailand during the Vietnam War. Her fortune-telling grandmother was also her father’s maid, and she had introduced her daughter to him; they married in a traditional Thai ceremony when he was 19 and she was 18. They both had entrepreneurial spirits, and Kessler knew she would have her own business one day. After Kessler married, the couple 32

GILBERT WOMAN MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

lived in Virginia, where they ran a stained-glass business, but the more successful commercial endeavor is the one she began in 2010 after they moved to Arizona: Elaine Kessler Photography. She didn’t dream of becoming a photographer, but stumbled into the profession when the well-framed pictures she took of baby Adele caught the eye of others. “Someone offered me money to take pictures of their family; that was the start,” she says. Kessler’s photography now is the result of years of practice. She didn’t take formal lessons for the most part. “When I’m photographing people, I have an inherent belief that everyone is beautiful. I think it just depends on how you see them,” she says. “When I’m doing landscapes, I’m always looking for the light. And that’s a great model for my life, too.” About 900 photo shoots later, “I’m always looking to shape the environment with the camera,” she says. “When I’m hired, it’s a great opportunity to create art.” Which is her other passion.

Kessler is known as an arts activist in Gilbert, and she revels in it. “I like that,” she says. “I think it was natural. I'm an activist in a lot of different areas, and I love the arts. I’m passionate about it. That was an area that’s missing for me in Gilbert; there isn’t art activism or art or activism so I’ve tried to create outlets for the arts that have meaning.” She is referring to District Second Saturdays, Mixer for Creatives and Created Equal Trigger Exhibits, all artbased events she designed to mobilize people to make a difference. “I think it’s me doing what I want to do and people wanting to call it something,” she says. She’s also a member of the town’s


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stakeholder task force on public arts, which is examining how to improve the arts, especially in the Downtown Heritage District. “I’m creating the argument that the arts support the economy and that it’s good for the quality of life,” she says. Which is also the topic of the master’s degree for which she’s reading, “Creative Enterprise and Cultural Leadership” at Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts. Kessler also chairs the town’s volunteer Human Relations Commission, which seeks to engage and empower its residents. The arts, she says, will promote natural engagement. Then recently, she was hired by Gilbert to provide photographs for the Discover Gilbert campaign, where she highlighted the town’s diversity because “we’re changing.” With her innate curiosity and interest in her surroundings, it’s only natural that Kessler would be thinking of politics and governance either locally or regionally. She sees it somewhere for herself: a platform where the arts support the economic foundation. She asks herself constantly whether you make more of a difference being a noisy constituent or someone in leadership. Yes, because she believes in seizing the moment. And it didn’t stem from her grandmother’s predictions or her dreams. “She believes in seizing the moment. That’s why I want to make the most of it. In every single way, I want to be the best everything,” she says, adding: “Well, my version of the best, because it’s different.” ELAINE KESSLER’S ART-BASED GATHERINGS • District Second Saturdays: A self-guided, site specific art tour through the Heritage District of Downtown Gilbert 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Saturdays Oct. 8, Nov. 12 and Dec. 10. • Mixer for Creatives: A forum for artistic people with the aim of mobilizing them to make a difference: None scheduled. • Created Equal Trigger Exhibits: A forum for conversation on a chosen topic designed to trigger civic action: None scheduled.

Write to Elaine at elaine@elainekesslerphotography. com.

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BERNADETTE PETERS ON ‘MOZART,’ MUSIC AND HER BELOVED MUTTS BY CHRISTINA FUOCO-KARASINSKI

Bernadette Peters prefers to keep busy. She laughs about her schedule, which balances the award-winning Amazon Prime show “Mozart in the Jungle” and concerts. “It’s nice to have choices,” Peters says. “It’s nice to be proud of what you do.” A veteran of the Broadway stage, Peters will give a career retrospective when she joins The Phoenix Symphony Orchestra to perform favorites from the stage and The Great American Songbook during a show at the Mesa Arts Center on Saturday, Oct. 15. She is best known for her performances in “Sunday in the Park with George,” “Song and Dance,” “Into the Woods” and “Annie Get Your Gun.” Peters has taken home three Tony Awards and has been memorialized on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. “I love my concerts, though,” Peters explains. “There’s not that fourth wall. I can say what I want, and sing what I want. Basically, I know I’m there to entertain, whether it’s


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We would like to welcome invite “everyone and their Velander mom” to watch, Dennis says Dr. Breanna she was ready. to our “I was relieved to get team it over with because I had been

Reserve your space – Go to AzMNH.org, click groups looking forward to it for so long,” she said. “We got and email. champagne, and I had actually (my aunt) shave it... and then Nancy kind of worked her magic to make it look a little better. It was super fun, and Liz just shared stories 3336 Chandler about whenEshe had shavedHeights her head.”Road Dennis says Suite that 119 she is enjoying her new “nonexistent hair.” AZ 85298 Gilbert, “Your hair is kind of like your protector and, once it’s gone, it makes you vulnerable,” she said. But Dennis says Dr. Howie Brauer Dr. Breanna Velander she has received a lot of support to ease the transition to Dr. Joy Brauer the new hairdo. Arizona Museum of Natural History “If anything, people were just like, ‘Oh, my gosh, now 53 N. Macdonald, Mesa, Rd AZ 85201 480.279.4790 I www.sevillefamilydentistry.com I Corner of Chandler Heights and Higley Rd 480-644-3553 | AzMNH.org you can just see your true beauty because all your hair is gone.’ I was really happy about it, and I kept getting compliments about how I wear it so well.” Dennis likes showing people that she shaved her hair off and it wasn’t the end of the world. She also emphasizes that there are other ways to get involved in the fight against cancer. Organizations like FCC provide lots of ways to help or remember a loved one, and “you obviously don’t have to shave your head,” she says. You can visit Liz Dennis’ event page at https://give.fightcrc. org/fundraise?fcid=665967

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Help her get there. Laura Dennis, left, poses with her aunt, Liz Dennis, before Laura has her head shaved to support colorectal cancer research. Photo courtesy Laura Dennis.

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Gael Garcia Bernal, right, Bernadette Peters and Malcolm McDowell star in the classical music comedy series "Mozart in the Jungle." Below, Rodrigo (Bernal) and Gloria (Peters) share a moment in episode three, season two of the award-winning Amazon Prime show.

in a fun way or a dramatic way. That’s the aim. That’s what’s important. “The other thing is I also get to pick songs that other people sang. I heard these songs and I get to recall hearing them.” Singing with orchestras is a joy for Peters, who has concerts scheduled through the end of the year. “It’s wonderful to have a great orchestra behind you,” she says. “I have some lovely charts they enjoy. It’s great stuff for them to play. They have some solos so I get to hear that.” Her small-screen career mimics her real life. The comedy “Mozart in the Jungle” tells the story of a symphony behind the curtains and on stage. It was 36

GILBERT WOMAN MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

created by Paul Weitz (“About a Boy”), Roman Coppola (“The Darjeeling Limited”) and Jason Schwartzman (“Rushmore”). Gael Garcia Bernal plays Rodrigo, a brash new maestro, and Lola Kirke appears as a young oboist who longs for her big break. “Mozart in the Jungle” won the 2016 Golden Globe for best TV comedy or musical series. Peters explained that as soon as she read the script, she was interested in playing Gloria Windsor, the head of the fictitious New York Symphony. “I always say that I like to go where the writing is good,” Peters says. “It can be good on stage; it could be good on television; it could be good on

film or it could be bad. The great part is I get to choose what I do. I could go do something else. That’s a luxury and a privilege.” With Weitz, Coppola and Schwartzman on board, she adds, the writing is well done. The cast also includes Malcolm McDowell. “I’m proud of our show,” Peters says. “In this day and age there is so much that’s dark and heavy in the world in the arts and television. I’m happy our show is very good.” A native of Ozone Park, New York, Peters began performing at age 3, with appearances on “Juvenile Jury” and “Name that Tune.” She graced the stage for the first time in “This is Goggle,” with James Daly and Kim Hunter. While still in her teens, she appeared in “The Most Happy Fella” and “The Penny Friend,” and performed in the national touring company of “Gypsy.” Broadway called her to the stage in 1967 for “Johnny No-Trump,” and in 1968 she earned a Theatre World Award for her portrayal of Josie Cohan in “George M!” Later that year, she took home a Drama Desk Award for “Dames at Sea.” Since, she has become a renaissance woman of sorts. She devotes her time and


very good.”

In this day and age there is so much that’s dark and heavy in the world. I’m happy our show is

talents to numerous events that benefit Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS. Her “pet project” is Broadway Barks, a dog and cat adoption benefiting New York City animal shelters and adoption agencies. It is hosted by Peters—who lives in New York City and Los Angeles with her rescue dogs, Charlie and Rosalia—and Broadway Barks’ co-founder Mary Tyler Moore. Broadway Barks is the name of her first book, which landed on The New York Times Bestseller List. The book package includes a CD recording of an original song written and sung by Peters. She penned “Stella is a Star” and “Stella and Charlie: Friends Forever.” Raising funds for pet-related issues is important to Peters.

“I’m always thinking about how to raise money,” she says. Companionship of animals is important to humans, she adds. “Dogs can sniff out cancer quicker than any medical doctors sometimes, and with more accuracy,” she explains. “At least we know that much. It’s a shame. People think we should be able to dispose of them. “I’ve always loved animals. I think its innate there when it’s strong. I think a lot of people don’t realize that we’re a kill nation. I think the world doesn’t understand animals yet.” Despite her hectic schedule, she’s not one who plans. “How does the saying go? Man plans, God laughs?”

CATCH A SHOW Bernadette Peters with The Phoenix Symphony, 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 15, at the Mesa Arts Center’s Ikeda Theater, One E. Main St., Mesa. Tickets are $60 to $90. For more information, call 480-644-6500 or visit mesaartscenter.com.

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Tempe Oktoberfest

The Sights and Sounds

of

Fall

CELEBRATE COOLER WEATHER IN GILBERT AND BEYOND BY CARSON MLNARIK AND CHRISTINA FUOCO-KARASINSKI

The Town of Gilbert generally doesn't host fall festivals, preferring to leave that to community organizations. This year, however, it's making an exception with the debut of the Gilbert Off the Street Art Festival. “We let the community take the lead on fall festivals,” says Mike Leppert, Town of Gilbert’s special events coordinator. “Rather than compete, we decided to let them do it. We’ve replaced it with Off the Street Art Festival on Saturday, Oct. 29.” Leppert says the town scheduled the event to fall during the day—10 a.m. to 7 p.m.—so it doesn’t conflict with any nighttime Halloween events. It will be held along the Western Canal Trail, just west of Gilbert Rinsley Road, near Ash, Leppert says. 38

GILBERT WOMAN MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

“That whole strip is a greenbelt there,” he says. “We’ll have about 50 or so sponsors and artisan vendors selling and distributing information.” The festival encompasses all forms of art, ranging from culinary designs to a chalk artist competition to music by local musicians Rinsley, Notes from Neptune, “American Idol” veteran Thomas Muglia and Booya. “The unique part of the festival is we’re doing steamroller print making,” he adds. “We take a steamroller and put down a printing pad and ink and paper and plywood, the steamroller runs over it and it makes a beautiful ink pink design.” Food will be at a minimum during the Off the Street Art Festival, as town officials are encouraging patrons to visit downtown restaurants. For more information, visit http://bit.ly/2aOXqd5. This fall, it’s all about the energy, sounds and sights of Gilbert. In case you can’t make it, we’ve compiled a list of some of the top fall festivals around the Valley.


Joseph and Anthony Vertuccio explore their family's farm.

Thomas Muglia

SCHNEPF FARMS PUMPKIN AND CHILI PARTY An afternoon at Schnepf Farms provides some of the best fall family fun. Expect homemade cornbread, hayrides, a roller coaster, hillbilly pig races, zip line, corn mazes and train rides. Also don’t forget to swing by the pumpkin patch for some carving at home. Pumpkin and Chili Party, times TBA Thursdays through Sundays in October, Schnepf Farms, 24610 S. Rittenhouse Rd., Queen Creek, $18, 480-987-3100, schnepffarms.com. VERTUCCIO FARMS Experience autumn the Vertuccio Farms way. There will be activities for the whole family, including a 7-acre corn maze, a barrel train ride, petting zoo and mini zipline. Vertuccio Farms Fall Festival, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday The Great Pumpkin Festival

through Thursday, 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday, from Oct. 1 to Nov. 6, at the farm, 4011 S. Power Rd., Mesa, $9, 480-882-1482, vertucciofarms.com FOUR PEAKS OKTOBERFEST For those looking for a different kind of fall festival, the Four Peaks Oktoberfest is the largest celebration of its kind in Arizona. There will be traditional Bavarian beer festivities during the day and concerts at night, by the likes of Lil Jon. There will be carnival games and a selection of food and beer from around the world. Four Peaks Oktoberfest, times vary, Friday, Oct. 7, to Sunday, Oct. 9, Tempe Beach Park, 80 W. Rio Salado Pkwy., Tempe, $7 to $80, 480-350-8181, tempeoktoberfest.com. THE GREAT PUMPKIN FESTIVAL The fall tradition at the Desert Botanical Garden continues. Take a hayride out to the pumpkin patch where kids can find the perfect pumpkin. There’s also a hay bale maze, pumpkin decorating, carnival games, farm animals, and country, folk and bluegrass dance instruction. A separate station in the Community GILBERT WOMAN MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

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Garden shows how pumpkins and vegetables grow. Festival activities are included with paid Garden admission. The Great Pumpkin Festival, times vary, Friday, Oct. 21, to Sunday, Oct. 23, Desert Botanical Garden, 1201 N. Galvin Pkwy., Phoenix, $10 to $22, 480-941-1225, dbg.org. GOODYEAR FALL FESTIVAL Celebrate fall with the family at Goodyear Ballpark, the Spring Training home of the Cincinnati Reds and Cleveland Indians. There will be a pumpkin patch, costume contest, trickor-treating, corn hole, a book sale, arts and crafts, dance, rock wall and trackless train rides. Goodyear Fall Festival, 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 22, Goodyear Ballpark, 1933 S. Ballpark Way, Goodyear, free, 623-882-3120, goodyearbp.com.

Vertuccio Farms

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GILBERT WOMAN MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

AUTUMNFEST ARTS AND CRAFTS FAIR Anthem residents and visitors from throughout the Valley can come together to celebrate all things fall. Besides arts and crafts, the fall festival will feature a pumpkin patch, live music, magicians, balloon artists, arts and crafts vendors, carnival rides and fire truck, ambulance and sheriff patrol vehicle tours. Autumnfest Arts and Crafts Fair, times vary, Saturday, Oct. 22, and Sunday, Oct. 23, Anthem Community Center Park, 41703 N. Gavilan Peak Pkwy., Phoenix, free, 623-742-6050, onlineatanthem.com.


DIA DE LOS MUERTOS PHOENIX FESTIVAL Experience Dia de los Muertos at Steele Indian School Park. There will be an artists’ Mercado, a variety of food, mask-masking, a community altar, musical petting zoo and sugar skull decorating. The night will end with La Procesión, when all will march to remember those they have lost. Dia de los Muertos, noon to 6 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 23, Steele Indian School Park, 300

E. Indian School Rd., Phoenix, free, 480834-5731, diadelosmuertosphx.com. HALLOWEEN SPOOKTACULAR Calling all the witches, superheroes, goblins, ghosts (and parents)! The Chandler Halloween Spooktacular will featuring games like pumpkin bowling, witches’ broom races and piñatas as well as a haunted house, inflatable corn maze and face painting. There will also be a

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Tempe Oktoberfest

costume contest and a trunk-or-treat. Halloween Spooktacular, 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 28, at the Chandler Downtown Library Plaza, 22 S. Delaware St., Chandler, free, 480-782-2735, chandleraz.gov. BALLOON SPOOKTACULAR The Balloon Spooktacular presents more than 20 hot air balloons, 4,000 pounds of candy, live music, food, tethered balloon rides, a haunted trail and fireworks. Balloon Spooktacular, 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. Friday, Oct. 28, Salt River Fields at Talking Stick, 7555 N. Pima Rd., Scottsdale, $10 to $15, 480-270-5000, srfballoonfestivals.com. SCOTTSDALE FALL FESTIVAL Scottsdale’s annual fall festival guarantees spooky fun for everyone. The event will feature more than 10 bounce houses, 25 game booths, live music, fireworks and a lot of candy. Scottsdale Fall Festival, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 29, Eldorado Park, 2301 N. Miller Rd., Scottsdale, free, 480-312-0217, scottsdaleaz.gov.

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PAISLEY PUMPKIN HOLIDAY FESTIVAL This outdoor holiday festival at Dana Park features dozens of unique vendors, food and family fun. Paisley Pumpkin Holiday Festival, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 29, Dana Park, 1758 S. Val Vista Dr., Mesa, free admission, thepaisleypumpkin.com. CERTIFIED LOCAL FALL FESTIVAL The Certified Local Fall Festival is an annual celebration of all things Arizona. The entertainment lineup is filled with more than 100 local vendors. Visit your favorite Arizona businesses, restaurants and food trucks. Certified Local Fall Festival, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 5, Margaret T. Hance Park, 67 W. Culver St., Phoenix, free admission, 602-956-0909, localfirstaz.com.

Vertuccio Farms

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GILBERT WOMAN MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

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A BLESSED

Family

THROUGH HEARTACHE, FORMER SPORTS STAR FINDS SOLACE IN HUSBAND, TWO SONS BY CHRISTINA FUOCO-KARASINSKI

For 21-year Gilbert resident Denise Butticci Peck, being named to the Chico State Athletics Hall of Fame is bittersweet. She’s thrilled that she was honored in late September for her soccer and track talents during her two years at the school. However, it’s upsetting that her father, who died in April 1999, won’t be there. “It’s a little emotional,” Peck says. “I was really close with my father. My father was my everything. Once I think about it, I get a little choked up. He’s really the one this would mean the world to. I just 44

GILBERT WOMAN MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

have a heavy heart because my dad won’t be there.” Her father’s death was just another devastating blow to the family. “We’ve had a lot of heartbreak,” she says. “My sister lost her 6-year-old daughter. There’s my dad. My husband, Chad, is a really strong individual. He’s a stay-at-home dad who has raised our boys since they were babies. Not a lot of men can say that. It’s pretty special what we have.” Their two sons are Davis and Devin. Davis is a club soccer star who recently

committed to Grand Canyon University. He plays forward, mirroring his mom’s years of soccer. Devin is developmentally disabled. He was born three and a half months premature. “Devin’s my little munchkin,” she says happily. “He was the miracle baby of the Valley. He was covered extensively by the media. He was baptized on Easter Sunday at St. Joe’s 17 years ago. “He was in the hospital for four and a half months before he came home. He faced a lot of challenges while in the hospital. I remember on Feb. 4, they told


us there was nothing more they could do, but that little stinker fought through it.” He’s nonverbal, but, Peck says, he’s a typical teenager, who has his nose in his iPad. Even though he was told he would never walk, he’s making strides. “He’s his brother’s biggest fan, too,” she added. “Davis has a lot of inner strength to do well for his brother. There’s a neat bond between those two.” SOCCER CAREER Peck is honored to be named to the Chico State Athletic Hall of Fame. She played soccer in 1991 and 1992, and participated in track and field in 1991 at the Chico, California, school. “It’s hard to say why I was named,” she says. “I only played there two years. Usually the people they name played all four years. I know I was a big part of the soccer team, looking back at the articles that were written.” Growing up in California’s Bay area, Peck was a longtime soccer player. Her high school didn’t have a team, so she played with a traveling club. She began her post-high school career at Cal StateHayward, which won an NCAA national

championship while she was there. Peck was named MVP of that tournament— as a sophomore. “It was a good time,” she says. “We were such a great team. We beat everyone, but I ended up blowing out my knee. It was my third major knee surgery. “It was a good time to leave because my coach, Colin Lindores, was hired as the men’s team’s coach at Stanford. I took a year off to recover from knee surgery before transferring to Chico.” Chico State was a good move for her as she learned to be independent because she was two and a half hours from her parents. The distance didn’t matter to her parents, who never missed a game. At Chico State, she studied

recreation administration, but now works as regional director for the Southwest for Biogen, which specializes in the discovery, development and delivery of therapies for the treatment of neurodegenerative, hematologic, and autoimmune diseases to patients worldwide. She manages a team of eight people. She enjoys living in Gilbert with her family, whom, she feels is “blessed,” despite its challenges. Peck misses the Bay area, but has fallen in love with the Valley. “It’s been a great place to raise the children,” she says. “It’s been a great place to live. Even though I miss home, I’m happy here.” GILBERT WOMAN MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

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travel

Photo courtesy Utah Shakespeare Festival 2016.

The new $30 million Engelstad Shakespeare Theatre in Cedar City, Utah, is built in the Elizabethan style.

Finding Culture in the

Wilderness

A VISIT TO THE FAMOUS UTAH SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL BY SCOTT SHUMAKER

Sitting down to “Henry V” at the 55th annual Utah Shakespeare Festival felt different than any other theater experience I have had. Maybe it was the setting. My fiancée and I had just spent the day driving past 1,000-foot cliffs, sculpted rocks, and endless vistas on our way to Cedar City, a town of about 30,000 in southwestern Utah. This small town is home, improbably, to one of the oldest and largest Shakespeare festivals in the country. How did the Utah Shakespeare Festival, begun in 1962 on a $1,000 budget, blossom into a $7 million, four-month theatrical extravaganza attended by more than 100,000 people? During our visit, we discovered an interesting alchemy between the Utah canyon country and Tony Award-winning theater. Each is great alone, but together they are even better. The drive from Arizona to Cedar City might be among the most scenic car trips I have ever taken. On the way to the festival we skirted the Vermillion Cliffs, the North Rim of the Grand Canyon, and Zion National Park—to name just a 46

GILBERT WOMAN MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016


Photo by Karl Hugh. Photo courtesy Utah Shakespeare Festival 2016.

A scene from the Utah Shakespeare Festival’s 2016 production of “The Cocoanuts.”

GILBERT WOMAN MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

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travel

A scene from the Utah Shakespeare Festival’s 2016 production of “The Greenshow.”

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GILBERT WOMAN MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

Photo by Katrina Christensen. Courtesy Utah Shakespeare Festival 2016.

Paul Sandberg, left, as Julius Caesar and Sam Ashdown as Mark Antony in the Utah Shakespeare Festival’s 2016 production of “Julius Caesar.”

Photo by Karl Hugh. Courtesy Utah Shakespeare Festival 2016.

few prominent attractions. There are lots of worthwhile places to stop and stretch your legs along this route. Just off of Highway 89A, for example, the Navajo Bridge allows pedestrians to walk dizzyingly high above the Colorado River. Jaw-dropping scenery like this was still swirling in my head when the lights dimmed in the Engelstad Theater, the festival’s $30 million recreation of an Elizabethan-era theater. The play began as the day’s last rays of sun beamed into the semi-outdoor theater, and the audience hushed as a tall, stone-faced actor strode on stage. “Henry V” famously opens with this lone narrator beckoning the audience to use its imagination to help the actors recreate the Battle of Agincourt, where a vastly outnumbered English army defeated the French forces. “Suppose within the girdle of these walls are now confined two mighty monarchies,” the narrator beckoned, as the audience sat in rapt attention. Pretending that France and England were locked in conflict on a stage in rural Utah was surprisingly easy, thanks to the festivals high production values. The costumes, lighting, and effects were carefully and professionally crafted, and the acting and staging were sophisticated. For example, subtle audio touches, like low bass beats played during the narrator’s opening soliloquy, added an eerie touch that drew me in. And when Henry V, disguised as a regular soldier, visits his


men the night before the big battle, the campfire on stage dancing and puppetry before the evening plays and is performed on was a real fire. an outdoor stage next to the main theaters. Maybe it was the production’s use of smoke-andOn the night we attended, the singing and dancing followed fire effects that led to the theater’s fire alarm going off an “English Country Faire” theme. As the audience stretched out mysteriously halfway through our play. Everybody had to and relaxed in the grass, a troupe of performers danced and crooned evacuate the theater briefly, but instead of being irritated, out tunes like “Scarborough Faire” and the “Drunken Sailor” sea we enjoyed a short moonlit stroll in the cool night air. shanty. At one point, the performers invited As we waited for the all clear, we explored the leafy audience members on stage to participate in a Jane campus of Southern Utah University, where Austen-era dance and a game of hot potato. The the festival is held, and stumbled on free show wasn’t cutting edge, but it delivered the recently retired Adams easy-going entertainment for the whole family. Memorial Theater. The I suspect that the professionally directed Adams is a reproduction shows, beautiful language and inspired acting at of Shakespeare’s original the Utah Shakespeare Festival are enhanced by T THE A G IN Globe theater, and its gorgeous natural surroundings. With three Y L: TLY PLA A N E IV R T S R E U the wooden structure, National Parks nearby, visitors to Cedar City C EF ESPEAR K A H S completed in 1977, helped can easily alternate between high culture and UTAH Murder d d O put the festival on the map. vast wilderness. Hiking during the day and The for Two The le p u In 1981, the BBC even flew plays at night—this is my kind of festival. Co Julius now coanuts o h C g u ro r out members of the Royal th Caesa through now Oct. 22 Shakespeare Company— now FOR MORE INFORMATION, h g Oct. 22 throu Jeremy Irons among them— through visit bard.org 5 1 Oct. to film a documentary in Oct. 22 351 W. Center St., the Adams. With the recent Cedar City, Utah 84720 opening of the Engelstad 435-586-7880 Theater, an updated Elizabethan theater, the Adams is slated for demolition. The evacuation led to a fun side adventure. We noticed the gate to the old theater was left open, and as we looked Family Funeral inside the darkened “wooden O,” dimly illuminated by the - Comfort From Trust moon, it seemed like a vision back in time to the days when Shakespeare was writing and acting in plays to keep his company profitable. When you lose a loved one, third generation of Coury’s, feel overwhelmed with deit is one of those times in life Mountain View Funeral tails, so another benefit that Though it is great place to pay homage to the Bard, the when you can feel lost, or Home is a Mesa, AZ tradition family funeral homes can ofUtah Shakespeare Festival is more than Shakespeare. If we adrift–not sure of which way with professionally trained fer is access to a concierge to turn and how to make it and licensed staff members to help with everything from hadn’t been in the mood for “Henry V” that night, we could through. You need to know all with the stated goal of florists, hotels, restaurants that there’s someone there ensuring your loved one re- and even car services. Our have chosen “The Cocoanuts,” a Broadway musical from that you can trust, someone ceives the dignified memori- professional staff is available who feels like family. A funeral al service that they deserve. to assist with any special 1925, playing on another stage. The musical comedy was director who cares can make needs six days per week. a huge difference in your Community Education originally performed by the Marx Brothers and is set during comfort level, and allow you A family funeral home takes Finding the right fit for a futhe Florida land boom of the 1920s. It is filled with snappy to the safety of knowing that services a step further by neral home is important; you your best interests are being offering education before want to know that not only is dialogue and musical numbers composed by Irving Berlin. considered. This is the bene- a loss as well as caring and your loved one being treated fit of choosing Mountain View compassion during a period with dignity, but that you and A live band performs the numbers at the festival. Funeral Home and Cemetery of mourning. Funeral direc- your family will feel comfortfor your final arrangements tors and their team will help able and supported in your Other non-Shakespeare offerings in this year’s festival and those of your loved ones. you understand the meaning decisions during this time. include “Murder for Two,” a musical whodunit about a of different parts of the me- Selecting Mountain View FuFamily Owned and Operated morial service, the differenc- neral Home and Cemetery is murder at a small town birthday party, and Neil Simon’s Mountain View Funeral es between cremation and one way to ensure that you Home understands the con- interment, and provide you are using a family funeral classic comedy, “The Odd Couple.” cept of family: since 1951, with a wealth of additional home who will go above and the Coury family have been options including beautiful beyond your expectations. Though it offers plenty of mature productions—for operating the family funeral touches such as a release of home under the guiding phi- white doves after the service. example, this year’s production of Shakespeare’s “Julius losophy of being of service Mention this Caesar”—the Utah Shakespeare Festival prides itself on to members of the communi- Your Personal Concierge ad to get ty in their time of need. Now When a loved one passes $200 being family-friendly. The festival includes child-friendly managed by the Second and from the mortal coil, you can Discount plays among more adult productions, and licensed child care ASK ABOUT HOW WE’RE GOING GREEN. is available during performances. While younger children FUNERAL SERVICES • CEMETERY • CREMATION may not be ready for Shakespeare, the whole family can 480-832-2850 | www.mvfuneralhome.com hang together during the light-hearted, and totally free, On Main St. Just East of Sossamon Rd. “The Greenshow.” “The Greenshow” consists of singing, GILBERT WOMAN MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

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food &wine

DINING | REVIEWS | WINE | SPIRITS

A Cut

ABOVE Sharon Gee, right, encouraged her daughter Kathy, left, to pursue a career in medicine, instead of the culinary arts.

A FOODIE AT HEART, WILD GINGER CHEF TRADES SCALPEL FOR CLEAVER BY CHRISTINA FUOCO-KARASINSKI

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Kathy Gee was turned on to food as a child growing up in the basement of her family’s Chinese restaurant in Cleveland. The artistry and flavors that her great-grandfather, grandfather and father put into the traditional Chinese dishes was enough to make her mouth water. But her parents had other aspirations for her. They wanted her to go to medical school. “My parents wanted better things for me,” says Gee, who studied nursing at Arizona State. “But I had to go where I was happy.” That place is Gilbert’s Wild Ginger, her family’s restaurant, where she is the chef. It is right in her wheelhouse. “My parents are more traditional,” she says. “I loved growing up


Wild Ginger chicken is the house specialty and marinated in ginger and jalapeno, with just a hint of sweetness.

The crispy roasted pork undergoes a four-day “aging process.” The Chinese traditional meal features five-spice pork in a steamed mantou (Chinese steamed bun or bread) with cilantro, cucumber and red bell pepper. The three accompanying sauces make it a fusion dish—traditional hoisin, spicy aioli and sweet chile sauce.

Walnut shrimp is battered with a sweet mayo glaze and topped with candied walnuts.

in a traditional household. I know what authentic Chinese food tastes like. I get to mix into it the new-school concept.” Serving dishes like butterscotch braised pork ($15) and lemongrass chicken ($13), Gee is self-taught, save for a few high school classes. “I took it upon myself to learn about almost every culture after school,” says Gee, who called herself “the biggest foodie ever.” “I would go out somewhere, eat a certain dish and try my best to replicate it.” Now, it’s her time to shine. Initially, Wild Ginger was to be just Chinese, or maybe Chinese and Vietnamese. “I was into Asian fusion, mixing bold, intricate, exciting spices and flavors together to make something different and creative,” Gee says. Wild Ginger’s signature dishes start with Wild Ginger chicken— battered chicken, ginger, jalapeno and a hint of sweetness. Adding to the ginger theme is ginger ice cream ($5), which has just a hint of the spice. “For a restaurant called Wild Ginger, we didn’t have a lot of ginger dishes,” Gee says with a laugh. “I told my dad that we needed a ginger dish, a signature dessert. What’s easier than ice cream? “I wasn’t sure if people would like it. Ginger is a different flavor, especially within ice cream. I figured it would be hit or miss. I’ve had GILBERT WOMAN MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

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food & wine

FOOD SPOTLIGHT

such great reviews on it. Customers are requesting pints. But for me to make the ice cream, it’s a three-day process. I only make a certain amount because I can only store a little.” Gee also recommends the gluten-free butterscotch braised pork ($15), which features garlic and butterscotch miso glaze, which is placed atop wasabi mash. “I let it age out for a couple of days and marinate,” she says of the pork. “I

bake it and make sure it’s nice and crispy. I put a cucumber slice to make it more refreshing and add bell peppers. “Instead of having one sauce, I have three: hoisin, spicy sweet aioli and sweet chile. You have three different flavors, in case I don’t hit your palate.” She adds that the hoisin sauce is the most popular, the aioli a close second. Gee doesn’t skimp on the portion, either. “You get a huge slab of it and that

It takes three days to create the homemade ginger ice cream with ginger bits, topped with homemade orange zest and sesame brittle.

Butterscotch pork belly is braised for 14 hours with a butterscotch miso glaze after it is seared. It comes with wasabi mashed potatoes.

Mongolian beef is tender and stir fried with green and white onions with a bit of spice.

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FOOD SPOTLIGHT

food & wine

David Gee is proud to have his daughter Kathy on board as chef.

baby is braised for 12 hours,” she says. “You don’t see a lot of pork belly out here. If you do, it’s in Scottsdale and it’s 2 ounces for $20. I marinate it in black pepper, chives, garlic, shallots and white and green onions. It’s soaked in and the meat falls apart. I have to flash freeze it for a second, just so I can cut it. If you don’t, it falls apart. The butterscotch braised pork is among the restaurant’s best-selling dishes. Ironically, her father loved the meal, but was skeptical about adding it to the menu. “My dad kept telling me it’s not going to sell,” she says. “As soon as the word got out, I have made more than 100 pounds of it. That one sells mostly under our specialtyitem menus, which is awesome.” Her father, David Gee, says that the Asian-fusion restaurant’s pricing reflects the neighborhood.

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food & wine

FOOD SPOTLIGHT

Master Gee’s chicken is battered and served with a spicy brown sauce, with bell peppers and onions.

“The price is affordable—not too expensive, but not real cheap,” he says. Wild Ginger is her father’s third restaurant. The first two were not as upscale. David Gee says that the Gilbert location, at Higley and Guadalupe roads, was the ideal spot for the restaurant. “I live in this neighborhood, Morrison Ranch,” David Gee says. “I’ve been living here for seven years. I love this neighborhood. “I was looking for the perfect space for many years. It’s a good location. We’ve been pretty busy, thanks to word of mouth.” Kathy and her father keep a foot in the past while looking toward the future. “We butt heads like crazy because we’re family,” she says. “But it’s nice to work with my sister, mom and dad. I relive what I did growing up. I grew up in a restaurant in Cleveland— literally. Twenty years later, I’m back in the restaurant and it’s me behind the stove.” WILD GINGER 861 N. Higley Rd. Suite 111 Gilbert 85234 480-907-7717 Wildgingeraz.com

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food & wine

IN SEASON

BY KELLY POTTS

Blackberry Hand Pies INGREDIENTS • • • • • • • • • • • • •

1 tablespoon sour cream 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice (from 1 lemon) 2 tablespoons ice water, plus more if necessary 1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour, plus more for rolling Coarse salt 1/3 cup plus 1 teaspoon granulated sugar, divided 1 stick cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces 3/4 cup fresh blackberries Blackberries regular, 6 oz. package 3/4 cup fresh raspberries 1 tablespoon plus 1 1/2 teaspoons cornstarch 1 large egg, lightly beaten Fine sanding sugar, for sprinkling

DIRECTIONS

Blackberries Perhaps one of the most overlooked berries is making a winter comeback. Blackberries contain oil rich in omega-3 and -6 fats as well as protein and dietary fiber. This versatile berry is popular for use in desserts, jams, seedless jelly and sometimes wine. Winter is one of the best growing seasons for blackberries, so enjoy fresh berries all year-round.

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Whisk together sour cream, lemon juice and ice water in a bowl. Mix together flour, 1/2 teaspoon salt, and 1 teaspoon granulated sugar in a large bowl. Add butter and beat with a mixer on medium-low until mixture resembles coarse meal with some blueberry-size clumps remaining. Gradually beat in sour-cream mixture until just combined but still crumbly. (Squeeze a small amount of dough to see if it holds together. Beat in more water, 1 teaspoon at a time, if necessary.) Divide dough in half, gather into two flat rectangles, and wrap in plastic wrap. Refrigerate until just firm, 45 minutes. Roll out each rectangle of dough into a 7-by-14-inch rectangle on a piece of floured parchment with a floured rolling pin. (Dough will be very thin.) Transfer rectangles on parchment to two baking sheets and refrigerate until firm, 15 minutes. Meanwhile, stir together berries, remaining 1/3 cup granulated sugar, cornstarch, and 1/4 teaspoon salt in a bowl. Slide 1 dough rectangle, still on parchment, onto a work surface. With a long side facing you, cut dough crosswise into four 3 1/2-by-7-inch strips. Mound 2 tablespoons berry mixture in center of bottom half of each strip. Brush edges with egg wash and fold top half over fruit to enclose. Press firmly to seal and trim bottom edge, leaving folded top edge uncut. Cut vents in each pie and place about 2 inches apart on baking sheet lined with fresh parchment. Transfer to freezer. Repeat with remaining dough and berry mixture. Freeze hand pies until very firm, at least 45 minutes. Preheat oven to 375 degrees with racks in upper and lower thirds. Lightly brush pies with egg wash and sprinkle with sanding sugar. Bake, rotating sheets and switching racks halfway through, until pies are golden brown, 35 to 40 minutes. Transfer to a wire rack to cool. Serve warm or at room temperature.


IN SEASON

food & wine

Peach and Wild Blackberry Salsa INGREDIENTS • • • • • • • • • •

2 large peaches (firm and ripe, peeled, stone removed and diced into 1/2-inch pieces) 1 1⁄2 cups fresh wild blackberries or 1 1⁄2 cups regular fresh blackberries 1⁄2 large sweet red pepper, seeded and diced small 1⁄2 large red onion, chopped small 2 medium jalapeno peppers, seeded and chopped very small 2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh cilantro 1 teaspoon ground cumin 6 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice (about 3 large limes) 1⁄4 cup freshly squeezed orange juice 1⁄4 cup liquid honey

DIRECTIONS Prepare peaches and place in a large mixing bowl. Wash and pat dry blackberries and set aside. To the mixing bowl with peaches, add sweet red pepper, red onion, Jalapeno peppers, cilantro, cumin, lime juice, orange juice and honey, mix well. Add blackberries and fold in gently trying not to mash them. Set mixture aside in refrigerator so that flavors will combine. Serve with grilled fish or seafood of your choice.

food & wine

FROM THE CREATIVE MINDS of chef Kathy Gee and her father, David, Wild Ginger serves up some of the most innovative Asian fusion dishes in the Valley. Traditionalists will enjoy orange chicken or sweet and sour pork, but set that aside for inventive dishes like butterscotch pork with wasabi mashed potatoes, or the battered Wild Ginger chicken with jalapeño and just a hint of sweetness. The modern twist continues with the comfortable decor, that includes oversized pillows and intricate art. Stop by Wild Ginger and enjoy the finest in Asian fusion.

Crispy Roasted Pork Appetizer

861 N. Higley Rd., Suite 111, Gilbert 480-907-7717 | wildgingeraz.com Monday-Saturday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday, noon to 8 p.m.

RESTAURANT GUIDE

CALLING ALL BREAKFAST LOVERS! If you haven’t been to the Henhouse Cafe you are truly missing out. You’ll feel right at home with the friendly atmosphere and shabby chic decor. Our food is purchased locally from farm to table, we even make our own sausage in house. It’s high quality comfort food that will delight your taste buds. The menu is bursting with egg items from the griddle to chicken and waffles. The homemade sausage and homemade green chile sauce is so delicious!! We don’t think you can go wrong with anything on the Henhouse Cafe menu. 3133 S. Lindsay Rd., Gilbert 480-899-4214 3244 E. Guadalupe Rd., Gilbert 480-219-7379. henhouse-cafe.com Monday-Sunday, 6:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.

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food & wine

WHAT'S COOKING

What's Cooking WITH JAN D'ATRI

Hamburger Pancakes I just love this recipe. For so many reasons. Not the least of which is the name—hamburger pancakes. I also love the stories behind the recipe. Hamburger pancakes were made popular during wartime when rationing was top of mind. Here what one of my favorite vintage cookbooks, “Cooking On a Ration,” said about 1943: “We have taken a sudden nosedive from happy-go-lucky splashing about with plenty of whipping cream, pounds of butter and rib roasts to conserving our precious food supply, making it stretch,” it read. “Women have been whirled into 58

GILBERT WOMAN MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

dizzy readjustments and are showing dauntless spirit and resolve to turn out delectable food with whatever materials may be available.” These were times of battle and belttightening. Fancy dishes like Entrecote a la Bourguignon were likely replaced by recipes simply titled, wartime stew and victory pie. Meatball pancakes (or hamburger pancakes) was one of those simple and dollar-stretching dishes that should have never left our recipe box. I’ve received several emails over time from readers sharing their recipe for these unique and savory pancakes.

They’re a favorite for busy moms as they come together quickly, and perfect for kids who will gobble them up in an instant! They can be a main meal served with tomato sauce or as a finger food appetizer with catsup! Here’s a recipe and story from Marty Grotlisch: “It was World War II and I was just out of college,” Marty said. “I was on a radio show in Kansas City called The Happy Kitchen. As that was some 64 years ago, memories dim, but such fun it was! We always included at least one recipe. When my ‘true love returned


from the Battle of the Bulge, we married and I left with a suitcase full of recipes.” Well, Marty, I’m glad this one went packing with you. After making your wartime meatball pancakes, it was a battle to the finish in our family for the last one on the plate!

MARTY’S MEATBALL PANCAKES INGREDIENTS:

3 egg yolks, beaten 1/2 pound ground beef 1/2 teaspoon baking powder 1/2 teaspoon salt Dash of pepper 1 tablespoon grated onion 3 stiffly beaten egg whites 1 teaspoon lemon juice 1 tablespoon minced parsley

DIRECTIONS:

Mix together first eight ingredients and then fold in the beaten egg whites. Drop by spoonfuls onto hot greased griddle. When puffed and brown, turn and brown on other side. Serve warm with sauce or catsup.

Peach and Sour Another story, another recipe…. Cream Here’s anotherTart recipe and story I received from Pat in

Tucson: “I was a young bride on a very low budget and always looking for recipes that would stretch my dollar. The hamburger pancakes made my dollar go further INGREDIENTS: andforwere delicious cold. We served our Flour the work surfacehot • 1orstore-bought piecrust these (such asinPillsbury) as yellow a special oncequartered a week and theyhoney, would sell • • restaurant 5 ripe medium peaches, • 1 tbsp warmed 1 16-ounce container out every time.” sour cream • 4 tbsp confectioners’ sugar • 2 tbsp thinly sliced almonds

HAMBURGER PANCAKES

DIRECTIONS:

1. On a floured surface, roll the dough into a 12-inch circle. Gently drape the dough on top of a rolling pin, lift it up, place it over a 10INGREDIENTS: inch round tart pan with a removable bottom, and unroll. Press the 1/2 hamburger doughpound into place. Run the rolling pin over the top of the pan to trim 1/4 cup chopped onion excess dough. Prick the dough several times with a fork. Refrigerate 2 tablespoons tomato sauce for at least 30 minutes. 2. Place oven rack in upper third of oven and 3 egg yolks heat to 400-degrees F. Place a baking sheet in oven. Line the crust with Salt & pepper to taste parchment paper or foil, fitting it up the sides of the pan. Fill with pie 3 egg whites, stiffly beaten weights or dried beans and bake for 15 to 18 minutes. Remove the Oil or butter weights and paper. Return the tart crust to oven and bake for 5 minutes Brown gravy or tomato sauce (optional) more. Transfer pan to a rack to cool. 3. Place the peaches in a medium bowl, drizzle with the honey, and toss. In a bowl, combine the sour DIRECTIONS: cream and sugar. Spread the mixture over the cooled crust. Arrange Combine hamburger, onion, tomato sauce, egg yolks, salt & the peaches, rounded-side down, on top. Sprinkle with the almonds. pepper until well blended. Fold in egg whites. Add a small Bake for 45 minutes or until the cream is set, the almonds are golden, amount of oil or butter to skillet. Drop mixture by tablespoon and the peaches are tender. 4. Cool on a rack for 20 minutes. Serve full onto hot skillet. Push down gently, with back of spoon, till warm or cold. round and flat like a pancake. Turn when golden brown and continue cooking until browned on both sides. I save drippings Recipe courtesy Real brown Simple gravy. in pan to make GILBERT WOMAN MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2016 59 GILBERT WOMAN MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016 59


datebook

5

GREAT DATES BY MEGAN MARPLES

1

ALES ON RAILS n Anne Runolfsso

SATURDAY, OCT. 1, TO SUNDAY, OCT. 30

Celebrate Oktoberfest on the Verde Canyon Railroad Thursdays through Sundays in October. Lunch includes sauerkraut, pretzels, strudel and German sausage. At the beer garden, sample European ales and craft beers. They will also be serving Verde Canyon Railroad’s private-labeled brews made in Sedona at the Oak Creek Brewery.

2

BRAVO BROADWAY: MUSIC OF THE NIGHT

Verde Canyon Railroad, 300 N. Broadway, Clarkdale, verdecanyonrr.com

SATURDAY, OCT. 1

Listen to popular music from Broadway such as “The Phantom of the Opera” at Symphony Hall this fall. Guest conductor Robert Franz will be leading the show with Broadway soloists Hugh Panero, Capithia Jenkins and Anne Runolfsson performing. Other Broadway hits include “West Side Story” and “Les Misérables.” Symphony Hall, 75 N. Second St., Phoenix, phoenixsymphony.org

3

A TASTE OF GREECE: GREEK FESTIVAL OF CHANDLER THROUGH SUNDAY, OCT. 2

Transport yourself back to Greece with this exciting event. The festivities include Greek music, folk dancing and more. Throughout the event, traditional Greek cuisine such as Pasitso and Dolmathes. Imported drinks from Greece will also be served throughout the event. An “agora” marketplace will be selling jewelry, books and arts and crafts. St. Katherine Greek Orthodox Church, 2716 N. Dobson Rd., Chandler, atasteofgreeceaz.com

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4

THE SOUND OF MUSIC

TUESDAY, OCT. 18, TO SUNDAY, OCT. 23

Travel to the hills of Austria with “The Sound of Music.” ASU Gammage will be home to Maria and the von Trapp Family as they try to find their way through World War II. Listen to the Grammy-, Tony- and Academy Award-winning best score with songs such as “The Sound of Music,” “Edelweiss” and “My Favorite Things.” Photos by: Matthew Murphy

ASU Gammage, 1200 S. Forest Ave., Tempe, asugammage.com

5

DIA DE LOS MUERTOS PHX FESTIVAL

SUNDAY, OCT. 23

Join the Dia de los Muertos celebration at Steele Indian School Park and imbibe in mask-making, sugar skull decorating and face painting. A multitude of vendors will be in attendance selling traditional Mexican crafts and specialty pieces for alters. At the end of the festival, watch the Candlelight Procesión. Guests are encouraged to bring pictures and memorabilia to the community altar. Steele Indian School Park, 300 E. Indian School Rd., Phoenix, diadelosmuertosphx.com

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CAUGHT YOU

looking good

1

Tisha Marie Pelletier and family

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GILBERT WOMAN MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016


CAUGHT YOU Stacey Durney models her outďŹ t as she prepares to see a show at the Hale Theatre.

looking good Cindi Johnson strikes a pose outside the Hale.

Sandra Fox arrives at ASU Gammage for the opening of "Cabaret" on Tuesday, Sept. 13. She is building a home and opening a business in Gilbert.

Nicole Bluth is excited for the night's performance at the Hale.

GILBERT WOMAN MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

63


CLOSING

Shot

Chico State Athletics Hall of Famer Denise Butticci Peck of Gilbert still gets a kick out of soccer.

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GILBERT WOMAN MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016


JOIN US ON OCTOBER 7TH FOR THE 4TH ANNUAL DAY-OF-GLAM!

· Be pampered in style by the professionals from ROLFS as we turn our showroom into a salon - call (480) 405-2957 to RSVP to the event. · The Mobile On-Site Mammography Truck will be on location providing complimentary life-saving mammograms - call (480) 967-3767 to schedule yours.

we will make a $100 donation to breast cancer research help us raise awareness for every new vehicle wear pink to the dealership any day in October and we sell in October

get a FREE

oil change* (480) 405-2957

WWW.COULTERINFINITI.COM 6225 E. TEST DRIVE | MESA, AZ 85206


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