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*See store for complete terms and conditions of written limited warranties. Lifetime warranties are only valid for as long as original customer owns the vehicle. **After the sale and up to 30 days. Bring in the advertisement or quote listing tire and price. Present your original invoice to salesperson. We will verify price and calculate refund (200% of tire price difference).

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4

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When you want the custom look for less than the custom price, come to

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Showroom Open Tues.-Sat. 9am-4pm | www.warehousesalesinc.com TIMES-CALL / LONGMONT MAGAZINE

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contents

16

28

36

10 | AROUND THE CORNER

26 | DINING OUT

51 | SPOTLIGHT

A look at the North Hover Centre.

Pinocchios serves up homemade Italian from numerous locations.

Gamer has passion for activity.

12 | LIFESTYLE Circus comes to life through retired dentist’s models.

14 | PROFILE Chef Deb makes her dream’s come true by cooking up seasonal favorites.

16 | BUSINESS New wine bar to open this spring in Prospect Village.

19 | BOOK CORNER A glimpse at local authors, upcoming happenings and editor’s pick.

20 | FOOD Gluten free cooking becomes popular.

22 | FAMILY Nonprofit helps adults and children connect with the Earth.

24 | OUTDOORS Caribou Ranch Open Space offers numerous adventures.

Check it Out

For more information, visit Longmont Magazine online at www.longmontmagazine.com.

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‘Like’ our page on Facebook and learn about upcoming events, happenings and future magazines.

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Follow @LongmontMag on Twitter for updates in the community, events and upcoming magazines.

6

28 | LIFESTYLE Knitting is a popular pastime for many avid crafters.

52 | HOT TIPS Plan the perfect springtime picnic.

54 | RECREATION

Lyons pinball revisits classic addiction.

Fencing offers physical, mental challenges.

34 | FASHION

57 | HOME FRONT

Bright, citrus colors light up spring fashion.

Reupholstering is an easy alternative.

32 | LIFESTYLE

58 | GARDEN TIPS

36 | COMMUNITY Service dogs provide a great resource to those in need.

42 | HEALTH Spring clean your diet.

44 | PETS Bunnies are a large commitment.

46 | GARDENING Plan ahead for the perfect garden.

Top 5 flowers to plant this spring.

59 | OUTLOOK A glimpse at the the Longmont Council for the Arts.

61 | RECREATION Local parks, greenways and golf courses add to life in Longmont.

64 | ABOUT TOWN 72 | EVENTS 83 | FUN FOR ALL On the Cover Chef Deb Traylor has had a passion for cooking since she was young. Following in her inspiration to be just like Julia Child, Traylor enrolled in culinary school and is now the corporate chef for Mountain High Appliance in Louisville, BlueStar representative and demonstrator, Nutrition Services Training Chef for the St. Vrain Valley School District, a regular visitor and demonstrator at the Longmont Farmers’ Market, Louisville Farmers’ Market, Fort Collins Farmers’ market and a private chef for many prominent families. Photo by Paul Litman Design by Trisha Allin SPRING 2011

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Best Sale Prices and the Lowest E Everyday Prices … Guaranteed! STOP IN AND SEE OUR WINE CELLAR & CHILLED W WINE WIN ROOM

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Expires 4/30/11.

Expires 4/30/11.

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

“I Just Don’t Believe in That…”

Dear friend,

You Benefit from a Unique Offer… If you bring in this article (by March 16th, 2011) you can receive my entire new patient exam for $59, which includes a comprehensive new patient exam and a 30 minute massage. …There are no hidden fees here. Further care is very affordable and you’ll be happy to know that I have family spinal adjustment plans.

Let’s start with me, the gal on the right. Fourteen years ago when I was a freshman in college taking pre-med courses, I developed allergies which led to chronic sinus infections. My medical doctor had me on some really powerful drugs, but nothing was helping! The infections kept getting stronger and stronger and so did the doses of antibiotics. I was so sick for so long that my parents decided to take me out of school so I could focus on getting healthy. A friend of mine convinced me to give chiropractic a try, but I just didn’t believe in it! Out of desperation, I went to see him. The chiropractor did an exam, took some films, and then “adjusted” my spine. The adjustment didn’t hurt, it actually felt good. I finally got relief from the terrible pressure in my sinuses! It worked so well that I have never had another sinus infection in over 12 years…and I went to chiropractic college instead of medical school, as I had planned. Madi, the little girl in the middle of the photo, used to be plagued with ear infections. Her mom Tara, the gal on the left, was constantly taking her to the pediatrician for the first 6 months of her life. After I started to adjust Madi, the ear infections started to subside, and now, years later, she has never had another ear infection. She is a happy, healthy, lively toddler now, not a sickly little girl. Copyright 2000, KA

TIMES-CALL / LONGMONT MAGAZINE

SPRING 2011

It’s strange how life is, because now people come to see me with their sinus and allergy problems. Also they come to me with their headaches, migraines, chronic pain, neck pain, shoulder/arm pain, whiplash from car accidents, backaches, ear infections, asthma, allergies, numbness in limbs, athletic injuries, just to name a few. A large percentage of Americans no longer have health insurance and those who do have it have found that their benefits are being reduced as each year passes. Deductibles are rising, and restrictive HMO’s are now common. That’s where my practice comes in. I have found a way so that more people are able to afford the care they need, people with or without health insurance. A whole week of care in my office could cost what you’d pay for just one visit elsewhere.

“It Shouldn’t Cost an Arm and a Leg to Correct Your Health” You should know a little about my qualifications. That’s important so that there’s no misunderstanding about quality of care. I’m a graduate of both the University of Florida and Cleveland Chiropractic College (a prestigious 4 year program). I’ve been entrusted to take care of tiny babies to pro-athletes alike. I just offer a lower initial fee so more people can get the care they need. My office is called Advanced Family Chiropractic and it is at 1020 Ken Pratt Blvd in Longmont, CO (on the west side of the Safeway plaza). My phone number is 303-772-8311. Please call my wonderful assistant Lindsay today to make an appointment. Thank you. -Dr. Jessica Thompson P.S.: When accompanied by the first, I am also offering the second family member this same examination for only $39.

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When I meet people in town, they usually say, “Oh, yeah, I know you, you’re Dr. Jessica. I’ve seen your ad with that picture of you and that cute little girl.” Well, perhaps I should tell you a little more about that photo, and why I use it in my ads.

303-772-8311 1020 Ken Pratt Blvd, Unit G, Longmont

advanced-family-chiro.com advancedfamilychiro@gmail.com

7


editor’s note

I

love cooking and trying out new recipes. Whether it’s a new entrée for dinner, a tasty side dish or something to satisfy my sweet craving, I’m game to try almost any recipe at least once. My love of cooking comes from my grandmothers. (Sorry mom, you always say you don’t like to cook!) Growing up, I remember going to their houses and letting my nose lead me to the kitchen. There, my eyes would take in the homemade breads rising in the oven, bubbling casseroles, sticky caramel rolls and fresh-baked cookies. Of course, if either of them were still in the middle of a project, I’d grab a chair and climb up to help. Cookie dough is the best, and for some reason it always tasted better at grandma’s house. Cooking in those days was always done from scratch, as women spent hours whipping up their time-tested recipes. For one of my grandmothers, her zucchini bread is still the only recipe I make today. And for my other grandma, if I could only perfect her caramel roll recipe I’d be set to carry on her tradition. In my kitchen, cooking from scratch is the only way to go. I find a lot of my recipes in magazines and on blogs about healthy cooking. I figure anytime I can lighten the fat or calories, why not? It’s better for us. One area I hadn’t explored was gluten-free cooking, until I wrote this magazine’s food feature. Gluten-free options are becoming more mainstream as people opt for this diet either because of dietary restrictions or simply because they feel better. The gluten-free Orange Cupcakes I made (page 21) were a winner with my husband and co-workers. While the recipe used rice flour, the slight texture difference was minimal and the flavor was great. There are a lot of gluten-free recipes out there, and until now, I didn’t really think about making them. But after my first baking adventure, I’m intrigued to try more. Join me! Kristi Ritter Specialty Publications Editor

P.S. If you have any great gluten-free recipes, we’d love to share them with our readers. E-mail us at longmontmag@times-call.com or post them on our Facebook page.

online Don’t forget Longmont Magazine is online year-round at www.Longmont Magazine.com. Read our digital edition, check out our videos and don’t miss any local happenings.

Fans & Followers Stay connected with Longmont Magazine in between every print publication by following us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/LongmontMagazine or tweeting with us on Twitter @LongmontMag. You’ll find daily updates, 8

deals and events you won’t want to miss.

Facebook Feedback

What’s your favorite thing about Longmont and why? “I love the downtown...Longmont has maintained their old historic buildings and they are still in use. It’s quaint, it’s lovely and the downtown is very vital.” – Barbara Coppins “The view from just about anywhere in town while driving west. Very few places that add up to that.” – Josh Hunter

SPECIALTY PUBLICATIONS EDITOR Kristi Ritter

kkritter@times-call.com, 303-684-5275

SPECIALTY PUBLICATIONS ASSOCIATE EDITOR Summer Stair

sstair@times-call.com, 720-494-5429

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Esteban Hernandez, Anna Taylor, Laurel Toney, Kendra Walker

PHOTOGRAPHERS Joshua Buck, Lewis Geyer, Richard M. Hackett, Paul Litman ADVERTISING DIRECTOR John DiMambro jdimambro@times-call.com, 303-684-5293 ADVERTISING DISPLAY MANAGER Penny Dille pdille@times-call.com, 720-494-5445 Longmont Magazine A Publication of the Longmont Times-Call 350 Terry St., Longmont, CO 80501 303-776-2244, 800-270-9774 www.longmontmagazine.com Longmont Magazine is published four times a year. Copies are inserted into the newspaper and are available at the Chamber of Commerce, visitor locations and businesses throughout the area. Longmont Magazine distributes 40,000 copies to Longmont, Berthoud, Boulder, Dacono, Del Camino, Estes Park, Firestone, Frederick, Gunbarrel, Johnstown, Lafyette, Louisville, Lyons, Mead, Milliken, Niwot, Platteville. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Editorial & Events: To submit an event listing, visit www.timescall.com/submitevents/ or e-mail calendar@times-call.com To submit a story idea: Call: 303-684-5275 E-mail: LongmontMag@times-call.com Social Networks: Find Longmont Magazine on both Facebook and Twitter to receive updates on happenings in communities and upcoming events.

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B AR

editor’s note

Simple, natural, elegant Italian

E

Nathan, 2, helps me in the

Summer Stair Specialty Publications Associate Editor

kitchen.

TIMES-CALL / LONGMONT MAGAZINE

B AR

Organic/Local Produce • Colorado Pork/Lamb/Bison Vegetarian/Vegan/Gluten Free Choices

Denver Restaurant Week

Sat. Feb. 26 to Fri. Mar. 11

Extensive 3-Course Dinner $26.40 Every Night! For menu visit www.denver.org/denverrestaurant

2785 Iris Ave. Boulder, CO 80304 (NW corner 28th & Iris)

303.443.5100

happy hour: m-th 4:30 - 6 lunch: m-f 11-2:30 dinner: m-th 4:30-9:30 • f-sat 4:30-10 closed sunday

LM-159471

very once in awhile you come across a story that speaks to you on a personal level. A story about something or someone you can relate to or be inspired by. This issue’s cover story on Longmont’s Chef Deb was one such story for me. As a single mom myself, I understood the challenges Chef Deb spoke about and the stereotypes people often associate with single women. But even more than that I was able to relate to the joy she feels when cooking. While the process of cooking isn’t the most joyous feeling for me, the environment in my kitchen around cooking is what makes me shine. Dinnertime at my house is a time when me and my sons come together at the end of the day and unwind. My oldest often sits at the barstools coloring and chatting about his day at daycare, while my youngest attentively helps me prepare the food. Although it is chaotic as voices beg to be heard over one another and one-too-many hands linger over the stove, it is delightful. While this is a special time in my evenings, I am also looking forward to creating new memories with the warmer weather and the awakening of the outdoors that will shortly be upon us. Several stories within this edition have caught my attention and I look forward to sharing a picnic with my sons, planting annuals in my flower garden, getting vegetables started indoors and going on a hike. I would even like to check out the new wine bar opening in Prospect Village. So here’s to spring and all it brings before us.

www.arugularistorante.com SPRING 2011

9


around the corner

A LOOK AT NORTH HOVER CENTRE

North Hover Centre On the northwest corner of Hover Street and 17th Avenue, a string of businesses, services and eateries highlight a shopping center offering a little for everyone. – Esteban L. Hernandez Deli Cioso Deli Cioso is a Longmont staple for Mexican food that expanded when Kent and Kellie Masias opened this second location in 2009. Specializing in homestyle Chicano cooking, Deli Cioso offers a menu teeming of Mexican dishes. “Our daily specials are around $5, and it’s a full meal,” Kent says. He recommends the Taco Azteca, which is a lightly fried tortilla layered with tasty refried beans and spicy ground beef served under a splash of green chile with lettuce and tomatoes. Lavish Tan and Nails Spa Those looking for some work on those nails or getting that dapper hue for the spring season need to look no further than this salon. “We offer manicures and pedicures all in one location,” says Christina Tai, owner. This one-stop shop opened in November 2010 and specializes, as the store name suggests, in lavish tans and nail treatments for those of all ages. Ziggi’s Coffee Drive Thru This drive-thru coffee shop opened in March 2010 as the second Ziggi’s Coffee in Longmont. But there are no automated machines at this stop. Drive on by and you will be greeted by the smiling faces of baristas ready to satisfy an espresso craving. “We pride ourselves in being really fast and incredibly friendly, and obviously high quality drinks,” says owner Brandon Knudsen. Stop by and try their hot chocolate, a scrumptious drink made with locally produced chocolate milk and a secret potion of syrups that give the drink

Also Don’t Miss: This shopping center houses other welcoming services and stores like Select Physical Therapy for those seeking physical wellness. Supercut’s

10

Lavish Tanning and Nail Spa staff at front from left; Jodie Fitzgerald, Christina Tai and son; back from left; Nga Dang, Tayler Norquay and Judy Nguyen. (Paul Litman)

what Knudsen calls “a punch.” Quick Liquor Kent Corder took ownership of this liquor mart in February 2010. Celebrating his first anniversary in business, Corder aims at making Quick Liquor a competitive store by offering affordable prices and superior customer service, which he prides himself on providing in his store. “We have a very good environment,” Corder says of his spirit shop. “We’re friendly. We are nice to everybody.” Corder estimated his store stocks anywhere between 300 and 400 different types of spirits including brandy, tequila, vodka and wine among other popular beverages. well-known hair salon service is chic enough for the posh lady but subtle enough for a rugged man. Check out the latest releases via Blockbuster. The nearby Longmont Professional Building

Kellie Masias prepares a burrito for a customer at Deli Cioso West. (Paul Litman)

houses three occupants: Hearing Rehab Center, a renowned Colorado audiology center; Jenny Baker, CPA, a certified public accountant; and James Maurer, DDS, a dentist.

SPRING 2011

TIMES-CALL / LONGMONT MAGAZINE


it’s all the best of at martini’s

a casually upscale place to chill & shake it experience what everyone is talking about

543 terry st. • 303.651.2772

martinisbistro.com menu prices range from $7 - $19

TIMES-CALL / LONGMONT MAGAZINE

SPRING 2011

11


lifestyle

CIRCUS COMES TO LIFE

Under the Big Top

Circus comes to life through man’s models BY KRISTI RITTER • PHOTOS BY PAUL LITMAN

Flying trapeze artists, mammoth elephants, exotic animals, horsemen and dazzling acts of entertainment all under one big top tent is quite a show. One that has evolved throughout the decades, and still attracts patrons. Circuses were believed to have started in America in 1793, according to www.circusinamerica.org, when British equestrian John Bill Rickets presented a circus in a wooden amphitheater in Philadelphia. By the 1870s, P.T. Barnum had already made a life of spectacle, earning the title of a master showman, thus launching his own circus venture, making it the largest in American history. The Greatest Show on Earth, as Barnum’s circus became known, launched itself into a time when numerous circus companies canvassed towns throughout the nation. By 1872, Barnum’s circus adventure covered 5 acres and accommodated 10,000 seated patrons at a time. The circus also took to the rails, traveling by train to cover more ground. By the early 1900s, train loads of circus cars arrived at new locations daily, embarking on a huge production to set up the big top tent, practice for the show, care for animals, and, of course, allow hundreds of circus employees to do their daily chores,

whether it was practicing for acts or making the meals that fed hungry workers. Setting up the tent alone was a spectacle as hundreds of stakes had to be driven into the ground by teams of eight men. It was the growth and vastness of the circus during the early 1900s that intrigued Berthoud resident and retired dentist Dr. Jay Mills. “The old circus is what’s fascinating to me; when the entire event was set up under tents.” Like many children, Mills attended the circus in his youth, but doesn’t recall much of the excitement. By the time he reached high school, he started making models of the people, animals and train cars found throughout circus life. Creating these models was not like purchasing a kit at a hobby store and assembling it, as circus models were never carried in the stores. The models come from hours and years of research Mills has done to capture the true essence of the circus, an art only a handful of people do nationwide. “I have thousands of photos and items I’ve found in my research,” he says, which is evident from the numerous file cabinets, bookcases and cupboards that line the great room in his basement,

Top left: This blacksmith was created from an old photograph acquired by Jay Mills. It is made of wire armature within and surrounded with sculpted composite resin. Top right: A one-sixteenth scale model of the main entrance to the circus tent created by Jay Mills. Right: Mills created this circus ringmaster from a photo. 12

SPRING 2011

TIMES-CALL / LONGMONT MAGAZINE


Left: Wire armature is used to make one-sixteenth scale miniature figurines for Jay Mills’ circus collections. Left bottom: Ornate moldings that surround the top of a circus wagon are created using wax molds, then poured with resin before being glued to the wagons. Below: A work in progress of wood horse carvings.

Jay Mills, of Berthoud, is a retired dentist, who builds miniature circus models from the early 1900s to 1930s. Everything from wagons, tents, animals, figurines and assorted accessories are handmade to scale.

showing evidence of his passion. “My inspiration comes from the pictures I find to model my work after.” Along with those are display cabinets showing off numerous railroad flat cars that carried the colorful circus wagons to their locations, as well as models of circus employees, animals, clowns, baggage trunks, animal food carts, horses and more. It’s a collection that represents what the circus looked like throughout the 1920s and 1930s, when according to Mills, a circus would easily include 350 draft horses, 120 performing horses, 25 sleeping coaches, 1,300 laborers, clowns, performers, animal trainers, cooks and people who traveled days in advance of the circus to order supplies and have the site ready when the train arrived. Mills builds one-sixteenth-inch scale models and begins with the research of his subject, finding photos and articles, as well as referencing numerous circus organizations, including the Circus His-

torical Society, Circus Fans Society, Circus Model Builders Association and the circus museum at the Ringling Museum of Art in Sarasota, Fla. Mills has even created models for the museum. With research and photos at his fingertips, Mills starts the model process by sketching scale drawings. “If I can’t draw it, I certainly won’t be able to make it,” he says. Then starts the tedious task of figuring out the sizes of wood, ordering supplies and crafting other items from scratch. Because none of the supplies are found in stores, he uses scrap brass pieces and wiring for wagon mechanisms, while many pieces are carved from wax and epoxy and then molded and resin casted to allow him to duplicate designs. Elephants are carved from wood because of their size, and epoxy is added to mold the animal shape. He then uses cheesecloth to add the lifelike texture before painting it. Because of the model size he creates,

This circus cage wagon was created by Jay Mills. After he assembles the boxes, the intricate details of the wagon are created from wax molding.

Model circus clowns are made out of wood and resin and then painted.

TIMES-CALL / LONGMONT MAGAZINE

SPRING 2011

he can add a lot of detail to make the items precise, including the wax mouldings he creates for relief work on the wagons. While Mills’ passion is in sculpting and carving the tiny figures, he finds joy in creating the baggage wagons that hauled circus supplies because they were heavy duty pieces of equipment. It’s not a small task to create this miniature circus village. The ornate wagons alone can easily keep him busy for 300 hours. “By the time I dig out the photos, research items, cast, carve and paint, it’s a time consuming hobby,” he says. He realizes he probably won’t be able to create the entire circus, he’s now focusing on making the items he loves, including a blacksmithing tent and additional wagons. The circus is his life, and his passion shows when he talks about the magic under the big top.

This model elephant is getting his nails trimmed. Jay Mills carves his elephants from wood and then covers them in resin to create the life-like appearance. 13


profile

MOM FINDS COMFORT IN THE KITCHEN

Chef Deb Traylor prepares food in a kitchen at Mountain High Appliance in Louisville. Chef Deb is the corporate chef on staff at the store.

Chef Deb makes her dream come true BY SUMMER STAIR • PHOTOS BY PAUL LITMAN

It was at the age of 6 when Deb Traylor, known to those she cooks for as Chef Deb, first dreamt of being a chef. Every day after school, Traylor would prop in front of the TV and with her eyes devour whatever Julia Child was making on screen. It was this passion for cooking that settled into Traylor’s veins and drove her into the kitchen. Through old cookbooks, she tried new recipes and perfected her skills, all the while dreaming of some day learning to cook in France. When it came time to go to school, Traylor opted for a four-year university over hospitality school, because France was not included in the program. She knew to be the chef she wanted to be, sacrificing on France was not an option. So she went to school to pursue something different and things started happening. “I grew up I guess,” she laughs. “I went to school, got married, had a family. Culinary school was put on the back burner.” It wasn’t until after Traylor’s divorce and her mom’s death that school became an option. Her mother left her money for culinary school and with the prompting of her daughters, then 9 and 7, Traylor enrolled in the Culinary School of the Rockies in Boulder. 14

“My daughters really pushed this for me,” she says. “They gave me my blessing and told me that when I cooked I was the most happy.” Traylor’s schooling was hard, but she persevered, and as a single mom it was even more challenging. Luckily, her ex-husband and friends pitched in when she went to Avignon, France, for a five-week internship. Today, Traylor is living her dream as a classically trained French chef. Her day jobs consist of being the corporate chef for Mountain High Appliance in Louisville, BlueStar representative and demonstrator, Nutrition Services Training Chef for the St. Vrain Valley School District, a regular visitor and demonstrator at the Longmont Farmers’ Market, Louisville Farmers’ Market, Fort Collins Farmers’ market and a private chef for many prominent families. “A lot of people told me I couldn’t do it, but I always knew I could,” she shrugs. “Being a woman and single mom in this field is difficult, but not impossible.” Traylor keeps things interesting by recreating dishes and trying new things. Being a successful chef is also about word-of-mouth and being willing to do several different things, she says. Traylor also realizes that doing this later in life has given her a drive she may not have had before. SPRING 2011

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“I’m driven to do this. It’s the pulse in my veins,” she says. “It makes me happy. It’s nurturing and fulfilling for me.”

Real Estate From Start To Finish

While French food is a passion for Traylor, keeping her dishes made from local produce and meat is also important to who she is. It’s something she thinks makes her dishes and menus unique, tasty and ever-changing. “It’s highly personable and my goal is to make it perfect. I want to be the Nordstrom’s of private chefs.” This passion for staying local is what has driven her to Longmont’s Farmers’ Market the past three years. There, Traylor takes fresh produce and demonstrates what can be done with one vegetable or fruit. “I want to show Longmont how to use fresh produce,” she says. “It’s about connecting the farmer with the shopper.” Being a part of the Longmont community is important to Traylor not only because it is the place she calls home, but because she knows its potential.

Wendy Conder

Chef Deb Traylor demonstrates the correct way to cut a pepper for grilling.

“Longmont is mine, my people, my community,” she explains. “I want to do more because right now I’m in my community and a no name chef.”

Check it Out

Follow Chef Deb on her blog, The Tasty Bits, http://thetastybits.blogspot.com, and follow her on her quest to find and create seasonal farm-to-table recipes in Colorado.

NUMBNESS/TINGLING?

Longmont, CO—Do you suffer from Numbness and Tingling down the arms or legs? Most numbness/tingling sufferers have no idea what to do when they experience these symptoms. Although there are many causes of numbness/tingling one of the main reasons is damage to the joints, ligaments, and discs in the neck or low back. Damage may have occurred as a result of an injury or could have developed slowly over time. In addition to pain, damaged spinal joints and discs (cushion between the bones) will place pressure on the nerves that go down the arms, hand, fingers, and even the upper back. This ‘pressure’ is the cause of numbness/tingling. See Figure 1. s When left untreated, pain and weakness in the muscles may be the eventual result. Generally, most of you resort to medication use. When the problem is in the neck or lower back, using over-the counter, and even prescribed drugs to fix the cause of the problem is not the answer for many. And if medication fails, surgery might be considered the only other alternative. Dr. Steven Joseph, DC and Dr. Steven O’Dell, DC want to let you know that there is another way. Come see what has given thousands of people relief within this state-of-the-art facility using over 50 types of Spinal Traction, Decompression, and Power PlateTM Vibration Technology - used by astronauts.

303-651-2300 • 303-775-0108 wendy@wendyconder.com

Pain Resulting from Injury

Figure 1

Neck Disc Injury

Nerves Down the Arm Vertebra Neck Disc

C5-C6 Disc Herniation with Nerve Root Compression

Spinal Cord Nerve Root

Chronic Pain, Numbness, and Weakness Radiate from The Neck Down to the Hand Side Cut-Away View

If you suffer from these or other warning signs call immediately to prevent possible advancing complications

Take Back Your Life, Stop Suffering and call today for a

COMPLIMENTARY CONSULTATION 303-678-7170

Longmont Spine              

A Different Approach *Diagnostic Imaging not included in offer

TIMES-CALL / LONGMONT MAGAZINE

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business

WINE BAR TO OPEN IN PROSPECT

Dave Smith, owner of Your Place or Vine, sits at his soon-to-be-open business located in Prospect Village in Longmont. The wine bar will carry more than 20 wines by the glass, as well as wine flights that offer three samples.

Cheers!

Unpretentious wine bar makes its way to Prospect this spring BY KRISTI RITTER • PHOTOS BY PAUL LITMAN

On a cycling trip through Italy two years ago, Dave Smith visited the hillside towns of Tuscany, including the many vineyards through Pienza, Montepulciano, Motalcino and Siena. Wine and its many facets had interested him for years, although he admits wine lists intimidated him as he struggled to develop the flavors and learn how they paired with foods. “The culture around food and wine is so amazing in Tuscany,” Smith says. “It really got me thinking about how I could bring that experience home.” After tackling a business plan, securing a location and financing, renovating and developing a wine list, Your Place or Vine is set to open this spring in Prospect Village in south Longmont. Establishing the Name Returning from his trip, Smith was inspired and went to work on developing a business plan to open a wine bar. “My goal was to build a community that focused around wine, socializing and education,” he says. “I wanted to create a place that was casual, fun and exciting.” Smith hit the books, as well, studying everything he could about the world of wine through written facts and talking with experts to discover wine’s history, how it’s made and the 16

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regions where it comes from. He credits his sister with the namesake for his new business. He immediately started the branding for his wine bar, creating a logo, setting up social media sites and creating a website, which he did himself since his day job keeps him busy as a software developer. Smith also partnered with Venus de Miles, the local all-women’s bike ride, and played an active role in the community by fundraising for the event in 2009 and 2010. It was the first wine booth ever at the event. Location It was during the 2009 Venus de Miles event that Smith found the Your Place or Vine location in Prospect. “The location is perfect, and the neighborhood loves the concept of the wine bar,” he says. “The community has been so supportive and the new urbanism concept is great for my vision.” With the location in foreclosure, it took some time for Smith to jump through the hoops to purchase the space. In May 2010, he took ownership and was able to start his business plans. Setup & Financing It has been a tough climate for lending and financing in the business world, but Smith had a solid business plan and a good relationship with the bank. Smith turned to the Small Business Administration and local business planning groups for advice. He took a course taught by a local attorney at the Small Business Development Center in Boulder, which taught him the fundamentals of setting up a business. He

Your Place or Vine, a new wine bar opening this spring, is located in Prospect Village.

Check it Out

Left: A wine preserver at Your Place or Vine. Right: In early February, owner Dave Smith was finishing the interior renovations of his new wine bar, Your Place or Vine, opening this spring in Prospect Village in Longmont.

established a financial plan for the business and completed financial projections that helped outline his plan for success. He also worked with the city of Longmont to qualify for a startup business grant that further helped his efforts. Other elements to set up included establishing a limited liability company (LLC), which is a flexible form of business that blends elements of partnership and corporate structures, allowing business owners to separate personal and business assets. Smith also set up federal tax identifications, bank accounts, and the biggest hurdle, obtaining the liquor license. Renovations Begin Comfortable and inviting is the vision Smith has for his new wine bar. Once the location and funding was secured, he started working with an architect to design the space, which includes a bar and lounge area. The bar area features tables and bar seating, while in the lounge area customers can settle into love seats. Warm, earthy tones reflective of Tuscany define the space. Outside seating will come this spring. Smith is also including a small kitchen for the business that will focus on serving small-bite cuisine that represents global tastes. Working with local vendors including Cheese Importers, Haystack Mountain Goat Dairy and Great Harvest Bread, customers can

Discover your wine palette at Your Place or Vine at 2020 Ionosphere St. in Longmont, or visit www.yourplaceorvine.com. Also check out www.LongmontMagazine.com for a video about Dave Smith’s journey.

TIMES-CALL / LONGMONT MAGAZINE

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Facebook

select among cheese plates, flatbreads, salads and even desserts to satisfy the sweet tooth. Setting the Wine List Exploring different vineyards has been a big job throughout the past two years of planning. While the wine bar will feature name brands, Smith loves to include the more unknown vineyards nationally and internationally. Initially, Your Place or Vine will start out with 20 wines by the glass, as well as wine flights offering a sample of three. But as he gains a customer base, he’s hoping to get ideas of what they want, allowing him to develop an evolving wine list. And while not everyone is a wine drinker, beer and spirits will be available on the menu. “I’m keeping everything flexible – the menu and wine list – so that people can always come back for something new,” he says. Business Goals As Smith continues to learn about the world of wine, he plans to make education a big part of a customer’s experience, offering a wine list that is approachable, easy to read and portrays a full description of the vintage, vintner and region. Drinking wine can be a wonderful experience when enhanced with the perfect glassware, temperature, freshness and food pairing. It’s the goal of Your Place or Vine to allow customers to choose their own wine by taste and palette.

Get all the Your Place or Vine updates by liking the Facebook page at www.facebook.com/yourplaceorvine.

Twitter Follow

Follow Your Place or Vine on Twitter @yourplaceorvine

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Praha Restaurant & Bar Menu Appetizers

Stuffed S Mushrooms

sstuffed t with a shrimp and crabmeat filling ttopped to o with fresh asiago cheese broiled and sserved e with a delicate fresh basil sauce.

Escargot

tender snails served with our own delightful fresh herb garlic butter and topped with puff pastry.

Oysters Rockefeller

on the half shell filled with a creamy spinach and cheese filling.

Chef M’s Duck Wings

Served with tangy cranberry sauce ............$9.95 Bistro Specials

Czech Us Out! Praha Restaurant and Bar, formerly the Old Prague Inn, has been serving extraordinary food since 1977. Today’s menu is a reflection of the old and new. Old are the traditional entrees such as Roast Duck and Saurerbraten. New are the Kaz Spaezle or Red Snapper with lemon caper sauce. The homemade apple strudel, or seasonal kolaces are the perfect way to end a great evening. The wine list appeals to the novice and experienced connoisseur alike. It offers moderately priced wines which offer value for your money. Owner and Executive Chef Monica was educated at the Salzburg Hotel School in Austria and trained with renown Chefs in Vienna, Krems, and Retz. Today, Monica uses her training and artistic talent to combine old recipes with new flavors and ingredients to give her guests a truly outstanding culinary experience. Monica’s sister and managing partner, Judy, helps organize special events and wine tasting dinners. Whether you are looking for a quick bite to eat, a leisurely dinner, or a place to hang with friends over appetizers and wine, Praha is the place to come. Czech us out, you won’t be sorry! The Praha is available for business lunches/meetings (10+), parties, and rehersal dinners.

Chevabchichi, Croatian Specialty .............$15.95 Duck Spaezle ..................................... $19.95 Kaz Spaezle ........................................ $10.95 Brat or Knackwurst Slider ........................ $6.75 Poulet Au Citron .................................. $19.95 Traditional Hungarian Gulasch ................. $16.95 Kobe Slider ........................................... $6.75 Vegetarian Entree

Changes Bi Monthly .................. $19.95-$22.95 Traditional Entrees

Sauerbraten ........................................$24.00 Roast Duck Czech Style ...................... $27.00 Rahmschnitzel ...................................$23.00 Wienerschnitzel .................................$22.00 Filet Mignon ..................................$28.00 Praha Haus Special Platter ............... $37.00

New American Cuisine with European Flair Czech us out!

LM-152162

Dinner served Wednesday - Saturday 5:00 p.m. - close Sundays 5:00 p.m. - 7:00p.m.

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7521 Ute Hwy, Longmont, CO 303-702-1180 www.praharestaurant.com SPRING 2011

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book corner

LOCAL READS, RECOMMENDATIONS AND EVENTS

EDITOR’S PICK

LOCAL AUTHORS Numerous authors in the area are telling their stories. Kathie Heinecken, owner of Barbed Wire Books in Longmont, says there are several authors that are being requested by customers. – KRISTI RITTER

‘Weird Colorado’ By Charmaine Ortega Getz Sterling Publishing, 2010 As part of the “Weird U.S.” series, author and Boulder resident Charmaine Ortega Getz spent a year traveling Colorado, interviewing people, searching bookstores, libraries and the Internet to find all the weird things throughout the state to compile this book. It is a great travel guide to Colorado’s local legends and best kept secrets, from Frozen Dead Guy Days to stories of the beast in the basement of the Stanley Hotel.

‘The Walk’

By Richard Paul Evans

‘Brimstone & Lily’

‘Get Outta Town’

By Terry Kroenung Rare Moon Press, 2009 In this wacky fantasy novel of the Civil War, author Terry Kroenung pulls out all kinds of imagination. Kroenung is a literature teacher at Niwot High School and is said to own more swords than any other human. He has served as a U.S. Army infantry officer on the East German border, a Confederate Civil War re-enactor in Virginia and a pirate at street festivals.

By Ted Ringer Wonderful World Publishing, 2010 As an author, teacher and coach who grew up in Minnesota, Ted Ringer is now a Boulder resident who has written numerous books. Those include “Born With a Beard,” “Gus Goes West” and “Drawing & Dreaming.” His newest adventure, “Get Outta Town,” is a tale of the dead, the Internal Revenue Service and coffee.

‘The Mantle Ranch’

By Queeda Mantle Walker Fred Pruett Books, 2005 Author Queeda Mantle Walker grew up on Colorado’s western slope and this book shares her family’s joys and sorrows in the remote Yampa River Canyon. Walker married Rex Walker in 1955, who started a company with her brother, Pat, to supply dude horses to resorts, known today as Sombrero Ranches, headquartered in Longmont.

BOOK HAPPENINGS & CLUBS Storytime at the Longmont Library – Join the Longmont Public Library on Tuesdays and Wednesdays for two drop-in storytime sessions at 10:15 and 11 a.m. for lap-sit, toddler or preschool age children. Storytime will include stories, fingerplays and songs. Free. 409 Fourth Ave., Longmont. 303-651-8477. www.ci.longmont.co.us/library. Local Book Signing – Don’t miss a local book signing at Barbed Wire Books on May 14. TIMES-CALL / LONGMONT MAGAZINE

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Grouped by interest, owner Kathie Heinecken hopes to fill the store with local authors for the public to meet. 504 Main St., Longmont. 303-827-9620. www.barbedwirebooks.net. Sleepy Time Stories – Don’t miss bedtime storytime at the Longmont Public Library every Thursday at 7 p.m. While it can be for any age, it’s designed for 3- to 6-year-olds. Free. 409 Fourth Ave., Longmont. 303-651-8477. www.ci.longmont.co.us/library.

Simon & Schuster, 2010 Ever since I read the touching story of Richard Paul Evan’s “The Christmas Box,” I’ve been drawn to this author’s writing. The inspirational novels share powerful stories of love and family. While “The Christmas Box” released in 1995 has started an entire series of books Evans releases each October, 2010 brought the start to a new series released each April that starts with “The Walk.” The book tells the story of Alan Christoffersen, a Seattle executive who loses his job, his home and the love of his life. Exploring his deepest thoughts, he sets out on a walk with only essentials strapped to his back and heads for the furthest point on the map – Key West, Fla. The people he encounters and lessons he learns makes him think differently about his life. This April 5, Evans releases the second book in this series, “Miles to Go,” that continues Christoffersen’s adventure of self discovery. – KRISTI RITTER 19


food

GLUTEN-FREE SELECTIONS

Gluten-free options are becoming more mainstream BY KRISTI RITTER • PHOTOS BY PAUL LITMAN

Dining at a handful of restaurants these days, you’ll probably notice the gluten-free options on the menu. It’s not a fad diet or a food allergy, as celiac disease is an autoimmune disease that causes damage to the small intestine and doesn’t allow food to be properly absorbed. According to the Celiac Disease Foundation, one out of 133 people in the United States are affected with celiac disease, and medication is not normally required. The most common fix is to remove gluten from your diet. Gluten is the name for the proteins in grains that are found in all forms of wheat, rye, barley and triticale. Melissa Degen, owner of Sweet

Escape Pastries in Longmont, knows first hand the stress of finding a place where she and her children can dine without eating gluten. Degen and her daughter were diagnosed with celiac disease a little more than six years ago, and her son followed a couple of years later. And even though her husband doesn’t suffer from the disease, he has learned to follow a gluten-free diet. While her children didn’t know the difference, Degen recalls the delicious pastries her grandmother would make her growing up. So she took matters into her own hands and created a business that focuses on making gluten-free selections, including breads, muffins, cookies, pastas and pizza crust. “I remember great tasting pastries, so I had to find a way to make them,” she says. “And I needed chocolate cake!”

Although Degen has a background in electrical engineering, her grandmother’s appreciation for food lead her to take pastry classes at the Culinary School of the Rockies. She founded GF Pastry Chef in 2006, and in 2008 renamed the business when she moved into a larger location. The jalapeño and cheddar burger buns have been a popular seller, but the hoagies are the largest selling product. And if it’s your sweet tooth calling, don’t miss a chance to sink your teeth into their chocolate chip cookies. While Sweet Escape offers wholesale throughout the Front Range, a public retail store offers many of her selections for those who enjoy them. Even if you’re not a celiac, you may find your body likes it better. Degen says many diabetics find gluten-free products are easier with their blood sugars. Most people don’t realize the products are gluten free, which shows that Sweet Escape tests the taste, texture and appearance of all the items they make. “My goal was to be delicious, not nutritious,” she says. “But the funny thing is that we are nutritious. As long as you find something that works for you, that’s great.” Check it Out

Sweet Escape Pastries is a gluten free, wheat free and nut free bakery that offers items that are freezer-safe for 11 to 14 months. Check out their public retail sale Fridays from 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. at 600 S. Sunset St. Suite D in Longmont. For more details, call 720-204-2062 or visit www.SweetEscPastries.com.

Facebook

Follow Sweet Escape Pastries on Facebook for all the latest news about products and where you can find them.

Gluten free breads and buns from Sweet Escape Pastries in Longmont. 20

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food

GLUTEN-FREE RECIPES

Turkey and Spinach Potato Lasagna Courtesy Wendy McMillan 2 pounds peeled baking potato, cut into one-quarter-inch thick slices 2 teaspoons olive oil 1 pound lean ground turkey breast 1 medium onion, chopped 2 cloves garlic, minced 2 cups no-salt added tomato sauce 1 teaspoon dried basil 1 teaspoon dried oregano 1 cup low fat ricotta cheese 1 cup lowfat cottage cheese 1 egg, lightly beaten 1 egg white 1 10-ounce package frozen chopped spinach, thawed and drained 1 cup shredded part-skim mozzarella cheese 1 /2 cup grated parmesan cheese (optional)

Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Coat potato slices with olive oil, and layer on a baking sheet coated with cooking spray. Bake 25 to 30 minutes, until slices are firmly tender and beginning to brown on the edges. Remove and set aside. In a nonstick skillet, cook turkey, onion and garlic, browning meat. Drain fat. Return to burner, adding tomato sauce and herbs. Cover and let simmer. In a medium bowl, mix ricotta and cottage cheeses, spinach and egg. Arrange half the potato slices in a 9-by-13-inch baking pan coated with cooking spray. Spread with half of the spinach-cheese mixture. Top with half of the meat sauce and half of the mozzarella cheese. Repeat layers and, if desired, sprinkle top with parmesan cheese. Serves 8.

Orange Cupcakes Courtesy Teresa Litman 1 /4 cup shortening 1 /2 cup sugar 1 cup, plus 2 tablespoons rice flour 1 /4 teaspoon salt 1 /4 teaspoon cinnamon 1 /4 teaspoon ginger 1 /4 teaspoon nutmeg 1 teaspoon baking powder 1 /2 cup orange juice

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Line muffin tin with wrappers or grease. Put the softened shortening into a mixing bowl, add sugar and cream on medium until light and fluffy. Set aside. Mix and sift all the dry ingredients. Add the dry, alternating with the orange juice, into the mixing bowl. Blend on low for 30 seconds after all combined. Fill paper cups two-thirds full. Bake 20 to 30 minutes. Makes 9. Note: This recipe is figured for high-altitude baking, 5,000 feet or more, which is suitable for Longmont. Frost with cream cheese frosting and sprinkle with orange zest.

Tasty Gluten-Free Buckwheat Bread Courtesy Maria Laitinen, http://scandifoodie .blogspot.com, recipe by taste.com.au 11/2 cups gluten-free flour 1 /2 cup organic buckwheat flour 3 teaspoons gluten-free baking powder 1 /2 teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons caster sugar 2 egg whites 1 cup reduced fat milk 1 /2 cup vegetable oil 3-4 tablespoons seed mix (pepitas, sunflower seeds, pine nuts)

Black Bean Brownies Courtesy Wendy McMillan 1 (15.5 ounce) can black beans, rinsed and drained 2 eggs and 1 egg white 2 tablespoons melted butter 1 ounce unsweetened chocolate 1 /4 cup applesauce 1 /4 heaped cup cocoa powder 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 3 /4 cup sugar, honey or agave nectar 1 tablespoon instant coffee granules 1 tablespoon hot water 1 /4 to 1/2 cup chocolate chips (optional) 1 /4 to 1/2 cup cup chopped walnuts 1 teaspoon baking powder

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Lightly grease an 8-by-8 square baking dish. In a small pan, melt butter and 1 ounce chocolate. Combine the black beans, eggs, melted butter mixture, cocoa powder, baking powder, applesauce, vanilla extract, sugar/honey, water and instant coffee in a food processor; process until smooth; pour the mixture into the TIMES-CALL / LONGMONT MAGAZINE

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Courtesy http://scandifoodie.blogspot.com

prepared baking dish. Stir in the chocolate chips and nuts, if using. Bake in the preheated oven until the top is dry and the edges start to pull away from the sides of the pan, about 30 minutes.

Dark Chocolate Hazelnut Torte Courtesy Wendy McMillan 2 tablespoons butter 6 ounces quality dark chocolate (approximately 11/2 bars) 1 /2 cup unsweetened dark cocoa powder 4 beaten eggs 1 /2 cup 2 percent lowfat milk 3 tablespoons agave nectar or brown rice

Preheat oven to 350 degrees and grease a loaf pan. Sift together the gluten-free flour, buckwheat flour, baking powder and salt and stir in the sugar. Beat the egg whites until just frothy, and stir in the milk and the vegetable oil. Pour the egg white mixture into the flour mixture and beat for 2 minutes or until smooth. Pour the batter into the pan, and press the seed mix lightly into the batter. Bake for 40 to 50 minutes or until a skewer inserted in the middle of the bread comes out clean.

syrup /3 cup rice flour /2 cup coarsely ground or chopped hazelnuts

1 1

Preheat oven to 300 degrees. In a saucepan, gently melt butter and chocolate, stirring regularly. Add cocoa powder and mix well. In a separate bowl, mix eggs, milk, agave nectar or syrup and rice flour. Fold in chocolate mixture. Stir in nuts. Bake for 35 minutes. Torte will pull back slightly from sides. Serve with low-fat ice cream or whipped cream. Best chilled at least one hour. 21


family

NONPROFIT BRINGS ADVENTURE TO FAMILIES

Clockwise from far left: Katherine Mackinnon uses her senses during a game of fox walking. The exercise helps a person learn to focus their hearing, while the other participants learn to walk quietly. Mackinnon paints her face with charcoal as Guthrie looks on. Simon Paul Harrison shows a group of children an animal print that was most likely a mountain lion. Harrison leads an activity called Eagle Eye to help students learn to use all of their vision. (Paul Litman)

Families reconnect with the Earth BY SUMMER STAIR

The Earth is all around you, you are a part of it, but do you really know what it has to offer? These are the questions Wild Earth’s Children, a nonprofit organization based in Lyons, asks individuals and families. “Getting in touch with nature was the first thing that called to me and really touched my soul,” says Simon Paul Harrison, founder of Wild Earth’s Children. “It’s about helping others reconnect with the Earth without fear and become free.” With a mission of helping children and families to foster deep, meaningful relationships with the Earth through hands-on experiences in nature, the foundation offers many programs geared toward schools, children, teens, adults and families. Harrison says when families explore nature together, it solidifies what is taught and learned 22

Check it Out

For more information on programs and on Wild Earth’s Children, visit www.wildearthschldren.org or visit Simon Paul Harrison’s blog at www.simonpaulharrison.com.

because each person is taking something home with them. “They’re sharing the experience and it makes it more powerful,” Harrison says. Living near the mountains makes the opportunities to reconnect with nature unlimited. Harrison says families are aware that it is something often taken for granted. “People realize we live so close to these things and it would be so easy to lose it for their children,” he says. This is where Wild Earth’s Children programs can come into play. It allows families to get out together and learn primitive living skills and nature awareness techniques, such as fire by friction, building shelters, discovering wild edibles and tracking animals.

Another attraction for families is the adventures the Earth has to offer. “Everyone wants some kind of adventure and there are a million ways to seek adventure,” Harrison says. “When people seek adventure with the Earth, I see fear leave and this helps them do better in life and this treats them well.” The end goal for Harrison is after being out in nature, he wants individuals to have or at least feel independence, be lovers of life and have a reduction in fear. “It’s great to see people become free and seeing them letting go of the fear that they hide inside themselves,” he explains. “Kids don’t have this fear and they’re open to new ideas and experiences.” This is why it can be great for adults and children to experience nature and its beauty together. Natalie Eamonn of Drake has participated in the programs with her two sons and it has helped enrich their SPRING 2011

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home schooling, as well. “It’s an adventure along with the learning,” she says. Another parent, Lina Dzekciorius, has had all three of her sons be a part of the programs. “In general, people have a disconnect with nature and I wanted my sons to strengthen this and learn about themselves,” she says. This has been easy for Dzekciorius because she finds her sons thriving when doing the programs. The openness and curiosity expressed helps them break their shells, live it and experience it, she says. “They’re all about it. The nature and the adventure; it transcends into everything.” The feeling of experiencing nature and reconnecting with the Earth is a personal adventure and one that should not be taken lightly. Harrison says the learning is done through a specific method of teaching called Coyote Teaching. Coyote Teaching is what makes Wild Earth’s Children different. “We don’t give anybody anything easy, they have to work for it,” Harrison says.

Katherine Mackinnon of Wild Earth’s Children talks to a group of children during a recent outing at Roosevelt National Forest. (Paul Litman)

Coyote Teaching allows students the chance to develop their own motivation to learn through encouragement, without realizing that the teacher is guiding the process. There are no tests, no facts to remember and no external pressures to learn. Instead, the child’s natural desires to learn are strength-

ened. This process is extremely individualized and is often different for every student. Through interactions with nature, Harrison hopes individuals and families can leave his programs and feel as one with the Earth, connected with others and to all things present.

Steve’s Automotive and Alignment offers a range of services to make your life easier. As a full service automotive repair and automotive maintenance shop, Steve’s Automotive prides itself on providing high-quality service. Locally owned and operated by Steve Powers, the shop is committed to providing personalized auto repair for each customer. At the shop, no one is simply a repair order. The staff at Steve’s treats each vehicle individually and thoroughly to ensure the best customer service, quality and value. The shop’s goal is to provide service that will leave customers with peace of mind and the staff is committed to excellence, integrity, value and positive relationships. Services at Steve’s are as varied as the type of autos the shop repairs. With four alignment systems in place, Steve’s can align almost any vehicle, from cars and trucks to SUVs and RVs. Steve’s is also certified to perform alignment and repairs on big rigs. Other services include transmission or brake work, air conditioning or a general tune-up. Steve’s also performs manufacturerrecommended services and has a full-service diesel technician on staff. With 16 years in business, Steve’s has proven to be a local favorite for auto repairs and maintenance. The mechanic staff at Steve’s has a combined 150 years of experience working on a variety of cars, trucks, SUVs and semis, and are known as Boulder County’s alignment experts. At Steve’s, customers don’t just get great service, but peace of mind.

Service and Repair of Domestic and Imported Automobiles, SUVs, and Light Trucks Serving Boulder County and the Colorado Front Range for Over 15 Years

303-682-9015 • www.steves-alignment.com 510 2nd Ave. • Longmont TIMES-CALL / LONGMONT MAGAZINE

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outdoors

CARIBOU RANCH ADVENTURES Far left: Track for the ore carts still remain outside the mine entrance at the Bluebird Mine complex on the Caribou Ranch Open Space. Left: Visitors walk up to the falls in North Boulder Creek at the Bluebird Mine complex. The site includes a bunkhouse, remains of a log building, mining company house, chicken coops, a smoke house, the foundation of a mill, mine shafts and tracks for ore carts. (Lewis Geyer)

Caribou Ranch offers year-round enjoyment BY KRISTI RITTER

An area open to hikers, horseback riders and trail runners, Caribou Ranch Open Space near Nederland is a great place for recreational opportunities and to discover the rich heritage the space offers. The town of Caribou was established in 1870 after a silver prospector, William Martin, had come to the area nine years prior. The town originally had a church, three saloons, a brewery and a newspaper, the Caribou Post. The silver mine, which was known first as the Caribou Mine and then later as the Blue Bird Mine, made money during its time and was known for its Blue Azurite which was often found with the silver ore. In the early 1900s, a railroad also ran through the area to collect the findings from the mine. Martin named the Caribou Mine and established Tucker Ranch. By 1936, Lynn W. Van Vieet purchased the ranch and established the first Arabian horse breeding operation in Colorado. However, by 1971, new owner James Guercio renamed the ranch Caribou Ranch, according to Sarah Holton, Caribou Ranch Open Space park ranger and caretaker. Guercio was in the music business and converted one of the barns into a recording studio. While the Guercio family still owns the main ranch, the open space was purchased jointly by the city of Boulder and Boulder County in 1996. 24

As Boulder County’s highest open space area, hikers will be able to see many of the historic features of the area, including the old DeLonde homestead from the early 1900s and the Blue Bird Mine. Although the mine complex cannot be directly accessed, hikers can take a small trail that leads up to the mine. Caribou Ranch offers beautiful views of the surrounding mountain range, as well as numerous sightings of wildlife, including elk, moose, bobcat, coyote, marmot and mule deer, according to Holton. A great meadow in the area is also the site of spring elk calving, so the space closes from April through June to give the animals privacy. Because of the abundant wildlife, there are no dogs allowed on the 4.2 miles of trails that wind hikers, runners and horseback riders throughout the space. Holton says the area is a great place year-round, offering numerous hiking opportunities, as well as snowshoeing and cross-country skiing in the winter. “It’s not a difficult park to hike, making it ideal for families and older people to enjoy the views,” Holton says. However, for people with dogs or wanting to mountain bike, check out the Mud Lake Open Space located less than a mile away with 2.6 miles of trails. Visitors to Caribou Ranch in the fall will also enjoy the abundance of aspen trees throughout the area, casting a vivid color viewing.

Trail Stats

Round trip: 4.2 miles DeLonde Trail: 1.2 miles Blue Bird Loop: 1.8 miles Blue Bird Mine Segment: 0.1 mile Physical Difficulty: Easy, elevation at 8,000 feet or more Elevation Gain: 250 feet Facilities: picnic tables, restrooms at trailhead To get there: Caribou Ranch is located 2 miles north of Nederland. Turn west onto County Road 126 from the Peak to Peak Scenic Byway, Highway 72, and follow it to the parking lot on the right. Horse trailer parking is available at the Mud Lake parking lot ¾ miles away on County Road 126.

SPRING 2011

Check it Out

Caribou Ranch is a great place to spend the day or afternoon. Check out more information online and download the trail map at www.bouldercounty.org /play/recreation/pages /caribouranch.aspx.

Twitter Follow

Get updates for Caribou Ranch on Twitter by following Sarah Holton at @RangerSHolton.

TIMES-CALL / LONGMONT MAGAZINE


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DON’T MISS A SINGLE BEAT... Hearing HealthCare Centers has proudly provided Boulder County with the latest in hearing technology and exceptional customer service for more than 27 years. Dr. Whitney Swander, owner and doctor of audiology, has recently welcomed Dr. Edith Burns, doctor of audiology to the staff to better be able to serve our growing community.

WHAT’S NEW? WIRELESS TECHNOLOGY! Hearing HealthCare Centers is excited to offer a new approach to wireless technology. Range is a new line of hearing aids that can stream audio from your TV, computer or other listening device directly into your hearing aids, without the use of any body-worn accessories. A truly simple one-step set up of the transmitter is all it takes to enjoy wireless streaming. Does your spouse complain the TV is too loud? Are you curious to try it? Call for a free consultation and demonstration of this exciting new technology. Visit www.HearingHealthCareCenters.com for valuable information, original blog articles and reviews. You can also follow us on Twitter and become a fan on Facebook. pp Call one of our convenient locations to make an appointment today.

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SPRING 2011

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dining

PINOCCHIOS SERVES UP ITALIAN

Simply Italian

BY SUMMER STAIR


Left: Kentucky Bourbon Pie. Below: Inside Pinocchios Italian Restaurant in Longmont. Opposite page: Spicy Toasted Ravioli. (Paul Litman)

Pinocchios offers a taste from the kitchen Check it Out

Visit Pinocchios at 210 Ken Pratt Blvd., Longmont, 303-651-7828, or at 11078 Cimarron St., Firestone, 303-776-6727. http://pinocchios-st.com

the Michaiah’s Bread, which is an herb pull-apart bread served with marinara. A perfect way to end the meal is with a savory homemade dessert prepared in Pinocchios’ kitchens. Noted as a favorite among guests is the Italian Lemon Cake. The idea for Pinocchios began in Longmont almost eight years ago. Vick says after her divorce she needed a way to provide for her children and what better way than providing a warm, cozy place for the community to eat. In October 2003, in a little space on Main Street, Pinocchios was born. After five years at its Main Street location, Pinocchios moved to Harvest Junction on Colo. Highway 119. The new location offers a clean new building, a larger parking lot and is right off the St. Vrain Greenway bike trail.

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The success of Pinocchios can be seen as it has slowly expanded from Longmont’s borders to Brighten and Lafayette. While these two locations were started by Vick and carry the Pinocchios name and menu, she has since sold them to new owners. Recent endeavors by Vick include the opening of a Pinocchios in Firestone in November 2010, as well as a new restaurant adventure Sloppy Dog. March will also find a Pinocchios opening in Littleton, also owned by Vick. Pinocchios will go national, too, with franchise opportunities out of the state under the name of Delvickios. At the end of the day, Vick is thankful she has made her community, and those surrounding her, a part of her dream. The restaurant business has not only been prosperous for her, but has allowed for her to share in community events and family celebrations, all while working alongside her kids and husband. But when asked why Italian? Vick says, “It’s simply what I do best.�

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When owner Annie Vick talks about her family restaurant, Pinocchios, she makes it seem simple. It’s making Italian food just like you would at home. But this isn’t about a pack of noodles and a can of sauce. It’s food homemade from scratch that keeps Pinocchios’ customers coming back for simply incredible Italian. While customers can expect traditional favorites, such as spaghetti and meatballs, lasagna, pizza and calzones, there are plenty of dishes unique to Pinocchios’ restaurants. A favorite main dish among customers and staff is the Archobellino Piatto, which is pasta in a warm balsamic vinaigrette with chicken, Bermuda onion, roasted red peppers and sundried tomatoes. To start the meal off right, Vick recommends the Spicy Toasted Ravioli served with a sundried tomato pesto cream. And don’t forget the many breads made daily, including the Baked Pesto Bread that comes either green or red and is topped with mozzarella and

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Knit’s In! BY WENDY MCMILLAN • PHOTOS BY PAUL LITMAN

The year is young, and we’re leaping toward spring, full of fresh starts and opportunities. If you’re interested in pursuing something both creative and utilitarian, something that’s either social or peacefully solitary, you need look no further than a pair of knitting needles.


Jane Anderson, left, and LaRae Perry, sit together at Ziggi’s Coffee House while knitting socks and mittens. Anderson and Perry belong to the Peace Knitters Club which was formed in May 2010 to help make hand knit items such as winter hats, scarfs and mittens for people in need. Previous page: Donna Druchunas knits a scarf.

Gone is the predominant image of Grandma and her busy fingers knitting scarves by the fireside. From teens to celebrities, knitting is increasingly popular with all ages. Whether the growing trend is foremost inspired by the media, with shows such as Martha Stewart and Knitty Gritty, or a yearning for simplicity and a homemade items during tough times, this leisurely pastime is bringing groups together everywhere. According to a 2009 survey conducted by the Craft Yarn Council of America, not only has knitting’s popularity increased enormously across all ages, it is geared up to continue to do so, with 76 percent of the recorded 5,045 online respondents stating they had taught at least one person to knit or crochet within the past year. Taught by her mother, Gail Sundberg-Douse learned to knit when she was 9. Both her grandmothers knitted, and it was common in her family and community to exchange knitted gifts. Today, not only does Sundberg-Douse knit avidly, she spins her own wool, co-owns a business with her sister, Sue Johnson, and regularly teaches knitting classes through Longmont Parks and Recreation, all in addition to being a full-time nurse, wife and mother to four. Sundberg-Douse learned to spin her TIMES-CALL / LONGMONT MAGAZINE

SPRING 2011

own wool in college, but veered away from spinning alpaca wool, having heard it was difficult. In 2005, however, when her sister first purchased three pregnant alpacas, she was beautifully supplied with fresh alpaca fleece just begging to be spun, and it was time to learn. Although alpaca fleece is tricky to spin, it is easy, lovely material to work with. “It’s soft, warm and luxurious,” Sundberg-Douse attests. “It feels like silk and butter combined in your hands.” There is something particularly appealing about giving and receiving handmade items. Direct contact with the maker adds a touch that is even more special. Through her involvement with farmers’ markets and other like events, Sundberg-Douse has noticed a steady increase in commitment to supporting local and sustainable endeavors in line with resurgence in knitting and other pastimes. Longmont resident author and knitter Donna Druchunas has personal experience with renewed interest in handmade products. As a child, she learned a range of crafts, including knitting, rug-hooking, embroidery and sewing. After a 25-year hiatus, during which time she worked as a writer, designer and creative services manager,

Druchunas turned her attention back to knitting. “There was this beautiful yarn shop,” Druchunas recounts. “I couldn’t believe how yarn had changed. There was such a variety, washable wool, silk and mohair, and all these colors and textures.” When the shop held a half price sale, Druchunas bought a kit and was hooked; she learned to spin and dye wool with natural dyes. She then applied her writing skills in combination with her passion, resulting in her designs and articles being featured in publications such as Family Circle, Easy Knitting, Interweave Knits and numerous other magazines. She also designs patterns for numerous yarn companies. In addition to writing articles, Druchunas has also published several of her own books; her latest, “Successful Lace Knitting” presents a beautiful collection of patterns, as well as a biography of Dorothy Reade, known to many as the mother of modern lace knitting. “Knitting is very relaxing,” Druchunas says. “It’s also very portable and productive. You enjoy the yarn and the process the entire time you work on a project, and then the recipient of the item you create gets to enjoy it forever.” With advances in yarns and other materials, designs and other resources, 29


Local Knitting Resources Wabi Sabi Farm Store

Full service sewing lounge featuring classes, events and carefully selected supplies. 361 Second Ave. Suite 104, Niwot, 303-652-0532

Shuttles, Spindles & Skeins

Handweavers Guild of Boulder

Gypsy Wools

Peace Knitters Meetup Group

Longmont Recreation Services

Knit & Purl

Sheep to Shawl Online Store

For information on Donna Druchunas’

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Active since 1963, this group includes more than 300 members with interests in all fiber media, including knitting, weaving, felting, spinning, beadwork, quilting, dyeing, basketry, paper, crochet and surface design. www.handweaversofboulder.org

Unique hand-painted, hand-dyed yarns and spinning fibers, fine needlepoint and embroidery supplies. 1227 Spruce St., Boulder, 303-442-1884 www.gypsywools.com www.facebook.com/GypsyWools www.ci.longmont.co.us/rec/adults/ knitting.htm

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Sew Fresh Studio

Longmont, by appointment, call 303-678-8242. Gail Sundberg-Douse’s work is also available at The Orange Door, 370 Main St., Longmont. Supplies for knitting and spinning, books, classes, workshops and events. Table Mesa Shopping Center, 635 South Broadway, Unit E, Boulder, 303-494-1071 www.shuttlesspindlesandskeins.com.

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workshops and classes, visit http://sheeptoshawl.com

Meetings from 7 to 9 p.m. the second Saturday of every month at Ziggi’s Coffee House, 400 Main St., Longmont Contact Jane Anderson: janetyree@gmail.com, research Peace Knitters through Meetup Longmont Senior Center Wednesdays, 9 to 11 a.m. Group led by Becky Williamson. See city of Longmont groups/clubs, Senior Services page at www.ci.longmont.co.us/sen_ctr/groups

you might say knitting has given itself a modern makeover in recent years, resulting in funky, stylish products. It’s even found a special social networking niche of its own. Peace Knitters Meetup, founded by Jane Anderson last May, combines shared passion for craft with compassionate purpose. The group meets monthly at Ziggi’s Coffee House in downtown Longmont to work on charity projects, such as furnishing warm clothing for the homeless of Boulder County, or creating shawls and lap throws for nursing homes. “I’ve always loved knitting,” Anderson says. “I love handmade things, and craft. Last spring I decided I wanted to take my passion and use it to do something to bring more peace into the world.” Anderson was not alone in her sentiments, and her meetup group received a positive response, though she is eager to integrate new members. Instruction is not provided within group meetings, but all levels are welcome, and beginning knitters find themselves improving from the company. “People sometimes tend to think that they need to do something huge to make a difference,” muses Anderson. “In fact, little things truly can make an impact, and cultivating passion within oneself can translate into something really positive for others.”

LaRae Perry knits a pair of finger-less gloves at Ziggi’s Coffee House in Longmont. Perry is a member of the Peace Knitters Club, which meets monthly to work on charity projects, such as creating warm clothing for homeless, or creating shawls and lap throws for nursing homes. SPRING 2011

TIMES-CALL / LONGMONT MAGAZINE


Committed tted to Excellence. Focused on YOU.

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Colorado C l d iis a state t t where h h healthy lth outdoor td enthusiasts th i t abound. b d Thi This population l ti is fit and full of life. Yet, this young-at-heart population is aging and the effects of their fun-in-the-sun lifestyle eventually catch up. There are several ways to help protect against the further demise of your aging facial aesthetics. All of us should be using sunblock with a high SPF; daily facial fruit acid and strong retinol weekly. These work to slough off damaged skin cells. As we age we lose volume in our skin. This lack of volume causes fine lines and wrinkles. Fractional CO2 laser is a long lasting and powerful way to restore volume. This treatment stimulates a person’s skin to increase production of collagen. Extra collagen eradicates fine lines and dramatically softens the deep lines. Laser is also effective at eliminating sun spots, age spots and improving the pigmentation of the skin. Botox is also an excellent tool to reduce deep lines. Some deep lines are better served with filler products or fat grafting. Fat grafting is a more permanent solution in which fat is harvested from the abdomen, processed and then injected into areas of the face lacking volume. Another option for areas of facial volume depletion is silicone implants for the cheeks and lips. Often there is significant laxity and descent of the underlying structures of the face and neck and surgical options are the best choice. A facelift will lift and tighten the facial muscles and excess neck and jowl fat may be removed with liposuction. The skin is then re-draped, providing a natural, refreshed younger looking you. Eyelids benefit from surgical rejuvenation, as well. All of these techniques can be performed as office-based procedures similar to the dentist. Patients appreciate the decreased risks and expense of office-based procedures and tolerate these surgeries well. In addition, the recovery is usually remarkably fast.

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SPRING 2011

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lifestyle

THE BATTLE OF PINBALL

Classic Pinball

A nostalgic addiction revisited through Lyon’s business It began with an unorthodox birthday present. Kevin Carroll walked into his basement to receive a gift from his wife, Carole. What he discovered was a buzzing and chirping pinball machine illuminating the room. “I was blown away,” Kevin says. “I actually had a tear in my eye.” This, Kevin explains, started it all. After hours of playing nightly and inviting friends downstairs to try, Kevin realized pinball was something special and intoxicating. “We kind of got addicted,” he says. “So we thought, let’s get another one.” But they didn’t stop at a second machine. Not even close. Today, the Carrolls own somewhere between 140 and 170 machines in their

collection. “Too many,” Kevin laughs. The machines have overflowed from their basement to the garage, dining room and living room. “Our three-car garage has never seen a car.” But the pinball machines are not just for Kevin and Carole’s enjoyment. The machines are part of their shop, Lyons Classic Pinball, now an eight-yearrunning business. The Carrolls believed that if they could put decent pinball machines out in the public, maybe other people would be as into it as they were. With about 40 machines circulating in the shop, Lyons Classic Pinball has the largest public collection of pinball machines in Colorado, with the shop’s oldest machine dating back to 1961. “I’ll buy a game broken and bring it

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Jovan Fish, of Jamestown, gets into a game of Monster Bash pinball at Lyons Classic Pinball. (Paul Litman)

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SPRING 2011

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back to life,” Kevin says. He makes sure every machine in the shop is well-maintained and rotates them between the shop and his home. That way, there’s never an out-of-order machine on site and customers see a variety of games. The shop has generated many regulars, some driving to Lyons on a daily basis. Customers have even started their own Mile High Pinball League, where participants sponsor weekly competitions. The shop also hosts monthly pinball tournaments, a big hit every third Thursday of the month. Pinball veterans and world-ranked players show off their competitive pinball skills among packed crowds. The shop has seen all ages and abilities, some trying a game of pinball for the first time and others there to thrive on the nostalgia. People always ask Kevin if the kids enjoy his shop. “Yeah, the kids between 20 and 85,” he says as a joke. “It’s about the big kids.” Kevin makes it part of his job description to interact with his customers, offering first-time players tips and basics to the game. “Once you realize there’s an objective and you can get better each time, that’s when it gets addicting,” he says. Top: Dean Grover plays Strikes and Spares. Grover “I try to help them makes the 80 mile drive from Strasburg once a with that.” week to play at the weekly pinball league and Lyons Classic tournament. Bottom: The Family Guy game is one of the more modern pinball games located at Lyons Pinball is a labor of Classic Pinball. The game place has more than 40 love for Kevin and pinball games from the 1960s to 2000s. (Paul Carole, as 50 cent Litman) games don’t add up quickly. But their enthusiasm to have fun proves making a living off quarters can be a success. “I made this place work because I really wanted it to,” Kevin says. “And I love it.” Lyons Classic Pinball has brought a rising, nostalgic culture to Colorado. Other shops have started up because of the Carroll’s unique idea, and their pinball machines can now be found at various locations in the area. Lyons Classic Video, their sister operation, is a video game arcade at Oskar Blues Grill & Brew. “If you had told me about pinball the day before my wife gave me that first machine, I would have never thought that I’d be that into it,” he says. But something about the game keeps players coming back for more.

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What do you want to learn today? Whether it’s learning skills for a new job, pursuing a passion, being able to help children with schoolwork, or just to stay engaged, there’s an online resource devoted to helping you! Log on today to find exciting opportunities in Longmont to ensure that you never stop learning! LM-159616

Ron R. Hogsett, Owner 452 Main St., Longmont 303-651-1125 Mon. - Fri. 9:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m., Sat. 9:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. 33


fashion

SPRING FASHION REFLECTS VIBRANT COLORS

Mood Brightening

Liven your wardrobe with bright, citrus colors BY LAUREL TONEY

www.lillap.com

This spring, designers are showing bright collections filled with fruity fun. Citrus is this year’s color, and designers are hitting all levels of the spectrum. Honeysuckle pink and sugared lemon are prime, and orange hues and fruit-inspired prints are proving a great way to infuse life into your closet. After all the dreary neutrals of winter, who isn’t ready for a little punch of color? Local retailers tell you how you can incorporate this bold trend even if the thought of tangerine makes you want to scream. Holly Kabacoff, manager of MAX in Boulder, says bright yellow and mandarin orange are great colors to choose. Fuchsia and other jewel tone solids are also prevalent. “There’s also a lot of white,” she says, which pairs well with bright solids to create a crisp, fresh look. If you’re worried that these bold spring colors aren’t flattering, don’t. Wearing these bright statement colors in solids is “much easier than wearing pastels. It’s almost like wearing black,” Kabacoff says. They are slimming and flattering, especially in the form-fitting, but structured silhouettes designers are showing. Dana Culbertson, of JJWells in Boulder, says these saturated solids for spring are not only beautiful,

but needed. “Color does a lot for people’s mood,” Culbertson says. The colors for spring are bright, brilliant and uplifting, but not neon. Deep pinks and apple greens will elicit smiles but also complement most wardrobes and lifestyles. They’re paired well with the neutrals and blacks that you likely already have in your closet. “Designers are getting people to step out of the box,” Culbertson says. Look for unusual color combinations and pops of color. If you’re uneasy about wearing vivid brights like fuchsia and yellow, try adding them as an accessory. “Yellow is a conversation color; it elicits strong reactions,” Culbertson says. A lemon scarf is a great way to ease into spring and citrus; it makes a big impact with minimal effort. Statement handbags are another way to incorporate this trend and update your look. An orange handbag adds a splash of color. When the seasons change, you need color, Culbertson says, and with bright solids dominating this year, it’s easy to add color to your look. Colors and prints this year are stronger and more diverse than they have been in years past, creating myriad options for any woman’s wardrobe. This lime green accented stripped dress by Diane Von Furstenberg from MAX shows how citrus colors are included. This multi-colored silk dress by Diane Von Furstenberg at MAX highlights citrus colors.

Nally and Millie two-piece flyaway tank and tunic top with hand-painted silk scarf from Spain in America, modeled by Maria Chapman from JJ Wells. Black skirt and sangria top Diane Von Furstenberg available at MAX.

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Barbara Kawczynski is a puppy raiser and trainer of Taylor, a 9-month-old chocolate Labrador retriever. Taylor is in mobility assistant training which will take about two years to complete.

A Loyal Companion

Service dogs aid owners by allowing them to lead a rich life BY KRISTI RITTER PHOTOS BY PAUL LITMAN

Taylor maintains eye contact with her trainer, Barbara Kawczynski, during a training session at home.

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It broke Barb Kawczynski’s heart when she had to turn over the first dog she trained. After 18 months, the two had become inseparable as they traveled everywhere together, whether it was to work or the store. She taught the dog commands and corrected his inaccuracies, but also allowed him to be a dog and have fun in the family’s backyard. But even through the tears, she knew she was providing a gift that could change someone else’s life. Kawczynski is a puppy raiser for Canine Partners of the Rockies, a Colorado service dog organization that takes a dog from puppyhood to assistance dog to help people with physical or mental conditions that limit major life activity. Founded in 2002 by Bonnie Bergin, the

organization focuses on training dogs to be placed in Colorado so they could be a resource for the dogs and owners. Bergin originated the concept of service dogs in 1975 when she founded Canine Companions for Independence in Santa Rosa, Calif., which is now one of the largest service dogs organizations. Linda Port, program and training director for Canine Partners of the Rockies, has been with the organization since its beginning and believes in the local placement of dogs. “We feel that part of the way to make a successful service dog team is to always have support available. People’s lives change and their conditions change, so we want to be there to support them when those changes occur.” SPRING 2011

TIMES-CALL / LONGMONT MAGAZINE


An Unspeakable Bond Known by many, Boulder duo are inseparable On Tristan’s first day with William “Cal” Callahan, he jumped up onto the bed and snuggled in. Callahan and his wife, Meredith, looked at each other, fearing he had not been trained properly as a service dog. But with time, it was just one of Tristan’s quirks, and now a comfort as the two cuddle in bed. Tristan loves having his ears rubbed and Callahan enjoys the comfort of his true companion snuggling close, even when Tristan takes up all the covers and snores loudly. Tristan, a 10-year-old golden retriever, was the first service dog placed by Canine Partners of the Rockies in 2002. His owner became paralyzed in 1998 and sought a service dog not only for assistance, but companionship. “Tristan works as a great ice breaker, which makes me more approachable,” Callahan says. Trained as a mobility dog, Tristan is great at helping pull his owner’s wheelchair, shutting doors, getting the newspaper and even picking up objects as small as quarters. “Everything is so automatic with Tristan, who is ready as soon as I wiggle the handle,” Callahan says as he moves his powerchair handle and Tristan stands to alertness, staring his master in the eyes. Callahan and Tristan are known by many as they go everywhere together, especially on the city buses they ride and at the University of Colorado campus where Callahan works as a librarian. Tristan is the “lab-rarian” and gets spoiled, especially from a coworker who brings him an apple daily. Grabbing the apple with his teeth he returns to his bed below his owner’s desk, pulls out the stem and then eats the entire apple, core and all.

From top to bottom: William “Cal” Callahan talks to his 10-year-old yellow lab, Tristan, as he asks him if he is ready to go on a walk. Service dogs are trained to have a strong connection with their owners. In this case, Tristan and Callahan have a strong understanding with their eyes, and can almost read each other. Tristan is never far from his owner, often laying down under his chair or desk at work.

TIMES-CALL / LONGMONT MAGAZINE

SPRING 2011

Tristan loves to swim and run, taking to local trails with the Callahans, as well as going on daily walks around the neighborhood. Meredith believes Tristan has provided more than assistance to her husband. He’s given him something to take care of that is all his own. “I can’t imagine being without him,” Callahan says. “He’s just a true companion that does everything for you.” – KRISTI RITTER

Although Canine Partners of the Rockies is a relatively small organization, it placed its 32nd dog in 2010. This number was reached because of people like Kawczynski who take on the task of training the dog basic obedience commands, manners and establishing a comfort zone for the dogs to be in public and around people. Kawczynski has always been a dog lover, growing up with them throughout her life. After finding out about Canine Partners of the Rockies, she signed up as a puppy raiser and is now training her second dog, a nine-month-old female chocolate lab named Taylor. She says there are four breeds that make the most ideal service dogs: golden retrievers, Labrador retrievers, German shepherds and poodles. “Dogs need something to do and they need a purpose,” she says. “And when they’re working with someone they love, they are happy.” Taylor is learning well, taking only voice commands from her owner, which Kawczynski is careful to deliver in a consistent tone at all times so Taylor learns correctly. The puppy raising process takes the dog from 8 weeks old until 18 months in age, when the dog goes through medical exams to ensure good physical structure, Port says. From there the dog will go to a professional trainer to learn the essential service commands before being placed with a person who needs the services the dog provides. There are several types of service dogs that provide help to people with specific 37


-

have!

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Watching & Observing Service dog gives relief to caregivers At only 13 months of age, Karrie Lewis was in a car accident where she suffered a brain injury that caused almost total blindness. She also developed diabetes. “We’ve worked hard as a family to give her what we could,” says her mother Linda Lewis-Porter, who created an in-house apartment for her daughter, now 51. The family also raised the money to get Karrie a service dog. Having a service dog has completely changed Karrie’s life, who is independent in many ways taking walks, riding city buses, going to the senior center for lunch, attending church and going skiing every Saturday at Eldora Mountain Resort. “I’ve been skiing since I was in my 20s, and I’m excited about the Olympics,” Karrie says, referring to the Special Olympics she competed in in early February. Karrie had her first dog, Aggie, for 11 years, before losing her to cancer in October 2009. “Aggie had learned to alert Karrie to low blood sugars by nudging her until she would check it and help boost her

sugars back up,” Lewis-Porter says. In February 2010, Karrie got a new dog through Canine Partners of the Rockies. Blair is a 3-year-old golden retriever who is still young, but has slowly started to develop the low blood sugar intuition that Aggie had, which is such a help in making sure Karrie’s levels stay in check. “Many disabled people are lonely, so for Karrie the dog just fulfills such a special place,” Lewis-Porter says. For Lewis-Porter, knowing that Blair is watching and observing Karrie both at home and in the community allows her to feel a little more comfortable. “The dog gives her someone else to count on, which has been a life saving thing for Karrie and me,” she says. Having a dog has also given Karrie responsibilities she enjoys, including feeding and giving Blair water. It also allows her to put the dog’s needs first, which is great for a disabled person. “And he helps me walk around,” Karrie says, who loves to take Blair for walks. – KRISTI RITTER

disabilities, including guide dogs for the blind, hearing dogs for the deaf, seizure dogs designed to assist in medical conditions, anxiety dogs and mobility dogs that help owners with things they can’t do, such as retrieve items, turn off lights and close doors. Essentially, mobility dogs are an extension of their owners to allow them to live life. Training service dogs is a full-time job for people like Kawczynski, but one she knows is full of much reward. “The dogs need to be loved, but they love working,” she says. “If you go in with the right attitude, yeah it will break your heart, but you’re doing so much good.” Check it Out

Canine Partners of the Rockies is always looking for puppy raisers and sitters. They also find the greatest reward when they’re able to place a dog with a person in need. Find out more about how you can help or apply by calling 303-364-9040 or visiting www.caninepartnersoftherockies.org. You can also find out more about service dogs by visiting the Delta Society, which is an organization designed to improve human health through service and therapy dogs. Check out their website at www.deltasociety.org.

TIMES-CALL / LONGMONT MAGAZINE

SPRING 2011

Top: Karrie Lewis and her 3-year-old golden retriever service dog, Blair, go on a walk just outside her neighborhood in Gunbarrel. Above: Karrie Lewis hands over the mail to her mother, Linda Lewis-Porter, after getting home from a walk with Blair.

Service dogs are working

Educating the public about service dogs is important to the people who raise puppies. Longmont resident Barb Kawczynski says it’s important that people remember that a service dog is working. People shouldn’t do anything to interrupt the service dog while it’s in training. While some service dogs will wear a vest or harness that signal they are service dogs, it’s not required, so it’s always best to ask. Here are some tips for interacting according to The Delta Society, www.deltasociety.org: • Speak to the person first and ask if the dog is a service dog. Do not aim distracting or rude noises at the dog. • Do not touch the service dog without asking for, and receiving, permission. • Do not offer food to the service dog. • Do not ask personal questions about the handler’s disability, or otherwise intrude on his or her privacy. • Don’t be offended if the handler does not wish to chat about the service dog.

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Local Area

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Local Area

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health

A DIET OVERHAUL

Spring Clean

Your Diet BY ANNA TAYLOR

After the hearty meals and sugary sweets of the cold winter months, it’s time to freshen up your diet with all the delicious, healthy foods that springtime has to offer. “You’re coming out of the winter season so it’s a great time to cleanse,” says Cathy Hayes-Daly, a nutritionist in Boulder. Just like you spring clean your house, getting rid of the unhealthy junk food will start you fresh.

Start Small A diet overhaul may seem extreme, so focus on making small changes with your eating habits. “It’s a gradual change,” Hayes-Daly says. “Some people can completely change their diet, but most of us can’t change everything all at once.”

Start by adding more fruits and vegetables into your diet and try to minimize the amount of processed foods you eat. “Dark green vegetables should be the first thing added to your diet,” she says. “Vegetables are the nutritional powerhouses.”

Practice Portion Control In a world of super-size portions, a prominent problem for eating healthy is learning to control how much you eat. Hayes-Daly explains that most people don’t look at labels and realize they are actually consuming two to three portions. Simple tricks such as eating on smaller plates can help deter from overeating. “You generally feel better when you eat a little less,” she says.

Variety is Key Having a variety of foods in your diet is key to sticking to a healthy eating pattern. And, having a multitude of choices keeps you from getting bored and falling back into poor habits. There are numerous ways to incorporate more nutritional foods to the meals you already love and enjoy. Simply adding more chopped vegetables to a stew you regularly make is a simple way to get more produce into your diet. “Try to eat a rainbow of colors every day. Get the blue from blueberries, purple from eggplant and red from tomatoes,” Hayes-Daly says. Just the process of trying to attain the goal of eating each color will ensure you’re getting the variety and nutrients you need.

Curb the Cravings Numerous things in our lives keep us eating the way we do. Maybe a vice is chocolate cake after a long day at work or a piece of candy here and there. Regardless of what you’re food demon is, it usually has more to do with what is going on in other areas of your life that make you crave those things. “Our bodies actually don’t digest well when we are under stress,” Hayes-Daly says. “If you’re under stress, don’t eat – just take a minute to breath and think about why you are wanting that food.” This is not to say that you should cut certain foods out, just learn how to practice moderation. “If you want a cup of cocoa, have a cup. Then you won’t want a gallon of it later,” Hayes-Daly says. The overall goal is to find a healthy balance. “You just have to find what works best for you,” she explains. “When you find what works for you, you’ll find that you control yourself much better and naturally eat healthier.” 42

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pets

RABBITS AS PETS

Easter Bunnies

Rabbits are a 10-year commitment, not a holiday surprise BY LAUREL TONEY

For many, spring evokes images of colorful baskets filled with candy, baby chicks and rabbits. Easter might seem like a perfect opportunity to surprise kids with an adorable bunny. While rabbits are wonderful pets for many families, they should not be bought on impulse as a holiday gift. “Rabbits can be a lot of fun,” says Nancy LaRoche, co-manager of the

44

Colorado House Rabbit Society in Broomfield. “They are very social creatures.” Rabbits are playful, intelligent and loving. But in order to properly care for them, pet owners must know about rabbits and their care, and must be willing to make a long-term commitment. “Rabbits live from eight to 12 years, and some to 16,” LaRoche says. “They are not a one-year commitment.” LaRoche also says parents should not expect their children to be responsible for the animal. Rabbits and children are typically a bad match because of a rabbit’s fragile nature. Children and adults both need to learn to properly handle a rabbit and children always need to be supervised when around rabbits. Bill Guerrera, a veterinarian at the Animal Doctor in Broomfield who specializes in rabbits, says it is all too common for rabbits to suffer serious injuries like broken backs from improper handling by an enthusiastic child. Before you consider a bunny for your family, consider the space it would require in your home. Because of their social nature, rabbits need to be paired and housed inside, where they can be a part of the family. Having rabbits in the house is ideal, but it requires a lot of work to rabbit-proof your home. “You shouldn’t have them in the house until you know what you’re doing,” LaRoche says. Rabbits need large crates with ample space so they have their own safe habitat, as well as space for extended play outside of their crate that is free of hazards like wires and chewable furniture.

Rabbits are often thought of as great “starter pets” for children and families because of their small size and lowmaintenance care. Not so, say Guerrera and LaRoche. From a veterinary standpoint, rabbits are considered exotic. They require regular specialized veterinary care and are at least as expensive as a dog, medically. “They are vastly different from cats and dogs in terms of diet, illness and symptoms,” LaRoche warns. “You really need to get educated before you take on an exotic.” LaRoche and the Colorado House Rabbit Society can aid in that education if you’re serious about adopting a rabbit. Their application process addresses factors that could hinder a family’s ability to properly care for rabbits ranging from allergy issues to the costs of veterinary care. If you’re still interested in adopting a rabbit after the application process, they’ll guide you and your family through three different sessions of training and education to ensure you’re prepared for rabbits to become a part of your family. Buying rabbits at pet stores or breeders can be unsafe, so find a rescue. Pet store bunnies are often unhealthy or underdeveloped and stores lack the expertise to give them proper care, according to the Colorado House Rabbit Society website. These cute bunnies rapidly become adults, and their behavior changes. Buying instead of adopting also contributes to rabbit over-population. If your children show an interest in rabbits, start with a stuffed animal or a chocolate bunny for Easter and go through the adoption process together as a family, advises LaRoche. Surprising a child with a basket full of 10 years of responsibility isn’t fun or festive. Check it Out

For more information about rabbits, visit www.coloradohrs.com or www.makeminechocolate.org. SPRING 2011

TIMES-CALL / LONGMONT MAGAZINE


Why Choose Hitek Automotive Repair? There are many reasons customers keep coming back to Hitek Automotive Repair, including quality workmanship, reasonable pricing and personalized service. Locally owned and operated by Scott and Geri Nichols, Hitek prides itself on keeping its customers happy. “I like to get to know everybody,” Scott says. “You can get and give better service when you get to know your customers and their cars.” Scott, who from a young age found a passion for working with cars and people, made a career out of it when he purchased Hitek in July 2003. Since then he has seen the business nearly double in sales. He has recently upgraded his diagnostics software so he can diagnose almost any vehicle out there. Gary Pias, Johnathan (John) Baldwin & “Along with the new diagnostic software we now have the latest Visualiner 3D imaging alignment machine Scott Nichols, Owner from Snapon that enables us to do alignments, suspension work and all types of automotive repair work much more accurately and efficiently,” he says. Hitek is a 4,000-square-foot facility that occupies two buildings and its employees are Scott Nichols, Gary Pias, shop foreman and ASE Certified Master Technician, and John Baldwin, Automotive Technician II. Scott guarantees the quality of work the staff produces is second Computer to none and that the staff is qualified to work on today’s “Hitek” Diagnostic automobiles. (Check Engine Light) All customers are guaranteed a price estimate before parts are Offer not valid with When Repairs Done By Offer not valid with purchased or any work is done. any other offer.

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SPRING 2011

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gardening

PLANTING YOUR VEGETABLE GARDEN

Plan ahead for the perfect garden BY SUMMER STAIR

Spring is probably the busiest time of the year in the garden. Plants start waking up, the lawn comes out of dormancy, the ground longs to be reworked, mulch needs to be replaced, and flower and vegetable gardens need to be started. But with so much to do where does a person begin? While it may seem overwhelming, it is simply a matter of figuring out the specifics of what you want from your garden. The following information will help you get started on the right track to a successful garden.


Fill cells with soil.

Poke holes before planting.

Plan Ahead “Plan your garden ahead of time,” says Ryan Schmitt, horticulturist at Botanical Interests in Louisville. Schmitt avidly promotes researching seeds and space requirements before choosing specific plants so you ensure you purchase the right amounts of seeds and other supplies. “This will inform your decision of what to buy and/or plant,” he says. “Planting a garden with the confidence that you have all the info you need will contribute to success.” Most packets have detailed information for gardeners of all levels to follow and if this information is not available never be afraid to ask questions. “There are people out there conspiring for your success, gardeners may just need to reach out,” Schmitt says. Prepare the Soil Soil preparation can be key to a healthy garden. But before adding any amendments, make sure all garden beds are clear of plant debris from the previous year. Schmitt recommends either doing this by removal or tilling in the fall. Once the beds are clean, it is time to prepare the soil for seeds and plants. Michael Morris, hardgoods manager at The Flower Bin in Longmont, says because of Longmont’s clay-based soil that is high in pH (which is the measurement of acid and alkaline) gardeners have to be aware of adding an organic material, such as peat moss, to the soil continuously. This will improve the texture of the soil, lower alkaline levels and keep the nutrients available to the plant throughout its growing season, TIMES-CALL / LONGMONT MAGAZINE

SPRING 2011

Plant seed.

Provide humidity.

he says. Schmitt also recommends looking up the specific needs of the type of plants chosen and incorporating any nutrient amendments at the recommended rates before sowing seeds. While most seeds directly sown will be in the top 2 inches of the cultivated soil, Morris recommends digging or tilling the soil and any amendment into the soil 4 to 6 inches deep so plant roots can grow strong. Getting Started Indoors Due to Longmont’s growing season there are many plants that do better if started indoors before being transplanted outdoors. Schmitt recommends the following plants to be started indoors. (Weeks listed are the number of weeks it should be started indoors before being transplanted.) • 12 to 16 weeks – Endive, escarole, artichoke (to get first year crop) and celery. • Eight to 12 weeks – Eggplant, onion and leeks, kale, most herbs, tomato and peppers. • Three to six weeks – Melons, cucumbers, gourds and squashes, cole crops and zucchini. Planting Outside It’s true some plants do best if sown directly outside into the soil. These plants are better because they grow and mature well at cooler temperatures. Schmitt recommends lettuce; spinach; onions (can also be started indoors); mustard; radish; cole crops (broccoli, kale, cabbage, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts); chard; turnips; and garlic (plant in fall or as soon as soil is workable in the spring; spring plantings should be a softneck variety.)

Plant emerges. (Courtesy Carol O’Meara)

Getting started indoors If starting seeds indoors is a new venture, don’t fret. Ryan Schmitt, horticulturist at Botanical Interests in Louisville, says it’s simple and with the basic setup of a container, some seed starting media, a basic fertilizer, light and temperature, a person can get started. Here is a breakdown of what to look for when buying a setup for your home. • Container – Bottom drainage is a must. If you are using a small container it will have to watered more often. • Seed starting media – Do not use soil from outside. Go to a garden center and buy a specific seed starter. It should be light in texture and will usually consist of fine-ground peat moss and vermiculite. • Basic fertilizer – When plants get their first set of true leaves (ones that look like that of an adult plant) feed with a balanced fertilizer as the package recommends. • Light – To grow a seedling that will thrive outside and survive the rigors of transplant, ample light is required. A sunny window is usually not enough. The most basic setup is a shop light with a 2 to 4 foot fluorescent tubes in it, one cool and one warm. This should be no more than 3 inches from the top of the seedlings. It should be put on a timer and be run for 14 to 24 hours a day. Any additional light will only help. • Temperature – Most plants will germinate well in normal household conditions. Most seeds germinate well in a temperature range from 65 to 75 degrees. If seeds are germinating slowly, or the house is cool, bottom heat can be applied by placing seeds near a heat vent or on a special germination mat available at most garden centers.

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Come

Worship with us

First Baptist Church of Longmont 701 Kimbark St. • 303-776-1128 www.fbclongmont.com

Sunday

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www.fclc.org

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Sunday at 8:00 a.m., 9:30 a.m. & 11:00 a.m. Saturday at 5:30 p.m.

CHRISTIAN EDUCATION Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Wednesday at 6 p.m.

9775 Ute Hwy 66 - Longmont (1/4 Mile East of Hover St.)

Lenten Services

Wednes days beginnin g March 9 4:30 & 7:0 0p Good Fri m day Services 6:00 & 7:3 0 pm

Tuesday

Intercessory Prayer 6:30 pm

Saturday

Encounters Worship - 6:00pm

Wednesday

Bible Lecture and Prayer 1 & 6 pm Dr. Ray Lincoln

Christian Life Coaching Center

Counseling and Seminars, Dr. Ray Lincoln

Connecting with God through love and learning!

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SPRING 2011

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Come

Worship with us

Third Avenue and Terry Street, Longmont, CO

303-776-2800

www.firstluth.org

“Rooted first in worship, learning and hospitality” Worship Times Saturday Evening 5:30 pm Sunday Morning 7:40, 8:30, and 11:00 am Education Hour 9:45 am

Pastors Steven D. Berke, Paul E. Judson and Julie Brooks

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SPRING 2011

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spotlight

TEEN FINDS HOBBY IN VIDEO GAMES

Game On!

Playing video games is somewhat of a passion for 17-yearold Colby Grinde. While he may not use it alongside his work upon graduation, he does know that playing video games is something he will always enjoy doing at the end of the day.

– SUMMER STAIR

Q: When did you start playing games? A: I was 5 or 6 and it was on my mom’s Nintendo 64. My mom got me into it and I’d play with my older brother.

Q: What was the first game you ever played? A: Mario or Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles.

Q: Have you ever played in any tournaments? If so what game? A: I’ve done a couple team tournaments and some Call of Duty tournaments. I’ve played in Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 1 and 2, and Call of Duty: Black Ops. I got third place in a couple of them.

Q: What is your favorite game to play? A: Call of Duty: Black Ops. It’s pretty much the only game I’ve played that’s come out in a while.

Q: Is there a specific genre you play more than others? A: I like the action of shooter games. I don’t like the type of games where you take turns. I like to kill whoever first, before they kill me.

Q: Why video games? A: At the end of the day, when I don’t want to do anything, I can go play my XBox. Even if it was a bad day, playing my XBox takes my mind off things.

Q: You work at Play N Trade in Longmont so you get to work alongside your passion. How is that? A: It’s pretty cool. I like doing it and if I don’t have homework I can play a game. It’s pretty nice. TIMES-CALL / LONGMONT MAGAZINE

SPRING 2011

(Paul Litman)

51


hot tips

PLAN THE PERFECT PICNIC

Create the ideal picnic with healthy choices BY SUMMER STAIR

Don’t let another spring pass you buy indoors. Instead, get out and enjoy nature coming alive with family and friends by having a picnic. Bridget Nannen, co-owner of Greens Point Catering in Longmont, says people are looking toward picnics as a way to get outside, have a nice meal and relax. The only thing that draws people away from the idea is the thought of planning it out on top of their already busy schedule. “Step back and make yourself slow down,” Nannen recommends. “It’s not about planning anything out. Make it easy, hang out, keep it simple, keep it relaxing. You put all that together, a picnic is a very valuable thing and time and money well spent.” Once you make the decision to have a picnic everything else will fall into place, use these tips offered by Nannen to keep things stress-free and healthy.

• Keep it fresh – Longmont residents are lucky to live near so many local farmers, Nannen says. “It’s bigger, better, fresher food that’s local.” Grab a basket and head out to the local farmers’ market, a local farm, restaurant or grocery store. Here you can gather fresh breads, meats, fruits and vegetables and even drinks. This is a great way to keep the meal healthy, fun and colorful. • Find the perfect spot – Whether you are looking for something intimate and romantic or quality family time there are parks scattered across Longmont (see page 61) that will provide the perfect location. There are also great hiking spots a quick 30 minutes away. Or, better yet, stay home and plan the picnic in your own backyard. • Provide entertainment – It’s always a good idea to bring something to do so you can enjoy more than just eating outdoors. Nannen suggest sports activities, books for reading or some fun board or card games.

Be prepared Here’s a list of items according to picnicfun .com you may want to have on hand. • A picnic basket, backpack or cooler pack to carry items in. • Ice or frozen cold packs to keep food and drinks the right temperature. • Cloth napkins. • Containers to put extra food in. • Something to hold trash. • Condiments: salt, pepper, ketchup, mustard, mayo and sugar. • Insect repellent and sunscreen. • Basic first-aid kit • A camera.

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SPRING 2011

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recreation

FENCING ADVENTURES

En Garde

Ada Urist, 8, sticks head coach Gary Copeland in the chest during a lesson at the Northern Colorado Fencers facility in Boulder. (Paul Litman)

Fencing offers physical, mental challenges BY SUMMER STAIR

The scene is set. The opponents gaze intently at one another. The shuffle begins front to back, back to front. The “sword fight” or at least what one would imagine it would look like, begins. This “fight” is empty of theatrics seen on the big screen and is simply two fencing opponents practicing and perfecting their skills, preparing for a bout. Known as one of the oldest western martial arts, fencing can be practiced as a fun, recreational activity or as a serious competitive sport. Offered through Northern Colorado Fencing in Boulder, students can begin the art form as young as age 8 and can continue it throughout their lifetime. Fencing is thought to have originated in Spain around the 12th or 13th centuries, but modern day fencing is more closely related to the activity that arose around the sport in the late 17th and early 18th centuries. For many the sport is attractive because of the physical and mental challenges it offers those who practice it. It is also a “lifetime” sport that can be practiced at any age. Ashli Socorro, 17, has only been practicing the sport for a couple of months, but is thankful she discovered it because it is something she can do even after she graduates. “You can do it no matter what age you are,” she says. “You can even start at any age and still be good. It’s not about that.” Another aspect that draws many in, including Socorro, is that even though fencing is not considered a team sport, it is community oriented. “I am more familiar with my comrade fencers than I ever was when I played soccer, and it’s not even a team sport,” she says. Adam Campbell-Kruger, 17, finds the attraction for him is the mental aspect of the sport. Not having the outcome of the match dependent on other people is appealing, he says. “It’s a unique and amazing sport,” Campbell-Kruger says. “Fencing is different because it’s me out there, not anyone else.” Whatever a person’s personal objective is for joining the sport, everyone comes to the same consensus that it is a sport like no other. Whether fencing is at a recreational level for a person or at a competition level, the sport will continue to offer a mental aspect like no other. Check it Out

To learn more about Northern Colorado Fencing and head coach Gary Copeland, visit http://ncfencers.org.

54

Above: Nina Van Loon, 16, and Jennifer Anderson, 16, practice fencing. Quint McClellan, 8, left, and Logan Ruch, 10, fence. Middle: Spencer Anann, 15, and Adam Campbell-Kruger, 17, practice footwork and blade work at the Northern Colorado Fencers facility. (Paul Litman)

What is fencing? According to Northern Colorado Fencing in Boulder, the sport of fencing involves the attack and defense of two opponents who are using one of three weapons – a foil, epee or sabre. A bout is a scored competition, where in France it would be referred to as a match. A match, in English terms, is several bouts between fencers on two different teams. A competition is bouts or matches between two teams. The object of the sport is to score touches by touching the opponents target area with the point of the weapon (a foil or epee) or with the edges (a sabre). The goal is to touch, but not be touched. The winner is the fencer who gets the appointed number of touches first during the timed bout.

SPRING 2011

TIMES-CALL / LONGMONT MAGAZINE


Northern Colorado Fencers student Nina Van Loon, 16, has enjoyed competing in the sport of fencing for seven years. (Paul Litman)


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SPRING 2011

TIMES-CALL / LONGMONT MAGAZINE


home front

NEW LIFE FOR FURNITURE

Furniture Makeover Reupholstering is an easy alternative to give furniture new life, while keeping the environment in mind BY KENDRA WALKER

When looking to redesign a room in your home, it’s difficult to say goodbye to sentimental items, especially expensive furniture that is a pain to replace. Instead of throwing away an old piece of furniture, try recycling it by giving it a reupholstering makeover. Reupholstering is an easy, environmentally friendly and financially-savvy method to create a new look for your furniture. Whether it be a dining room chair, sofa or ottoman, there is an alternative to buying new. “It’s definitely less expensive,” says Sandy Hannum, a supervisor at Hancock Fabrics in Longmont. “A lot of people these Do-it-Yourself This task is not as impossible as it may first appear. By tackling this project on your own, it gives you the ability to accomplish future reupholstering endeavors. If it appears overwhelming, start with something easy. “I see people reupholstering dining room chairs the most,” Hannum says. It is important when searching for a new fabric to look for upholstery fabric instead of regular fabric. Upholstery fabric is stronger and made to experience daily wear and tear. “It’s two or three times more expensive than regular cotton or fashion fabric,” Hannum says. “But it’s higher quality and made with materials that will last.” Most upholstery fabric can be found at fabric stores, design centers and home improvement stores. Don’t forget to measure your furniture to learn how many yards of fabric you need.

Professional Service If you feel more comfortable leaving the job to the professionals, look for a service that specializes in furniture reupholstering. Most places can take on any piece of furniture, new or old. “We get several, older antique pieces of furniture,” says Rex Wilson, owner of S & S Upholstery in Longmont. “People are starting to bring more of those older pieces in to restore.” It helps to find a place that offers fabric choices with the reupholstering service, so you don’t have to search for fabric at another location. Find out if you can e-mail a picture of your furniture to the business so they can get an idea of the labor required. It’s also a good idea to find one that will include specific services, such as free estimates, pickups and deliveries. By restyling your furniture to a modern look, “you’ll also end up with a piece of furniture that will last longer,” Wilson says.

Furniture Care

Check it Out

Don’t forget that taking care of your furniture is an important factor in helping to make it last. Vacuum the upholstery regularly and use upholstery cleaners and spot removers to get rid of stains. Consider a steam cleaning, if necessary. Your furniture will last longer and continue to appear well-maintained with its new, reupholstered look.

TIMES-CALL / LONGMONT MAGAZINE

days will even find something at a garage sale for cheap and then redesign it.” Reupholstering allows you the freedom to perfectly fit your furniture to the color scheme and mood you intend to create in your redesign. Reupholstering is also a necessary task if you want to keep your furniture in quality shape and turn that ratty, old lump in the middle of the room into a new, eye-catching focal point. Think of it as a face-lift for your couch. Whether you turn to a professional service or choose a do-ityourself approach, reupholstering can be as easy (or even easier) as buying a new, expensive piece of furniture at the store.

SPRING 2011

For more information and instructions on reupholstering furniture, visit www.repairhome.com/resources/how-toguides/ and search “how to reupholster furniture.”

57


garden tips

SPRING PLANTING

Top 5 flowers to plant BY LAUREL TONEY

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Allysum This is a hardy, low-growing annual with small flowers in a range of colors that is perfect of spring planting, says Erica Althans-Schmidt of Gwynne’s Greenhouse near Lyons. Snapdragons This is another flower that is great to plant in early spring, “if you can find it,” AlthansSchmidt says. Pansies These petite flowers prefer the

mild temperatures of shoulder seasons. They work well as ground cover and come in many colors.

Allysum

Stock This plant is a fragrant earlyspring annual. The four-petaled flowers come in colors like red, yellow and deep purple.

Snapdragon

Violas Pansy

Like pansies, violas prefer climate of the shoulder seasons fall and spring. You can start planting these in the beginning of April, Althans-Schmidt says. She also recommends planting vegetables like lettuce, kale and spinach this time of year, and you can plant perennials such as bleeding hearts and red leaf bergenia as soon as the ground has defrosted.

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SPRING 2011

TIMES-CALL / LONGMONT MAGAZINE


outlook

LONGMONT COUNCIL FOR THE ARTS

LONGMONT COUNCIL FOR THE ARTS VOLUNTEER

Lonni Peterson

The Muse Gallery also houses Longmont Council for the Arts. (Courtesy Debbie Adams Photography)

Longmont Council for the Arts focuses on the community BY SUMMER STAIR

Often the voice of a community can be seen expressed through its art. Through different mediums residents, visitors and artists can explore a communities’ voice, interests, history, concerns and visions for the future. While Longmont has many venues for this to happen, the driving force behind it is the nonprofit organization the Longmont Council for the Arts whose goal is to promote visual and performing arts within the community. Since its beginning in 1985, the LCA has

(Courtesy Debbie Adams Photography) TIMES-CALL / LONGMONT MAGAZINE

SPRING 2011

Check it Out

Discover what’s happening with Longmont Council for the Arts at www.ArtsLongmont.org

been the behind-the-scenes foundation for many art programs in the community. Nine programs in all, they include the Longmont Studio Tour, Artist Registry, Muse Gallery and Westend, LCA Endowment for the Arts, Granting Programs, Artist in Residence, Colorado Center for the Arts, ART Enthusiast News Magazine and Friday Afternoon Concerts. Joanne Kirves, executive director for LCA, says within each one of these programs smaller programs for all ages occur. From seniors to kids, Kirves says having a place for every artist to practice, display or simply enjoy others work is what is most important. While the Muse is the year-round face for the LCA, don’t forget that many art programs throughout the community are probably organized and put on by the LCA and its many volunteers. Kirves says without volunteers it wouldn’t happen. “Our volunteers are what makes us move!”

Lonni Peterson had never met the former Longmont Council for the Arts board member who called her in 2006, inviting the former educator to join LCA as a board member. But the call was the spark that ignited Peterson’s continual commitment to LCA. Today she continues to display dedication and passion, while volunteering as chairperson for the artist registry at the Longmont Council for the Arts. Peterson oversees the artists registry program that helps market and display artists’ work. “We have a list of about 200 artists and we try to give all the artist on our registry a turn to display their art and have it up for sale at one of the venues,” she says. Peterson’s schedule is hectic, to say the least. Her days are full of errands like contacting artists and setting up meetings with potential buyers, all while running back and forth from the various venues. Peterson says one of her favorite parts of her volunteer efforts is the public’s reaction when new art is displayed. “I feel like I’m giving what I can to the community, in a way that I love. It’s a way of giving.” – ESTEBAN L. HERNANDEZ

59


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recreation

EXPLORE PARKS, GREENWAYS AND GOLF COURSES

Springtime Fun

City parks offer a variety of fun and relaxing opportunities center/pool complex includes wading pool, indoor pool and fitness equipment.

City parks offer a variety of fun and relaxing opportunities throughout the area. Here’s a glimpse at the parks and some of the features they include. Numbers in parenthesis correspond to map locations.

Collyer, (6), Sixth Avenue and Collyer Street. 5.2 acres, picnic area, barbecue pits, playground, restrooms, shelters, volleyball and tennis courts.

Affolter, (1), Holly Avenue and S. Judson Street. 5.3 acres, basketball courts, multi-use field, softball field, tennis courts, restrooms, shelter and playground.

Dawson, (7), 1757 Harvard St. 12.9 acres, volleyball court, picnic area, playground, restrooms, shelters, barbecue pits and tennis courts.

Alta, (2), 10th Avenue and Alta Street. A halfacre, picnic area and playground.

Flanders, (8), 2229 Breakwater Drive. 4.1 acres, fishing, soccer/football field, shelter, barbecue pits, restrooms, playground, volleyball court, basketball hoops, picnic area and roller hockey court.

Athletic Field, (3), 11th Avenue and Kimbark Street. Basketball courts, soccer/football field and picnic area. Carr, (4), 21st Avenue and Gay Street. 8.4 acres, basketball courts, soccer/ football fields, picnic area, barbecue pit, playground, restrooms, shelter, softball field, tennis courts and roller hockey rink. Clark Centennial, (5), 1100 Lashley St. 48.5 acres, baseball field, basketball court, soccer/football field, picnic areas, barbecue pits, playground, restrooms, shelter, four softball fields, tennis courts, volleyball areas, concession stand and roller hockey rink. Recreation

Garden Acres, (9), 2058 Spencer St. 4.1 acres, shelter, playground, picnic area, restrooms, soccer/football fields, barbecue pit, concession stand and softball fields.

Clockwise from the top; Wyeth Leemon, 11, Tristan Ivkov, 12, and Stuart Leemon, 8, enjoy a nice summer day of fishing at Izaak Walton Pond in 2008. (Paul Litman)

Golden Ponds, (10), 651 Third Ave. 94 acres with 56 acres of water surface, nature area with shelters, restrooms, trails, picnic areas, barbecue pits and fishing. Hover Acres, (11), 1361 Charles Drive. 9.2 acres, tennis courts, basketball court,

Willow Farm Park. (Paul Litman) TIMES-CALL / LONGMONT MAGAZINE

SPRING 2011

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playground, horseshoe pit, volleyball courts, soccer/football fields, picnic area, shelter and barbecue pit.

Local Greenways

Izaak Walton, (12), 18 S. Sunset St. 21.5 acres, clubhouse, fishing, picnic area, barbecue pit, shelter and restrooms. Jim Hamm Nature Area, (13), 17th Avenue and County Line Road. 23.9 acres, fishing, nature trail, barbecue pit, restrooms and shelter. Kanemoto, (14), Missouri Avenue and South Pratt Parkway. 8.7 acres, ball fields, picnic area, playground, restrooms, shelters, soccer/football fields, volleyball courts and wading pool. Kensington, (15), 100 E. Longs Peak Ave. 18.2 acres, fishing, basketball court, picnic area, playgrounds, restrooms, barbecue pits and shelters.

Jane Jennings and Dara Arbuthnot ride bicycles on the St. Vrain Greenway in Longmont. (Richard M. Hackett)

Lanyon, (16), 19th Avenue and Collyer Street. 7.7 acres, basketball court, picnic area, barbecue pit, playground, restrooms, shelter and softball fields.

roller hockey rink.

Left Hand Creek, (17), 1800 Creekside Drive. 10 acres, playground, softball field, basketball hoops, volleyball court, picnic area, barbecue pit, restrooms, shelters, soccer/football fields and roller hockey rink. Loomiller, (18), 11th Avenue and Sumner Street. 15.3 acres, fishing, picnic area, barbecue pit, playground, disc golf, restrooms and shelters. McIntosh Lake, (19), located west of Longmont on Colo. Highway 66. 55 acres, fishing, basketball court, picnic area, shelter and restrooms. Pratt, (20), Baylor Drive and Ithaca Court, 4.2 acres, basketball court, picnic area, playground, restrooms, shelter, softball field, tennis courts and 62

Quail Campus, (21), 310 Quail Road. 8.6 acres, skate park, picnic area, horseshoes, concession stand and recreation center with basketball courts, fitness center, climbing wall and indoor pools. Raber, (22), 24th Avenue and Sunset Street. 3.2 acres, shelter, picnic area and playground. Rogers Grove, (23), 220 Hover St. 10.5 acres, arboretum, outdoor learning center, picnic area, shelter/interpretive center, outdoor amphitheater, demonstration garden, restrooms and barbecue pit. Roosevelt, (24), 700 Longs Peak Ave. 21.7 acres, shelters, restrooms, barbecue pit, picnic area, playground, horseshoe pit, recreation center, rose garden and splash pool.

Greenways in the Longmont area provide a recreational opportunity for residents, as well as add to the environmental surroundings. Dry Creek Greenway is in the St. Vrain center, through Willow Farm Park and the Meadow View subdivision to Silver Creek High School. Lefthand Greenway runs from Kanemoto Park south to Pike Road and west to Hover Street. Longmont Supply Greenway begins south of 17th Avenue at Cambridge Drive and runs south to Hover Acres Park. Oligarchy Greenway runs from Airport Road to Hover Street, a section through Garden Acres Park, and from Mountain View Avenue to Rothrock Dell Park. Rough and Ready Greenway runs from Colo. Highway 66 to Ninth Avenue along the Rough and Ready Ditch east of the Ute Creek Golf Course. St. Vrain Greenway runs from Golden Ponds to Main Street to Left Hand Creek. Spring Gulch No. 2 Greenway runs from Colo. Highway 66 to Pace Street and from 17th Avenue to about Mountain View Avenue. For more information about greenways and to read about future expansion, visit www.ci.longmont.co.us and click on recreation.

Rothrock Dell, (25), 700 E. Fifth Ave. 6.4 acres, SPRING 2011

TIMES-CALL / LONGMONT MAGAZINE


Golfers at Ute Creek Golf Course in Longmont. (Paul Litman) Charlie Love, 2, plays at the Left Hand Creek Park playground with his mother Kathleen Love in 2009. (Paul Litman)

basketball court, picnic area, playground, restrooms, shelter, softball field and roller hockey rink. Sandstone Ranch, (26), 2929 and 3001 Colo. Highway 119. Community Park, 103 acres, ballfields, soccer/football fields, volleyball court, shelters, restrooms, barbecue pits, picnic areas, playground, concession stands, 24,000 squarefoot skate park with in-ground concrete bowls and street course. District Park, 180 acres, 1880's historic home and visitors center, scenic overlook of the Front Range, 0.7 mile trail with connection to St. Vrain Greenway, open space and wildlife area, cultural history and natural resource programs, tours and special events. Due to wildlife no dogs are allowed in the District Park. Spangler, (27), 200 Mountain View Ave. 5.1 acres, picnic area, playground, restrooms, barbecue pits and shelter. Sunset, (28), Longs Peak Avenue and Sunset Street. 7 acres, nine-hole golf course, picnic area, barbecue pits, playground, shelter, outdoor swimming pool and concession stand. Thompson, (29), Fourth Avenue and Bross Street. 5.4 acres, picnic area, barbecue pits, playground, restrooms and shelter. Valley, (30), 28 Troxell Ave. 2.5 acres, basketball courts, barbecue pit, volleyball court, horseshoe pit,

playground and shelter. Willow Farm, (31), 901 S. Fordham St. 9.4 acres, basketball court, picnic area, barbecue pits, restrooms, playground, roller hockey, softball field, multi-use field and shelters.

Parks with Dog Parks Blue Skies Park, (1), 1520 Mountain Drive. 11.4 acres, basketball court, volleyball court, skate park, shelters, restrooms, picnic area, playground, barbecue pit and off leash dog exercise area. Dog Park I, (2), 21st Avenue and Francis Street. 2.5 acres, off leash dog exercise area, picnic area and shelter. Dog Park II, (3), Airport and St. Vrain roads. 2.5 acres, off leash dog exercise area, picnic area and shelter. Rough and Ready, (4), 21st Avenue and Alpine Street. 9.8 acres, skate park, basketball courts, sand volleyball court, bocce ball and horseshoe courts, multi-use play field, off-leash dog exercise area, playgrounds, restrooms, shelters, picnic area and barbecue pit. Stephen Day Park, (5), 1340 Deerwood Drive. 15 acres, skate park and BMX / mountain bike area, basketball court, sand volleyball court, multi-use play field, off-leash dog exercise area, water spray fountain for children to play in, playground, restrooms, shelters, picnic area and barbecue pits. Union Reservoir, (6), 461 Weld County Road 26. 736-acre lake, fishing, camping, picnic area, restrooms, shelter, volleyball, 24 barbecue pits, playground, horseshoes, wakeless boating, wind surfing and swimming beach. Dog beach for off leash and play and swim. Entry fee. Call 303-7721265. For more information, call 303-651-8446, or visit www.ci.longmont.co.us/parks/ park_list/overview/index.html.

Sandstone Ranch. (Paul Litman) TIMES-CALL / LONGMONT MAGAZINE

SPRING 2011

Golf Courses

Bella Rosa Golf Course 5830 Weld County Road 20, Frederick 303-678-2940 9 holes, public Coal Creek Golf Course 585 W. Dillon Road, Louisville 303-666-7888 18 holes, public Fox Hill Country Club 1400 E. Colo. Highway 119, Longmont 303-772-1061 18 holes, private Haystack Mountain Golf Course & Driving Range 5877 Niwot Road, Niwot 303-530-1400 9 holes, public Indian Peaks Golf Course 2300 Indian Peaks Trail, Lafayette 303-666-4706 18 holes, public Lake Valley Golf Club 4400 Lake Valley Drive, Longmont 303-444-2114 18 holes, private Saddleback Golf Club 8631 Frontier St., Firestone 303-833-5000 18 holes, public Sunset Golf Course 1900 Longs Peak Ave., Longmont 303-651-8466 9 holes, public Twin Peaks Golf Course 1200 Cornell Drive, Longmont 303-651-8401 18 holes, public Ute Creek Golf Course 2000 Ute Creek Drive, Longmont 303-774-4342 18 holes, public

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about town

INN BETWEEN BENEFIT DINNER

1

Inn Between Benefit

2

5

4

3

Greens Point Catering developed and hosted the Inn Between Benefit Dinner on Jan. 27, which was part of the elegant Supper Club that benefits a new nonprofit each month. Thirty people were in attendance and Greens Point Executive Chef Chris Peirce welcomed four teens from the Inn Between into his kitchen. 1. Chef Chris, the kitchen crew and four student volunteers from The Inn Between. 2. Chef Chris prepares the third of six courses. 3. Chef Chris teaches the students how to garnish a soup bowl. 4. Donna Lovato from The Inn Between shares a bit about the organization with Supper Club guests. 5. Students learn the correct way to toss a salad. (Courtesy Bobby Turner Photography)

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TIMES-CALL / LONGMONT MAGAZINE

SPRING 2011

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about town 1

PARTY WITH A PURPOSE FUNDRAISER FOR THE OUR CENTER

2

Party with a Purpose

4

On Nov. 30, Oskar Blues Homemade Liquids and Solids hosted the Party with a Purpose fundraiser for the OUR Center in Longmont. More than 200 people attended the event and helped raise more than $20,000 and nearly 800 cans of canned food for the local community nonprofit. 1. Rick Stewart. 2. Front to back are John Hall, Rick Salinas and Dan Jepson (red shirt). 3. Mark Stauch and his wife Hadley Solomon. 4. Steve Kalasz from the band Nomad Fish. 5. Bryan Swallow with the band Nomad Fish, left to right are Mark Hibbert, David McGuire and Paul Roberts. 6. Elaine Klotz, development director, of the OUR Center and Edwina Salazar, executive director of the OUR Center. (Courtesy Joe Jack Photography, www.joejackphoto.com)

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SPRING 2011

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Honest Car Care & Repair 40+ Years of Automotive mottiv ive Experience! Ex

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Since 2004, Stonum Automotive has provided Longmont-area auto owners with comprehensive auto repair services, affordable prices and superior customer service to get people back in their automobile in no time. Owning his own shop was always a dream for John Stonum , who grew up around cars with the influence from family. His father was retired from General Motors and his step-father built streetrods, each providing influence in Stonum’s passion for the industry. Stonum started working in parts as a young man before moving into the service aspect of the business and working alongside many great employees throughout the years. When it came time to open his own shop, Stonum turned to those former workers and asked them to join his team. “We offer great employees and exceptional technicians who stay abreast to new technologies through continuing training and education,” Stonum says. Stonum Automotive provides service on all makes and models, including diesel engines and European autos, and also offers tires and alignment options, as well as windshield replacement. Top-of-the-line tools and equipment allow them to do a great quality repair the first time. Each technician is also equipped with a computer right at his toolbox to easily access repair information, labor times and parts, which helps in getting automobiles fixed and back in the hands of the customers. “Our goal is to try and get every service done in one day,” he says. “We truly are a full-service shop to help our customers.” Stonum Automotive has experienced a lot of growth in its short history, starting out with a 2,000 square foot shop and two bays, to now occupying four units in the building with eight service bays, five technicians, a clean and spacious waiting area, great parking and more than 7,000 square feet. Whether a customer decides to wait for his or her car in the comfortable waiting area with television and space for kids to play, or opt for a free shuttle ride to work or home, Stonum Automotive takes care of its customers through superior service.

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"The Shop You Would Recommend to a Friend" TIMES-CALL / LONGMONT MAGAZINE

SPRING 2011

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about town

15TH ANNUAL LAFAYETTE QUAKER OATMEAL FESTIVAL

Quaker Oatmeal Festival On Jan. 8, community members gathered for the 15th Annual Lafayette Quaker Oatmeal Festival. The unique festival includes an oatmeal breakfast, 5K run/walk, health fair and oatmeal baking contest. The 5K race and health fair were helps at the Bob Burger Recreation Center. The health fair was sponsored by Boulder Community Hospital and the Community Medical Center. It offered residents health screenings, interactive demonstrations and many other health related booths. (Courtesy Lafayette Recreation Department and Colorado Hometown Weekly)

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LONGMONT SYMPHONY BENEFIT

Longmont Symphony Orchestra Benefit An Evening to Benefit the Longmont Symphony Orchestra was on Feb. 5 at the Dickens Opera House in Longmont. Guests were treated to a four course dinner and live entertainment by the Lee Thomas Band and the Longmont Symphony Orchestra string quartet. (Courtesy Keith Bobo, Photography Maestro)

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Feb. 19 • Andy Eppler. Folk and traditional music. 4:30 p.m. Free. Left Hand Brewing Company, 1265 Boston Ave, Longmont. 303-772-0258. www.lefthandbrewing.com. • 19th Annual Imagine This! – On the Wild Side. A day of family fun, where area artists, performers, organizations and invited guest artists come together, and persons of all ages can experience the art of creativity. Activities and performances are geared for persons of all ages. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. $1. Mountain View Bible Fellowship Gymnasium, 1575 S. St. Vrain Ave., Estes Park. 970-586-9203. Last year’s Annual Imagine This! – On the Wild www.EstesArts.com. Side brought out all kinds of families for fun. The • Nature at Night. Join a 19th annual event is set for Feb. 19. (Courtesy ranger for a cup of cocoa Mountain View Bible) and a stroll around the pond to learn about the creatures who prowl and hunt at the park at night. This program is great for children and adults. Hikes will last about one hour. Meet at the Camper Services Building. Program is free, but a park pass is required of all vehicles entering the park. 7:30 p.m. Free. St. Vrain State Park, 3525 Colo. Highway 119, Firestone. 303-485-0186. http://parks.state.co.us/Parks/StVrain/Pages /StVrainHome.aspx. • Horse-Drawn Carriage Ride & Historical Storytelling. Reserve your spot to ride in a horse-drawn carriage around beautiful Haystack Mountain Golf Course and take a journey back in time and listen to a story about our land’s rich history by storyteller, Donlyn Arbuthnot. After your ride relax and eat a light supper of soups and chili’s along with a side dish or two and dessert. 4-8 p.m. $35. Haystack Mountain Golf Course, 5877 Niwot Road, Niwot. 303-530-1480. E-mail zhanna@golfhaystack.com. www.golfhaystack.com. • Hospital Heart Talk and Walk. Presented by J.R. Trujillo. 10 a.m. Longmont United Hospital, 1850 Mountain View Ave., Longmont. 303-485-4184. www.luhcares.org. • Children’s Theatre: Pocahontas. Saturdays, 3 p.m. $5. Jesters Dinner Theatre, 224 Main St., Longmont. 303-682-9980. www.jesterstheatre.com. • Dogs Enjoy Afternoon Reading. Children of all ages are invited to read to specially trained Reading Education Assistance Dogs at the Longmont Library. 1-2 p.m. Free. 409 Fourth Ave., Longmont. 303-651-8477. www.ci.longmont.co.us/library. Feb. 19-20 • Rails in the Rockies model railroad exhibition. Experience a variety of fully operational model railroad scales on a layout of more than 16,000 square feet. Children can operate trains on a junior layout. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday. $5; children under 12 will be admitted free. Estes Park Conference Center, 201 S. St. Vrain Ave., Estes Park. 970-577-9900. www.estesvalleymodelrailroaders.org. Feb. 20 • Danny Shaffer. American Folk Music. 5 p.m. Free. Left Hand Brewing Company, 1265 Boston Ave, Longmont. 303-772-0258. www.lefthandbrewing.com. • Guest Recital - Esther Park, piano. 4:30 p.m. Free. University of Colorado at Boulder, Grusin Music Hall, Boulder. 303-492-8008. www.cuconcerts.org. • Music in the National Parks Premier. Rocky Mountain Artist-in Residence composer Dr. Stephen Lias presents his composition, “Music of the National Parks,” a four movement sonata for trumpet and piano. 2 p.m. $5. No charge for children or students. Stanley Hotel, 333 W. Wonderview Ave., Estes Park. 970586-9519. www.estesparkmusicfestival.org. Feb. 21 • Artist Series featuring Hilary Hahn. 7:30 p.m. Starting at $16. Macky Auditorium Concert Hall, University of Colorado, Boulder. 303-492-8008. www.cupresents.org. SPRING 2011

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events • Family Movie Monday: Mr. Magorium’s Magic Emporium. Believe in magic and you’ll love this story. 5:30-7:30 p.m. Berthoud Public Library, 236 Welch Ave., Berthoud. 970-532-2757. www.berthoudpubliclibrary.org. • President’s Day Crafts. Presidential themed crafts and activities available in the art room while supplies last. Available all day. Included with museum admission. WOW! Children’s Museum, 110 N. Harrison Ave., Lafayette. 303-604-2424. www.wowmuseum.com. • What’s Your Job? Join WOW! in February as we learn about different careers in a series of programs for children. Learn what it is like to be firefighter with the Lafayette Fire Department. 10 a.m. Included with museum admission. WOW! Children’s Museum, 110 N. Harrison Ave., Lafayette. 303-604-2424. www.wowchildrensmuseum.org. Feb. 23 • CU Jazz Combos. 7-9 p.m. Free. University Memorial Center, 1669 Euclid Ave., Boulder. 303492-8088. www.cupresents.org. • Faculty Tuesday with Compositions by Daniel Kellogg. Featuring CU-Boulder faculty and students. 7:30 a.m. Free. Grusin Music Hall, 18th Street and Euclid Avenue, Boulder. 303-492-8008. www.cupresents.org. • Storytime Wednesday: Bears. Listen to huggable bear stories and make crafts. 11 a.m. all ages welcome. Berthoud Public Library, 236 Welch Ave., Berthoud. 970-532-2757. www.berthoudlibrary.org. • Hoe & Hope Garden Club. Round table discussion of last year’s successes and failures. Noon-3 p.m. First Evangelical Lutheran Church, 803 Third Ave., Longmont. 303-651-3989. • Square and Round Dances. Second and fourth Wednesdays. Sponsored by The Hix ’n’ Chix Square Dance Club. 7:30 p.m. rounds, 8 p.m. squares. $5.50 members, $6 nonmembers. Longmont Senior Center, 910 Longs Peak Ave., Longmont. 303-702-0555. E-mail drboyle@ieee.org. Feb. 24 • Landlord Symposium. The first 2011 Landlord Symposium, sponsored by the City’s Division of

The Hix ‘N’ Chix Square Dance Club hosts square dancing at the Longmont Senior Center the second and fourth Wednesdays of the month. (Paul Litman) TIMES-CALL / LONGMONT MAGAZINE

SPRING 2011

The Niwot Chili Cookoff in 2010 awarded in front from left, Seth Steele (amateur category winner), Roma Melrose and Chef Dale Lamb (both winners in the pro categories). In the back is John Crosse (amateur category winner). This year’s chili cookoff is Feb. 26. (Courtesy Niwot Association)

Community and Neighborhood Resources, features Hazel Heckers, from the Colorado Bureau of Investigation, discussing identity theft issues and prevention for landlords; and Roselyn Strommen, Longmont attorney, discussing everything you need to know about eviction. 6-9 p.m. Free. City Council Chambers, Longmont Civic Center, 350 Kimbark St., Longmont. www.ci.longmont.co.us/cnr. Feb. 25 • Collage Concert featuring CU Bands. 7:30 a.m. Free. Macky Auditorium Concert Hall, University of Colorado, Boulder. 303-492-8008. www.cupresents.org. • Boulder Bach Festival Organ Concert. This organ recital features the renowned organist, Christian Lane, currently the assistant university organist and choirmaster at Harvard University. In 2004, Lane earned both second prize and the coveted audience prize at the American Guild of Organists National Young Artists Competition, widely considered to be the country’s pre-eminent contest in this field. 7:30 p.m. First Congregational Church, 1128 Pine St., Boulder. 303-776-9666. www.boulderbachfestival.org. Feb. 26 • Honor Band Concert featuring Colorado high school and middle school performers. 2 p.m. Starting at $10. Macky Auditorium Concert Hall, University of Colorado, Boulder. 303-492-8008. www.cupresents.org. • Longest Day of the Year. Rock and Roll. 4:30 p.m. Free. Left Hand Brewing Company, 1265 Boston Ave, Longmont. 303-772-0258. www.lefthandbrewing.com. • Second Start Community Garden Registration. Second Start Community Garden, located just east of the corner of 11th Avenue and Baker Street in Longmont, will be accepting registrations for new gardeners for the 2011 season. Registration at the Longmont Public Library conference room. 10 a.m.noon. 409 Fourth Ave., Longmont. 303-774-4384. E-mail sscg.longmont@gmail.com. • Resonance Women’s Chorus Children’s Concert. An exuberant concert full of big sound, humor and joyful energy. The 45-minute performance includes selections from Resonance’s spring program, spiced with additional material to create an interactive and “kid-friendly” event. Children of all ages welcome. 3-3:45 p.m. 12 and under; $10: 13 and older free. First United Methodist Church, 820 Ninth St., Berthoud. 303-473-8337. resonancechorus.org. • Niwot’s Chili Cookoff. Join your neighbors, friends and the community for the Second Annual Niwot

Take the Chill out with Chili event. Professional chefs cooking four different types of chili, amateur chef entries, live music by the Niwot High School Orchestra and dessert from My Mom’s Pies. 5-8 p.m. $8-$10. Left Hand Grange in Niwot, Second and Franklin, Niwot. 303-652-4144. www.niwot.com/events/. • Dinner and A Movie featuring the classic movie Stagecoach, courtesy of The Criterion Collection. Introduction by Film Reviewer for Colorado Public Radio and Film Contributor for National Public Radio, Howie Movshovitz and the meal will be prepared by Flatirons Barbecue. Fundraiser to benefit Altona Grange. 6 p.m. $30. Altona Grange, Hall 127, 9386 N 39th St., Longmont. 303-4433099. www.altonagrange.org. • Move it! Fitness Fair. Field day fun-for-the-wholecommunity event made possible by a State Farm Youth Advisory Board grant. Enjoy games and activities sure to inspire you to move it. 1-4 p.m. Free. Clark Centennial Park, 1100 Lashley, Longmont. 303-651-8406. www.ci.longmont.co.us/rec/teen/teen—clubs.htm. Feb. 27 • Spring Swing concert with Jazz Ensemble I, featuring the music of Glenn Miller. 2 p.m. Starting at $10. Macky Auditorium Concert Hall, University of Colorado, Boulder. 303-492-8008. www.cupresents.org. • Estes Park Music Festival Winter Concert Series: 3/4 Trio Recital. 2 p.m. $5; children and students will be admitted free. Stanley Hotel, 333 W. Wonderview Ave., Estes Park. 970-586-9519. www.estesparkmusicfestival.org. • Kort McCumber. Traditional folk music and fine beer. 5 p.m. Free. Left Hand Brewing Company, 1265 Boston Ave, Longmont. 303-772-0258. www.lefthandbrewing.com. • Lego Club at the Longmont Library. Complete a building challenge and display your creations in the library. Best for children age 6 and older. Children under 8 must be with adult. 2-4 p.m. Free. 409 Fourth Ave., Longmont. 303-651-8477. www.ci.longmont.co.us/library. Feb. 28 • Family Movie Monday: Marmaduke. Fitting in with four-legged friends isn’t easy for a super-sized teenage dog. 5:30-7:30 p.m. Berthoud Public Library, 236 Welch Ave., Berthoud. 970-532-2757. www.berthoudpubliclibrary.org.

Ongoing February Events

• Feb. 25-March 12 – Coal Creek Community Theater presents Beau Jest. 7:30 p.m. Friday and 73


events Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday. $10-$15. Louisville Center for the Arts, 801 Grant St., Louisville. 303-665-0955. www.ccctheater.org. • Through Feb. 26 – EcoCreations at the WESTend Gallery. WESTend EcoCreations – A Juried Exhibition of art made from found objects and recycled materials. Barry Snyder, Jenny Fillius, Susan Helen Strok, Stephanie Hilvitz, Bill Ikler, Lauren Hansen Emery, Brenda Stumpf, Susan Morgan, Grace Walker, David Marshall. 11 a.m. -5 p.m. Tuesdays-Fridays; 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturdays. Free. Muse Gallery, 356 Main St., Longmont. 303-678-7869. www.ArtsLongmont.org. • Through Feb. 26 – NCAR Gallery Features Oil Paintings by lair. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. weekends/holidays. Free. National Center Atmospheric Research, 1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder. 303-497-2408. www.ucar.edu/outreach/art—gallery/calendar.html. • Through Feb. 28 – Charcoal drawings by Joe Olsson. Cafe Luna, 800 Coffman St., Longmont. 303-702-9996. • Feb. 27-April 3 – 24th Annual Women’s History Month Art Exhibit featuring women artists of Colorado and the United States. Noon-3 p.m. Free. Cultural Arts Center, 453 W. Elkhorn Ave., Estes Park. 970-586-9203. www.estesarts.com. • Through March 6 – Art Quilts by Barbara Beasley. Free. Bead Lounge, 320 Main St., Longmont. 303-678-9966. www.beadlounge.com. • Through March 11 – California Dreaming exhibit. Still Frame Gallery, 372 Main St., Longmont. 303-579-2960. • Through March 13 – America Celebrates Quilts. Quilts have often been created to observe special occasions, like weddings, births and new homes. The art quilts in this exhibit celebrate holidays and events, from the 4th of July and Mardi Gras to the Festival of the Buddha and Derby Day. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays; 1-5 p.m. Sundays. Free. Longmont Museum and Cultural Center, 400 Quail Road, Longmont. 303-651-8374. www.ci.longmont.co.us/museum. • Through March 31 – Annie. Annie is a spunky Depression-era orphan determined to find her parents, who abandoned her years ago on the doorstep of a New York City Orphanage run by the cruel, embittered Miss Hannigan. Days and times vary; call for details. Jesters Theatre, 224 Main St., Longmont. 303682-9980. www.jesterstheatre.com. • Through April 17 – Camelot. The enchanting story of King Arthur, Guenevere,

From left: Linda Kreibich, Mary Kay Hoagland, Donna Deubler, Judy Luppens-Huntley, Mary Beason and Shirley Werner price quilts in 2010 for the 24th annual Interfaith Quilt Sale. This year’s preview sale is on March 4 and the sale on March 5. (Lewis Geyer)

and Lancelot. Days and times vary; call for details. Jesters Dinner Theatre, 224 Main St., Longmont. 303-682-9980. www.jesterstheatre.com. • Through May 31 – Third Annual Winter Art Walk. A self-guided tour of Estes Valley galleries and studios sponsored by the Cultural Arts Council of Estes Park. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily. Free. Start at 423 W. Elkhorn Ave., Estes Park. 970-5869203. www.EstesArts.com. • Through June 4 – National Juried Photo Show. Free. Louisville Center for the Arts, 801 Grant St., Louisville. 303-546-8668. www.louisvilleart.org.

MARCH EVENTS March 3 • Family Movie Night. Join us for a new release based on the series, “The Owls

Swim•Float•Swim! teaches children skills for life The following letter was written by a parent who enrolled her children in Infant Aquatics.

Dear Judy, My husband and I are avid sailors, and our children have spent a lot of time on boats. Our family went on a two-month sailing cruise and island hopped our boat from Antigua down to Trinidad in the Caribbean. Charlie, age 5, and Camille, age 2, loved living on their floating home. Although they both began swimming with you as babies, we insisted that they wear life jackets whenever they were on deck and sent them below in rough seas and for sail changes. When we reached Trinidad, my husband and I were very busy “putting the boat to bed” — preparing it for hurricane storage out of the water. The marina where we worked had a wonderful pool, but the water in the marina was black, oily and rank — teeming with tennis ball jellyfish. Every day we scrubbed the boat in the morning

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and swam in the pool in the afternoon. To get to the pool, we walked on a series of wide concrete docks built 5 feet above the water. Perhaps due to the familiarity of our routine, I began to be less vigilant and allowed my children to walk along the docks without holding my hands, which were loaded down with pool toys. On one of these typical days, 2year-old Camille turned to tell me something and slipped off the edge of the dock, falling 5 feet into the oily water. Instantly, she disappeared beneath the surface of the black water. I was paralyzed with fear, unable to move. At that instant, I was consumed by thoughts of my daughter being stung by the multitude of jellyfish. It seemed like hours before she popped up to the surface, safely floating on her back, breathing normally. Before I could react to the accident, a man working on a neighboring boat did a perfect swan dive into the ocean

(over the concrete dock), swam over to Camille, picked her up and handed me my shaken but very much alive, little girl. Camille likes to tell us how she went straight to the bottom and how the jellyfish told her that they wouldn’t sting. She still loves swimming in the ocean. We enrolled both of our children in your program to prevent a tragedy from occurring. I believe that the survival skills Camille received from Infant Aquatics and your excellent teaching saved my daughter’s life. We’re looking forward to having our children continue swimming with Infant Aquatics for many years to come. Sincerely, Amy Britton Swim•Float•Swim! home of Infant Aquatics, Boulder County’s only dedicated swim school for children age 6 months and older, is located in the Diagonal Trade Center, 795 S. Sherman St. in Longmont. For more information, visit www.swimfloatswim.com or call 303-499-BABY.

SPRING 2011

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events of Ga’Hoole” by Kathryn Lasky. Bring your own movie snacks. 6-7 p.m. Free. Carbon Valley Regional Library, 7 Park Ave., Firestone. 720-6855100. www.MyLibrary.us. March 4 • Boulder Bach Festival Chamber Concert. Ann Marie Morgan, viola da gamba, will be featured in the annual chamber concert. Works performed will be J.S. Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto No. 6 in B-flat Major, Sonata No. 3 in G minor for viola da gamba and harpsichord, and Cello Suite No. 6 in D Major, performed on piccolo cello. 7:30 p.m. First United Methodist Church of Boulder, 1421 Spruce St., Boulder. 303-776-9666. www.boulderbachfestival.org. • 1st Friday Art Walk in Niwot. New art, kids’ activities and live music along Second Avenue and in Cottonwood Square. Several shops stay open late for browsing. 5-8 p.m. Free. Downtown Niwot, Historic Old Town and Cottonwood Square, Niwot. 720-272-9299. www.facebook.com/niwot. • Interfaith Quilters 25th Anniversary Show & Sale Preview Sale. Get a sneak peak at the quilts before being able to purchase Saturday. 6-8 p.m. First Lutheran Church, Third and Terry streets, Longmont. www.InterfaithQuilters.com. March 5 • Longmont Symphony Orchestra Concert. Featuring pianist Hsingay Hsu performing the Liszt Piano Concerto. Tschaikovsky Symphony 6 also on the program. 7:30 p.m. $16 adult; $14 senior; $12 youth. Vance Brand Auditorium, 600 E. Mountain View Ave., Longmont. 303-772-5796. www.longmontsymphony.org. • 28th Annual Tiny Tim Auction. With a Mardi Gras

theme, enjoy a fun filled evening planned with a live and silent auction, a heads and tails raffle and “buy it now!” options. 5:30 p.m. $60 per person. The Plaza Conference Center, 1850 Industrial Circle, Longmont. 303-776-7417. www.tinytimcenter.org. • Interfaith Quilters 25th Anniversary Show & Sale. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. First Lutheran Church, Third and Terry streets, Longmont. www.InterfaithQuilters.com. March 6 • Estes Park Music Festival presents the Windy Peak Recital featuring an electronic piano, dolcimer and fiddle. 2 p.m. $5; children and students free. Stanley Hotel, 333 W. Wonderview Ave., Estes Park. 970-586-9519. www.estesparkmusicfestival.com. • Bridal Crawl Tours of Wedding Venues. On an accompanied, scheduled tour, view wedding sites as if they were set up for a wedding – complete with flowers, cake, linens, photography, music and more to help wedding couples envision their big day. Caterers and cake vendors offer samples and refreshments throughout the day. 9 a.m. $30 for bride and one guest. Start at Stanley Hotel; venues throughout Estes, 333 E. Wonderview Ave., Estes Park. 970-577-9900. www.estesparkweddings.com. • Boulder Bach Festival Symposium – Bach and Sons. An engaging and informative symposium with Charley Samson, classical music radio host for KVOD Colorado Spotlight, as moderator. 2 p.m. Free. Atonement Lutheran Church, 685 Inca Parkway, Boulder. 303-776-9666. www.boulderbachfestival.org. March 7 • Invitational Art Doll Show. Bead Lounge is pleased to present local artists such as Laura Humenik and

Sandy Vanderpool displaying their wonderful handmade art dolls. Created from various materials, beads, paper, semi-precious stones, glass, metal wire and more, these dolls will enchant your imagination. Free. Bead Lounge, 320 Main St., Longmont. 303-678-9966. www.beadlounge.com. March 9 • The Longmont Artists’ Guild’s Demonstrations. 6:30 p.m. Free. The Great Frame Up, 430 Main St, Longmont. 303-828-3453. • Square and Round Dances. Second and fourth Wednesdays. Sponsored by The Hix ’n’ Chix Square Dance Club. 7:30 p.m. rounds, 8 p.m. squares. $5.50 members, $6 nonmembers. Longmont Senior Center, 910 Longs Peak Ave., Longmont. 303-702-0555. E-mail drboyle@ieee.org. March 10 • LUH Volunteer Fundraiser. Pearl Connection. 7 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Longmont United Hospital, 1850 Mountain View Ave., Longmont. 303-651-5205. www.luhcares.org. March 11 • Girlyman. Informed by 60s vocal groups and infused with a witty musical playfulness, Girlyman’s songs are an irresistible blend of acoustic, Americana, and rock. 8 p.m. $15-$17. Wildflower Pavilion on Planet Bluegrass, 500 W. Main St., Lyons. 303-823-0848. www.wildflowerpavilion.com. • Round ’em Up Opening Reception. 6-9 p.m. Free. Muse Gallery, 356 Main St., Longmont. 303-6787869. www.artslongmont.org. • Second Friday in Downtown Longmont. Art openings, live entertainment and retailer open houses. 6-9 p.m. Downtown Longmont, Main

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events Street, between Third and Sixth Avenue, Longmont. 303-651-8484. www.downtownlongmont.com. March 11-13 • Susannah. Carlisle Floyd’s first major opera, it is the second most performed in the American repertoire (after Gershwin’s Porgy and Bess). Times vary; call for details. $14-$38. Macky Auditorium Concert Hall, University of Colorado, Boulder. 303492-8008. www.cupresents.org. March 12 • Celtic Music. An afternoon of Celtic music performed by the students of Arlene Patterson. 2 p.m. Free. Barbed Wire Books, 504 Main St., Longmont. 303-827-3620. barbedwirebooks.net. • Longmont Chorale presents Americanum Centurum: A Choral Collection. In recognition of outstanding American Choral Composers of the last 100 years, works performed include music of Charles Ives, Aaron Copland, Libby Larsen, Amy Beach, Eric Whitacre, Morton Laudridsen, Timothy Tharaldson, Leonard Bernstein and Samuel Barber. 7:30 p.m. $16, $14 seniors, $12 students. First Congregational United Church of Christ, 1500 Ninth Ave., Longmont. 303-651-7664. www.longmontchorale.siteblast.com. • Boulder Bach Festival B Minor Mass. Bach’s magnificent Mass in B minor, considered one of the finest major choral works in Western music, will be directed by Robert Spillman, former music director and now interim music director for the Festival. 7:30 p.m. First United Methodist Church of Boulder, 1421 Spruce St., Boulder. 303-776-9666. www.boulderbachfestival.org. • McTeggart Irish Dancers Performance. Get in the St. Patrick’s Day mood with a special dance performance by the McTeggart Irish Dancers. St. Patrick’s Day themed crafts available too. 11 a.m. Included with museum admission. WOW! Children’s Museum, 110 N. Harrison Ave., Lafayette. 303604-2424. www.wowchildrensmuseum.org. • 50th Annual 4-H Carnival - Fun in the Sun. Celebrate 50 years of 4-H Carnival Fun. Tickets available for food and game booths. Family fun and prizes. Silent auction from 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 11 a.m.6 p.m. Free. Boulder County Fairgrounds, 9595

Nelson Road, Longmont. 303-678-6238. E-mail jmsranch@comcast.net. • Taste of Therapy Wellness Fair. Don’t miss this opportunity to try a variety of alternative wellness options. Try massage, acupuncture, energy work and more. Only $5 for each 15 minute hands on demonstration. (Paid at the fair) Appointments are taken at the fair on a first-come basis. Spaces fill quickly. 10 a.m.-1 p.m.; doors open at 9:45 a.m. Free. Izaak Walton Clubhouse, 18 S. Sunset St., Longmont. 303-651-8404. www.ci.longmont.co.us/rec/special. March 12-13 • Boulder Symphony concert with Boulder Chorale. Boulder Symphony, the Community Orchestra of Boulder County, in collaboration with The Boulder Chorale, Ben Riggs, conductor, present “Symphonic Shamans: Paving Paths of Joy.” Boulder Symphony music director Devin Patrick Hughes will conduct the orchestra and chorale in Beethoven’s beloved “Choral” Symphony No. 9. 7:30 p.m. Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday. $10-$15. First Presbyterian Church of Boulder, 1820 15th St., Boulder. 970-577-1550. www.bouldersymphony.org. March 13 • House Concerts featuring Brazilian Dance with Dexter Payne. 4 p.m. $35. Muse Gallery, 356 Main St., Longmont. 303-678-7869. www.artslongmont.org. • Estes Park Music Festival features Jason Chiang Recital. 2 p.m. $5; Children and students free. Stanley Hotel, 333 W. Wonderview Ave., Estes Park. 970-586-9519. www.estesparkmusicfestival.com. March 15 • Fireside Chat with Helen Ellena, author of “Notes from Out of the Shadows: Word Snapshots of a Mind Journey.” 6:30-7:30 p.m. Free. Carbon Valley Regional Library, 7 Park Ave., Firestone. www.MyLibrary.us. March 16 • LiveWell Longmont Worksite Wellness hosting its first Healthy Hour with the Chamber of Commerce. A healthy breakfast treat, networking and an educational seminar will be offered. Health promotion expert Lisa Bailey will present on The

Chris Lennert, the vice president of operations at Left Hand Brewing Co., his wife Heather, and sons Evan, 4, left, and Noah, 7, paint pottery in 2010 at Crackpots in preparation for the OUR Center’s 7th annual Empty Bowls fundraiser. This year’s event is on March 19. (Lewis Geyer/) 76

Business Case for Wellness. Register online at www.longmontchamber.org. 8-9:30 a.m. Free. Longmont Area Chamber of Commerce, 828 Main St., Longmont. 720-568-9917. E-mail lfeuerborn@longmontymca.org. March 17 • Parsons Dance and East Village Opera. Choreographed and directed for the stage by David Parsons, Remember Me is a high-energy mix of contemporary American dance, opera and rock music. 7:30 p.m. $12-$52. Macky Auditorium Concert Hall, University of Colorado, Boulder. 303492-8008. www.cupresents.org. • CU at the Longmont Library presents Professor Ira Chernus. 7-8 p.m. Free. 303-651-8470. www.ci.longmont.co.us/library. March 18 • Friday Afternoon Concert and Art Show. 1:30 p.m. art, 2:30 p.m. concert. $7. Longmont Senior Center, 910 Longs Peak Ave., Longmont. 303-651-8411. www.ci.longmont.co.us/sen—ctr. • Elephant Revival with special guest Reed Foehl. The neo-acoustic Colorado quintet Elephant Revival explores the spirit of Celtic, folk, psychedelic country, reggae grooves, and 1940s standards in their own unique style of transcendental folk. 8 p.m. $15-$17. Wildflower Pavilion on Planet Bluegrass, 500 W. Main St., Lyons. 303-823-0848. www.wildflowerpavilion.com. March 19 • OUR Center Empty Bowls Dinner. Fundraiser to help feed the hungry in the community. Handmade bowls made by artists. $20, $25 at the door. Longmont High School, 1040 Sunset St. Longmont. www.ourcenter.org • Longmont Youth Symphony. Spring performance including Longmont Junior Youth Symphony and Wind Ensemble. 7 p.m. $10 adults, $7 students and seniors. Niwot High School, 8989 E. Niwot Road, Niwot. 303-351-1452. www.longmontyouthsymphony.org. • Nature at Night. Join a ranger for a cup of cocoa and a stroll around the pond to learn about the creatures who prowl and hunt at the park at night. This program is great for children and adults. Hikes will last about one hour. Meet at the Camper Services Building. Program is free, but a park pass is required of all vehicles entering the park. 7:30 p.m. Free. St. Vrain State Park, 3525 Colo. Highway 119, Firestone. 303-485-0186. http://parks.state.co.us/Parks/StVrain/Pages /StVrainHome.aspx. • Bead Lounge Spring Holistic/Psychic Fair. Come meet our practitioners and try out various healing modalities including Intuitive Tarot, Chakra, Native American Medicine Wheel, Life Coaching and more. Cost per consultation varies with each practitioner. 10:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. Bead Lounge, 320 Main St., Longmont. 303-678-9966. www.beadlounge.com. March 20 • Estes Park Music Festival presents Sherwood Park Flute Ensemble recital. 2 p.m. $5; children and students free. Stanley Hotel, 333 W. Wonderview Ave., Estes Park. 970-586-9519. www.estesparkmusicfestival.com. March 23 • NanoDays at WOW!. What is a nano? Find out the answer to this and more during NanoDays! NanoDays is a nationwide festival of educational programs about nanoscale science and engineering and its potential impact on the future. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Included with Museum Admission. WOW! SPRING 2011

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events Children’s Museum, 110 N. Harrison Ave., Lafayette. 303-604-2424. www.wowchildrensmuseum.org. • Square and Round Dances. Second and fourth Wednesdays. Sponsored by The Hix ’n’ Chix Square Dance Club. 7:30 p.m. rounds, 8 p.m. squares. $5.50 members, $6 nonmembers. Longmont Senior Center, 910 Longs Peak Ave., Longmont. 303-702-0555. E-mail drboyle@ieee.org. March 25 • Packway Handle Band. The acoustic quintet from Athens, Ga. performs thought provoking songwriting, clever arrangements of bluegrass traditionals, and totally unexpected (even totally inappropriate) covers, all delivered with a crackling energy around a single microphone. 8 p.m. $12-$15. Wildflower Pavilion on Planet Bluegrass, 500 W. Main St., Lyons. 303-823-0848. www.wildflowerpavilion.com/. March 27 • Giddyup Kitty Bluegrass Band Recital. A four-piece, high-energy, all-female bluegrass band. Weaving fine melodies with rich harmony. 2 p.m. $5; children and students free. Stanley Hotel, 333 W. Wonderview Ave., Estes Park. 970577-9900. www.estesparkmusicfestival.com. March 28 • NanoDays at WOW!. What is a nano? Find out the answer to this and more during NanoDays! NanoDays is a nationwide festival of educational programs about nanoscale science and engineering and its potential impact on the future. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Included with Museum Admission. WOW! Children’s Museum, 110 N. Harrison Ave., Lafayette. 303-604-2424. www.wowchildrensmuseum.org. March 29 • Book Lovers’ Book Club. Monthly discussion “Little Bee” by Chris Cleave. 6-7 p.m. Free. Carbon Valley Regional Library, 7 Park Ave., Firestone. 720-6855100. www.MyLibrary.us. March 31 • Pianist Nobuyuki Tsujii. 7:30 p.m. $12-$52. Macky Auditorium Concert Hall, University of Colorado, Boulder. 303-492-8008. www.cupresents.org.

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Ongoing March Events

• Through March 6 – Art Quilts by Barbara Beasley. Free. Bead Lounge, 320 Main St., Longmont. 303-678-9966. www.beadlounge.com. • Through March 11 – California Dreaming exhibit. Still Frame Gallery, 372 Main St., Longmont. 303-579-2960. • Through March 12 – Coal Creek Community Theater presents Beau Jest. 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday. $10-$15. Louisville Center for the Arts, 801 Grant St., Louisville. 303-665-0955. www.ccctheater.org. • Through March 13 – America Celebrates Quilts. Quilts have often been created to observe special occasions, like weddings, births and new homes. The art quilts in this exhibit celebrate holidays and events, from the 4th of July and Mardi Gras to the Festival of the Buddha and Derby Day. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. TuesdaysSaturdays; 1-5 p.m. Sundays. Free. Longmont Museum and Cultural Center, 400 Quail Road, Longmont. 303-651-8374. www.ci.longmont.co.us/museum. • March 18-April 2 – Crimes of the Heart. Story of the three Magrath sisters, Meg, Babe, and Lenny, who reunite at Old Granddaddy’s home in Hazlehurst, Mississippi after Babe shoots her abusive husband. Times and dates vary, visit website. 2 p.m., 7:30 p.m. $15-$17. Longmont Theatre Company, 513 Main St., Longmont. 303-772-5200. www.longmonttheatre.org. • March 25-May 22 – Jill Soukup: Industrial and Equine Architecture. Artist Jill Soukup’s paintings reflect changing landscapes. Her bold paintings of horses in

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events motion contrast with her observations of urban scenes. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays; 1-5 p.m. Sundays. Free. Longmont Museum and Cultural Center, 400 Quail Road, Longmont. 303651-8374. http://www.ci.longmont.co.us/museum. • March 26-May 22 – Niwot on the Rails history exhibit. Niwot, Colorado, began as a railroad town. Over time, it has seen fires, booms and busts, and even wholesale relocation. This exhibit traces the history of a small community that has changed a lot in the years since it was founded, but retains a selfreliance and a character all its own. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays; 1-5 p.m. Sundays. Free. Longmont Museum and Cultural Center, 400 Quail Road, Longmont. 303-651-8374. www.ci.longmont.co.us/museum. • Through March 31 – Annie. Annie is a spunky Depression-era orphan determined to find her parents, who abandoned her years ago on the doorstep of a New York City Orphanage run by the cruel, embittered Miss Hannigan. Days and times vary; call for details. Jesters Theatre, 224 Main St., Longmont. 303-682-9980. www.jesterstheatre.com. • Through April 3 – 24th Annual Women’s History Month Art Exhibit featuring women artists of Colorado and the United States. Noon-3 p.m. Free. Cultural Arts Center, 453 W. Elkhorn Ave., Estes Park. 970-586-9203. www.estesarts.com. • Through April 17 – Camelot. The enchanting story of King Arthur, Guenevere and Lancelot. Days and times vary; call for details. Jesters Dinner Theatre, 224 Main St., Longmont. 303-682-9980. www.jesterstheatre.com. • Through May 31 – Third Annual Winter Art Walk. A

self-guided tour of Estes Valley galleries and studios sponsored by the Cultural Arts Council of Estes Park. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily. Free. Start at 423 W. Elkhorn Ave., Estes Park. 970-586-9203. www.EstesArts.com. • Through June 4 – National Juried Photo Show. Free. Louisville Center for the Arts, 801 Grant St., Louisville. 303-546-8668. www.louisvilleart.org.

APRIL EVENTS

April 1 • 1st Friday Art Walk in Niwot. New art, kids’ activities and live music along Second Avenue and in Cottonwood Square. Several shops stay open late for browsing. 5-8 p.m. Free. Downtown Niwot, Historic Old Town and Cottonwood Square, Niwot. 720-272-9299. www.facebook.com/niwot. April 2 • Children’s Theatre: Alice in Wonderland. Saturdays, 3 p.m. $5. Jesters Dinner Theatre, 224 Main St., Longmont. 303-682-9980. www.jesterstheatre.com. April 3 • Estes Park Music Festival presents Colorado Brass Quintet Recital. 2 p.m. $5; children and students free. Stanley Hotel, 333 W. Wonderview Ave., Estes Park. 970-586-9519. www.estesparkmusicfestival.com. April 6 • Keeping Your Bones Healthy: Osteoporosis. Presented by Dr. Matthew Gerlach. 10 a.m. Longmont United Hospital, 1850 Mountain View Ave., Longmont. 303-485-4184. www.luhcares.org.

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April 7 • Giddyup Kitty at the Longmont Library. Back again for another performance, Giddyup Kitty is a fourpiece, high-energy, all-female bluegrass band. 7-8 p.m. Free. 303-651-8470. www.ci.longmont.co.us/library. April 8 • Missy Raines & the New Hip. One of bluegrass music’s most decorated bassists, Missy Raines, leads this progressive quartet from smoky jazz chops to raucous rock grooves, all with seamless virtuosity and musical wit. 8 p.m. $15-$17. Wildflower Pavilion on Planet Bluegrass, 500 W. Main St., Lyons. 303-823-0848. www.wildflowerpavilion.com. • Round ’em Up with Cowboy Poetry by Zeb Dennis. 6-9 p.m. Muse Gallery, 356 Main St., Longmont. 303-678-7869. www.artslongmont.org. • Second Friday in Downtown Longmont. Art openings, live entertainment and retailer open houses. 6-9 p.m. Downtown Longmont, Main Street, between Third and Sixth avenues, Longmont. 303-651-8484. www.downtownlongmont.com. April 9 • Longmont Symphony Orchestra Concert featuring acclaimed soprano Cynthia Lawrence. Program also includes Prokofiev’s Lt Kije Suite and Mussorgsky’s Pictures at an Exhibition. 7:30 p.m. $16 adult; $14 senior; $12 youth. Vance Brand Auditorium, 600 E. Mountain View Ave., Longmont. 303-772-5796. www.longmontsymphony.org. • 14th Annual Taste of Therapy Wellness Fair. Don’t miss this opportunity to try a variety of alternative wellness options. Try massage, acupuncture, energy work and more. Only $5 for each 15 minute

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events hands on demonstration. (Paid at the fair) Appointments are taken at the fair on a first-come basis. Spaces fill quickly. 10 a.m.-1 p.m.; doors open at 9:45 a.m. Free. Izaak Walton Clubhouse, 18 S. Sunset St., Longmont. 303-651-8404. www.ci.longmont.co.us/rec/special. April 10 • House Concerts featuring Veelah. 4 p.m. $35. Muse Gallery, 356 Main St., Longmont. 303-6787869. www.artslongmont.org. • Estes Park Music Festival presents pianist Margie Patterson. 2 p.m. $5; children and students free. Stanley Hotel, 333 W. Wonderview Ave., Estes Park. 970-586-9519. www.estesparkmusicfestival.com. April 12 • What are the latest treatments and preventive practices for colon cancer? Presented by Dr. Barnett and panel. 10 a.m. Longmont United Hospital, 1850 Mountain View Ave., Longmont. 303-4854184. www.luhcares.org. April 13 • The Longmont Artists’ Guild’s Demonstrations. 6:30 p.m. Free. The Great Frame Up, 430 Main St, Longmont. • TREWE class begins – weight management. 10 a.m. Longmont United Hospital, 1850 Mountain View Ave., Longmont. 303-485-4184. www.luhcares.org. • Square and Round Dances. Second and fourth Wednesdays. Sponsored by The Hix ’n’ Chix Square Dance Club. 7:30 p.m. rounds, 8 p.m. squares. $5.50 members, $6 nonmembers. Longmont Senior Center, 910 Longs Peak Ave., Longmont. 303-702-0555. E-mail drboyle@ieee.org. April 14 • LUH Volunteer Fundraiser. Imagine Nation Books. 7 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Longmont United Hospital, 1850 Mountain View Ave., Longmont. 303-651-5205. www.luhcares.org. • Author Mark Obmascik presents his book, “Halfway to Heaven.” Journalist Obmascik set himself the goal of climbing all 54 Colorado 14ers. 7-8 p.m. Free. 303-651-8470. www.ci.longmont.co.us/library. April 15 • Friday Afternoon Concert and Art Show. Celtic Music with Colcannon. 1:30 p.m. art, 2:30 p.m. concert. $7. Longmont Senior Center, 910 Longs Peak Ave., Longmont. 303-651-8411. www.ci.longmont.co.us/sen—ctr. • Ellis. A perennial favorite at the Folks Festival, Minneapolis-based singer-songwriter Ellis’s compelling songwriting and engaging performances leave audiences better than she finds them, with softened edges and opened hearts. 8 p.m. $15$17. Wildflower Pavilion on Planet Bluegrass, 500 W. Main St., Lyons. 303-823-0848. www.wildflowerpavilion.com. April 16 • Healthy Kids Day at the Longmont YMCA. Free activities for the whole family. Open to the community. Games, youth sports, health screenings and refreshments. Pool is open too. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Ed and Ruth Lehman YMCA, 950 Lashley St., Longmont. 303-776-0370. www.longmontymca.org. • Wild Earth Saturday. Boulder County’s 10th annual celebratory kick off to Earth Week, a collaborative project of Wild Bear Mountain Ecology Center and the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Celebrate the magnificent earth and our human interaction with it through hands-on activities, presentations and films exploring climate TIMES-CALL / LONGMONT MAGAZINE

SPRING 2011

Volunteers help out during the Ed & Ruth Lehman YMCA’s annual Healthy Kids Day. This year’s event is April 16. (Courtesy Ed & Ruth Lehman YMCA)

change, the natural world, sustainability and more. Please contact registrar@wildbear.org for more information about the event and/or to register your group. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. NCAR, 1850 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder. 303-258-0495. www.wildbear.org. • 9Health Fair. Receive a variety of health screenings. 9Health Fair is Colorado’s largest nonprofit, volunteer-driven health fair program that promotes health awareness and encourages individuals to assume responsibility for their own health. 7 a.m.-noon. Free. Erie Community Center, 450 Powers St., Erie. 303-926-2793. www.9healthfair.org. April 17 • Estes Park Music Festival presents Estes Valley Chamber Singers Concert in this final Winter Concert Series. 2 p.m. $5; children and students free. Stanley Hotel, 333 W. Wonderview Ave., Estes Park. 970-586-9519. www.estesparkmusicfestival.com. April 19-20 • April Drop-In Science Explorations. April’s Topic: All Things Green. Curious about how to approach science with your kids? Join WOW! this month for family science fun. Drop-in science explorations are informal hands-on science sessions that are included with your museum admission. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Included with Museum Admission. WOW! Children’s Museum, 110 N. Harrison Ave., Lafayette. 303-604-2424. www.wowchildrensmuseum.org. April 21 • Arts & Carafes. Jewelry workshop with Katerine Ware. 6-8:30 p.m. $35. Muse Gallery, 356 Main St., Longmont. 303-678-7869. www.artslongmont.org. April 23 • Arbor Day & Earth Day Celebration. Festivities this year will also include Earth Day activities. Help plant new trees in the park, make some crafts and learn new ways to help the environment. 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Erie Community Park, 450 Powers St., Erie. 303-926-2793. www.erieparksandrec.com. April 26 • Book Lovers’ Book Club. Monthly discussion “The Help” by Kathryn Stockett. 6-7 p.m. Free. Carbon Valley Regional Library, 7 Park Ave., Firestone. 720685-5100. www.MyLibrary.us. April 27 • Square and Round Dances. Second and fourth Wednesdays. Sponsored by The Hix ’n’ Chix Square Dance Club. 7:30 p.m. rounds, 8 p.m. squares.

$5.50 members, $6 nonmembers. Longmont Senior Center, 910 Longs Peak Ave., Longmont. 303-702-0555. E-mail drboyle@ieee.org. April 30-May 1 • All Shubert Concert. On the program is Schubert’s Symphony No. 8 The "Unfinished" and Mass in Eflat. A reception will follow the Sunday Concert. 7 p.m. Saturday; 3 p.m. Sunday. Free, but donations are accepted. Mountain View Bible Fellowship, Colorado 7 and Peak View, Estes Park. 970-5779900. E-mail ljohnson@airbits.com. • A Midsummer Night’s Dream featuring Longmont Dance Theatre. This production is composed by Felix Mendelssohn and choreographed by Stephanie Tuley and Kristin Kingsley. 2 p.m. $18, $12 students/seniors. Niwot High School Auditorium, 8989 Niwot Road, Niwot. 303-772-1335. wwww.longmontdancetheatre.com.

Ongoing April Events

• Through April 2 – Crimes of the Heart. Story of the three Magrath sisters, Meg, Babe and Lenny, who reunite at Old Granddaddy’s home in Hazlehurst, Mississippi after Babe shoots her abusive husband. Times and dates vary, visit website. 2 p.m., 7:30 p.m. $15-$17. Longmont Theatre Company, 513 Main St., Longmont. 303-772-5200. www.longmonttheatre.org. • Through April 3 – 24th Annual Women’s History Month Art Exhibit featuring women artists of Colorado and the United States. Noon-3 p.m. Free. Cultural Arts Center, 453 W. Elkhorn Ave., Estes Park. 970-586-9203. www.estesarts.com. • Through April 17 – Camelot. The enchanting story of King Arthur, Guenever, and Lancelot. Days and times vary; call for details. Jesters Dinner Theatre, 224 Main St., Longmont. 303-682-9980. www.jesterstheatre.com. • April 29-July 10 – Carousel. In a Maine coastal village toward the end of the 19th century, the swaggering, carefree carnival barker, Billy Bigelow, captivates and marries the naive millworker, Julie Jordan. Days and times vary; call for details. Jesters Dinner Theatre, 224 Main St., Longmont. 303-6829980. www.jesterstheatre.com. • Through May 22 – Jill Soukup: Industrial and Equine Architecture. Artist Jill Soukup’s paintings reflect changing landscapes. Her bold paintings of horses in motion contrast with her observations of urban scenes. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays; 1-5 p.m. Sundays. Free. Longmont Museum and Cultural Center, 400 Quail Road, Longmont. 303651-8374. www.ci.longmont.co.us/museum. 79


events • Through May 22 – Niwot on the Rails history exhibit. Niwot, Colorado, began as a railroad town. Over time, it has seen fires, booms and busts, and even wholesale relocation. This exhibit traces the history of a small community that has changed a lot in the years since it was founded, but retains a self-reliance and a character all its own. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays; 1-5 p.m. Sundays. Free. Longmont Museum and Cultural Center, 400 Quail Road, Longmont. 303-651-8374. www.ci.longmont.co.us/museum. • Through May 31 – Third Annual Winter Art Walk. A self-guided tour of Estes Valley galleries and studios sponsored by the Cultural Arts Council of Estes Park. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily. Free. Start at 423 W. Elkhorn Ave., Estes Park. 970-5869203. www.EstesArts.com. • Through June 4 – National Juried Photo Show. Free. Louisville Center for the Arts, 801 Grant St., Louisville. 303-546-8668. www.louisvilleart.org.

MAY EVENTS

May 6 • Greensky Bluegrass. Winners of the 2006 Telluride Bluegrass band contest, the progressive acoustic Michigan quintet has been equally embraced by the jamband and Americana audiences for their blend of originals, traditionals and exploratory rock covers. 8 p.m. $20. Wildflower Pavilion on Planet Bluegrass, 500 West Main St., Lyons. 303-823-0848. www.wildflowerpavilion.com/. • Eyes on the World Opening Reception featuring a collection of paintings by the Plein Air Painters of Estes Park. Exhibit continues through May 22. 5-8 p.m. Free. Cultural Arts Center Fine Art Gallery, 453 W. Elkhorn Ave., Estes Park. 970586-9203. www.estesarts.com. • 1st Friday Art Walk in Niwot. New art, kids’ activities and live music along Second Avenue and in Cottonwood Square. Several shops stay open late for browsing. 5-8 p.m. Free. Downtown Niwot, Historic Old Town and Cottonwood Square, Niwot. 720-272-9299. www.facebook.com/niwot. • LUH Volunteer Fundraiser. Annual Potted Plants - Bedding Plants Sale. 7 a.m.3:30 p.m. Longmont United Hospital, 1850 Mountain View Ave., Longmont. 303-651-5205. www.luhcares.org. May 7 • How The West Was Sung. Longs Peak Chorus performing western songs in

four-part barbershop harmony. 7 p.m. $15. Vance Brand Civic Auditorium, 600 E. Mountain View Ave., Longmont. 303-678-9967. www.harmonize.com/longmont. • Longmont Chorale presents Spotlights and Highlights from Broadway. Featuring Broadway winners of the last 40 years, including a major section featuring the songs of Andrew Lloyd Weber. 7:30 p.m..$16, $14 seniors, $12 students. Niwot High School, 8989 E. Niwot Road, Niwot. 303-651-7664. www.longmontchorale.siteblast.com. May 11 • Neck Pain: Diagnosis and Treatment. Presented by Dr. Alexander Mason. 10 a.m. Longmont United Hospital, 1850 Mountain View Ave., Longmont. 303485-4184. www.luhcares.org. • Square and Round Dances. Second and fourth Wednesdays. Sponsored by The Hix ’n’ Chix Square Dance Club. 7:30 p.m. rounds, 8 p.m. squares. $5.50 members, $6 nonmembers. Longmont Senior Center, 910 Longs Peak Ave., Longmont. 303-702-0555. E-mail drboyle@ieee.org. May 12 • John Stansfield as Enos Mills at the Longmont Library. As a boy and as a man, Mills lived a remarkable mountain life. Hear Stansfield’s account. 7-8 p.m. Free. 303-651-8470. www.ci.longmont.co.us/library. May 13 • FiberScapes Opening Reception. 6-9 p.m. Free. Muse Gallery, 356 Main St., Longmont. 303-678-7869. www.artslongmont.org. • Color + Texture = Fiber! Deb Coombs fiber art open art reception. 5-7 p.m. Free. Art Center of the Rockies, 517 Big Thompson Ave., Estes Park. 970-5865882. www.artcenterofestes.com. • Second Friday in Downtown Longmont. Art openings, live entertainment and retailer open houses. 6-9 p.m. Downtown Longmont, Main Street, between Third and Sixth avenues, Longmont. 303-651-8484. www.downtownlongmont.com. May 14 • Longmont Symphony Orchestra Pops Concert featuring the Queen City Jazz Band. Join us early for a dessert social sponsored by the Longmont Symphony Guild. 7:30 p.m. $18. Vance Brand Auditorium, 600 E. Mountain View Ave., Longmont. 303-772-5796. www.longmontsymphony.org.

BARGAINS!!

Are your kids’ rooms busting at the seams? Toys taking over the house? Then now is the perfect time to gather all of those extras and sell them at the upcoming Shop Kids Event Feb. 26 and 27 at American Furniture Warehouse in Firestone. Started by Megan Johnson, an energetic mother of three boys and owner of Shop Kids Resale & Consignment in Longmont, the event is the ultimate shopping place for buying anything for kids, from clothing and toys to swings and strollers. There are even some items for pregnant women. Shop Kids Event is a great place for you to shop or sell your gently used items at 65 to 80 percent of the price you mark. And it’s easy to do by visiting www.shopkidsevent.com. The website will guide you through signing up to be a consigner, and tag and price all of your items. Then bring them to the event and help the organizers display them for sale. For parents shopping, Saturday is a great day to find the perfect items, but if you’re wanting the ultimate deal, come Sunday where the majority of items are half price. At the end of the event, consigners pick up their unsold merchandise, or bring it into the Resale & Consignment store to sell. Any items not picked up will be donated. Don’t miss this opportunity to clean out your kids’ stuff and find some great deals.

Visit our next

SHOP KIDS EVENT WAREHOUSE SALE FEBRUARY 26 & 27 American Furniture Warehouse at 1-25 & Hwy 119

Also visit our retail location that you'll find organized with great name brand children's clothing and equipment.

$5 OFF $30 Purchase Must bring in ad for rebate. Good at store Location Only. Expires 5/31/11

Shop Kids Resale & Consignment

900 S. Hover Rd. Longmont • shopkidsconsignment.com • 303-776-0510

6

Mon.-Fr: 10am to 7 pm Sat: 10am to 6 pm Sun: 11 am to 5pm 80

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events • Boulder Chorale: Songs of the Journey. The Boulder Chorale, Children’s Chorale and Camerata combine forces for the season finale concert of music commemorating travel, outreach and journey. Join the Boulder Chorale as we conclude our 45th season and prepare to depart on a June musical and cultural exchange tour to Cuba. 7:30 p.m. First United Methodist Church. 1421 Spruce St., Boulder. 303-554-7692. www.boulderchorale.org. • Carbon Valley Community Expo. The Carbon Valley Community Expo allows local businesses to display their services and products and connect with the community. Free admission, with activities, food and fun for all ages. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. American Furniture Warehouse, 10550 Jake Jabs Blvd., Firestone. 303-833-5933. www.carbonvalleychamber.com. • Fishing Clinic. Learn about fishing, casting and baiting techniques, become familiar with the varieties of local fish and enjoy some great fishing. The first 200 youth (12 years of age and younger) will receive a free fishing pole, courtesy of the Colorado Division of Wildlife and the Town of Erie. Adults will be allowed to fish without a license during the event. Registration is required and begins on May 1. 9 a.m.-noon. Free. Thomas Reservoir, 2000 N. 119th St., Erie. 303-926-2793. E-mail cedwards@erieco.gov. www.erieparksandrec.com. • 21st Annual Jazz Fest and Art Walk Weekend. A musical kickoff for the busy summer. Spring Art Walk May 14-31 spotlights select galleries and artists studios in the greater Estes Valley. Tour maps available. Visit the galleries, listen to some of the best musical talent in the region. Bring your own blanket or lawn chairs and camp out for the afternoon to listen to the music. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. Performance Park & Greater Estes Valley, 417 W. Elkhorn Ave., Estes Park. 970-586-9203. www.EstesArts.com. • Parade of Years. Stanley Steamers and other vintage automobiles recreate the Big Thompson Canyon drive that brought the first tourists of the season to Estes Park and Rocky Mountain National Park. The classic autos will be on exhibit at Bond Park on Sunday. 9-11 a.m. Free. Bond Park, Elkhorn and MacGregor avenues, downtown, Estes Park. 970-586-6256. www.estesnet.com/museum. • Children’s Theatre: The Lion Kind. Saturdays, 3 p.m. $5. Jesters Dinner Theatre, 224 Main St., Longmont. 303-682-9980. www.jesterstheatre.com. • Massive Book Signing. More than 20 local authors will be here to talk about and sign their books. Western Americana, nature, WW2, local history, paranormal fiction will all be represented. Come talk to the authors who most interest you. Noon-5 p.m. Free. Barbed Wire Books, 504 Main St., Longmont. 303-827-3620. barbedwirebooks.net. May 15 • House Concerts featuring Chamber Music. 4 p.m. $35. Muse Gallery, 356 Main St., Longmont. 303678-7869. www.artslongmont.org. • Boulder Bach Festival “Bach for Kids” Concert. 2 p.m. Free. Boulder Public Library, Canyon Theater, 1001 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder. 303-776-9666. www.boulderbachfestival.org. • Boulder Chorale: Songs of the Journey. The Boulder Chorale, Children’s Chorale and Camerata combine forces for the season finale concert of music commemorating travel, outreach and journey. Join the Boulder Chorale as we conclude our 45th TIMES-CALL / LONGMONT MAGAZINE

SPRING 2011

Due to strong winds only a handful of balloonists were determined enough to attempt the night glow in 2010, as the kick off of Erie’s annual Town Fair. One of the brave pilots, Ken Tadolini, of the Re/Max balloon team was able, with the help of his crew, to provide a glow for hundreds of onlookers. This year’s Erie Town Fair is May 21. (Alan Crandall)

season and prepare to depart on a June musical and cultural exchange tour to Cuba. 4 p.m. First United Methodist Church. 1421 Spruce St., Boulder. 303-554-7692. www.boulderchorale.org. May 17-18 • May Drop-In Science Explorations. May’s Topic: Plants & Gardens. Curious about how to approach science with your kids? Join WOW! this month for family science fun. Drop-in science explorations are informal hands-on science sessions that are included with your museum admission. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Included with Museum Admission. WOW! Children’s Museum, 110 N. Harrison Ave., Lafayette. 303-604-2424. www.wowchildrensmuseum.org. May 19 • LUH Volunteer Fundraiser. Mile High Jewelry and Accessories. 7 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Longmont United Hospital, 1850 Mountain View Ave., Longmont. 303-651-5205. www.luhcares.org. May 21 • Longmont Youth Symphony Grand Finale Concert featuring the , Longmont Junior Youth Symphony and the Wind Ensemble. 2 p.m. $10 adults, $7 students and seniors. Niwot High School, 8989 E. Niwot Road, Niwot. 303-351-1452. longmontyouthsymphony.org. • 15th Annual Erie Town Fair. Balloon launch at 6 a.m., more than 200 vendors, entertainment, barbecue, Garage Rats Car Show, beer garden. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Coal Creek Park/Historic Downtown, Kattell and Cheesman, Erie. 303-828-3440. www.eriechamber.org. Mary 21-22 • Strawberry Festival Antique Show. 80 antique dealers statewide, cafe serving food, and strawberry shortcake, art show. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday. $4, children under 12 free. Boulder County Fairgrounds, 9595 Nelson Road, Longmont. 303-776-1870. www.stvrainhistoricalsociety.org. May 22 • Ella’s Walk featuring the Furry Friends Festival.

Longmont Humane Society’s tribute walk for Meredith Hope Emerson who tragically lost her life in 2008. Meredith’s rescue dog Ella will make the 3mile walk and we ask participants to pledge by visiting our website and signing up. Ella’s Walk is a huge fundraiser for the Longmont Humane Society animals and we depend upon your pledges to care for over 5,000 animals each year. Furry Friends Festival follows with Mutt Main Street, entertainment and loads of fund for 2 and 4-legged friends. 8:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Walk free, pledge for the shelter. Boulder County Fairgrounds Picnic Area, Nelson Road and Hover Street, Longmont. 303-772-1232 ext. 235. www.longmonthumane.org. May 25 • Square and Round Dances. Second and fourth Wednesdays. Sponsored by The Hix ’n’ Chix Square Dance Club. 7:30 p.m. rounds, 8 p.m. squares. $5.50 members, $6 nonmembers. Longmont Senior Center, 910 Longs Peak Ave., Longmont. 303-702-0555. E-mail drboyle@ieee.org. May 28-30 • Antiques and Collectibles Show. More then 50 vendors offer a treasure trove of antiques and collectibles. 10 a.m. $1. Fairgrounds at Stanley Park, 1209 Manford Ave., Estes Park. 970-5779900. www.rooftoprodeo.com/antiques.asp. • Art Market. More than 90 juried artisans assemble to kick off the summer season and to showcase their art. Local, regional and national artisans will offer fine arts and crafts for sale. Sponsored by the Art Center of Estes Park. 9 a.m. Free. Bond Park, Elkhorn and MacGregor avenues, downtown, Estes Park. 970-586-5882. www.artcenterofestes.com.

Ongoing May Events

• May 6-21 – The Musical Comedy Murders of 1940. Secret passageways, Nazi saboteurs, and dead bodies combine to create a blizzard of mayhem in the sidesplitting The Musical Comedy Murders of 1940. Times and dates vary, contact website. 2 p.m., 7:30 p.m. $15-$17. Longmont Theatre Company, 513 Main St., Longmont. 303772-5200. www.longmonttheatre.org. • Through May 22 – Jill Soukup: Industrial and Equine Architecture. Artist Jill Soukup’s paintings reflect changing landscapes. Her bold paintings of horses in motion contrast with her observations of urban scenes. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays; 1-5 p.m. Sundays. Free. Longmont Museum and Cultural Center, 400 Quail Road, Longmont. 303651-8374. http://www.ci.longmont.co.us/museum. • Through May 22 – Niwot on the Rails history exhibit. Niwot, Colorado, began as a railroad town. Over time, it has seen fires, booms and busts, and even wholesale relocation. This exhibit traces the history of a small community that has changed a lot in the years since it was founded, but retains a selfreliance and a character all its own. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays; 1-5 p.m. Sundays. Free. Longmont Museum and Cultural Center, 400 Quail Road, Longmont. 303-651-8374. http://www.ci.longmont.co.us/museum. • Through May 31 – Third Annual Winter Art Walk. A self-guided tour of Estes Valley galleries and studios sponsored by the Cultural Arts Council of Estes Park. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily. Free. Start at 423 W. Elkhorn Ave., Estes Park. 970-586-9203. www.EstesArts.com. • Through June 4 – National Juried Photo Show. Free. Louisville Center for the Arts, 801 Grant St., Louisville. 303-546-8668. www.louisvilleart.org. • Through July 10 – Carousel. In a Maine coastal village toward the end of the 19th century, the 81


events swaggering, carefree carnival barker, Billy Bigelow, captivates and marries the naive millworker, Julie Jordan. Days and times vary; call for details. Jesters Dinner Theatre, 224 Main St., Longmont. 303-682-9980. www.jesterstheatre.com. Ongoing Events, Clubs and Happenings • April through October – Sailboat Racing. Sunday afternoon recreational level dinghy and multihull racing. 1 p.m. $50 a year family membership. Union Reservoir, Weld County Road 26, Longmont. 303-652-3617. • Potluck Bluegrass Open Jam every Monday. 7-9:30 p.m. Ziggi’s Coffee House, 400 Main St., Longmont. 303-682-5120. E-mail davegaudreau@hotmail.com. www.ziggiscoffee.com. • Live Music at Niwot Tavern. Ongoing times and dates. Free. Niwot Tavern, 7960 Niwot Road, Niwot. 303-652-0200. www.niwottavern.com. • Crackpots pottery painting. Weekday and weekend classes, parties. Prices and time varies. Crackpots, 501 Main St., Longmont. 303-776-2211. www.ecrackpots.com. • The Art of Beading. Weekday and weekend classes. Prices and time varies. Bead Lounge, 320 Main St., Longmont. 303-678-9966. www.beadlounge.com. • Saturday Art Experience. Art classes for children age 5 to 12. Pre-registration is required. Second and fourth Saturday of the month. Free. Old Firehouse Art Center, 667 Fourth Ave., Longmont. 303-651-2787. www.firehouseart.org. • Blue Egg Arts art classes. Mobile art classes for children. 303-652-3383. www.blueeggarts.com. • Longmont Genealogical Society. Second Wednesday of the month. 1 p.m. First Lutheran Evangelical Church, 803 Third Ave., Longmont. 303-678-5130. • Interfaith Quilters. Mondays, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. First Lutheran Evangelical Church, 803 Third Ave. Longmont. 303-684-9796. • Ales4FemAles: Beer Club for Women. Meets at 6:30 p.m. the last Monday of each month. Left Hand Brewery, 1265 Boston Ave., Longmont. 303-772-0258. E-mail ales4females@gmail.com. www.lefthandbrewing.com. • Longs Peak Barbershop Chorus meets at 7 p.m. Mondays at St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, 1303 S. Bross Lane, Longmont. 303-678-9967. • The Hoe and Hope Garden Club meets from 12:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. the fourth

Wednesday of each month at the First Evangelical Lutheran Church, 803 Third Ave., Longmont. 303-485-0208. www.hoeandhopegardenclub.com. • Tri-Town Toastmasters meets at 6:25 p.m. every Monday at American Furniture Warehouse, I-25 and Colo. Highway 119, Firestone. 800-851-8643. • MOMS Club of Longmont-East. Offering support and activities for moms and their children of all ages, last Friday of the month. Longmont. 303-682-9630. • MOMS Club of Longmont-West, a nonprofit organization for stay-at-home mothers, meets the fourth Wednesday of each month. 303-827-3400. longmontwestmoms.com. • Foothills Audubon Club meeting. Local birding club meeting. Public welcome. First Monday of the month. 7 p.m. Berthoud Community Center, 248 Welch Ave., Berthoud. 303-652-2959. • Fun With Flowers Workshop meets from 8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. the second Tuesday of each month at the Natural Resource Building at the Boulder County Fairgrounds, 9595 Nelson Road, Longmont. Cost is $3. 303-684-9759. • Night Speakers Toastmaster meets at 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays at St. Vrain Valley Credit Union, 777 21st Ave., Longmont. 720-652-7117. • The Longmont Artists’ Guild meets at 7 p.m. the second Wednesday of each month at The Great Frame Up, 430 Main St., Longmont. 303-828-3453. • Folklorico Dancers every Wednesday at La Mariposa, 1240 Ken Pratt Blvd., Longmont. 6 p.m. 303-772-6288. • Tuesdays through Sept. 6 – Salsa/Latin at The Boulder Draft House. Salsa and Salsaton classes, guest instructors, performances, music and dancing. No experience or partner necessary. 7:30 p.m.-midnight. $3-$10 (with class). The Boulder Draft House, 2027 13th St., Boulder. 720-422-3354. E-mail hillary@bouldergreenstreets.org. • Wednesdays 2011 – Open studio at the Cultural Arts Council of Estes Park. Free form work sessions for artists to bring their own project from home. Individual instruction is provided and focused to guide personalized growth as an artist. Beginner to intermediate level. 10 a.m.-noon. $10. Cultural Arts Council; Fine Art Gallery, 423 W. Elkhorn Ave., Estes Park. 970-586-9203. www.EstesArts.com.

Dedicated to providing medical care outside of a hospital emergency room, South Pointe Urgent Care in Lafayette offers a convenient location with walk-in urgent care services. Open Monday through Saturday, Dr. Gregory Denzel is not new to the urgent care business after operating a successful office in Greeley. But with a goal to locate and work closer to the Denver Metro area, Denzel sold his practice in Greeley and brought that successful business plan to his new location in Lafayette which opened in late January. South Pointe Urgent Care offers numerous services, including minor emergency care, strep throat testing and care, wound care, treatment for sinus issues and an onsite facility for x-rays. In addition, the office offers worker compensation services for local businesses on a 24-hour basis. Not many urgent care facilities provide this, making South Pointe unique. Denzel will also offer follow-up visits for patients on primary care cases. Denzel’s goal is to give a hybrid between a family practice with walk-in emergency services, a great flow to the office and reasonable prices with acceptance from all insurances.

NOW OPEN IN YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD

South Pointe U

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fun for all

HOROSCOPES Aries – 3/21-4/19 You’ll face tough challenges this spring, but don’t stress too much. Try taking a long walk to relieve your frustrations. Taurus – 4/20-5/20 If the chaos of the season gets you down, make lists, get organized and do some spring cleaning, and you’ll start thinking clearly. Gemini – 5/21-6/21 You might be intimidated by boredom, but be sure to take some time to relax this spring. Pick a new hobby to stay focused. Yoga is recommended. Cancer – 6/22-7/22 You may come across frustrating people over the coming months, but you’ll get through it if you don’t let your aggressive nature get the best of you. Leo – 7/23-8/22 Let your creative side shine through this spring with a new project or hobby. This will ensure your happiness and fulfillment. Virgo – 8/23-9/22 The spring season is the perfect time to do something for yourself. A massage or shopping spree would be a perfect way to be pampered. Libra – 9/23-10/22 Get motivated this spring and you’ll be rewarded. The stars are aligned in you favor, and prosperity is imminent. Scorpio – 10/23-11/21 Channel your energy by giving back to the community in the next few months. We hear volunteers are needed for Longmont’s Cleanup Greenup. Sagittarius – 11/22-12/21 Expect a new love interest or friendship to blossom this spring; it will calm your restless nature.

Volunteer Greeters Needed!

2 Hours 2 2 Weeks

Greeters for

generates enough food for a family of four for

Make Your Volunteer Time Count The Most!

Our 23rd Annual “Hunger Hurts the Whole Community” Food Drive is Wednesday, April 20 through Sunday, May 1st

Here’s how YOU or YOUR GROUP can help:

Greet in groups of 1-3. A Great opportunity for families! Stand near the entrance of the grocery store, right next to our donation bin. Hand a grocery bag or flyer to shoppers as they come in and remind them to donate. We need greeters every evening of the drive and especially during the weekends from 9am to 7pm each Saturday and Sunday.

Grocery store DROP OFF LOCATIONS, also locations where GREETERS are needed: Longmont: All King Soopers, Pantry Market, Gunbarrel: Lafayette: Lyons: Louisville: Niwot:

All Safeway Locations Drop off Location at Longmont Times-Call King Soopers King Soopers, Sunflower Farmers Market St. Vrain Market GREETER King Soopers TIME SLOTS: Mon - Fri: 5 to 7pm Niwot Market Sat & Sun: 9am to 11:30am, Drop off location at 11:30am to 2pm, 2pm to 4:30pm Community Food Share & 4:30pm to 7pm

Capricorn – 12/22-1/19 Take up a cause close to your heart in the coming months and you might just change the world. Trust your instincts for the best results. Aquarius – 1/20-2/18 When a friend faces a difficult time, you’ll be the perfect shoulder to lean on. Your unique perspective will guide them on the right path. Pisces – 2/19-3/20 Check your emotions at the door when conflicts arise this season, and don’t underestimate your ability to shine in spite of cloudy weather. – COMPILED BY KENDRA WALKER AND LAUREL TONEY TIMES-CALL / LONGMONT MAGAZINE

SPRING 2011

Sponsored by

Hunger Hurts The Whole Community

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find-a-physician call 303.485.3553 or visit luhcares.org

Changing Insurance may require a new doctor. We know Choosing a Doctor is an Important Decision.

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For when you need a new doctor, Longmont United Hospital offers a free 24/7 doctor referral service to help you. The medical staff at Longmont United Hospital is comprised of over 255 doctors representing over 35 specialities. Their expertise, along with the leadingedge facilities, offers you access to advanced medical services,

comprehensive rehabilitation programs, and educational classes. To find a doctor for your health needs, call the doctor referral center at 303.485.3553.

Changing The Caring Experience...

luhcares.org 303.651.5111 SPRING 2011

TIMES-CALL / LONGMONT MAGAZINE


Longmont Magazine Spring2011