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June - July 2012, vol 2

Take One, It's Free!

Our BerkshireTimes

Community News | Local Events | Personal Growth | Vibrant Living

Western MA | Northern CT | Eastern NY | Southern VT

Connect, Share, Grow, Prosper • It's All About Community!


GOOD FOOD WITH

VALUE(s)

413.528.9697 • WWW.BERKSHIRE.COOP 42 BRIDGE STREET • GREAT BARRINGTON MONDAY - SATURDAY 8-8, SUNDAY 10-6

It’s more than a just a store – it’s a co-op.


Expect more. The Montessori School of the Berkshires

Independence

Innovation

Intellect

Summer at MSB

Eight weeks of Children’s House and Elementary summer programs for ages 3-12 yrs.

This year’s themes include Glorious Garden Artists, Explore the Woods, Passport Around the World, Think It, Draw It, Build It & more.

Plus, new this year, four weeks of Toddler summer programs for ages 18 mos - 3 yrs.

Register online at BerkshireMontessori.org Lenox Dale, MA (413) 637-3662

An Education for Life.

Toddler • Early Childhood • Elementary • Adolescent • Summer Program


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Our BerkshireTimes™ PUBLISHER Kathy I. Regan publisher@ourberkshiregreen.com _______________ EDITORIAL Kathy I. Regan editor@ourberkshiregreen.com Rodelinde Albrecht rodelinde@ourberkshiregreen.com

CONTENTS 4

From the Publisher

4

Good Tidings

5

Art, Culture & Entertainment Event Sampler

Copyeditors/Proofreaders Rodelinde Albrecht Patty Strauch _______________

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DESIGN Magazine Design/Layout Kathy I. Regan

7

Ads–Independent Designers Katharine Adams, Rural Ethic Studio katmail@ruralethicstudio.com

What to Do & Where to Say Bridge of Flowers

Food & Drink Farmers' Markets, Recipe

10 Home, Garden & Landscape Meadow Maintenance

12 Education & Workshops

Christine Dupre cedupre@msn.com Elisa Jones, Berkshire Design Studio elisa@berkshiredesignstudio.com Shirley Sparks, Graphic Design on a Dime sms234@aol.com _______________ ADVERTISING ACCOUNT MANAGER Patty Strauch patty@ourberkshiregreen.com ______________ EVENT COORDINATOR Patty Strauch patty@ourberkshiregreen.com _______________ CONTACT Our BerkshireGreen, Inc. P.O. Box 133, Housatonic, MA 01236 Phone: (413) 274-1122, Fax: (413) 541-8000 www.OurBerkshireGreen.com www.OurBerkshireTimes.com www.OurBerkshireCalendar.com

R

COVER ILLUSTRATION

Rocking Chairs

Mary Rembold

I connect with the land on a very deep level and delight in the integrity of the weathered buildings and lush landscapes found in New England. I enjoy juxtaposing these subjects and exploring the intersection where they come together in my photographic greeting card line, Blue Thistle Studio. The spirit of bygone days is captured on paper and fabric in my handmade and vintage image greeting card line, Blue Thistle Paperie. Contact Mary at mary@ bluethistlestudio.net, www.bluethistlestudio.net. Shop: www.etsy.com/shop/BlueThistlePaperie

June - July 2012

Bard College at Simon's Rock

13 Animal Talk The Dog Days of Summer

14 Back to Nature Tales from the Trail

15 Our Berkshire Marketplace Spotlight on Local Products

16 Community Spotlight Great Barrington: A Remarkable History Gwendolyn Hampton VanSant

20 Health & Wellness Inflammation: The Root of Many Diseases Event Sampler Is Gravity Dragging You Down?

24 Mind & Spirit The Warmth and Wisdom of Sheilaa Hite

25 Fashion & Beauty Exfoliate with Salt from the Dead Sea

25 Meet & Greet Event Sampler

26 In Business Build a Powerful Brand Personality

27 Directory of Advertisers 28 Index of Advertisers IBC Sponsors

15 Berkshire Bargains Coupons! Discounts! Savings!

About Us Our BerkshireTimes™ is an Our BerkshireGreen™ publication. We are dedicated to supporting our local economy and creating an ever-expanding, unified network of community-minded individuals, businesses, and organizations in our area. We give more than 50,000 readers per issue the opportunity to connect, share knowledge, and inspire one another through our publications, networking events, and growing online services. Our bimonthly publication (six issues yearly) is free to the public and distributed throughout western MA, northern CT, eastern NY, and southern VT, starting in February of each year. See our website for a location near you. Most of our editorial content is contributed by our community members. We welcome your ideas, articles, and feedback, and encourage you to submit original material for consideration through our website. You will find complete instructions on our online digital form. Our popular networking events are held at fine locations throughout our region. There is no admission charge or reservation required for most events, and you will find great company, interesting speakers, delicious free appetizers, and a cash bar. It’s all about community! To find out more about advertising, submitting editorial, attending one of our popular free networking events, and posting events on our free community calendar, see our websites at left, and join our mailing list to receive our free monthly eNewsletter. All content in Our BerkshireTimes™ is accepted in good faith. We do not necessarily advocate and cannot be held responsible for opinions expressed or facts supplied by our authors, illustrators, and advertisers. We reserve the right to refuse advertising for any reason. For printing errors of the publisher's responsibility, liability is limited to the cost of the ad space in which it first appeared. Unless otherwise noted, we use a Creative Commons License in place of a standard copyright.

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From the Publisher

Good Tidings

I

can count on one hand the number of days I’ve spent outside over the past several months. Usually I’m very content behind my computer enjoying publishing and the creative graphic design work I do for our magazine . . . that is until the sweet summer air of our Berkshire Mountains starts to stir. Now I crave the sunshine (and all of that amazing natural vitamin D that is so good for our immune systems) and plan to spend as much time as possible in our organic garden and going on local adventure days with my husband, Kevin, and seven-year-old daughter, Brianna. We live in such a beautiful, culturally rich area, the only difficult part will be deciding what to do first! Susan Jameson, and our event sampler at right, provide some excellent suggestions. Happy summer. Enjoy! Kathy I. Regan Our BerkshireGreen Publishing (413) 274-1122, publisher@OurBerkshireGreen.com

S S

pecial thanks to Lyn at Bodhi Tree Gallery for hosting our first community networking event in Connecticut! Join our mailing list at www.OurBerk shireTimes.com so you can receive invitations to upcoming events (June 14 at the Good Purpose Gallery in Lee, MA, and July 18 at Naji’s Restaurant in Great Barrington, MA – both from 5:30-7:30pm). There is no admission charge or reservation required, and you will find great company, interesting speakers, delicious free appetizers, a cash bar, and a place to display your advertising material. Join us! Patty Strauch, Event Coordinator & Independent Account Representative (413) 269-6119, patty@OurBerkshireGreen.com

S

ummertime, and the living is . . . breezy and beautiful in the Berkshires and in neighboring Vermont, New York, and Connecticut. We are pleased to showcase the products and services offered by our newly extended community. And we invite you to write about what interests and excites you. Send us your photos and illustrations, too. Visit OurBerkshireGreen.com for hints and instructions about how to send in your editorial contributions. We love hearing from you, our readers! Rodelinde Albrecht, Assistant Editor & Independent Account Representative (413) 243-4350, rodelinde@OurBerkshireGreen.com

June / July 2012

Through Arts & Culture / By Susan Jameson

I

t is summer at last and with it comes the Berkshires’ long tradition of rich and diversified cultural offerings! Music, dance, theatre, and visual arts organizations are known for presenting stellar concerts, popular performing arts series (both masterpieces and innovative new works), art festivals, and delightful children’s theatre to inspire all ages. Whether you are a full-time Berkshires resident, a second-home owner, or a first-time visitor, and whatever your artistic sensibility may be, Our BerkshireTimes welcomes you to be part of our own Berkshire community. This issue of Good Tidings celebrates the gifts of our community’s renowned arts organizations: Tanglewood, Jacob’s Pillow, the Berkshire Theatre Group, and the Williamstown Theatre Festival. Enjoy and may good bless you!

T

d

anglewood, the summer home of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, offers a number of family-friendly ticket programs, concerts, and activities throughout its 75th anniversary season, including a scavenger hunt for families on June 29; free lawn tickets for those ages 17 and under; a 50% discount on Friday-evening concert tickets for students 18 and older; and the August 25 Family Concert. Tanglewood on Parade takes place on August 7, offering a full day of musical activities for the entire family, culminating in a concert in the Shed followed by spectacular fireworks over the Stockbridge Bowl. The annual Berkshire Night gives Berkshire residents the chance to experience Tanglewood for free. www.tanglewood.org. ~ Kathleen Drohan, Associate

Director of Public Relations, Tanglewood, Lenox, MA

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4

Empowering Our Community

T

he Williamstown Theatre Festival would be meaningless and adrift without the Berkshire community. For the past 25 years, we’ve offered an annual “Free Theatre” production out of doors. In 1987 we did A Study in Scarlet, an adaptation of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes mystery. It starred a then little-known actor named Alec Baldwin and Tim Daly. This year, we commemorate that production with a new Holmes adaptation, The Valley of Fear. Steve Lawson, a Williamstown community member and long-time WTF artist, has been a Free Theatre instigator and playwright for many years, and he made this adaptation. It runs July 11-14 and July 20-27 at Poker Flats at 7pm, a great show for all ages, and pic-

www.OurBerkshireTimes.com

nicking is encouraged. www. wtfestival.org

~ Jenny Gersten, Artistic Director of Williamstown Theatre Festival, Williamstown, MA

F

or eight decades, Jacob’s Pillow has been proud to serve not only a national and international audience, but our own Berkshire community. Our founder, modern dance pioneer Ted Shawn, believed in engaging and welcoming everyone to dance and the Pillow continues his work today. In addition to our ticketed performances, thousands of people from Berkshire County to Brazil come to see free outdoor Inside/Out performances every year; free exhibits and talks enlighten and entertain; and, perhaps most importantly, our beautiful natural setting provides an atmosphere that is welcoming, relaxing, and inspirational. We hope many people will visit this summer to try something new! www.jacobspillow.org ~ Mariclare Hulbert, Director of Marketing and Communication, Jacob’s Pillow Dance, Becket, MA

B

erkshire Theatre Group is committed to serving our Berkshire community by providing a wide-range of diversified programming at varied price points. This summer at the Colonial we feature rap icon Raekwon, jam band The Chris Robinson Brotherhood, and comedian Bill Engvall. For most shows a number of balcony seats are offered for at least 50% less than the premium ticket price. For our produced shows this summer, including A Chorus Line at the Colonial, and A Thousand Clowns, The Puppetmaster of Lodz, A Class Act, Brace Yourself, and more at our Berkshire Theatre Festival campus in Stockbridge, Preview Performance tickets are set at only $37 or $35. Our free (suggested donation) Friday Reading Series and $10 Musical Mondays are always popular. www.berkshiretheatregroup. org ~ Rebecca A. Brighenti, Director of Marketing

& Public Relations, Berkshire Theatre Group: The Colonial Theatre, Pittsfield, MA, Berkshire Theatre Festival, Stockbridge, MA ~ Susan Jameson is the founder of Humanity in Concert, and the co-founder of Healing Winds and the Rock, Rattle & Drum Pow Wow. She is an interfaith minister, dancer, and passionate metaphysician committed to her work in spiritual development. www.HealingWinds.net


Art, Culture & Entertainment June - July Event Sampler To see more events or to post your event for free go to

www.OurBerkshireCalendar.com “Angel” Author Lecture

Date: Saturday, June 9, 2012 at 11am Place: North Adams Public Library, 74 Church Street, North Adams, MA - (413) 662-3133 Price: Free. Author Lori Szepelak will chronicle her spiritual journey that began on a desolete road in Hancock, MA, and with the assistance from an angel, led to the publication of her first book, An Angel on My Shoulder. She will also explain how all of us can experience our own journey with the angels that surround us. Book signing to follow.

Integrative Pest Management Workshop Date: Thursday, June 14, 2012 at 5-7pm

Place: Berkshire Botanical Garden, Intersection of Routes 102 and 183, Stockbridge, MA (413) 298-3926. Price: Members $25; Nonmembers $35. Learn how to put Integrated Pest Management (IPM) practices to work efficiently in a workshop designed for gardeners, landscapers and grounds managers. Led by Ron Kujawski, PhD, former Landscape and Nursery Specialist for UMass Cooperative Extension. Demonstrations of IPM tools and techniques and a close look at some of the most common insect, disease and weed problems of woody ornamentals.

Fiber Night

Date: Wednesday, June 20, 2012 at 5-7pm Place: Bodhi Tree Galllery, 6 Gay Street, Sharon Shopping Center, Sharon, CT - (860) 364-5642 Price: Free. Bring your needle work, and enjoy good company every Wednesday night for an open knitting group. We welcome all levels of needle workers of all kinds! Enjoyable company and refreshments served!

Williamstown July 4th Parade

Date: Wednesday, July 4, 2012 at 11am Place: Downtown Williamstown, Spring Street Williamstown, MA - (413) 458-9077 Price: Free. July 4th will begin with the Williamstown Parade at 11am, winding up Route 2 from Southworth Street

Our BerkshireGreen

Networking Events Thursday, June 14 5:30-7:30pm Good Purpose Gallery & The Starving Artist Cafe 40 Main Street, Lee, MA Wednesday, July 18 5:30-7:30pm Naji's Restaurant 405 Stockbridge Road, Great Barrington, MA

Join us. Free appetizers, cash bar, speakers, door prizes!

and continuing down Spring Street where the Flatbed Jazz Band will be playing. Enjoy a FREE barbecue courtesy of Stop and Shop and Williams College. Following the barbecue at 1:30pm, a reading of the Declaration of Independence will be held at the Williams College Museum of Art.

Housatonic Valley Art League Juried Art Show 2012

Date: July 5-29, 2012 at 10am-5pm Place: Dewey Memorial Hall, Main Street, Sheffield, MA. Price: Free. Juried Show open July 5, reception on July 6 from 4:30-6:30. Show includes a large collection of quality local artwork for sale at affordable prices. The public is welcome. Gallery hours are 10-5, Sundays 1-5, Wednesdays closed. The show concludes on July 29.

Summer Sundays in July

Date: Sunday, July 15, 2012 at 2-10pm Place: Spring Street and Water Street, Williamstown, MA - (413) 458-9077 Price: Free. Riding on the success of 3 years of Summer Sunday festival fun, Summer Sundays will be returning this year with even more music, more fun and more food. Artisan sales starting at 2pm, music beginning at 4pm and special performances and participatory science activities at 6pm. Information and schedules can be found at www.summersundays.com.

Creative Berkshire History

Date: July 30-Aug 3, 2012 at 9am-3pm Place: The Montessori School of the Berkshires, 21 Patterson Road, Lenox Dale, MA (413) 637-3662 Price: $225. Creative Berkshire History summer program for ages 6-12. Through lots of hands-on activities and explorations, we’ll learn about and experience the incredible authors and artists who have gotten their creative inspiration here in the Berkshire hills.

AMERICAN INDIAN

-AMERICA POW WOW – HEALING HER SPIRIT! - Sat. August 11th & Sun. August 12th, 2012 -

Pow Wow One Day Admission 8 $

Seniors: $6 • Youth 11-17: $6 • Children Under 10: Free

- Authentic American Indian Dancing, Drumming, Arts, Crafts and Demonstrations GRAMMY & NAMMY AWARD WINNER

Kaya Blaze

Joseph FireCrow!

MOUNT GREYLOCK

photography

(413)329-9553

7th ANNUAL ROCK, RATTLE & DRUM

NAMMY AWARD WINNER “Lord of the Strings”

Arvel Bird!

(at the base of the mountain)

Access road from Route 7 next to Vacation Village

kayablaze@gmail.com

flickr.com/photos/kayablaze

Bring the magic of music into your home Call to discuss how to host a House Concert - at no cost to you!

Bruce Mandel

SINGER/SONGWRITER, HOME & CONCERT PERFORMER www.brucemandel.com / 413.269.7229

WIRTES FARM, 45 GREYLOCK ROAD, LANESBORO, MA Go to www.healingwinds.net for More Information

413-443-2481 • humanityinconcert@earthlink.net A CULTURAL COUNCIL OF NORTHERN BERKSHIRE 2012 GRANT RECIPIENT! POW WOW IS HAPPENING RAIN OR SHINE! • ALL TICKETS ARE AVAILABLE AT THE GATE.

SAT.ÊAUGUSTÊ11THÊ10AMÊÐÊ7PM SUN.ÊAUGUSTÊ12THÊ10AMÊÐÊ6PM GRANDÊ ENTRY:Ê 1:00PMÊ SAT.Ê &Ê SUN.

www.OurBerkshireTimes.com

June / July 2012

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Art, Culture & Entertainment

LIGH ING

D NCE

PHOTOGRAPHY

MU

POET

THE TRE

Y

VISU L

LITERATURE

PAIN ING

IC

INS ALLATION

ONG

williams.edu/arts

PERFO MANCE Art In Motion

Hartsville Design Woodworking (413) 528-6133

www.HartsvilleDesign.com

TOONERVILLE TROLLEY LOCAL

MUSIC MOVIES IN WILLIAMSTOWN CRAFTS JULY 8, 15, 22, 29 FAMILY FUN f

www.ToonervilleTrolleyRecords.com

RECORDS + CDs

NEW • USED • IMPORTED

OUTDOOR

131 Water Street Williamstown, MA OPEN 10-6 Mon-Sat

LOCAL ARTS &

TONS OF

6

June / July 2012

www.SummerSundays01267.com Summer Sundays @ 6

www.OurBerkshireTimes.com

413-478-5229 “Best Mobile Gallery in New England” -Yankee Magazine

HOTCHKISS Mobiles

www.artmobiles.com

•Sold in Museum Stores Nationwide


Food & Drink

What to Do & Where to Stay Bridge of Flowers

O

Shelburne Falls, Massachusetts

riginally a trolley bridge built by the Shelburne Falls & Colrain Street Railway, the Bridge of Flowers is now a beautiful garden pathway and local scenic attraction worth the visit. In 1908 the five-span, 400-foot concrete arched trolley bridge, connecting the towns of Shelburne and Buckland, was constructed to help deliver heavy freight from the Shelburne Falls rail yard to the mills on the 7½-mile line along Route 112 North to Colrain, as well as passengers and local goods, such as milk, apples, and cotton.

Resort, Spa, Nature.

local by nature

329 main st, lakeville, ct 06039 860 435 9765 cafegiuliact.com

Lake Wononscopomuc

A Resort Getaway in the

Berkshire Foothills of Connecticut

The railway went bankrupt in 1927 and the bridge became overgrown with weeds in the two years following its demise. But then a local resident, Antoinette Burnham, had the idea to transform the old trolley bridge into a bridge of beauty – a bridge of flowers. The Shelburne Falls Woman’s Club sponsored this project in 1928, and by April 1929, 80 loads of loam and several loads of fertilizer were put on the bridge, all by donated labor. For over 80 years now the Bridge has been cared for by the Shelburne Falls Area Women’s Club Bridge of Flowers Committee and volunteer members from across the community who work hard to keep the Bridge’s many flowers, plants, trees, shrubs, and vines growing beautifully throughout the season. The Bridge is open April 1 through October 30 and is located off Route 2 on the Mohawk Trail in the beautiful village of Shelburne Falls, MA. bridgeofflowersmass@gmail.com, www.bridgeofflowersmass.org

Gardens, Grounds & Farms of Lee A Tour of Special Places

Visit six distinct and select Lee properties ~ a tour assured to delight and surprise ~

Enjoy the essence of the Berkshires! Nearby - but without the traffic.

PUBLIC

34 HOLDEN STREET NORTH ADAMS eat+drink 413.664.4444

Nearby State Parks

Lodging & dining with a scenic outdoor setting.

(800) 222-2909 www.InterlakenInn.com

Saturday, June 23, 2012, Noon to 3:30 PM Tickets: $15 in advance; $20 the day of the event

Millions Against Monsanto − Support the California GMO Labeling Ballot Initiative. California is poised to be the first state with mandatory GMO labeling laws through the 2012 California Ballot Initiative process. GMO foods have a profound hazardous effect on our health and our environment. A win for the California labeling laws will affect packaging and ingredient decisions nationwide. Find out how you can make a difference at www.organicconsumers.org/monsanto/index.cfm.

Lakeville, Connecticut

Tickets available at the Lee Chamber Information Booth, 3 Park Place or call (413)243-0852

All proceeds benefit the Downtown Lee Hanging Flower Basket Project Hiking trails nearby

CASUAL AMERICAN FOOD CRAFT BEER / LIVE MUSIC LATE NIGHT MENU / WIFI SERVING DINNER SUNDAY, MONDAY, AND WEDNESDAY 5-9PM; THURSDAY, FRIDAY, AND SATURDAY 5-11:30PM. BAR UNTIL MIDNIGHT OR LATER.

WWW.PUBLICEATANDDRINK.COM

www.OurBerkshireTimes.com

June / July 2012

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Food & Drink

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Farmers' Markets Connecticut

Massachusetts

Enfield Farmers’ Market

Pittsfield Farmers’ Market at Park Square

Wednesdays 3-6 Enfield Town Green, 820 Enfield Street

Saturdays 9-2, May 12 to Oct 20 Park Square’s Bank Row, Pittsfield Barry Hollister, Barry@BerkshireHarmony.com www.BerkshireHarmony.com, (413) 281-4114

Norfolk Farmers’ Market

BTW save room

Saturdays 10-1, May 19 to Oct 13 19 Maple Avenue, Norfolk In front of Norfolk Town Hall Lisa Auclair, LisaAuclair@sbcglobal.net (860) 542-5044, www.NorfolkFarmersMarket.org

Sheffield Farmers’ Market

Fridays 3-7, May 25 to Sept 7 340 South Main Street (Rt 7), Sheffield Village Green parking lot of Old Parish Church www.TheSheffieldFarmersMarket.com

Northeast CT Farmers’ Markets www.nectfarmersmarket.org

West Stockbridge Farmers’ Market

Danielson: Saturdays 9-12, June 9 to Oct 27 Killingly Library, 25 Westcott Road, Killingly 5pm dinner only, seasonal hours

150 Main Street Lee, Mass. 413.243.6397 cheznousbistro.com

French chef, American baker, real food

Thursdays 3-7, May 24 to Oct 18 Harris Street/Merritt Way, West Stockbridge WSFarmMarket@gmail.com www.WestStockridgeFarmersMarket.org

Plainfield: Tuesdays 4-6, June 26 to Oct Doyle’s Dollar Store, 732 Norwich Road (Rt 12)

Williamstown Farmers’ Market

Massachusetts

Saturdays 8:30-12:30, May 26 to Oct 27 South end of Spring Street, Williamstown Roger & Nancy Johnson & Ronald Turbin (413) 458-3933 or (413) 458-9930

Berkshire Area Farmers’ Market

Wednesdays and Saturdays 8-2, May 5 to Nov 24 Berkshire Mall parking lot, Lanesborough Lenita Bober, (413) 569-3663

Farmers’ Market at CHP

Thursdays 4-7, June 7 to Aug 30 442 Stockbridge Road, Great Barrington Mary Feuer & Michelle Derr, (413) 528-0457 www.CommunityHealthPrograms.org

Great Barrington Farmers’ Market Saturdays 9-1, May 5 to Oct 27 44 Castle Street, Great Barrington Train Station, behind Town Hall Rose Levine, (413) 528-8950 RosemaryLevine@yahoo.com

Lenox Farmers’ Market

Fridays 1-5, May 11 to Oct 12 Shakespeare & Co., 70 Kemble Street, Lenox Rose Levine, (413) 528-8950 RosemaryLevine@yahoo.com

North Adams Farmers’ Market

Saturdays 8-12:30, July 7 to Oct 6 St. Anthony Drive, North Adams Municipal parking lot, Marshall & Holden Street Lisa Loomis & Diana Kittler, (413) 662-3000

Otis Farmers’ Market

June / July 2012

New York Kinderhook Farmers’ Market

Saturdays 8-12:30, mid June to mid Oct Hudson Street & Village Green, Kinderhook Jean Brower (518) 758-1232 James Fleming (518) 758-9020

Lebanon Valley Farmers’ Market

Sundays 10-2, May 27 to Oct 28 In the heart of New Lebanon, at Rt 20 & 22 Carin de Jong, (518) 860-4294 managerLVFM@gmail.com

Vermont Brattleboro Farmers’ Market Saturdays 9-2, May 5 to Oct 27 Rt 9, West Brattleboro (802) 254-8885

Chester Farmers’ Market

Sundays, 11-2, May 20 to Oct 14 Rt 11 & 103 in front of Zachary’s Pizza, Chester (802) 875-2703

Saturdays 9-1, May 12 to Oct 6 2000 East Otis Road, Otis Parking lot of Papa’s Healthy Food Jess Ripley, OtisFarmersMarket@yahoo.com, (413) 357-9919

Manchester - West River Farmers’ Market

Pittsfield Farmers’ Market

Walloomsac Farmers’ Market

Thursdays 3-7, June 21 to Oct 18 North Street by the Senior Center, Pittsfield Barry Hollister, Barry@BerkshireHarmony.com www.BerkshireHarmony.com, (413) 281-4114

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www.OurBerkshireTimes.com

Thursdays 3-6, May 24 to Oct 11 Dana Thompson Recreational Center Rt 30, Manchester Center (802) 824-4492

Saturdays 10-1, starting May 5 Tuesdays 3:30-5, starting May 8 150 Depot Street, Riverwalk Park, Bennington (802) 688-7210, info@walloomsac.org


Food & Drink

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Certified Piedmontese Beef™ Grilled Ribeye With Onions & Peppers Agrodolce Certified Piedmontese by Great Plains Beef All Ingredients Available at Your LaBonne’s Markets – www.labonnes.com

HOURS:

Certified Piedmontese™ brings you naturally tender and flavorful beef without the saturated fat, cholesterol, and calories of traditional beef. The unique breed of cattle combines flavor and tenderness with good health in every delicious cut.

Monday – Friday 5:30 am – 9 pm Saturday 5:30 am – 3:30 pm Sunday 7 am – 1 pm Tel: 413-243-9756 85 Center Street, Lee, MA

2 14-ounce Certified Piedmontese™ ribeye steaks Olive oil Salt and pepper Preheat grill to 400°F. Rub both sides of the steaks with a drizzle of olive oil and a generous amount of salt and pepper and place on the center of the grill. Close the lid and grill for about 7 minutes, while monitoring closely for flame-ups. Flip the steak and continue grilling the other side with the lid closed for about another 7 minutes, or until the steak reaches desired doneness. Please note: Certified Piedmontese™ beef cooks faster than other beef, so when grilling, be careful not to overcook. We recommend a lower final temperature than you might use with traditional beef. A kitchen thermometer inserted into the steak should read 120°F for mediumrare, 125°F for medium. Remove steaks from the grill and let rest on a plate for 5 minutes. Slice the ribeye across the grain and serve topped with Onions & Peppers Agrodolce. There is often some liquid left on the pan from roasting the peppers and onions, which tastes great drizzled over the steak as well. Onions & Peppers Agrodolce: 1 large red onion, cut into ⅛-inch strips 3 large bell peppers, cut into ⅛-inch strips 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1 tablespoon aged balsamic vinegar 1 ½ tablespoons brown sugar 1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme leaves, or other herb of your choice Salt and pepper to taste

Fine Dining with rustic elegance

private parties, special events, birthdays, rehearsal dinners, weddings e Boathouse, 349 Main Street, Lakeville, CT 06039 [T] 860-435-2111 www.theboathouseatlakeville.com [F] 860-435-4543

Preheat oven to 400°F. Slice the peppers and onions lengthwise into ⅛-inch strips. In a bowl, toss together the onions, peppers, olive oil, balsamic vinegar, brown sugar, thyme, salt, and pepper. On a baking sheet lined with parchment paper, spread the onion-and-pepper mixture in an even layer and place in the oven for 12 to 15 minutes, until tender and slightly browned.

MARKETS

Wine Pairing: Primitivo, an Italian varietal of Zinfandel. ~ Certified Piedmontese by Great Plains Beef, 100 West Grand Drive, Lincoln, NE 68521, (800) 544-1359. All ingredients available at your LaBonne’s Markets located at 22 Academy Street, Salisbury, CT – 639 Straits Turnpike, Watertown, CT – 238 Main Street South, Woodbury, CT. See as at right.

S It’s Grilling Time! Come to LaBonne’s Market for the best steaks! We’re an old fashioned butcher shop and a whole lot more! 22 Academy St., Salisbury CT 860.435.2559 (present this ad at the meat counter for your FREE sample of our marinated meats.)

www.OurBerkshireTimes.com

June / July 2012

9


10%

OFF ONE

ORGANIC I TEM - SEEDS, VEG. PLANT,

Ward’s Where Gardeners Grow

OR

PEST SOLUTION

WITH THIS

A D.

Open Daily 8 AM - 5:30 PM

600 S. Main Street - Gt. Barrington 413-528-0166 www.wardsnursery.com

Not valid with other offers. Expires 8/31/12

Home, Garden & Landscape

Gallery of Fine Crafts See Our Stylish Collection of Unique Handcrafted Gifts & Home Decor Exclusively featuring the works of local artisans!  Sharon Shopping Center, 6 Gay Street, Sharon, CT

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Meadow Maintenance

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Contributed By Project Native

s more people begin to recognize the environmental impacts of traditional lawns, interest in native meadows has grown tremendously. In addition to their aesthetic appeal, meadows provide important habitat for wildlife. As a result of their growing popularity and recent decline from our local landscape, we frequently get calls about the proper installation and maintenance of meadows. First, let us define a meadow. A meadow is a temporary stage in the ecological parade of succession. To maintain a meadow and prevent a field from returning to woodland, we must interrupt the process by mowing, grazing, or burning once or twice a year. Once a year mowing is sufficient to keep a meadow from reverting to woodland, but may not be sufficient to discourage woody seedlings, brambles, invasive vines, and multiflora rose. Mowing more than twice a year will only encourage cool season grass species and create additional turf area. Spring is the time of year that wildlife utilizes the meadow for reproduction. Mowing between April 1 and June 20, while appealing to suburban sensibilities, is the worst time to mow. Doing so destroys nests and eggs, and kills young birds and animals. Recommended dates for mowing are early July for the first cutting and a second cutting, if necessary, the following March. This will maximize bird and animal habitat and promote desirable and attractive vegetation.

Mowing in late June or early July is desirable in that it removes the browning cool season species and provides growing space for the warm season species to grow, flower, and provide habitat for the remainder of the year. Mowing between mid July and late October does not allow the vegetation enough growing season to renew itself and therefore provides little food and cover for wildlife until the following spring. Mowing at this time of year would only be desirable if there was a noxious species, such as thistle or multiflora rose, that you want to stop from reproducing. Mow meadows when the ground is dry and cut at a height of 6” to 8” during growing season and 4” to 6” during the dormant season. When vegetation is allowed to grow beyond the height of a lawn, whether intentionally or not, it is often perceived as untidy, a sign of neglect, and a breeding ground for vermin. To give the appearance that a meadow is intentional and managed, maintain a mowed turf swath around the public edges and consider incorporating a trail network. Well maintained trails encourage people to get into the meadow and discover their beauty up close and first hand. ~ Project Native is a nonprofit native plant farm, nursery, and wildlife sanctuary in Housatonic, Massachusetts. To learn more, see their website at www.projectnative.org.

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June / July 2012

love

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ccording to the Department of Systematic Biology at the National Museum of Natural History, dragonflies take the title for the fastest flying insects, with speeds reaching up to 35 to 40 mph. They can also hover and fly backwards. There are more than 400 dragonfly and damselfly species in North America, and 5,000 species of dragonflies in the world. As nymphs, dragonflies eat mosquito larvae, other aquatic insects and worms, and for a little variety even small aquatic vertebrates like tadpoles and small fish. As adults, these agile insect-devouring hunters are a welcome sight in any garden, consuming many insects including mosquitoes, gnats, midges, beetles, moths, flies, and mayflies. If you would like to encourage dragonflies, build a pond! Ensure that the water and surrounding area is free of chemicals and pesticides, and that it has a good mix of marginal vegetation as well as submerged plants.

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Home, Garden, & Landscape

Tucked away at the end of a quiet country lane, this Call Our Stockbridge Office 413-499-7490

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ince 1985, recognized for careful designs, proven components and high quality workmanship, BPVS solar electric systems are user friendly, efficient and reliable.

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June / July 2012

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Education & Workshops Bard College at Simon’s Rock Summer Program

et ready for something new! Bard College at Simon’s Rock, long a leader in engaging high school students ready for more educational challenge, is offering nonresidential academic enrichment classes this July for teenagers. Directed by longtime Simon’s Rock faculty member Jennifer Browdy de Hernandez, the Summer Program will run for four weeks starting July 2. Students can choose from twelve different week-long half-day classes in science, history, literature, media studies, and the arts, taught by experienced college faculty with a passion for making learning fun. Students will be able to use and enjoy the college’s state-of-the-art biology labs, as well as the new Daniel Arts Center, complete with theater and dance studios, cutting edge video and music editing labs, and well-stocked painting studios. Field biology students will explore the 300-acre campus, complete with ponds, streams, forests, and fields, learning how to sample habitats and evaluate biodiversity. Other classes will include science classes in biotechnology and the biology of life in extreme environments; local Native American history; Flamenco dance; social psychology and pop culture; painting in the Impasto style of Van Gogh; reading and creating graphic novels; and a suite of digital media

classes that will engage students in the creation of digital music, digital animation, and digital journalism. Three unique half-day sessions will be offered each week of the Summer Program. New sessions start July 2, July 9, July 16, and July 23. Morning sessions will run from 9:30-12:30 followed by afternoon sessions from 1:30-4:30. Students can sign up for a half day or full day of classes. Tuition is $300 per week-long class, or $500 for two classes within the same week. In keeping with the Simon’s Rock ethos of small classes, class sizes are limited to 12 students, so early registration is suggested. To register, visit www.simons-rock.edu/summer or email engagesummer@simons-rock.edu. Since its founding in 1966 by pioneering educator Elizabeth Blodgett Hall, Bard College at Simon’s Rock has been dedicated to providing an innovative curriculum designed to engage and stimulate young people who are ready for an educational experience that takes them seriously as creative thinkers. Under the leadership of President Leon Botstein, the early college model has been growing successfully across the country, with Bard High School Early College (BHSEC) schools in New York, New Jersey, California, and New Orleans.

New for 2012!

SUMMER PROGRAM

Expect more.

Lenox Dale, MA (413) 637-3662 BerkshireMontessori.org

Hands-on sustainability education for all ages

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Sustainability tours by appointment: Ecological wastewater treatment Wind and solar energy Organic gardening Composting & recycling Sustainability Education Experience Days (SEEDs) for grades 7-12

Academic Enrichment Camp for Teens July 2 - July, 27, 2012

Photo by Jane Feldman ’74

EXPERIENTIAL CLASSES Science • Humanities • Media Studies • Social Studies Painting • Music • Digital Animation • Theater and more Taught by accomplished faculty in state of the art facilities

Morning, afternoon or day-long programs 413-528-7224 | www.simons-rock.edu/summer

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June / July 2012

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Darrow is a college-preparatory, co-ed, boarding and day school for grades 9–12 located on the Massachusetts–New York border. 518-794-6000, www.darrowschool.org.

LIMITED OPENINGS AVAILABLE FOR FALL 2012!


Animal Talk CARING FOR PETS SINCE 1957 Join us for our monthly summer ‘Pet Wellness Series’ Sunday brunch! It’s free!! For more information, visit our website at www.bensdotters.com and watch for our ads in ‘Animal Life’.

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Your trusted source for quality supplies and foods. We stock carefully selected kibbled, canned, freeze-dried, dehydrated, refrigerated, and frozen diets. Your trusted resource for raw-feeding information and advice. We’re not just another raw diet retailer, we are experienced raw feeders!

The Dog Days of Summer / By Michael Roth, DVM

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he long daylight hours and strong sun of June and July just beg for spending time on or in the water. We are fortunate to have many ponds, lakes, and rivers to choose from, whether you are a boater, swimmer, or waterskier. Why not include your dog in your water sport activity? Swimming comes naturally to many dogs, and is an excellent exercise that burns lots of calories without incurring wear and tear on the joints, especially important if you have an older dog that has arthritis. Hesitant swimmers may develop more confidence if you join them in the water, and fitting these dogs with a life jacket will increase their buoyancy. A life jacket should be worn by any dog that is on a boat in a large enough body of water if you are unsure of your dogs’ ability to make it to shore in case of a boating mishap. If your dog is looking for a little more excitement, consider dock diving, where you throw a toy into the water and your dog jumps off the dock with a running start to retrieve it. For more information, check out the web sites listed at the end of this article. Remember to bring a towel for drying off your dog at the end of the day. This is especially important in the long-haired breeds, as

wet fur can predispose to the development of hot spots if the underlying skin is moist for an extended period of time, especially in hot, humid weather. Pay special attention to the neck and sides of the face, where floppy ears may impede natural drying. Your dog will probably be fast sleep on the ride home, but securing your pet with a safety belt or in a crate will protect both of you, as dogs can become projectiles if you have to make an sudden stop, or are involved in an accident. Putting your dog in a crate on the roof is not a recommended method of transport, especially if you are considering running for public office in the future. www.dockdogs.com www.dockdogs.com www.splashdogs.com www.splashdogs.com www.ultimateairdogs.net www.ultimateairdogs.net

~ Dr. Roth graduated from Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine in 1985, and provides house call services to guardians of dogs and cats in the Berkshires and neighboring Columbia County, New York.

All Your Pet’s Needs!

VISIT US IN OUR NEW HOME IN LENOX Premium Foods • Treats • Supplies • Toys Summer Gear for the Adventurous Pet Gifts for Pet Lovers Lots of Fun Stuff at Competitive Prices! 413-637-0800 www.chezpet.com Lenox Commons, 55 Pittsfield Rd., Lenox, MA 01240 Mon.-Fri. 10AM to 5:30PM • Sat. 10AM to 5PM

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June / July 2012

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Animal Talk

Back to Nature

Tales from the Trail

White Horse Hill

111 Swamp Road, Richmond, MA 413-698-2999 www.whitehorsehill.com Excellent horseback riding instruction--all levels

Lessons, Showing, Indoor & Outdoor Rings Weekly Summer Programs 9 to 3:15 daily Quality horses for sale as well!

Back to Nature Beautiful vistas, heritage apples, award-winning wines Free wine tasting • Hiking • Fresh baked goods

Hilltop Orchards, home of Furnace Brook Winery Open daily: 9am-5pm • (413) 698-3301 508 Canaan Rd / Rt 295 • Richmond, MA 01254 hilltoporchards.com • furnacebrookwinery.com

A month alone on the Appalachian Trail – if that didn't make a person tough, what would? ~ Joanna Ezinga 14

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By Joanna Ezinga

he Appalachian Trail is a narrow footpath that winds it way through the ancient Appalachian Mountains from Georgia to Maine for more than two thousand miles. It’s less than two feet wide in most places and marked by a single white blaze randomly painted on trees, rocks, signs posts, bridges, buildings, and sidewalks. Each year thousands of people attempt to hike its entire length. Most years only a few hundred succeed. This is the improbable story of my thru-hike – improbable because I never intended to leave my work and family for six months, walking 2,169 miles through fourteen states. I flew to Georgia on March 17, 2010. My plan was to spend one month on the trail hiking north for approximately 340 miles into southern Tennessee. From there I would hitch a ride to Nashville and fly back to Albany. The rationale behind this month in the wilderness was linked to my preparation for the 2010 triathlon racing season. I have been a triathlete for twenty years and was looking forward to a strong summer of competition, concluding with Nationals in September. To compete at the level I desired, I needed more than speed and endurance. I needed mental toughness. A month alone on the Appalachian Trail – if that didn’t make a person tough, what would? My first day on the Trail was perfect. Temps in the mid 50s, a warm sun shining through bare tree branches and a gentle breeze carried the musty smell of a forest still in winter dormancy. The Trail was flat, dry, and exactly what this newbie hiker needed to boost her confidence. “Wow,” I thought, “This isn’t so hard.” By Day 3, I wasn’t so certain. Blood Mountain loomed ahead and just saying the name aloud gave me shivers. To my amazement, I made the climb with no difficulty and was psyched to keep going. As the days turned into weeks, my joy in being on the Trail continued to grow and I realized it would be very hard to leave. I clearly remember the first time I let myself seriously think about staying. I longed to continue hiking, but felt terribly guilty for wanting to put my own desires before my responsibilities to others. Nightly journal entries reflected my inner conflict but on Sunday, April 4, I wrote in my journal, “I have made the decision to hike to Maine. I am not ready to come back.” Once I started walking the trail, something unexpected happened. A deep longing, unreal-

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ized until my journey began, emerged. I absolutely loved trail life. Rise with the sun, eat when hungry, rest when tired, walk. The simplicity of this routine held deep appeal for me. During the long days of summer, I would spend 14 hours walking, my internal rhythms meshing with cycles of the sun and moon. Rise with the sun, eat when hungry, rest when tired, walk. It was that simple, that clear. With the complexities of modern life stripped away, only the essentials remained: food, shelter, friends. With this kind of clarity comes the rare opportunity for self-reflection and insight. A chance to discover what is important and what can be discarded. Gradually, I let go of my hurried, multitasking approach to life. My goal-oriented personality softened and I discovered new qualities: playfulness, humility, acceptance, courage, and gratitude. Without question, walking the trail was the hardest thing I have ever done. I eventually made peace with the elements: rain, mud and cold; hail, sleet, and snow; withering heat, and ferocious thunder and lightning storms. My body was bruised and frequently in pain, my feet blistered and bleeding. I would walk for days without seeing a soul. I felt fear, loneliness, exhaustion, anger, and sadness. But I also walked in tremendous joy and contentment, surrounded by an amazing beauty few witness. The babbling brooks sang me to sleep with their lullabies and the mourning dove awakened me with her song. I stood atop mountains with only more mountains in every direction. I savored the taste of cold mountain water on a hot summer’s day. I swam naked in crystal clear lakes and each night made my bed on a different patch of ground. On April 14, Delta Flight 6317 from Nashville to Albany took off at 6:05am. Seat 2C was empty and I was greeting a new day in Hot Springs, North Carolina. I had walked 277 miles. Another 1,892 remained. On that morning, I abandoned months of training and longheld goals for triathlon competition. I traded work, friends, and family for six months of woods, wet feet, and wonder. How is it possible for someone not to know they are going to leave everything behind? It is possible when one is willing to heed an unexpected call and embrace the unknown.

~ Joanna Ezinga is a USA Triathlon and USA Cycling Coach and Certified Personal Trainer. In 2007 she founded Ezinga Fitness specializing in personal training for women over 50 and coaching for beginner triathletes. In 2010 she completed a solo hike of the Appalachian Trail and plans to lead future adventure backpacking trips on the AT. Joanna@ezingafitness.com


Our Berkshire Marketplace

Leonard Weber Townscape - Hancock Shaker Village pictured above. Artist Leonard Weber began his Townscape Collection in 1980. Since then,

he has painted more than fifty cities, towns, villages, restorations, and historical sites ranging in size from his small hometown of Monterey, Massachusetts, to West 57th Street in New York City. The watercolors in the Townscape Collection are created on location, each capturing a unique moment in the time, space, and history of the community. Prints are available for purchase through his website in two sizes. Large prints (approximately 12" x 38") are $55 and small prints (approximately 4" x 11") are $20 including shipping. See townscape of Great Barrington, MA, on pages 16 and 17 of this issue. Visit www.leonardweber.net.

Critters Around the Berkshires Notecards - Original verses and

artist images, blank side for personal message. $3 each, singles or sets, for gifts, birthdays, souvenirs. Available at Norman Rockwell Museum Gift Shop. All proceeds go to Educational Fund administered by Berkshire Taconic Community Foundation. Ruth & Hans Heuberger, Gnu Press, Great Barrington, MA. For more information, contact Ruth & Hans at haruhe@verizon.net.

Berkshire Bargains Save 10% off Martial Arts Tuition

Martial Arts Institute of the Berkshires in Great Barrington, MA, is offering 10% off tuition when you present their advertisement (from page 19 of this issue) at time of purchase.

Save 10% on Groceries

Uruguayan Amethyst

pictured center, golden/violet African Spirit Quartz with Amethyst and Citrine just left of center, and Labradorite from Madagascar at far left. Specimens range in price $6-$10, up to $300 for two of the Amethysts in this display. Crystal Essence is a Gallery of Wonders of the Earth. They will be celebrating 27 extraordinary years this June. Enjoy their selection of Gorgeous Gemstone Jewelry, Minerals, Clothing, Pottery, Candles, Books, Music, Fair Trade Items, Yoga Items, Body Care, and more. Located at 39 Railroad Street, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528 -2595, www.crystalwellness.com, www.crystalessence.com

Guido’s Fresh Marketplace in Great Barrington and Pittsfield, MA, is offering 10% off your order when you present their advertisement (from page 19 of this issue) at checkout.

Free Consultation

Susan Spiegel Solovay is offering a free medical hypnosis consultation (quit smoking, lose weight, pain relief, or stress/sleep issues) at her office in Hillsdale, NY, or Great Barrington, MA, when you present her advertisement (from page 20 of this issue).

Upstairs Basement

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June / July 2012

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Community Spotlight: Great Barrington Eco-scape Gardens

Organic and Ecologically Friendly Landscape Design, Restoration, and Maintenance ESTATE/PROPERTY MANAGEMENT FINE/SPECIALTY GARDENING OUTDOOR LIVING SPACES

Great Barrington

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A Remarkable History / By Gary Leveille

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Sharon True, M.A., C.M.A., R.S.M.T

Somatic Movement Therapist & Certified Pilates Instructor PRIVATE, DUET, AND GROUP CLASS WORKOUTS WITH HOLISTIC APPROACH AVAILABLE IN GREAT BARRINGTON

413.528.2465

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June / July 2012

hen glaciers from the most recent ice age began their last retreat, abundant plant and animal life returned to the Housatonic valley. Mastodons and wooly mammoths roamed the turf, and human visitors known as Paleo-Indians followed their prey here. The Great Barrington area was first inhabited by the Native Americans of the Algonquin nation. For unknown reasons, the ancient aboriginal settlements were abandoned, but later the Housatonic valley and surrounding hills became part-time hunting grounds for Mohican Indians who drifted over from their Hudson River settlements. When Dutch and English settlers arrived here prior to 1730, the local Native Americans lived in two small villages along the Housatonic River. According to tradition, one of the sites in Great Barrington was referred to as the “Great Wigwam.” In 1736, a permanent Indian mission was established in Stockbridge, and most of the local Indians moved there. Although many of the early white settlers in south Berkshire were of English extraction from the middle and eastern parts of Massachusetts, as well as from Connecticut and Rhode Island, there were also many Dutch families who had settled here even earlier from adjacent areas of New York. Great Barrington was known as the Upper or North Parish of Sheffield until 1761, when it was incorporated and named the Shire town of the new county of Berkshire. The towns of Pittsfield and Great Barrington were created by an act of the Great and General Court of Massachusetts in 1761, the former named for Britain’s Prime Minister, William Pitt, and (most likely) the latter for his war minister, Lord Barrington. Following the Boston Tea Party in 1773, the English parliament took over the Massachusetts colony and assigned judges and magistrates to replace the democratically elected local governments. On August 16, 1774, hundreds of Berkshire County residents, supported by scores of supporters from nearby Connecticut, occupied the courthouse in Great Barrington and prevented the British-appointed judges from sitting. It was the first organized resistance to British judicial rule in America! An important trial that led to the abolition of slavery in Massachusetts also occurred in the same Great Barrington courthouse. In 1781, Mum Bett aka Elizabeth Freeman was a slave in the Sheffield household of Colonel

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John Ashley. After overhearing Ashley and his colleagues discussing human rights, Mum Bett was determined to win her own freedom. The brave woman approached lawyer Theodore Sedgwick, who agreed to help her. The case was heard at the Great Barrington courthouse during the summer of 1781. Sedgwick argued that slavery was unconstitutional under the Massachusetts constitution which declared that all men are free. Mum Bett won her case and, after similar cases were upheld by the Massachusetts Supreme Court, slavery was outlawed in the state. In the early 1800s, Great Barrington remained primarily a quiet farming community. But by the 1830s and ’40s, the town prospered as it developed manufacturing industries. Even the village of Van Deusenville was home to several stores, a woolen mill, a post office, and an iron ore blast furnace. In Housatonic, Monument Mills was incorporated in 1850, and the Owen Paper Mill was started in 1856. The Housatonic Railroad fueled growth and helped position the town as a major center of trade. Numerous fires changed the downtown landscape during the latter 1800s. Busy Railroad Street was devastated by fire in 1854 and again in 1896. It was rebuilt by resilient residents and remains today a magnet for downtown shopping. It was also in Great Barrington that the first practical use of modern electrical current distribution was demonstrated. In 1886, inventor and electrical genius William Stanley powered lights outside shops along Main Street using alternating current transformers. This became the basis of the electric distribution system that is used today throughout the world. Author, editor, scholar, and civil rights pioneer William Edward Burghardt Du Bois was born and raised in Great Barrington. Du Bois excelled in school and graduated from Great Barrington High School in 1884. School Principal Frank Hosmer successfully lobbied local townsfolk to raise money to pay for Du Bois’s college tuition and expenses at Fisk University in Nashville. Du Bois went on to become the first African American to earn a doctorate at Harvard University. Great Barrington recently celebrated its 250th anniversary with a year-long celebration throughout 2011. The downtown district is a bustling center of commerce filled with fascinating architecture, attractive galleries, interesting stores, and popular restaurants. It is


Community Spotlight: Great Barrington

BENSDOTTER’S PET 940 MAIN STREET, GREAT BARRINGTON

CONGRATULATIONS #1 GREAT BARRINGTON! SEE OUR ADS IN THE ‘ANIMAL TALK’ AND ‘SPONSORS’ SECTIONS

no surprise to locals that Smithsonian Magazine recently selected Great Barrington as the best small town in America. With pleasures like majestic Monument Mountain, the Housatonic River Walk, the Guthrie Center, the Mahaiwe Theatre (the list goes on and on), there is so much to enjoy and appreciate.

Historic Sites (Abbreviated List) Civil War Monument: The magnificent and unusual Winged Victory was sculpted by Truman Bartlett and erected in 1876. It is located in front of Town Hall. Memorial Stone: Commemorates the first open resistance to British judicial rule in America in 1774. It is located in front of Town Hall. Hopkins-Searles Castle: This amazing Main Street chateau was built in 1885-1888 by the widow of railroad magnate Mark Hopkins. Newsboy Fountain: Erected in 1895 by Col. William Brown, part-owner of the first New York Daily News. It is located on Rt. 23 west. Fairgrounds: Established by the Housatonic Agricultural Society in 1854. Devastated by a tornado in 1995. Railroad Street: Late Victorian downtown business district with interesting shops and architecture. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center: Located on Castle Street, the Mahaiwe is one of the oldest surviving theaters in the country. Monument Mills Complex: Once a major manufacturer of bedspreads and cotton and wool products, located in Housatonic. Rising Paper Mill: Eclectic 19th-century paper mill still operates today in Housatonic.

1771 Truman Wheeler Farmstead: South Main Street headquarters of the Great Barrington Historical Society.

Prominent Citizens (Abbreviated List) William Cullen Bryant: Beloved poet, editor, writer, critic, activist. Justin Dewey: Legislator and prominent judge. Presided at the Lizzie Borden trial. W.E.B. Du Bois: Renowned African-American author, educator, and civil rights pioneer. Elizabeth Freeman (Mum Bett): Lived in Sheffield and Stockbridge, but her legendary trial challenging slavery took place in Great Barrington.

NURSERY • ORCHARD • GARDEN SHOP

Fresh-picked or pick-your-own blueberries in July and August. Open daily for picking, 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. 686 Stockbridge road great barrington, Ma 01230 www . windyhillfarMinc . coM (413) 298-3217 fax (413) 298-3167

Arlo Guthrie: Legendary musician, singer, storyteller, and humanitarian.

Traditional Chinese Medicine Acupuncture MICHELLE MANTO

James Weldon Johnson: African-American poet, diplomat, essayist, lawyer, and author of God’s Trombones.

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Chief Konkapot: Legendary Native American sachem. Aaron Schroeder: Prolific composer, songwriter, producer, and music publisher.

Traditional Naturopathic Care

William Stanley: His experiments with electrical transformers resulted in Great Barrington being the first community in the world to be lighted by alternating current electrical power. ~ Gary Leveille is the author of several books including Eye of Shawenon (Egremont history), Around Great Barrington, and Old Route 7 – Along the Berkshire Highway. Gary is principal of Berkshire Creative Communications and has more than 30 years’ experience as a copywriter, editor, author, and newspaper columnist. He is also an avid local historian and manager of a vintage photo archive: BerkshireArchive.com. garyleve@verizon.net

Professional Timber Frame Restoration Since 1970

SERVING AMERICA’S COLONIAL AND CIVIL WAR ERA HOMES, BARNS & LOG CABINS

Housatonic River Walk: Access to this beautiful walkway is found to the left of Rite-Aid Pharmacy, behind St. Peter’s Church, and at the bottom of Church Street.

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Monument Mountain: Prominent natural landmark of considerable beauty, and subject of legends and folktales.

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reat Barrington Townscape by Leonard Weber. Leonard has painted more than fifty cities, towns, villages, restorations, and historical sites ranging in size from his small hometown of Monterey, Massachusetts, to West 57th Street in New York City. Prints are available for purchase through his website. See page 15 of this issue for more information, and visit his website at www.leonardweber.net.

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June / July 2012

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Community Spotlight: Great Barrington Gwendolyn Hampton VanSant By Elizabeth Blackshine

How You Know Her

©'

HOME

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Interior Design & Renovations Landscape Design Kitchens & Baths Specialty Bedding Window Treatments Floral Shop & Antiques

Jenifer House Commons, Great Barrington, MA, 413-644-9960 wingateltd.com, Open daily: Mon. - Sat. 10 - 5, Sun. 12 - 5

What We Would Never Guess About Her

She came to Simon’s Rock as a math major. Exposure to liberal arts at school and within the area changed her mind and her life course. 18

June / July 2012

Inspiration

Gwendolyn is a bilingual African-American Gwendolyn is inspired by her family and each mother, wife, educator, and community ac- person she meets along this path of diversity tivist/organizer. In addition to serving as work in our community. a Commissioner on the Status of Women, Gwendolyn is cofounder and Executive Di- Community, Health & Our Environment rector of Multicultural BRIDGE, a grass- On a practical level, for many years Gwendolyn roots organization dedicated to enhancing has run one of her cars on vegetable oil. On a integration of the myriad of diverse peoples spiritual level, the local access to practitioners of Western Massachusetts and cultivating trained in indigenous healing arts is close to cultural competence within organizations her heart. She has participated in ceremonies throughout the Berkshires and beyond. and rituals from Peruvian, Native American, and African traditions. With her background During tough times in life as an educator and her she goes to local shamantraining as a diversity ic peoples to get healing, leader, she designs curfor keeping her centered. riculum for workplace Gwendolyn believes these language classes as well traditions allow us to inas highly customized teract with nature on a cultural competency deep level of exchange, training curriculum for building mutually sustaingroups of all kinds. ing relationships with our Gwendolyn works with serene surroundings and corporations, schools, our community. universities, municipal Professionally, the departments, caregivchildren’s programs at ing organizations and Multicultural BRIDGE, more. Gwendolyn has including Gideon’s Garreceived recognition by den, Seed to Harvest Governor Patrick, who collaboration with Taft praised her for her leadFarm, and the Outdoor ership in community, Curriculum, have signifcalling her a “treasure to icant components that Berkshire County and connect children to the this commonwealth.” earth. Gwendolyn draws You may know her Favorite Inspirational Quote from her eight years of as a local mom advoteaching religious educating for youth in the I’m a woman cation at the Unitarian community and happy Phenomenally. Universalist Meeting of to join forces, support, Phenomenal woman, South Berkshire. There, and share her experias in the youth programs ence with others. That’s me. at BRIDGE, she emphaExcerpt from Phenomenal Woman, by Maya Angelou Why the Berkshires sizes the interconnectedIn 1987, Gwendolyn came to the Berkshires ness of all life. The principle of interconnectto attend Bard College at Simon’s Rock. edness as a vehicle for education allows her While in college, raising her first son, she to take every opportunity to bridge nature to never really planned on staying in the Berk- learning about new cultures. shires after graduation. Having formed a Find out more about Multicultural supportive community that was integral to BRIDGE at www.multiculturalbridge.org. See her family life, she decided to stay. She fell in their ad on the facing page. love with the quality of life, the beauty, the ~ Liz Blackshine is a writer, social worker, consultant, peacefulness of it all.

www.OurBerkshireTimes.com

and a Monterey, MA, resident. She has a background in social work and mental health counseling. Liz has published articles concerning diversity in the Capital Region and abroad. She is a frequent attendee of the Berkshire South Friends Meeting.


Community Spotlight: Great Barrington

STATE VENDOR CERTIFIED SERVICES Dr. Goldman, a leading international figure in the practice and continuing education of Osteopathy, has been in practice in Sharon, CT since 1992. He now brings his extensive healthcare experience to Great Barrington and the surrounding communities. As a certified specialist in Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine and fully licensed physician, Dr. Goldman treats the whole person not just the symptoms by emphasizing the interrelationships of structure, function, and the ability of the body to heal itself.

call for appointment and information concerning treatment protocol and insurance eligibility

Multicultural Education & Awareness Cultural Competence & Diversity Training Workplace Language Classes Translation Interpretation

a 501c3 organization SDO certified (formerly SOMWBA)

SAVE THE DATE Great Barrington, ma 413-528-3334 | Sharon, ct 860-364-5990

July 14th

3:30 - 6pm

Our 3rd Annual

Cultural Competence & Community Stewardship Awards Ceremony

Charlie Spence

COLLABORATION CELEBRATION LEARNING INTEGRATION EMPOWERMENT

440 Stockbridge Road • Gt. Barrington, MA PO Box 320 Housatonic, MA 01236 p 413-274-1001 f 413-274-1033 info@multiculturalbridge.org

multiculturalbridge.org

413-528-8020 www.vcaallcaring.com Please visit our website for current promotions and discounts, such as the Free First Exam for New Clients.

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June / July 2012

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Health & Wellness

Inflammation The Root of Many Diseases / By Nina Anderson

Become the best version of yourself Wellness Bound Coaching

Kenly Brozman, LICSW Certified Health & Wellness Coach

FREE Initial Consultation

www.wellnessboundcoaching.com kbrozman@gmail.com • 518-929-2050

Low Back Pain • Sciatica • Disc Problems 301 Walker Street ▪ Lenox, MA 01240

Traditional Acupuncture Jeffrey Gordon, M.Ac., L.Ac.

Elle Day Spa at the Crowne Plaza • One West St., Pittsfield, MA 01201 Appointments: 413.445.5600 • www.jgordonacupuncture.com

“Live with Calmness, Balance and Vitality”

MEDICAL HYPNOSIS Quit Smoking ❖ Weight Loss ❖ Pain Relief Stress/Sleep Issues ❖ Prepare for Surgery

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Energy In Motion Studio PILATES, YOGA, FITNESS Movement for renewed energy, health and well-being. Focus on alignment, back care, sports performance; special needs welcome. Private sessions or small group classes in a beautifully equipped studio.

Catherine Brumley West Stockbridge, MA 413-232-7838

Eileen Lawlor, LICSW 3 EMDR 3

Hypnosis Co-dependency 3 Grief, Loss & Transition Counseling 3 Addiction 3

413.528.7916 4 EileenAtStillpointStudio.com

J

oint problems and arthritis can affect anyone, young or old. There is hope for healing, but it is best to determine the trigger for the problem rather than to mask the pain with drugs. A holistic approach determines the underlying cause of the affliction – whether it be from injury, chronic use, diet, or lifestyle. In most cases inflammation is the cause. Many people don’t believe arthritis can be prevented because there’s a common perception that joint cartilage (the cushioning that covers the bones in a joint) simply wears away with age. But actually joint cartilage wears away with inflammation, which is a normal healing process. But if the inflammatory response does not shut off and becomes chronic, it can not only affect joints, but blood vessel walls (atherosclerosis), lining cells of the gut (as in lactose and gluten intolerance), and contribute to diseases like diabetes, cancer, strokes, and other illnesses. If you can prevent chronic inflammation you can prevent joint problems. Even if you already have arthritis, reducing the amount of inflammation in your system will help relieve your symptoms and give you more freedom of movement – sometimes within weeks or even days. Highly movable joints such as the wrists, fingers, shoulders, hips, and knees, are the most likely to be affected by osteoarthritis. These are called synovial joints because the two bones that meet in this type of joint are bathed in synovia – a clear fluid whose job is to provide lubrication. Sometimes, though, the membrane that secretes the synovia becomes inflamed. According to Dr. Vijaya Nair in her book Prevent Cancer, Strokes, Heart Attacks, and other Deadly Killers, “When an avalanche of inflammatory chemicals gets released, those inflammatory chemicals wear away joint cartilage. The first step in any program to combat arthritis and joint problems isn’t to stop the pain - it’s to stop the inflammation.” Doctors can prescribe anti-inflammatory drugs, but there are healthier ways to combat inflammation. People can alter their diet to include foods such as olive oil, cod, salmon,

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June / July 2012

www.OurBerkshireTimes.com

sardines, kale, ginger, bok choy, mushrooms, avocados, cranberries, apples, cinnamon, and almonds, just to name a few. Avoiding sugar, processed foods, polyunsaturated oils that contain few omega-3s, and for some people, gluten and dairy can make a significant difference. Hormone-laden meat can also trigger an inflammatory response as can pesticides and chemical ingredients in foodstuffs. Stress is probably the biggest factor because the chemical reaction our bodies create to stressors lowers our immune response and allows inflammation to run unchecked. In addition, I recommend a simple list of supplements that I have seen create an effective treatment. Probably the easiest, most effective anti-inflammatory supplement is curcumin. But be careful: not all curcumin is effective. You need a blend that has curcumin, demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin – collectively known as curcuminoids. Not all curcumin supplements have these. The one we use is an ingredient in Dr. Nair’s Jiva Curcumin/Fermented Soy Complex (www.jivasupple ments.org). Other ingredients that help inflammation are bromelain, reservatrol, ginger, alpha lipoid acid, and zinc. It is also prudent to take a good plant oil combination made from flax, primrose, and sunflower oils. Most of us run to drugs to alleviate pain, but the root of this pain may be runaway inflammation. Therefore, it may be wiser to treat the cause than just to mask the problem with a painkiller. I personally have healed my ski-traumatized knee with foods and supplements that treat inflammation. If you’d like more information, I highly recommend reading Dr. Nair’s book. ~ Nina Anderson, of Sheffield, MA, is the CEO of Safe Goods Publishing, LJB Piper, and the COO of Jiva, Essence of Life, Inc. She holds a Specialist in Performance Nutrition certification from the International Sports Science Association. and has been involved in the natural healing industry for more than 20 years.


Health & Wellness TriYoga Berkshire

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Heather Coon

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413.854.3177 d www.triyogaberkshire.com 1224 North Main Street (Rte.7) - Sheffield, MA

22 Upper Main Street, Suite 7 Sharon, CT 06069 (860) 364-9840

3 miles south of Great Barrington over looking the beautiful Housatonic River

Bente Dahl-Busby, PT, DPT Kimberly Parker, PT Sylvia Stots, PT

Hands-On Health & Wellness

In the Flow and on the River

Are You Concerned About Your Memory or the Memory of a Loved One? Free Memory Screening Available

There are many pathways to healing.

Specializing in the diagnosis and treatment of memory problems for over 20 years. Call today for more information or to make an appointment

local (802) 447-1409 toll free (866) 646-3362 or visit www.memorydoc.org

357 Shields Drive, Bennington, VT 05201

“A Taste of Japan in the Berkshires” InTouch Massage & Day Spa Hair, Massage, Skin, Waxing... Williamstown, MA 413-458-3235 InTouchDaySpa.com

Shirakaba Guest House

21 Private Acres, Indoor Pool Hot Tub, Epicurean Delights New Ashford MA, 413-458-1800 Berkshires-Shirakaba.com

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June / July 2012

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Health & Wellness June - July Event Sampler

Is Gravity

To see more events or to post your event for free go to

www.OurBerkshireCalendar.com Self-Healing with One Light Healing Touch

Date: Thursday, June 14, 2012, at 6:30-8pm Place: Little Chapel on the Hill, 55 Main Street, Lenox, MA - (917) 748-8463 Price: Suggested Offering $15-20 Presented by AnnE O’Neil, founder of your soul path, this class is a great opportunity to learn more about energy and how to work with it. It is an introductory class in which participants will: experience a profound grounding exercise, allowing one to be more present; learn more about how life force energy flows; and begin to tap into one’s innate healing ability. www.yoursoulpath.com

Living Healthy for a Lifetime Spirit, Mind & Body Wellness Fair

Date: Sat., June 16, 2012, at 10:30am-2:30pm Place: Lenox Community Center, 65 Walker Street, Lenox, MA - (413) 553-3533 Price: Free Many fields will be represented from fitness and weight loss, stress management, nutrition, life coaching, Chinese medicine, massage,

yoga, thriving through cancer treatments, to mentoring adult children caring for aging parents. Berkshire County is a well-spring of talented professionals helping people achieve their health and wellness goals and desires about living a zesty, vibrant, healthy and happy life – for a lifetime. We are still looking for vendors and sponsors. Call Jeannie at (413) 553-3533 or Kathleen at (413) 822-1280.

Fitness Fun!

Date: July 16-20, 2012, at 9am-3pm Place: The Montessori School of the Berkshires, 21 Patterson Road, Lenox Dale, MA - (413) 637-3662 Price: $225 Fitness fun! Summer program for ages 6-12. Learn about the Four Components of Fitness, while having a blast! We’ll play games for muscular strength, hop through aerobic and anaerobic activities, and relax into the proper way to stretch. www.BerkshireMontessori.org

Dragging You Down?

O

By Megan Reisel

ne thing is for certain, we all feel gravity. Just hold your arm out to the side, shoulder level, and in a very few moments the force will be with you, pulling your arm back downwards. This force has been working on your posture all your life, and if you are feeling those effects on your spine, shoulders, neck and head, low back, and those lowly feet, you are not alone. The compression that gravity causes upon the body is cumulative. If you are not working to elevate your posture in a balanced alignment, you most likely feel the victim of time and weight drawing you down. Result? Pain and discomfort that increases with time.

Tips to Reverse That Nagging Downward Pull While sitting, feel the lift your breath can have upon your skeleton. Draw the breath in deeply and slowly; feel the filling of your breath in your chest like a balloon inflating. Next, allow your exhalation to leave your body as if the balloon were now deflating . . . melting downward with gravity into a concave shape. Repeat this breathing exercise a few times, so you become acquainted with how your body feels as it rises upward and sinks downward. When you have found the way you can lift your torso so that you now feel the pull of your head towards the sky, keep rising an inch or so more, enough to give you the sensation that the lift is pulling you up from your hips and also pulling into your legs. You may want to close your eyes and imagine you can see your skeleton lifted and supported by your muscles to stay upward and lengthened. As you allow your breath to release, try to keep the pull upward, while relaxing your body’s tensions from the inhalation aspect of the exercise. This means you will not collapse downward, but instead maintain the lift as you exhale. Notice how you can find the deep core musculature that supports your body’s effort to maintain uprightness. This may feel very strained and difficult at first – it is new to your body’s system of patterns. Keep working daily, and you will become more familiar with the pattern to go “UP.” Remember . . . going up is just the start of working out of that gravitational pull to collapse. Learn more by studying at Kinesphere Studio in Lee, where good posture and alignment are always on the menu. ~ Megan Reisel, registered somatic movement therapist, certified movement analyst and instructor of Gyrotonic® at Kinespshere Studio, located at 66 Main Street, Lee, MA. (413) 329-8219

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Health & Wellness Wendy Mae Nunnally Licensed Massage Therapist NCBTMB Certified

Village Center 68 Main Street Lenox, MA 01240 413 841 0938 Office Hours and House Calls

Professional Massage Therapy

12 years experience

respite gurgling blue waters soothe my uncalm they mirror the darkening sky of early evening magnolias, honeysuckle butterfly bushes encircle me budless roses were luminous coral before the deer ate them the patio umbrella houses a lone bat and births wasps in its folds lilies silently trumpet their presence O I wish I could see the color of the wings or tufted heads of the birds doing their evening chores

Whole Body MoveMent GYROTONIC® whole body fitness Creative movement therapy Craniosacral bodywork

Ming Lash,

rsmt

somatic movement therapist

~ Poem by Gwen Gould, taken with permission from her poetry chapbook, Luminations

Jacqueline Nicholas Reiki Master/Teacher

413.446.0691 dreamcatchertree@gmail.com

Graceful, fluid movement, and integral strength Increase and sustain the ease and joy of living in your body

413-458-6100

Williamstown, MA • movingandhealingarts.com

Phoebe Williams, Certified Professional Coach

413.232.7018 | www.BerkshireLifeCoaching.com

Traditional Naturopathic Care

Crowne Plaza, Pittsfield, MA (413) 684-4888 | berganacupuncture@yahoo.com Japanese Style Acupuncture • Five Element Essential Oils Master Cupping • Energy Balancing • Second Degree Reiki Weight Loss • Smoking Cessation

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June / July 2012

23


Mind & Spirit

The Warmth and Wisdom of Sheilaa Hite / By Maurice Peterson

I

n a field crowded with wannabes and charlatans, Sheilaa Hite is known as one of the leading intuitive counselors in America. A full-time professional, her clientele is comprised of influential names, and she has regular bookings in major resorts, restaurants, and other establishments. A published author who has been widely featured on national television, she also leads workshops on astrology, Tarot, and life coaching. I met Sheila six years ago, when I was depressed and unmotivated. My hope was that she would convince me of her gift, and that her forecast would offer some relief. An African American of middle age, she had a look that was different than your average New England lady of any ethnicity. Her wardrobe was colorful without seeming garish, and if the clothes looked custom made, they likely were made by Sheilaa herself, who was at one time a union costume designer. From a half-dozen Tarot decks, she had me choose two for this reading. In my hands she placed three odd-looking twelve-sided transparent dice, which I was instructed to roll after envisioning a color and a number. Drawing from both decks, she laid out a Tarot spread of eight cards. And as I turned over one card with the left hand, then another with the right, I made a wish for her reading to promise nothing but happiness. That was not to be the outcome. “You’re on a raft, adrift at sea,” she reluctantly declared. “You feel alone and totally out of your element.” She couldn’t have been more accurate so she won my trust. By the end of the hour-long session, she did offer me hope. She predicted my neglected talents for music and performing would blossom in the new season, and my depression would also be lifted. After the three-month wait, I was truly feeling

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much more confident at home and at work. And, as predicted, I suddenly found myself singing in my first national TV commercial! Sheilaa boasts over 95 percent accuracy, as documented in The 100 Top Psychics in America by Paulette Cooper. My experiences with her bear this out. Having had several other sessions with her over the years, I was glad when this interview gave me the chance to learn more about this wise and mysterious soothsayer. First, I wanted to know when she discovered she had such a gift. “When I was born, my grandmother told my mother and father that I would be a special child,” said Sheilaa when we met in her apartment in Lenox. “I was to be dressed in certain colors and listened to carefully for when the cadence changed in my voice. Whenever it did, they were all supposed to follow what I said.” Sheilaa’s late parents did obey her sometimes random commands, changing their daily schedules or routes or avoiding situations, which Sheilaa assumes may have prevented accidents or worse strokes of fate. If this sounds like a family of Gypsy fortune-tellers, consider that Sheilaa’s parents were conservative professionals, her father a union organizer turned marriage counselor and her mother a nurse turned psychologist, living in Hyde Park, a mixed, middle-class neighborhood in Chicago. Ironically, these same parents – who did dress her in the specified colors and routinely obeyed her odd voice and dreams – were vehemently opposed to her pursuing a career based on these same intuitive abilities. “They wanted me to get ‘a real job.’ They were unsupportive when I won a fashion scholarship to the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. I learned I had to live my life without their approval. When this worked, it amazed them!” Clothing and costume design paid her bills when she first moved to Los Angeles. But from early on she did astrology on the side, earning extra money. After learning Tarot, she impressed her friends so much that word of mouth began to spread. People started coming to her, pleading for advice and willing to pay. With such a boost of confidence from the public, it wasn’t so hard to leave costume designing. In that field the most secure job would be a 20week TV series, so she was accustomed to always hustling up her next gig. After one transitional year, Sheilaa was able to leave designing and has been a full-time intuitive ever since. When asked about her most amazing prediction, Sheilaa, who has served more than 4,000 clients over the years, declines to cite one. “I don’t emphasize my predictions in the readings. My goal is to help people live. I help them understand their value and change the quality of their lives.” She recounted the story of a young mother who came for a reading in the early ’80s. “She’d just had the baby, and

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I said, ‘Oh, what did you name her?’ She said, ‘I just can’t think of anything to name her.’ I got chills, and I didn’t know why. I just knew the most important thing in the world was for her to name that baby! So I worked with her and I told her whatever her soul needed to hear about the importance of naming the baby. And we talked about names.” Later she related the story to a psychotherapist, who was alarmed. “‘Did the baby come from an abusive relationship?’ the therapist asked, and that was true,” said Sheilaa. “‘That means she sees the baby as part of that abuse. She’s going through postpartum depression, and without a name she’s not going to think of keeping her alive. So it’s good that you worked with her!’ “But I didn’t hear anything from the woman at all, until three years later. She told me she had come back west from New York and she had her daughter with her! And oh! My heart was so full! She came over with the little girl, who proceeded to wreck my apartment, but I didn’t care because I was so happy she was alive!” Fast-forward 18 years and 3,000 miles away to the Berkshires, where Sheilaa has been in residence ten years. When a woman walks in for a reading, Sheilaa has a sudden flashback to this scene of so long ago in Los Angeles. The woman confirms she is the same one from that fateful reading and, yes, the baby is a young woman now, just about to graduate from college. “That’s what I call a success story,” says Sheilaa Hite. “When people say, ‘I have found a better way of treating myself and of living my life because I spoke with you,’ that makes my heart feel good. It makes me know I’m doing the work I was sent here to do, and gives me reason to keep on living!” ~ Sheilaa is available by appointment at several locations in the Berkshires, including SEVEN salon.spa in Stockbridge, MA. (413) 298-0117, www.sevensalonspa.com.

S

heilaa Hite Intuitive Counselor

Featured in Paulette Cooper’s directory, ‘THE 100 TOP PSYCHICS in AMERICA’ Tarot • Astrology • Palmistry • Psychometry Mediumship • Past Life Regression Hypnotherapy • Life Coach Consultations in Person, by Phone or Skype Classes, Parties and Events

413-637-0085 “SHEILAA’s accuracy rate is 95-100%.” manager

– malibu shaman bookstore – malibu, ca

www.SheilaaHite.com


Fashion & Beauty

Meet & Greet

Exfoliate with Salt from the Dead Sea For a Youthful, Glowing Appearance / By Jean Pollock, HHP

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buildup of dead skin cells causes a rough and dull appearance. Gently removing the top layers of desiccated cells oxygenates the skin and speeds up cell growth, promoting a youthful, glowing appearance. A twiceor thrice-weekly salt or sugar scrub can make your skin look supple! Exfoliating with salt from the Dead Sea will not only remove dead skin cells, but it will, at the same time, infuse your skin with the minerals that the Dead Sea is so famous for. A scrub that also contains natural and nourishing oils, such as Jojoba, Sweet Almond, Avocado, Olive, or other, will moisten the skin while exfoliating at the same time. One comes across many offers – often at mall kiosks – of exfoliating scrubs, but just as often these scrubs contain artificial ingredients that can cause stress on the liver. Your skin is your largest organ. It both absorbs and expels toxins, vitamins, and minerals and your liver is always on the job to filter out any artificial ingredients that the skin has absorbed. Synthetic materials are interpreted as toxins by our bodies because they are unnatural and therefore do

not match the chemical makeup of the human cells. This causes stress on the liver . . . and all the while you thought you were doing yourself a favor! Tests have shown that only 20 minutes after an application of products containing parabens,* the parbens showed up in the urine. Be sure to read the ingredients on everything you purchase. Many products are designed to look as if they are good for you, or are labeled “all natural,” but looks can be deceiving. Companies spend a lot of money and research on packaging to make you think you are getting something that is natural . . . but beware! These lesser-quality beauty products may contain parabens, petroleum, alcohol, and artificial preservatives, which are anything but good for you. Choose carefully and spend your hard-earned money wisely. Local handcrafted products are often of much higher quality than mass-produced, slick-looking products and are sometimes even less expensive!

~ Jean Pollock, HHP, Mystical Rose Herbals, www. mysticalroseherbals.com. *Paraben: Any ester of parahy-

droxybenzoic acid, some of which are used in cosmetics and pharmaceuticals and have been found in breast cancer tumors.

meet & greet

get to know your community June - July Event Sampler To see more events or to post your event for free go to www.OurBerkshireCalendar.com

Our BerkshireGreen Networking Events

moon when the luster of the moon reveals my world shapes surrounding me are visible in the night sky I am not alone reflected light offers solace luminous images comfort my yearning tree shadows hold me in a loving embrace ~ Poem by Gwen Gould, taken with permission from her poetry chapbook, Luminations

Connect, Share, Grow, Prosper – It’s All About Community! Join Our BerkshireGreen Publishing for great company, delicious free appetizers, cash bar, interesting speakers, and door prizes. Come get to know your community and enjoy!

Good Purpose Gallery and Starving Artist Creperie & Cafe Date: Thursday, June 14, 2012, at 5:30-7:30pm Place: 40 Main Street, Lee, MA - (413) 394-5045 Price: Free. No reservation required.

Naji’s Mediterranean Cuisine Date: Wednesday, July 18, 2012, at 5:30-7:30pm Place: 405 Stockbridge Road, Great Barrington, MA - (413) 528-5540 Price: Free. No reservation required.

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June / July 2012

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In Business Think Management Abundance

Build a Powerful Brand Personality

Inger

Contributed By Qualprint A Division of Quality Printing Company, Inc.

get the most for your marketing dollars

Inger Pause, BA Health and Wellness Coach

Transformation from Within Cheshire, MA | 413-822-3302 pausehouse@verizon.net

Our BerkshireTimes 50,000 Readers

See our media kit at www.OurBerkshireTimes.com (413) 274-1122 Connect | Share | Grow | Prosper

It's All About Community!

I

t’s human nature to personify things – cars, boats, pets, places, and yes, even your product and company. Imagine your brand is a real person. Is it male or female, young or old, college-educated or street-smart, stylish or plain, thrifty or extravagant? Did you deliberately cultivate this personality, or has it just developed over time? More importantly, does this personality reflect who Imagine your target customers want brand is your brand to be?

and how others perceive it – can result in inconsistent marketing.

Lay out your current print marketing materials in one place so you can consider everything as a whole. Do they have a consistent look, feel, message, and tone? Are there pieces that can be combined? Now look at each piece individually. Does the message match the layout? your For example, is your message a real spirited and carefree, but the layout is dark and somber? person. Is it does your customer want male or female, Who you to be: the life of the party young or old, or the designated driver? You understand the underlycollege-educated must ing emotional associations to or street-smart, market your brand effectively.

Consider the personalities of some legendary brands. IBM is viewed as mature and serious, while Apple carved out a niche based on its own personality attributes – cool, stylish, casual, and easygoing. Consumers stylish or plain, from across the socioeconomic Thoughtfully develop a distinct spectrum are willing to spend thrifty or brand personality to move buymoney hand over fist to be a extravagant? ers from simple customers to part of the rebellious Harleybrand loyalists, creating powerDavidson mystique. Each of these brands has ful differentiation and real preference. This developed subtle aspects that can only be ex- exercise will influence your strategy at every perienced, not quantified or measured. It can’t touchpoint, including the tone of your marbe easily replicated, creating a high barrier to keting communications, your visual brand entry for potential competitors. identity, and how your frontline staff dress and communicate with customers. Talk to your customers to find out what your brand’s personality truly is, not what ~ This article cannot be reprinted without permisyou think it is. A bank that describes itself sion. Quality Printing Company aka “Qualprint” of as “friendly, honest, and stable” might find Pittsfield is a full service printer that was awarded that its customers use adjectives like greedy, two Bennys, the highest honor in the 2011 Premier dull, or boring. This “brand gap” – a con- Print Awards. For more information, visit their tradiction in how you see your own brand website at www.qualprint.com.

S Fun Business Facts Genne M. LeVasseur CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT ;;

Business & Personal Accounting

Email: ralevass@berkshire.net 21 Bracelan Court, Lenox, MA 01240 Ph: (413) 637-0858, Fax: (413) 637-0165

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June / July 2012

 Dell Computers was started by a 19-yearold with only $1,000.

 On February 10, 1964, the first self-adhesive stamps were issued.

 The company Adobe was named for Adobe Creek which ran behind the house of the co-founder, John Warnock.

 The first product that Sony came out with was the rice cooker.

 In 1975 Microsoft made $16,005 in revenue in its first year of operation.  In 1974, the founder of FedEx saved the company by taking its last $5,000 and turning it into $32,000 by gambling in Las Vegas.  In 1987, American Airlines decided to omit one olive from each salad course in the first class. As a result, they made a savings of $40,000.

 In 1939, Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard founded HP in Packard’s garage with an initial investment of $538.  In 1969, 16-year-old Michael Kittredge made a scented candle in his garage out of melted crayons as a gift for his mother. The neighbors took notice and expressed interest in buying his candles, so he started mass-producing them. Today Yankee Candle is the largest manufacturer of scented candles in the United States.


Directory of Advertisers Animals

Health & Wellness

BensDotter’s Pet ......................................13, 17, inside back cover Chez Pet ............................................................................................13 Petpourri, Inc. ..................................................................................13 Sand Road Animal Hospital, LLC ................................................13 Valley Veterinary Service ................................................................13 VCA All Caring Animal Hospital .................................................19 White Horse Hill .............................................................................14

Lee Chamber of Commerce ............................................................7 Williamstown Chamber of Commerce ..........................................6

Christine M. Tobin, APRN, PC, A-HNC ....................................21 Community Health Programs .........................................................2 Dr Jerome F. Errico, Bd Cert Chiro Phys ................................20 Eileen Lawlor, LICSW ....................................................................20 Energy in Motion Studio, Catherine Brumley ............................20 Frog Lotus Yoga Studio ..................................................................20 Integrative Health Solutions ....................................................20, 23 InTouch Massage & Day Spa ........................................................21 Jacqueline Nicholas, Reiki Master & Teacher .............................23 Lenox Village Integrative Pharmacy ............................................22 Marion Bergan Irwin, Licensed Acupuncturist ..........................23 Martial Arts Institute of the Berkshires ......................................19 Matt Albert, Bodywork ...................................................................23 Memory Clinic, The ........................................................................21 Michelle Manto, Traditional Chinese Medicine - Acupuncture .....17 Mikka Barkman, Native American Bodywork ............................16 Ming Lash, Somatic Movement Therapist ..................................23 Naomi Alson, Acupuncturist & Herbalist ...................................23 NordiCare Physical Therapy, PC ..................................................21 Phoebe Williams, Life Coach .........................................................23 Sruti Yoga Center ............................................................................21 Susan B. Lord, MD ...................................................................16, 23 Susan Merritt Yoga ..........................................................................23 Susan Spiegel Solovay, Certified Medical Hypnotist ..................20 Traditional Acupuncture, Jeffrey Gordon, M.Ac., Lic.Ac. ..........20 Traditional Naturopathic Care, Pam Youngquist .................17, 23 TriYoga Berkshire ............................................................................21 Veronique Rignault, Healing Ginger Therapy ............................21 Wellness Bound Coaching, Kenly Brozman ...............................20 Wendy Mae Nunnally Massage Therapist ...................................23 WholePerson Movement, Sharon True .......................................16 Yoga & Chakra Illuminations, Grace M. Tuma, MA .................23

Education & Workshops

Home & Garden

Art, Culture & Entertainment American Indian Pow Wow, Rock, Rattle & Drum ......................5 Bruce Mandel, Performing Songwriter ..........................................5 Community Access to the Arts - CATA ........................................5 Good Purpose Gallery .........................................inside back cover Graney Metal Design ........................................................................6 Hartsville Design Woodworking ....................6, inside back cover Hotchkiss Mobiles Gallery ............................................................6 Housatonic Valley Art League .........................................................5 Kaya Blaze Photography ..................................................................5 Leonard Weber, Hayloft Art Gallery ............................................15 Spectrum Playhouse ..............................................inside back cover Toonerville Trolley Records .............................................................6 Williams College - Arts at Williams ................................................6

Business Services Geiger Computers ...........................................................................26 Genne M. LeVasseur, Certified Public Accountant ...................26 Inger Management ..........................................................................26

Chambers of Commerce

Bard College at Simon’s Rock Summer Program ......................12 Berkshire Country Day School ...........................inside back cover BRIDGE, Berkshire Resources for the Integration of Diverse Groups & Education .........................................19 Darrow School .................................................................................12 Milne Public Library .......................................................................12 Montessori School of the Berkshires, The ......1, 12, inside back cover Renaissance Art School ..................................................................17 Triple Gem School of Thai Massage ...........................................12

Fashion & Beauty SEVEN salon.spa .............................................................................25 Shear Illusions, LLC ........................................................................25 Upstairs Basement ...........................................................................15

Food & Drink Berkshire Co-op Market ......................................inside front cover Berkshire Organics ............................................................................8 Boathouse Restaurant at Lakeville, The .........................................9 Cafe Giulia ..........................................................................................7 Chez Nous Bistro ..............................................................................8 Guido’s Fresh Marketplace ...........................................................19 Joe’s Diner ..........................................................................................9 LaBonne’s Markets ............................................................................9 Mizza’s Pizza Restaurant ...................................................................8 Naji’s Mediterranean Cuisine ..........................................................9 Pastorale Bistro & Bar ......................................................................8 Public eat+drink ................................................................................7 Sproutman® ......................................................................................15 Starving Artist Creperie & Cafe ......................................................7

Gift / Specialty Shops Crystal Essence .........................................................................15, 16 Gnu Press - Critters Around the Berkshires ...............................15

Health & Wellness Andrew M. Goldman, DO ............................................................19 BLEND Solution ............................................................................27

Country homes

John Harney Associates 7 Academy St, Salisbury, CT TEL 860 435 4600

Allegrone Construction Co., Inc. ..................................................11 Berkshire Fabric & Wallpaper Outlet ...........................................11 Berkshire Photovoltaic Services (BPVS) .....................................11 Bodhi Tree Gallery ..........................................................................10 Built to Last Stoneworks & Landscaping ....................................10 Countrytown Marble & Tile ..........................................................10 Eco-scape Gardens .........................................................................16 George Yonnone Restorations ......................................................17 Hardy Daylily Garden .....................................................................11 Herrington’s .....................................................................................28 Martha Flood Design ......................................................................11 Michael Gilbert - Decorative Painting/Artist .............................11 Okerstrom Lang, Ltd. .....................................................................18 Upstairs Basement ...........................................................................15 Ward’s Nursery & Garden Center ................................................10 Windy Hill Farm ..............................................................................17 Wingate LTD ...................................................................................18 Young Feng Shui .............................................................................10

www.harneyassoc.com

Lodging Berkshires Shirakaba Guest House ..............................................21 Interlaken Inn and Conference Center ..........................................7 Sharon Country Inn .........................................................back cover

Mind & Spirit AzureGreen ......................................................................................24 Sheilaa Hite, Intuitive Counseling .................................................24

Nature Hilltop Orchards - Furnace Brook Winery .............................14

Real Estate Barnbrook Realty ...................................................................................2 John Harney Associates, LLC - Real Estate Brokerage ................27 Kinderhook Group, Inc., Real Estate ...........................................11

Social Networking Concerned Singles ......................................................................25 www.OurBerkshireTimes.com

World's Most Powerful Advanced Ultraviolet Air Purifier For people who are serious about clean air The Sun Pure offers the ultimate in indoor air purification as it 'Cleans Air Down To The Last Molecule' using a Six Step process to achieve Maximum Results!

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June / July 2012

27


Index of Advertisers Allegrone Construction Co., Inc. .....................11 American Indian Pow Wow, Rock, Rattle & Drum ..............................................5 Andrew M. Goldman, DO ...............................19 AzureGreen .........................................................24 Bard College at Simon’s Rock Summer Program .......................................................12 Barnbrook Realty .................................................2 BensDotter’s Pet .............13, 17, inside back cover Berkshire Co-op Market .............inside front cover Berkshire Country Day School ..inside back cover Berkshire Fabric & Wallpaper Outlet ..............11 Berkshire Organics ...............................................8 Berkshire Photovoltaic Services (BPVS) ........11 Berkshires Shirakaba Guest House .................21 BLEND Solution ................................................27 Boathouse Restaurant at Lakeville, The ............9 Bodhi Tree Gallery .............................................10 BRIDGE, Berkshire Resources for the Integration of Diverse Groups & Education ..19 Bruce Mandel, Performing Songwriter .............5 Built to Last Stoneworks & Landscaping .......10 Cafe Giulia .............................................................7 Chez Nous Bistro .................................................8 Chez Pet ...............................................................13 Christine M. Tobin, APRN, PC, A-HNC ........21 Community Access to the Arts - CATA ...........5 Community Health Programs .............................2 Concerned Singles ..............................................25 Countrytown Marble & Tile .............................10 Crystal Essence ............................................15, 16

Darrow School ....................................................12 Dr Jerome F. Errico, Bd Cert Chiro Phys ...20 Eco-scape Gardens ............................................16 Eileen Lawlor, LICSW ......................................20 Energy in Motion Studio, Catherine Brumley ...20 Frog Lotus Yoga Studio ......................................20 Geiger Computers ..............................................26 Genne M. LeVasseur, Certified Public Accountant ..................................................26 George Yonnone Restorations .........................17 Gnu Press - Critters Around the Berkshires ....15 Good Purpose Gallery ................inside back cover Graney Metal Design ...........................................6 Guido’s Fresh Marketplace ..............................19 Hardy Daylily Garden ........................................11 Hartsville Design Woodworking .....6, inside back cover Herrington’s .......................................................28 Hilltop Orchards - Furnace Brook Winery ....14 Hotchkiss Mobiles Gallery ..................................6 Housatonic Valley Art League ............................5 Inger Management .............................................26 Integrative Health Solutions ......................20, 23 Interlaken Inn and Conference Center .............7 InTouch Massage & Day Spa ...........................21 Jacqueline Nicholas, Reiki Master & Teacher ..23 Joe’s Diner ............................................................9 John Harney Associates, LLC Real Estate Brokerage ................................27 Kaya Blaze Photography .....................................5 Kinderhook Group, Inc., Real Estate ..............11 LaBonne’s Markets ...............................................9

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June / July 2012

www.OurBerkshireTimes.com

Lee Chamber of Commerce ...............................7 Lenox Village Integrative Pharmacy ...............22 Leonard Weber, Hayloft Art Gallery ................15 Marion Bergan Irwin, Licensed Acupuncturist ....23 Martha Flood Design ........................................11 Martial Arts Institute of the Berkshires .........19 Matt Albert, Bodywork .....................................23 Memory Clinic, The ...........................................21 Michael Gilbert - Decorative Painting/Artist ..11 Michelle Manto, Traditional Chinese Medicine - Acupuncture ............................17 Mikka Barkman, Native American Bodywork ..16 Milne Public Library ..........................................12 Ming Lash, Somatic Movement Therapist .....23 Mizza’s Pizza Restaurant ....................................8 Montessori School of the Berkshires, The ........................................1,12, inside back cover Naji’s Mediterranean Cuisine .............................9 Naomi Alson, Acupuncturist & Herbalist ......23 NordiCare Physical Therapy, P.C. ....................21 Okerstrom Lang, Ltd. ........................................18 Pastorale Bistro & Bar .........................................8 Petpourri, Inc. .....................................................13 Phoebe Williams, Life Coach ............................23 Public eat+drink ...................................................7 Renaissance Art School .....................................17 Sand Road Animal Hospital, LLC ...................13 SEVEN salon.spa ................................................25 Sharon Country Inn .............................back cover Shear Illusions, LLC ...........................................25 Sheilaa Hite, Intuitive Counseling ....................24 Spectrum Playhouse .....................inside back cover Sproutman® ..........................................................15 Sruti Yoga Center ...............................................21 Starving Artist Creperie & Cafe .........................7 Susan B. Lord, MD ......................................16, 23 Susan Merritt Yoga ............................................23 Susan Spiegel Solovay, Certified Medical Hypnotist ......................................20 Toonerville Trolley Records ................................6 Traditional Acupuncture, Jeffrey Gordon, M.Ac., Lic.Ac. .................20 Traditional Naturopathic Care, Pam Youngquist ...................................17, 23 Triple Gem School of Thai Massage ..............12 TriYoga Berkshire ..............................................21 Upstairs Basement .............................................15 Valley Veterinary Service ...................................13 VCA All Caring Animal Hospital ....................19 Veronique Rignault, Healing Ginger Therapy ...21 Ward’s Nursery & Garden Center ...................10 Wellness Bound Coaching, Kenly Brozman ....20 Wendy Mae Nunnally Massage Therapist ......23 White Horse Hill ................................................14 WholePerson Movement, Sharon True ..........16 Williams College - Arts at Williams ...................6 Williamstown Chamber of Commerce .............6 Windy Hill Farm .................................................17 Wingate LTD ......................................................18 Yoga & Chakra Illuminations, Grace M. Tuma, MA ..................................23 Young Feng Shui ................................................10


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Our BerkshireTimes Magazine  

Community news, local events, personal growth, and vibrant living for western MA, northern CT, eastern NY, and southern VT. Connect, share,...

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Community news, local events, personal growth, and vibrant living for western MA, northern CT, eastern NY, and southern VT. Connect, share,...

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