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April - May 2013, vol 7

Take One, It's Free!

Our BerkshireTimes

Community News | Local Events | Personal Growth | Vibrant Living

Western MA | Northern CT | Eastern NY | Southern VT

Connect, Share, Grow, Prosper • Special Gardening Feature!


Left Field Farm Middlefield, MA

Community Matters. Eat Local Food. www.berkshire.coop


Our BerkshireTimes™ PUBLISHER Kathy I. Regan publisher@ourberkshiregreen.com _______________

Contents

EDITORIAL Kathy I. Regan editor@ourberkshiregreen.com

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Event Sampler Birds, Bugs & Botany™

Rodelinde Albrecht rodelinde@ourberkshiregreen.com Copyeditors/Proofreaders Rodelinde Albrecht Patty Strauch _______________ DESIGN Magazine Design/Layout Kathy I. Regan Ads–Independent Designers Katharine Adams, Rural Ethic Studio katmail@ruralethicstudio.com Christine Dupre cedupre@msn.com

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ADVERTISING ACCOUNT MANAGER Patty Strauch patty@ourberkshiregreen.com ______________ EVENT COORDINATOR Patty Strauch patty@ourberkshiregreen.com _______________ CONTACT Our BerkshireGreen, Inc. P.O. Box 133, Housatonic, MA 01236 Phone: (413) 274-1122, Fax: (413) 541-8000 www.OurBerkshireGreen.com www.OurBerkshireTimes.com www.OurBerkshireCalendar.com

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Special Gardening Feature Start Composting Today!

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Food & Drink A Thousand Years Over a Hot Stove

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Animal Talk Event Sampler

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Elisa Jones, Berkshire Design Studio elisa@berkshiredesignstudio.com Shirley Sparks, Graphic Design on a Dime sms234@aol.com _______________

Art, Culture & Entertainment

Our Berkshire Marketplace Fashion & Beauty Event Sampler

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April - May 2013 10 Education & Workshops Cultivating Emotional Intelligence

12 In Business The Simple Written Word

13 Community Spotlight Dalton & Hinsdale, MA

14 Health & Wellness Earthing

15 Mind & Spirit 16 Directory of Advertisers 17 Featured Advertisers

Home, Garden & Landscape

Tell Them You Saw Them

Electrosmog - Part 2

in Our BerkshireTimes Magazine!

Our BerkshireTimes™ The Voice of Our Community! New! Follow Us On Join our mailing list and submit editorial at www.OurBerkshireTimes.com Our BerkshireTimes™ is a free, bimonthly, print and online magazine published by Our BerkshireGreen, Inc. that gives more than 75,000 readers per issue the opportunity to connect, share knowledge, and inspire one another. It’s free to the public and distributed to more than 400 locations throughout western MA, northern CT, eastern NY, and southern VT, and is enjoyed by community members, second home owners, and visitors alike. Most of our editorial content is contributed by our community members. We welcome your ideas, articles, and feedback, and encourage you to submit original material for consideration through our website. You will find complete instructions on our online form. To find out more about advertising, submitting editorial, and posting events on our free community calendar, see our websites at left, and join our mailing list to receive our free monthly eNewsletter.

The illustrations on this month's cover are by CATA artists Community Access to the Arts (CATA) is a nonprofit organization that nurtures and celebrates the creativity of more than 500 people with disabilities in Berkshire County through shared experiences in the visual and performing arts. Founded in 1993 by Sandra Newman, CATA now offers more than 1000 individual arts workshops annually in 30 different health and human service settings and in its own Great Barrington studio. Photo at left: Community Access to the Arts' Annual Art show will take place at the Berkshire Museum on July 25, 2013. To find out more, and to see additional art online, please go to www.communityaccesstothearts.org.

All content in Our BerkshireTimes ™ is accepted in good faith. We do not necessarily advocate and cannot be held responsible for opinions expressed or facts supplied by our authors, illustrators, and advertisers. We reserve the right to refuse advertising for any reason. For printing errors of the publisher's responsibility, liability is limited to the cost of the ad space in which it first appeared. Unless otherwise noted, we use a Creative Commons License in place of a standard copyright.

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Art, Culture & Entertainment April - May Event Sampler

To see more events or to post your event for free go to

www.OurBerkshireCalendar.com Bruce Mandel Solo “Acoustic Stew”

Date: Fri April 5, 2013, 6-9pm Place: Sullivan Station, 109 Railroad Street, Lee, MA - (413) 243-2082 Come on in for a great dinner and mellow acoustic music in a historic train depot! www.brucemandel.com

Objectify: A Look into the Permanent Collection Opening Reception

Date: Fri, April 5, 2013, 5:30-7:30pm Place: Berkshire Musuem, Pittsfield, MA Objectify: A look into the permanent collections is a major new exhibition of some of the most significant and fascinating objects from the Museum’s holdings of more than 50,000 artworks, specimens, and artifacts, created in celebration of the Museum’s 110th anniversary. The reception is free and open to the public. www.berkshiremuseum.org

New England Brass Band in Concert

Date: Sun, April 7, 2013, 4pm Place: Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church, 74 First Street, Pittsfield, MA - (413) 442-1411 Price: $20 adult/$5 student NEBB is an award winning 30-piece brass and percussion ensemble founded in 1988 following the British band tradition. www.berkshiremusicschool.org

Music Marathon Weekend

Date: Sat, April 6 & 7, 2013, all day event Place: Berkshire Music School, 30 Wendell Avenue, Pittsfield, MA - (413) 442-1411 Price: Free The Berkshire Music School’s annual Music Marathon Weekend Fundraiser. www.berkshiremusicschool.org

New and Ancient Voices - Interpreting Nature in China and the US

Date: Sat, April 13, 2013, 4pm Place: First Congregational Church, 251 Main Street, Great Barrington, MA - (860) 435-4866 Price: $35.00 general, $45.00 Premium, $10.00 student. Crescendo’s first two commissioned works, written by two New England composers! West Lake Cycle was composed by John Myers, for choir, soloists, pipa (Chinese lute), didzi (Chinese flute) and harpsichord. The second is for unaccompanied mixed voices by Taiwaneseborn American composer Cheng-Chia Wu on Wu Xing or the Five Elements/Five Phases from the Chinese I Ching (The Book of Changes). www.WorldClassMusic.org

Monteverdi 1610 Vespers

Date: Sun, April 21, 2013, 3pm Place: Trinity Church, 88 Walker Street, Lenox MA - (518) 791-0185 Price: $30. The Cantilena Chamber Choir will present Monteverdi’s 1610 Vespro della beata vergine for chorus and orchestra. It is one of his most admired works and is thought to be among the most significant works of its era. The 1610 Vespers contains examples of traditional Gregorian plainchant, larger scale psalms and smaller scale motets, as well as a sonata and a concluding Magnificat, showing consummate skill in his instrumentation. www.cantilenachoir.org

GBRSS Presents “The Frog Prince,” a Puppet Story

Date: Sat, May 11, 2013, 10am Place: Great Barrington Rudolf Steiner School Early Childhood Building, 35 West Plain Road, Great Barrington, MA - (413) 528-4015. Price: Free. The Frog Prince, a classic tale of transforma-

S Upcoming Events Driving Miss Biddle Tea & Talk | April 27 at 3 pm Staging Fashion Tea & Talk | May 4 at 3 pm Mother’s Day Pink Tea and Ballet | May 11 at 3:30 pm Splendid Tables Tea & Talk | May 25 at 3 pm Concert with the Lichtenberg String Quartet | May 26 at 3 pm For more information or to reserve your seat please call 413-637-3206.

104 Walker Street, Lenox, MA

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413-637-3206

GildedAge.org

www.OurBerkshireTimes.com


Art, Culture & Entertainment Weddings at Darrow School Choose a setting of unparalleled beauty at historic Mount Lebanon Shaker Village.

Photo by Jane Feldman ’74

tion from the Brothers Grimm, will be presented by early childhood teachers from the Great Barrington Rudolf Steiner School (GBRSS) as a special full-length marionette play for children ages one through six.

Joan Rivers

Date: Fri, May 10, 2013, 8pm Place: The Colonial Theatre, 111 South Street, Pittsfield MA - (413) 997-4444 Price: VIP: $125 (premium seating) A: $100 B: $75 C: $50 A force of nature and one of the hardest-working celebrities in the world, Joan Rivers is an entertainment legend of unparalleled accomplishments. Don’t miss Joan as she performs her uncensored, uninhibited standup comedy for one night only at the Colonial. www.berkshiretheatregroup.org

Playwright: Elena Hartwell Performance Dates: May 17 through June 2, 2013 Hartwell tells the complex story of a recently deceased Vietnam vet whose half-Vietnamese son arrives unexpectedly at his father’s bakery. There, he meets the beekeeper whose hives are being mysteriously devastated and a young woman with whom he falls in love. The play, a rich, thoughtful character study, goes back and forth in time asking questions about love and loss, memory, and expectation.

Darrow School ∙ 110 Darrow Road ∙ New Lebanon, NY 12125 www.darrowschool.org ∙ 518-322-3657

Performances: Thursday, Friday and Saturday at 8PM Thursday, Saturday, Sunday at 2PM Call 1-802-447-0564 for tickets. Single Tickets: $37.00 Student Tickets: $10.00 • $5.00 off ticket with this ad • www.oldcastletheatre.org

CATA’s 20th Anniversary Performance

Date: Sunday, May 12, 2013, 1pm. Place: The Tina Packer Playhouse at Shakespeare & Co., 70 Kemble Street Lenox MA - (413) 528-5485, Price: $20. CATA’s annual performance features and celebrates its performing artists with disabilities. Appropriate for all ages, the show includes CATA’s Shakespeare’s Players, The Juggling Connection, and more. www.communityaccesstothearts.org

CATA’s 20th Anniversary Performance & Gala

Date: Sat, May 11, 2013, 5pm Place: The Tina Packer Playhouse at Shakespeare & Co., 70 Kemble Street, Lenox, MA (413) 528-5485. Price: $150. CATA’s 20th Anniversary performance highlights and celebrates its performing artists with disabilities including Shakespeare’s Players, The Moving Company, Tap Murmurs, The Serenaders, The Juggling Connection, and more. Proceeds from the event fund arts workshops for nearly 600 people with disabilities in Berkshire County. www.com munityaccesstothearts.org

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A Strange Disappearance of Bees

BIRDS, BUGS & BOTANY™

t was the Age of Discovery and the Era of Enlightenment. Exploration around the world in the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries fueled a fascination with Botany, Natural History, and Flora. Emissaries fanned out across the globe gathering specimens of exotic flowers and fauna to be catalogued by preeminent naturalists and bound into grand volumes. For these great books, brilliant illustrations were drawn and carved into copper plates, hand printed, and individually colored by some of the most excellent artists of all time.

Antique & Antiquarian Nature Prints from the Gallerie Collection at the Old Great Barrington Train Station

These magnificent original prints will be the focus of Art et Industrie’s spring exhibition entitled BIRDS, BUGS & BOTANY™ at the Great Barrington Train Station. Featured will be selected works from some of the greatest botanical illustrators of the Golden Age of Botany, including early hand-colored flower engravings by Sydenham Edwards for Curtis’s Botanical Magazine from the 1780s forward, Stipple-Engravings By Pierre J.F. Turpin for Chaumeton’s 1815 Flore Medicale, rare contemporaneous samples by “The Raphael of Flowers” Pierre-Joseph Redouté, spectacular hand-colored orchids by John Nugent Fitch for Robert Warner’s 1882 The Orchid Album, lavish lithographs from van Houtte’s

mid-19th-century Flore Des Serres, and more. Also featured will be select original J.J. Audubon hand-colored bird prints from his 1840 Octavo Edition of The Birds of America, together with full-size re-creations of the Havell engravings from the rare Amsterdam Edition, as well as wonderful works from Shaw & Nodder’s 1790-1814 Naturalist’s Miscellany, and others. All these and many more will be presented together with fine reproductions on greeting cards, giclees, and scarves at our newest location next to the Farmer’s Market at the Old Great Barrington Train Station. Please watch for our spring 2013, opening and check our website at www.artetindustrie.com.

www.OurBerkshireTimes.com

April / May 2013

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Special Gardening Feature 

Start Composting Today! / By CET

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 

Composting Recipe for Success

How to Use Finished Compost

Increases the organic matter in soil and helps build sound root structure Balances the pH of the soil Makes nutrients in soil more readily available to plants Attracts earthworms, considered the “earth’s greatest recyclers” Makes clay soils airy so that they can drain better Improves the ability of sandy soils to hold moisture and resist erosion Raises the vitamin and mineral content of food grown in a compost-rich garden Reduces reliance on petroleum-based fertilizers

Work it directly into garden soil (improves structure, adds nutrients). Sprinkle it on the lawn to keep it green without much water. Apply it around trees to feed the roots and reduce water needs. Apply it directly to the garden a few times a year as a mulch. Mix with potting soil for indoor gardening needs.

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600 S. Main Street - Gt. Barrington - 413-528-0166 - www.wardsnursery.com

PROJECT NATIVE Farm • Nursery • Trails projectnative.org

200 + species of native plants A non-profit native plant farm, nursery & wildlife sanctuary Open Mon-Sat 9:30-5:00 • Sun 10:30-5:00 Trails open dawn to dusk 342 North Plain Rd (Rt 41) • Housatonic, MA • 413-274-3433

Healthy Composting Requires Four Elements to Work Together O Temperature - Bacteria in a compost pile create heat as they work and grow. The best temperature for speedy composting is about 140°F at the center of the pile. To maintain good temperatures, an ideal compost pile should be at least 3’ x 3’ x 3’. O Oxygen - Aerobic, “oxygen-loving” organisms work quickly and without odors. If a compost pile does not have enough air, anaerobic organisms will take over and odors will develop. Encourage aerobic decomposition by turning the pile whenever you add materials and mix in dry leaves or straw. O Moisture - All organisms, including those in a compost pile, need water for growth. A dry compost pile will decompose slowly. If it is too wet, the oxygen supply will be limited, and anaerobic decomposition could occur. Do the “Squeeze Test” – composting materials should be about as moist as a wrung-out sponge. O Food - The creatures that do the work of decomposition view our waste as their food. Microscopic organisms need a mixture of carbon and nitrogen to grow and reproduce. Generally, “green” or wet materials are high in nitrogen (decompose rapidly), while “brown,” dry or woody materials are high in carbon (break down slowly). Prepare materials before you put them into the pile by chopping up stalks, vines, large twigs, straw, or hay.

When Is Compost Finished? Finished compost is a brown, crumbly, earthy-smelling, soil-like material. It takes between six months and one year for a pile to yield a finished product, depending on how much attention it is given. You should not be able to recognize the waste materials that went into the pile. For best use, you can screen it before use for finer compost.

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Composting FAQs O What should I do with grass clippings? Keep your lawn healthy by leaving grass clippings right on the lawn. If you collect and compost grass clippings, mix them well with a bulky “brown” material to keep them from becoming compacted and smelly. O What should I do with leaves that don’t fit in my bin? To decrease the volume of leaves, run the lawn mower over them before adding them to the pile, or wet them down and cover with a tarp to keep them from blowing away. Add them to your compost bin throughout the year to cover food waste or to provide “brown” materials for your composting recipe. Leaves and yard waste (not food waste) can easily be composted in a pile without using a bin. O Can I compost through the winter? Although the process will slow down in cold weather, some bacteria activity will continue. Food waste can still be added as long as it is covered each time with leaves or straw. You can further insulate your pile by covering it with thick, dark plastic.

Should I Add Lime? It is not necessary (and can sometimes cause problems) to add lime to adjust the acidity of a compost pile. Pine needles? Pine needles have a high acid content and are good to use as mulch on acidloving plants such as strawberries or rhododendrons. Pine needles take a long time to fully compost. No more than 10 percent of a pile should be pine needles at one time. Wood ashes? Use wood ashes cautiously; they have a high alkaline level. However, they do provide potash, a valuable nutrient for your garden. Add ashes to your compost pile in small quantities – no more than a quarter of an inch at a time. ~ Center for EcoTechnolog y (CET), 112 Elm Street, Pittsfield, MA, (413) 445-4556 ext. 25, www.cetonline.org


Food & Drink A Thousand Years Over a Hot Stove, By Laura Schenone Review By Miriam Jacobs A Thousand Years Over a Hot Stove, is not a new book, but I hope you won’t mind. I was inspired to choose it because I was dismayed with the highly artificial way the media currently portrays the world of cooking. In sharp contrast, this book warmly weaves together author Laura Schenone’s own family history, the sociological importance of cooking to women, and the history of cooking in America starting with the native inhabitants of this land (from whom she shares the instructions on how to build an earth oven). For instance, did you know that it was feminist Lydia Maria Child who wrote the first blockbuster cookbook, The Frugal Housewife, in 1829? It made her famous and much more money than the writing and publishing of literature and polemics (… plus c'est la même chose). In the cookbook she gave great advice on frugality, including yummy recipes using cheap cuts, such as mutton rack. (and did you know that just maybe that word ‘yum’

might be directly from the African Gullah word ‘n’yam’, meaning to eat?) In that same cookbook she also pushed her passionate agenda concerning the importance of education for girls, which was tolerated because, after all, it was merely in a cookbook. Her later writing on abolition was not as well received and her reputation suffered. A Thousand Years Over a Hot Stove will tell you fascinating stories about the eating habits of the mill women in their boardinghouses (you will be amazed at the huge breakfasts they ate), the influence of the introduction of revolutionary new inventions such as cast-iron stoves and canning, as well as the way we use ethnic foods to maintain our cultural ties to the old countries from which our forebears emigrated. The story of cooking is so much more complicated and fascinating than we have been led to believe, and I think you will just love reading about and connecting with your food in a much deeper, more profound, and historical way. ~ Miriam Jacobs is a writer and speaker and runs www.5thvillage.org

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BTW save room French chef, American baker, real food

5pm dinner only, seasonal hours

150 Main Street Lee, Mass. 413.243.6397 cheznousbistro.com

Crepes • Paninis • Soups • Salads

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Espresso • Coffee • Tea • Juices

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id you know that coconut water has an alkalizing effect on your body? It is also rich in electrolytes, vitamins, amino acids, and cytokinins, or plant hormones, which have anti-aging, anti-cancer, and anti-thrombolytic effects in humans.

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Visit our historic landmark Railroad Street, Lee, Massachusetts (413) 243-2082

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businesses

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April / May 2013

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Animal Talk April - May Event Sampler

CARING FOR PETS SINCE 1957 Your trusted source for quality foods and supplies. Your trusted resource for raw-feeding information and advice.

BENSDOTTER’S PET 413-528-4940 940 MAIN STREET, GREAT BARRINGTON, MA 01230

Convenient Location with Ample Parking on Route 7 less than a minute south of Guido’s

Monday-Friday 10a-6p Saturday-Sunday 10a-4p www.bensdotters.com

To see more events or to post your event for free go to

www.OurBerkshireCalendar.com Hoffmann Bird Club Field Trip to Connecticut Coastal Caravan

Date: Sat, April 6, 2013, 7am Place: Connecticut Coast, Pittsfield, MA (413) 655-8594 Price: Free A ¾-day trip to the Connecticut shoreline in the Milford - New Haven area looking for wintering waterfowl. Bring a scope. Lunch optional. Leave CT for MA about 2:30pm. Contact Dave Monk in advance at 655-8594, mamonks@verizon.net to arrange carpools. www.hoffmannbirdclub.org

Hoffmann Bird Club Field Trip to Stockbridge Cemetery & Beartown State Forest

Date: Sat, April 13, 2013, 7:30am Place: Red Lion Inn, 30 Main Street, Stockbridge, MA - (413) 528-4355 Price: Free Search for early spring migrants at two seldom explored sites in South County. Meet on Rt. 7 in Stockbridge across from the Red Lion Inn. Contact Kate Ryan at 528-4355, divinducky@ aol.com, for details. www.hoffmannbirdclub.org

Animals Up Close: The Red Coatimundi

Date: Tues, April 16, 2013, 1pm Place: Berkshire Musuem, Pittsfield, MA Encounter remarkable animals from around the world, presented by the W.I.L.D. Center & Zoological Park of New England, and learn how to support efforts to protect the habitats

and unique environments these animals need to survive. Species featured include the Red Coatimundi, Giant Flemish Rabbit, American Alligator, Australian Argus Monitor, Prehensile-tailed Porcupine, Goliath Bird-eating Tarantula, and Arctic Fox. Price: $15 adult ($5 member); $8 child ($3 member), children 3 and under free. Includes Museum admission. Tickets are available in advance by calling (413) 443-7171 ext. 10. Members Priority Seating.

Bowl-A-Thon Fundraiser

Date: Sat, April 27, 2013, 3pm Place: Cove Lanes, Great Barrington, MA Bowl-A-Thon Fundraiser to benefit Purradise, Berkshire Humane Society’s cat adoption center. Get a team of four together to bowl three games for a good cause. 50/50 raffle, prizes, and fun! Call Danielle at (413) 447-7878 if you have any questions. www.berkshirehumane.org

Hoffmann Bird Club Field Trip to Kent Falls, CT

Date: Fri, May 24, 2013, 5:30am Place: Bershire area TBD, Pittsfield, MA (413) 442-6327 Price: Free Join a ¾-day trip along River Road in search of Worm-eating, Hooded & Cerulean Warblers. Bring lunch. Contact Noreen Mole for more information at 442-6327, smole@berk shire.rr.com. www.hoffmannbirdclub.org

Catering to the needs of the well loved pet since 1993. Premium foods. Quality toys, treats, bedding and accessories for your furry friends! 333 Main St., LakeviLLe, Ct (860)435-8833

Catering to the needs of the well loved pet since 1993. Premium foods. Quality toys, treats, bedding, and accessories for your furry friends!

 333 Main Street, Lakeville, CT

(860) 435-8833 6

April / May 2013

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Our Berkshire Marketplace

Fashion & Beauty

Innovative Product!

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Intranasal Light Therapy

ntranasal Light Therapy (the simple pro- minutes. Based on the US Food and Drug cess of clipping a small red light diode Administration (FDA) information sheets for to the nose) is a way to stimulate self medical devices, low-level laser therapy (LLLT), healing and boost immunity by illuminating as well as normal light therapy devices, are catthe blood capillaries through the nasal cav- egorized as “non-significant risk” products. ity. Numerous conditions have been found The healing process is completely natural in to benefit from this therapy as it stimulates harnessing the power of the body to heal itself. restoration of body balance (homeostasis). Light therapy is low cost, effective, and conveWhen in balance, the body can prevent or re- nient, making it a healing breakthrough. verse conditions such as high blood pressure, The technology is complementary to high LDL cholesterol, diabetes, medications and dietary suppleatherosclerosis, sinusitis, de- Intranasal light ments in general. More than 40 mentia, viral infections, asthma, of accumulated scientific therapy can years immune system deficiencies, studies on low-level light therinfections, rheumatoid arthritis, stimulate self apy reveal no major contrainfibromyalgia, psoriasis, certain dications, and patients learn healing and to reduce the dosage of other sleep disorders, and more serious conditions. (under their docboost immunity. medications Researchers have found tor’s supervision) as the body that intranasal light therapy works systemi- heals with regular use of the device. It does cally, rather than directed at any particular no harm, respects the natural power of the condition. In conjunction with a good health body to heal, considers the fundamental program, it can assist the body in reaching ho- health factors, and promotes disease prevenmeostasis, and in the process many conditions tion. Most importantly, it gives those who are addressed. The light source also stimulates use it ownership of their own health. relevant areas of the brain to restore homeoIntranasal Light Therapy is supported stasis and raise improved cognitive perfor- by a large body of scientific evidence, both mance. Facial areas respond directly to the for the underlying mechanism as well as for light source and, as a result, the user may ex- demonstrating its efficacy for many diseases. perience immediate relief for pain in the face *Note that this statement has not been evaluated by and neck areas, addressing sinus, nasal con- the FDA. This device is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease because only a drug gestion, headache, migraine, and fatigue. Treatments are painless, lasting about 25 (for better or worse) can legally make such a claim.

A unique boutique in downtown Pittsfield for you to explore! Clothing  Accessories  Gifts 137 North Street, Pittsfield, MA The Shops In Crawford Square

www.pateezboutique.com

April - May Event Sampler

The blood profile reveals a person’s state of health. If we look at blood sample slides from a dark field microscope of an unhealthy subject (photo at left), we will see that the red blood cells (RBCs) are sticking together (aggregating) and behaving like glue – with high resistance to flow (“high viscosity”). The photo at right shows the same subject after 25 minutes of using the intranasal light unit.

Purchase Locally and Save $20! To find out more about the VieLight Intranasal Light Therapy unit go to www.mediclights.com and www.vielight.com. The unit sells online for $299 plus $20 shipping. For a limited time you can purchase this unit locally though Our BerkshireGreen, Inc. for $299 with free shipping (a $20 savings!).

To purchase the 633 Red Diode (LED) Intranasel Light Therapy unit go to the "Marketplace" at www.OurBerkshireGreen.com and save $20!

To see more events or to post your event for free go to www.OurBerkshireCalendar.com Radiant Natural Skin Care Workshop Date: Sat, April 27, 2013, 12-3pm Place: TriYoga Berkshire, 1124 North Main Street (Route 7), Sheffield, MA - (413) 854-3177 Price: $50 all material included. Advance Registration Required by 4/8/13. Come join us for this riotously fun time of making delicious natural skin care products using all natural ingredients from the kitchen and garden - fruits, vegetables, grains, nuts, essential oils, and your creative spirit will be used to make salves, creams, masks, lip balms, and more. Bring your notebook to record these amazing recipes and wear clothes that you can play in! Offered by Pam Youngquist, PhD, Traditional Naturopathic Care. To register call (413) 229-9013.

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April / May 2013

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Electrosmog - Part 2

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8

April / May 2013

Look for More Solutions in Upcoming Issues! / By Kathy I. Regan

I

n part one of this article (found in the April-May issue of Our BerkshireTimes Magazine, and still available online at www. OurBerkshireTimes.com in our magazine archive) we covered the various forms of EMFs (electromagnetic and radio frequency radiation) that we are exposed to on a regular basis, and how they affect us. We also discussed The BioInitiative 2012 Report (created by prestigious independent scientists and health experts from around the world), found at www.bioinitiative.org, that cites more than 3,800 studies detailing the toxic effects and possible risks from EMFs. There is significant growing evidence that clearly indicates that it is very much in our best interest to eliminate and/or reduce exposure to EMFs when and where we can for ourselves and for the sake of our children (they are at particular risk for altered brain development, blood brain barrier damage, impaired learning and behavior, and other serious health risks). Our BerkshireTimes received more positive feedback about addressing this subject than any other topic we have covered to date, which I find very encouraging. But I also heard (and personally understand) how frustrated, scared, and vulnerable many of our readers feel about wireless devices in our school systems and EMF pollution from smart meters in particular. But take heart, working together we can raise awareness and make our community a safe and healthy place to live. So, what exactly can we do?

Two Important Misconceptions The first thing we need to do is to clear up two important misconceptions. One is that lower frequencies are not harmful. Dr. Joseph Mercola (www.mercola.com) states, “At lower frequencies, such as the microwave range used by mobile phones and base stations, the energy emitted is too low to damage chemical bonds (non-ionizing radiation). This is the primary argument used by those who believe that cell phone radiation is completely harmless and choose to live in ignorant bliss and refuse to change their unhealthy behavior.” Although cell phone radiation is of low intensity, it is the oscillatory similarity between this pulsed microwave radiation and certain electrochemical activities within our bodies that raises serious concerns, according to the study Physics and biology of mobile telephony, published in The Lancet. We also need to understand that state and government officials are not adequately protecting us. We assume, and in fact are led to believe by product manufacturers, and utility and related service providers, that current standards for EMFs are perfectly safe and that all products sold in this country have been carefully tested. This is far from true. Keep in mind that in the early 1980s when cell phones were first introduced into the US market they were exempted from premarket safety testing under the “low power exclusion” rule. This exemption continues today regardless of the countless studies that have been published in peer-reviewed

www.OurBerkshireTimes.com

journals indicating serious safety concerns. Why? Because the cell phone industry alone is estimated to be worth more than two billion dollars – and simply put, money buys political influence. There is no federally developed national standard for safe levels of exposure to radiofrequency (wireless) energy. Many groups make a seemingly strong case for health safety by guaranteeing that their products are well below the Specific Absorption Rate, SAR (a measurement of the rate at which radio frequency energy is absorbed by the body). While the FCC has imposed a regulatory measure on peak exposure, the limit cannot logically be accepted as the cutoff line between healthy and hazardous. This is evident, considering that different nations have very different limits on peak exposure. Also, cumulative effects from multiple sources are not taken into consideration.

It's All About Harmony Electromagnetic Hypersensitivity Syndrome is a condition in which people are highly sensitive to electromagnetic fields. When exposed to wireless radiation they experience various symptoms including headache, fatigue, stress, nausea, burning and itchy skin, brain fog, and muscle aches. Lloyd Burrell (author of the eBook Beating Electrical Sensitivity, the Path to Tread, which you can buy through his website at www.elec tricsense.com), suggests that EMFs are not the sole underlying cause of electric sensitivity, but rather a trigger. He found out through his own experience that to heal his sensitivity he needed to implement a holistic healing program eliminating environmental, mental, and emotional toxins from his body. Watch his video clips, Beating Electrical Sensitivity, Part 1-4 on You Tube. There is also a wealth of quality information on his website. Learning about the hazards of EMFs can be stressful, but keep things in perspective – negative emotions are toxic in and of themselves, so it is important to stay calm. Do take the necessary steps to clean up your environment and your health, but remember that joy, love, and contentment are also powerful medicine.

Measuring EMF Levels You can find a professional to test your home, school, and workplace to establish the level of electrosmog in your environment, but decent EMF meters are now so reasonably priced and easy to use that you may wish to do some testing yourself as well. There are meters for specific EMF applications and also combination models. Companies that have a good selection of quality but affordable meters include Safe Living Technologies, www.slt.co, and www.lessemf.com (which has a useful guide to help you choose the correct meter for your needs: www.lessemf.com/guide.html and www. lessemf.com/metersbyapplication.html). One meter I like in particular to measure the levels


of harmful electromagnetic pollution present in my home and office is the STETZERiZER® Microsurge Meter by Graham-Stetzer, available at www.stetzerelectric.com and through www.Amazon. com. Note that you will need a separate radiofrequency meter to measure wireless devices.

Empowering Solutions The Problem: Wi-Fi in schools and public places. The Solution: The solution is straightfoward: switch back to a cabled network. In addition to protecting our children and the community from unnecessary harmful radiation, a cabled network can be just as convenient as Wi-Fi when installed correctly, it’s more secure, and it’s faster, which is a major bonus! According to NBC News, France, Germany, and England have dismantled wireless networks and have switched back to cabled networks in schools and public libraries. Schools in Canada, Austria, Switzerland, and select areas in the United States are following suit. Brenda Glashan, principal of the Aurora Montessori School north of Toronto said “Schools are in the business of helping children, not hurting them so we shouldn’t be taking chances.” The Aurora Montessori school is known for its advanced computer lab, and now hardwires all of its internet connections.. www.safeschool.ca, www.safeinschool.org The Problem: Electromagnetic radiation from household, office, and school appliances and equipment. The Solution: Two online stores that I am aware of, Stetzer Electric, Inc. (www.stetzerelectric.com) and Greenwave (www.green wavefilters.com) sell filters that you simply plug into your electrical outlets to reduce dirty electric. We have them in our home: they are effective, very reasonably priced, and they can be checked with the STETZERiZER® meter mentioned above. Note that many professionals say, and I agree, that it is best to stick to protection devices that produce results that can be measured with a handheld meter because if the device does not work it could lull you into a false sense of security. Earthing or Grounding (see article on page 14 of this issue) is also helpful. Search for Dr. Joseph Mercola and Clint Ober’s demonstration of the science behind Earthing on You Tube. The Problem: Smart Meters, and Automated Meter Reading (AMR) Devices for Water, Gas, and Electric. The Solution: Almost all meters in our area are now AMR devices. Full Smart Meters are on their way. Both of these devices emit harmful radiation. You cannot always tell if you have one, because your service provider did not ask your permission to install it, and many old-fashioned analog meters have been retrofitted with chips and antenna to operate wirelessly. Therefore, your best bet to find out is to use an RFR hand-held meter to test it. AMR meters are vulnerable to spoofing attacks and privacy breaches; they broadcast readings generally every 15 to 30 seconds regardless of whether any drive-by meter readers are in range; and they have a communication range larger than expected. Not good! Call your electric company to see if they will swap it for a nonradiation emitting meter, and then be sure to lock it up and post No Trespassing signs if you get one. If your utility service provider will not give you back a nonradiation-emitting meter, and you wish to protect your family by replacing the radiation-emitting meter with a safe, oldfashioned analog meter, go to www.freedomtaker.com. If you wish to leave the meter in place but want to shield your living space from the radiation, go to www.smartmeterblocker.com and www.smartmetershield.com. For additional information go to www.haltmasmartmeters.org, www.stopsmartmetersmassachusetts.org, www.sandaura.wordpress.com, and www.stopsmeters.org.


Summer wonder June 24 - August 16

Eight weeks of summer programs: Children’s House (ages 3-6) Elementary (ages 6-12) Visit BerkshireMontessori.org for session descriptions and to register.


Education & Workshops Cultivating Emotional Intelligence

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By K. Meagan Ledendecker

friend who teaches science to kindergartners through fifth-graders in local public school recently told me how she decided to dedicate time to teaching how to be a good friend. She went on to explain how her students were reacting so harshly and how social interactions tended to escalate quickly. Although taking time away from academics may be frowned upon by some, emotional intelligence is critical to later success in life. Jane M. Healy, PhD, an educational psychologist, has written numerous, wellresearched books on children, their brains, and learning. In Your Child’s Growing Mind, she argues that emotional intelligence is “actually more important in life than school smarts.” One way to cultivate emotional intelligence is to help children learn how to identify when they are starting to feel out of control or overwhelmed, and then how to

access tools for calming themselves down. At The Montessori School of the Berkshires we use Take a Break spaces where children can go on their own accord, so as to regain some composure or calm. Our Take a Break spaces are inspired by The Shining Mountain Center for Peaceful Childhood and include items that appeal to different senses. Components of the Take a Break spaces can include: O Scent bottles with essential oils (for calming, energizing, or promoting balance) O Pictures of peaceful scenes from nature O Textured items such as objects from nature, sensory balls, and the like O Items like a sand timer or electric tea candle (to indicate a “start” to using the space)

Berkshire Country Day School

Continued on page 12

HANDS-ON SUSTAINABILITY EDUCATION Sustainability tours by appointment:

• Ecological wastewater treatment • Wind and solar energy • Organic gardening • Composting & recycling • Sustainability Education Experience Days (SEEDs) for grades 7-12 Fourth Annual Sustainability Symposium:

April 23, 2013

Darrow is a college-preparatory, coed, boarding and day school for grades 9–12 located on the Massachusetts–New York border. 518-794-6000 • www.darrowschool.org

Call or email to set up your campus visit today!

Great Barrington Rudolf Steiner School

Where you belong.

The Frog Prince

“One size does not fit all when it comes to education. At BCD, students learn to ask questions, get answers and be themselves.” --BCD parent

a full-length marionette stor y

S a t u r d a y, A p r i l 6 , 1 0 a m S a t u r d a y, M a y 1 1 , 1 0 a m Free performances of the Frog Prince, based on the classic tale of transformation from the Brothers Grimm, performed by our teachers. Followed by an opportunity to experience our early childhood programs.

Preschool through Grade 9

Stockbridge MA

BerkshireCountryDay.org

For more information call 413-528-4015, ext. 106, or visit gbrss.org

3 5 We s t P l a i n R d , G r e a t B a r r i n g t o n , M A

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April / May 2013

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Education & Workshops

In Business

Cultivating Emotional Intelligence

The Simple Written Word:

Continued from page 11

O Objects that provide auditory or visual interest such as sea shells, thumb piano, kaleidoscope, and the like To keep the area fresh and engaging, we try to rotate the Take a Break items every few weeks. My daughters and I created a version of the Take a Break space for home. Together we found a neutral space in our upstairs hall where we could nestle in a bean bag, a PillowPet, a blanket, and a basket of some calm-down items. The tissue box came later, once someone used the space while teary-eyed! In addition to some books (for reading and coloring), we added scented pencils, a small bean bag, a sensory ball, as well as some easy-to-make sensory items. O In a slender jar, we added glitter, water, and food coloring, which provides a lovely, calming effect when you shake it. O We also colored rice with food coloring and rubbing alcohol, added it to a Ball jar, and hid little items inside. O Finally, we smooshed homemade playdough into balloons, which creates the perfect squish-when-upset item! While fun to make, the underlying purpose of all of the items and spaces is to help children become more emotionally literate. I’m delighted when one of my children stomps off, shouting, “I need to take a break!” In that moment she has recognized that she’s on the brink of doing something that she’ll likely regret once she’s calmed down. Whether at home or in school, we can create the spaces where our children can cultivate their emotional intelligence and form a foundation for future success. ~ K. Meagan Ledendecker is the Director of Education at The Montessori School of the Berkshires. She founded the school with her husband, Todd Covert. www.berkshiremontessori.org

Low Energy Neurofeedback System

Has your child been diagnosed with ADD/ADHD, autism or a learning disorder? For a safe and effective way to help your child, contact Dr. Peter May for a FREE CONSULTATION to find out how LENS Neurofeedback can help.

Dr. Peter May | 413-664-9050 | brainneurofeedback.com

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April / May 2013

Why So Hard?

T

By Frank J. Mendelson

he simple written word. Oh why, oh why is it so difficult to communicate it with clarity? More practice. I need more practice. Pablo Casals, acclaimed by many as the greatest cellist of the twentieth century, was asked at age 95 why he still practiced for six hours a day. He replied, “Because I think I’m getting better.” In Outliers: The Story of Success, Malcolm Gladwell argues that, indeed, practice is key. He identifies he magic number for greatness in his “10,000 hour rule.” Gladwell writes that 10,000 hours is the necessary and required amount of time spent in practice to achieve the level of mastery associated with being a world-class expert – in anything. “In Hamburg, we had to play eight hours a day,” said John Lennon. According to Gladwell, “By the time [The Beatles] had their first burst of success in 1964, in fact, they had performed live an estimated 1,200 times in their entire careers.” I need more practice. Look at Up in the Old Hotel for guidance. New Yorker author Joseph Mitchell’s composite character, old Mr. Flood, when talking about how to cook seafood, said “it takes almost a lifetime to do a thing simply.” Kenneth Roman and Joel Raphaelson, senior executives at the global advertising agency Ogilvy & Mather, combined to publish Writing That Works. The subtitle of this slender volume is maximally inclusive: “How to write memos, letters, reports, speeches, resumes, plans and other papers that say what you mean – and get things done.” They begin by talking about need, citing a 1979 article from Fortune magazine in which executives were asked what academic preparation was necessary for success in the business world. The unanimous reply: Teach them to write better. “Don’t mumble” is Roman and Raphaelson’s first, and possibly best, piece of advice, “Once you’ve decided what you want to say, come right out and say it.” But, yes, it takes practice. David Ogilvy, the original Mad Man and the firm’s founder, distributed a ten-point memo to his employees on how to write and be effective. Ogilvy wrote, “Woolly-minded people write woolly memos, woolly letters, and woolly speeches.” In essence, to communicate, you must first fully understand what you want to communicate. Then, and only then, can you write in simple and direct language – the most powerful way to communicate.

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Come right out and say it. Sometimes we mumble when we write. Sometimes we say too much and lose the point. We find ourselves trying to impress our boss, or our readers, with fancy words and phrases. They are distracting. In business, pare your statement down. We know this is essential advice when you prepare a personal or organizational elevator pitch. Can you say what it is you do in 2 minutes? How about in 15 seconds? But even the best companies write in a woolly way. For example, consider this corporate boilerplate from one company’s press release: As the trusted standard for all studio box office reporting, <MY COMPANY> provides intelligence into overnight theater-level reporting across the global theatrical market. What? What do you do? <MY COMPANY> analyzes the overnight box office from movie theaters around the world. Another example, from a corporate report: Net absorption of office space, which measures changes in occupied space from one period to the next, increased to 11.1 million square feet (msf) in the second quarter of 2012, up from 7.8 msf in the previous quarter. Huh? Not quite as easy to summarize. Avoiding their preferred term of art (net absorption of office space), here is my unsolicited attempt at revision: In 2012, occupied office space increased by 3.3 million square feet between the first and second quarters. Maybe you must use specific wording dictated by company policy, but start with the simple, direct statement, and build from there. With a little discipline and practice, it’s so much simpler than the other way around. Or, just skip to Ogilvy’s Rule #10. If you want action, go tell the guy what you want. ~ Frank J. Mendelson is an author, mediator, trainer, and teacher of business communications. He is senior account executive and managing editor for PRI Works, a creative design agency. Reach Frank at (518) 567-6413 or frank@priworks.com, www.priworks.com.


Community Spotlight: Dalton & Hinsdale The Artful Warrior

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insdale resident Andrea Feldman used painting as a healing therapy while undergoing treatment for two major illnesses. It helped distract her from her physical and emotional discomfort. She says “I was able to paint for at least part of most days. When I grew impatient with a piece, I told myself to just keep going and explore what might happen. After all, I had the time. That freedom allowed me to fully relax into the painting process. My mind and body were (relatively) quiet and peaceful; my thoughts were only of the colors and shapes.”

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So Much More than Fresh Coffee • Join Us for Breakfast Lunch & Dinner • 661 Main Street Dalton, MA (413).684.5080

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Sandi Girard (Co-op Branch Mgr., Wahconah Lacrosse President, Community Servant) and her team in Dalton are not just bankers – they’re your neighbors.

24/7/365/124… now those are bankers’ hours.

488 Main Street, Dalton (413) 684-1551 www.pittsfieldcoop.com Member FDIC

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Member SIF

Equal Housing Lender

April / May 2013

13


Health & Wellness

Earthing

The most important health discovery ever?

Book written by Clinton Ober, Stephen Sinatra, M.D., Martin Zucker

By Kathy I Regan

M

odern life has birthed many new wonders and advanced technology into the world. As humans we can be extremely creative, powerful, and self-sufficient beings, but we sometimes forget that our very survival depends completely on the gifts that Mother Nature provides. In our preoccupation with striving to achieve the latest and greatest creation of the moment to improve the quality of our lives, we lose sight of the fact that nature already had the fundamentals figured out long ago (with a little help from a higher power) and that new and improved is not always best. When left to their own devices (outside the reach of man’s influence) the plants and beasts of our world not only survive but thrive. Why is it then that current statistics show that Americans are actually less healthy across their entire life spans than citizens of 16 other wealthy nations? We have moved away from our natural connection to the earth in so many ways, and do not realize how profoundly this has effected us mentally, physically, and spiritually.

As you probably know, one unfortunate reason that many natural life-fortifying practices are not supported by the mainstream is because they do not fit into the plan of those who run our mega-billion-dollar health industry, and are quickly squelched as quackery. So, we need to do our own research, use our own intuition, and find openminded, supportive healthcare practitioners to help us on our quest. Another important reason I believe that some natural health practices and products are not given the respect they deserve is that overzealous claims are made for them, and when the expected immediate miracle is not achieved, they are cast aside as useless at best or fraudulent at worst. We tend to be a rather impatient lot in this fast-paced society. Good health, just like disease, is not achieved overnight. Small subtle positive (or negative) changes do add up, and can have quite a powerful effect over time. Earthing is just such a subtle but profound “therapy.” So what is Earthing anyway? Humans have walked barefoot and sat and slept on the Earth since time immemorial, thus absorbing the Earth’s natural electric energy into their bodies.

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April / May 2013

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Mind & Spirit

Health & Wellness We are electrical beings, and as with all living things, we are meant to be connected to the Earth. You can’t see the Earth’s energy but some people can feel it as a warm, tingling, and pleasant sensation when they are out walking barefoot along the water’s edge or on a stretch of dewmoistened grass. According to www.earthinginstitute.net, the body is mostly water and minerals and a good conductor of electricity (electrons). The free electrons on the surface of the Earth are easily transferred to the human body as long as there is direct contact, and this plays an extremely important role in maintaining health. It can also help to protect us from electric fields (not wireless). Unfortunately, syntheticsoled shoes act as insulators and when we are in homes and office buildings, we are also insulated and unable to receive the Earth’s balancing energies. 

 So go sit, stand, or walk barefoot outside for a halfhour and see what a difference it makes on your pain or stress level. Grass, sand, dirt, and concrete are all conductive surfaces from which your body can draw the Earth’s energy. Wood, asphalt, and vinyl will not work. You can also find Earthing products that are helpful to use in the winter, while sleeping, and while working at your computer, at www.earthing.com.

Energy In Motion Studio PILATES, YOGA, FITNESS Movement for renewed energy, health and well-being. Focus on alignment, back care, sports performance; special needs welcome. Private sessions or small group classes in a beautifully equipped studio.

Catherine Brumley West Stockbridge, MA 413-232-7838

Colon Hydrotherapy & Sauna Therapy Colonic-Lymphatic Enhanced Detoxification Far Infrared & Ozone Sauna Therapy Concettina & Bruce Collingwood I-ACT Certified Colon Hydrotherapists 413-445-7470 • ccollingwood@nycap.rr.com Located in Pittsfield, Massachusetts

Sharon True, M.A., C.M.A., R.S.M.T

Somatic Movement Therapist & Certified Pilates Instructor PRIVATE, DUET, AND GROUP CLASS WORKOUTS WITH HOLISTIC APPROACH AVAILABLE IN GREAT BARRINGTON

413.528.2465

Kimio Wheaton

Restoring Balance for Men 805.717.6696 KimioWheaton.com

BECOME AN ENERGY HEALER FOR CURRENT CLASS SCHEDULE VISIT: www.yoursoulpath.com/contact-anne/events

MEDICAL HYPNOSIS

AnnE O'Neil is a One Light Healing Touch Instructor and Certified Practitioner. She has been working with energy healing since 1996.

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heilaa Hite Intuitive Counselor

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April / May 2013

15


Directory of Advertisers Animals

Food & Drink (continued)

BensDotter’s Pet .........................................................................6, 17 Lenox Village Integrative Pharmacy .................................................6 Petpourri, Inc. .....................................................................................6 VCA All Caring Animal Hospital ...................................................6

Sullivan Station Restaurant ...............................................................5 Wild Oats Market ..............................................................................5

Art, Culture & Entertainment Art et Industrie .............................................................................2, 17 Bruce Mandel, Performing Songwriter ..........................................2 Community Access to the Arts - CATA ........................................2 Darrow School ............................................................................3, 11 First Fridays Artswalk .......................................................................3 Old Castle Theatre Company ...........................................................3 Renaissance Art Center .....................................................................3 Sabine Vollmer von Falken Photography .......................................3 Tanglewood / Boston Symphony Orchestra ...............back cover Ventfort Hall ......................................................................................2

Business Services Genne M. LeVasseur, CPA ..............................................................13 Pittsfield Cooperative Bank, The .................................................13 Rodelinde Albrecht Editorial Services ........................................16

Education & Workshops Berkshire Country Day School ......................................................11 Darrow School .............................................................................3,11 Dr Peter D May, LENS Neurofeedback ....................................12 Great Barrington Rudolf Steiner School ......................................11 Montessori School of the Berkshires, The .............................10, 17

www.HartsvilleDesign.com

Fashion & Beauty Lenox Petit Spa at the Garden Gables Inn .......................................7 Pateez Boutique ...................................................................................7 Studio Day Spa .....................................................................................7 Zabian’s Jewelers ................................................................................9

Food & Drink Angelina’s ..........................................................................................13 Berkshire Co-op Market ..........................................inside front cover Berkshire Organics ............................................................................13 Chez Nous Bistro .............................................................................5 Guido’s Fresh Marketplace ..............................................................5 Hilltop Orchards - Furnace Brook Winery ...................................17 Juice N’ Java .....................................................................................13 Starving Artist Creperie & Cafe .......................................................5

(413) 274-1010 528-6133 (413) 16

April / May 2013

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Gift & Specialty Shops AzureGreen ........................................................................................15 Lenox Village Integrative Pharmacy ..............................................6

Health & Wellness Dr Peter D May, LENS Neurofeedback ...................................12 Energy in Motion Studio, Catherine Brumley ........................15 Hydro Health of Western Massachusetts .................................15 Jacqueline Nicholas, Healer ...........................................................15 Kimball Farms Retirement Community .....................................15 Lenox Village Integrative Pharmacy ............................................6 Livingstone Dental Excellence ....................................................14 Matt Albert, Rehabilitative Bodywork .........................................15 Naomi Alson, Acupuncturist & Herbalist ................................15 Stram Center for Integrative Medicine .......................................15 Susan Spiegel Solovay, Certified Medical Hypnotist ...............15 WholePerson Movement, Sharon True .......................................15

Home, Garden & Landscape Berkshire Fabric & Wallpaper Outlet ............................................8 Bodhi Tree Gallery .............................................................................8 George Yonnone Restorations .......................................................8 Hartsville Design Woodworking ...................................................16 Okerstrom Lang, Ltd. ......................................................................4 Pilling Landscaping, Inc. .................................................................4 Project Native ...................................................................................4 Ward’s Nursery & Garden Center ...............................................4 Young Feng Shui ..............................................................................8

Mind & Spirit AzureGreen ......................................................................................15 Kent Mikalsen Studio .....................................................................15 Kimio Wheaton ...............................................................................15 Sheilaa Hite, Intuitive Counseling .................................................15 your soul path ..................................................................................15

Nature Hilltop Orchards - Furnace Brook Winery ...................................17

Social Networking Concerned Singles .............................................................................17


Special Thanks to Our Featured Advertisers An education for life. Toddler Children’s House Elementary Adolescent Summer

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April / May 2013

17


boston symphony orch estra • summer 2013

shed concerts june/july june 21 friday

july 5 friday

7pm, Shed Melissa Etheridge Live with special guest Eric Hutchinson Grammy- and Oscar-winning American rock singer-songwriter Melissa Etheridge brings her mixture of personal lyrics, pop-based folk-rock, and smoky vocals to the Shed.

8:30pm, Shed

Opening Night at Tanglewood melissa etheridge

eric hutchinson

june 22 saturday

8:30pm, Shed The Boston Pops performs a Jerry Garcia Symphonic Celebration Featuring Warren Haynes Keith Lockhart, conductor

jerry garcia

A new symphonic project celebrating American musical icon Jerry Garcia. This groundbreaking orchestral adventure features Garcia's storied original warren haynes compositions as well as classic interpretations of timeless standards that were hallmarks of Garcia's shows. Renowned vocalist/guitarist Warren Haynes collaborates with the symphony, lending his soulsoaked, introspective blend of rock, blues, R&B and jazz to Garcia's masterworks.

Boston Symphony Orchestra Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos, joshua bell conductor Joshua Bell, violin ALL-TCHAIKOVSKY PROGRAM Violin Concerto Symphony No. 5

july 6 saturday

8:30pm, Shed Boston Symphony Orchestra Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos Anne Sofie von Otter, mezzo-soprano Women of the Tanglewood Festival Chorus, John Oliver, conductor PALS Children's Chorus, Andy lcochea lcochea, conductor MAHLER Symphony No. 3

july 7 sunday

2:30pm, Shed Boston Pops Orchestra Keith Lockhart, conductor Vince Gill, special guest The Boston Pops pay tribute to vince gillof Aaron the American West. Program to include music Copland, Bruce Broughton, and John Williams.

july 12 friday

8:30pm, Shed Boston Symphony Orchestra Kazushi Ono, conductor Leon Fleisher, piano WAGNER Siegfried Idyll RAVEL Piano Concerto in leon fleisher D for the left hand RIMSKY-KORSAKOV Scheherazade

june 23 sunday 2:30pm, Shed Joan Baez and the Indigo Girls

joan baez

Sponsored by Country Curtains, The Red Lion Inn, and Blantyre

july 13 saturday june 29 saturday

8:30pm, Shed Boston Symphony Orchestra David Newman, conductor BERNSTEIN West Side Story

indigo girls

5:45pm, Shed A Prairie Home Companion at Tanglewood with Garrison Keillor Live broadcast

garrison keillor

National Sponsor: Ford Motor Company

july 4 thursday 7pm, Shed Jackson Browne Sara Watkins, special guest

Fireworks to follow the concert

shed prices

jackson browne

Lawn: starts at $9

Experience a thrilling new presentation of this iconic film and winner of ten Academy Awards®, including Best Picture. The Boston Symphony plays Leonard Bernstein’s West Side Story © 1961 MetroGoldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc. All electrifying score live, while the rights reserved. © A.M.P.A.S. newly re-mastered film is shown on large screens in high definition with the original vocals and dialogue intact. This classic romantic tragedy, directed by Robert Wise and Jerome Robbins, and with lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, is one of the greatest achievements in the history of movie musicals. It features Robbins’ breathtaking choreography and a screenplay by Ernest Lehman based on the masterful book by Arthur Laurents.

july 14 sunday

2:30pm, Shed The Caroline and James Taylor Concert Boston Symphony Orchestra Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos, lynn harrell conductor Lynn Harrell, cello STRAVINSKY Suite from Pulcinella HAYDN Cello Concerto No. 1 in C BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 8

july 23 tuesday

7pm, Shed Barenaked Ladies, Ben Folds Five, and Guster “Last Summer on Earth 2013”

july 26 friday ben folds five

barenaked ladies

guster

8:30pm, Shed

july 19 friday

8:30pm, Shed Boston Symphony Orchestra Vladimir Jurowski, conductor Jean-Yves Thibaudet, vladimir jurowski piano WAGNER Prelude to Die Meistersinger LISZT Totentanz, for piano and orchestra BRAHMS Symphony No. 1

july 20 saturday

8:30pm, Shed The Ting Tsung Chao Memorial Concert Boston Symphony Orchestra Lothar Koenigs, conductor bryn terfel Cast to include Katarina Dalayman, soprano (Brünnhilde) Amber Wagner, soprano (Sieglinde) Bryn Terfel, bass-baritone (Wotan) WAGNER Die Walküre, Act 3 Sung in German with English supertitles

july 21 sunday

2:30pm, Shed Members of the Boston Symphony Orchestra Pinchas Zukerman, conductor, violin, pinchas zukerman and viola Elizabeth Rowe, flute John Ferrillo, oboe Thomas Rolfs, trumpet Malcolm Lowe, violin Amanda Forsyth, cello VIVALDI Concerto in A minor for two violins and strings, RV 522 VIVALDI Concerto in B-flat for violin, cello, and strings RV 547 J.S. BACH Concerto No. 2 in E for violin and strings, BWV 1042 TELEMANN Concerto in G for viola and strings, TWV 51:G9 J.S. BACH Brandenburg Concerto No. 2 in F, BWV 1047

The Evelyn and Samuel Lourie Memorial Concert Boston Symphony Orchestra

Christoph Eschenbach, conductor and piano christine schäfer Christine Schäfer, soprano ALL-MOZART PROGRAM “Ch’io mi scordi di te…Non temer, amato bene,” Concert aria for soprano and orchestra, with piano, K.505 Piano Concerto No. 12 in A, K.414 Symphony No. 41, Jupiter

july 27 saturday

8:30pm, Shed The Stephen and Dorothy Weber Concert Boston Symphony Orchestra Andris Nelsons, conductor Krist ne Opolais, soprano andris nelsons Lioba Braun, mezzo-soprano Dmytro Popov, tenor Ferruccio Furlanetto, bass Tanglewood Festival Chorus, John Oliver, conductor VERDI Requiem

july 28 sunday

2:30pm, Shed The Cynthia and Oliver Curme Concert Boston Symphony Orchestra Christoph Eschenbach, christoph conductor eschenbach Garrick Ohlsson, piano ˇ DVOR ÁK Carnival Overture PROKOFIEV Piano Concerto No. 3 DVORˇ ÁK Symphony No. 9, From the New World

july 29 monday

7pm, Shed An Evening with Steve Miller Band One of rock music’s all-time greats, the Steve Miller Band brings their classic blues-rock sound to Tanglewood.

steve miller band

Visit tanglewood.org for full schedule.

Sponsored by Canyon Ranch

tanglewood.org • 888-266-1200

Inside Shed: $15–$117

official chauffeured transportation

providing pianos for the boston symphony orchestra at tanglewood and the students of the tmc

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Our BerkshireTimes Magazine - April-May Issue  

Our BerkshireTimes is the voice of our community. It's a unique community-driven publication and a leading resource for local events, commun...

Our BerkshireTimes Magazine - April-May Issue  

Our BerkshireTimes is the voice of our community. It's a unique community-driven publication and a leading resource for local events, commun...

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