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SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 8, 2013

NEWNAN, GA • COWETA COUNTY’S NEWS SOURCE • ISSUE 177 • 3 Sections, 26 Pages • $1.25

N’Gate student spends summer in China

Ogletree continues link from Coweta to pros

see page 1C

see page 6A

Historical Concepts wins award for best makeover see page 1B

Groundbreaking Monday for UWG Newnan campus By Celia Shortt celia@newnan.com

Formal groundbreaking will be held Monday at the old Newnan Hospital on Jackson Street where renovation and construction work will transform the facilities for a University of West Georgia satellite campus.

O n Mond ay, t he c it y of Ne w n a n a n d t h e Un i ve rsity of West Georgia will officially break ground on the new UWG Newnan campus near downtown. The new campus will be located at the site of the former Newnan Hospital at 80 Jackson St., just north of the downtown business district. The public is invited to attend the celebratory event at 11:30 a.m. along with Newnan city leaders and officials with other groups involved in the proj-

ect. Representatives of UWG, Mayor Keith Brady, and members of the Newnan City Council will be participating. "This is one of the most exciting projects we've ever undertaken," said Brady earlier this year. "It will have a huge impact on the economy." The Newnan Hospital Redevelopment Project is a partnership between the city of Newnan, the Newnan Hospital board, Coweta County, UWG, and the University System of Georgia Board of Regents. The project will move and expand the current Newnan

campus housed at the Shenandoa h I ndust ria l Pa rk . T he redevelopment will increase instructional space from 15,000 square feet to 51,000 square feet in the first phase of construction. The second phase will bring the total instructional space to 87,000 square feet. Included in the plans is a new lecture hall. In addition to the expansion, the selection of course offerings will also broaden. In terms of economic impact for the community, according to the UWG’s Center for Business and Economic Research,

this project will bring $21 million to Newnan during the constructional phase and create 176 jobs. Long-term, it is expected to generate between $1.4 million and $3.4 million in the community each year. Work on the new campus has already begun. The asbestos abatement and demolition on the old hospital property began at the end of August, with some of the buildings scheduled to come down in the middle of September. Even though work started in

campus, page 2A

Newnan Times-Herald marks 148th birthday

Paper’s new manager Pulitzer nominee

“Given the global nature of business, easy access to the airport is

By W. Winston Skinner

one of the major selling points of our economic development efforts,” said Greg Wright, Coweta Development Authority president.

John Winters, the new general manager at The Newnan TimesHerald, has a long journalistic resume that includes investigations of a nuclear materials production plant, a story that led to a tax reduction for senior citizens and stints running publications in Alaska and Nebraska. Winters, 51, who grew up in Tulsa, Okla., assumed his duties earlier this year. His journalism career started while he was studying at Washington and Lee University in Virginia, where he took some introductory journalism courses. He was a U.S. history major. When his father sat him down for “the talk” about how his college degree might lead to a job, Winters shared his interest in journalism. Soon, he had a summer internship writing the Action Line column for the Tulsa World. The job involved responding to reader calls — from finding a clown for a child’s birthday party to getting a neglected pothole repaired. “I just loved it,” Winters recalled. Back at W&L, Winters was challenged by professors, including Clark Mollenhoff, a Pulitzer Prize winning reporter who had briefly served as ombudsman to President

Hartsfield-Jackson remains the world’s busiest airport

winston@newnan.com

manager, page 2A

By W. Winston Skinner

“Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport estimates its Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson economic impact at more than $32. 5 billion for the International Airport metro Atlanta econremains the world’s omy, and it certainly busiest airport and plays an important role has a positive impact in our economic sucon t he economy i n cess,” he said. C o w e t a C o u n t y, “Given the globa l located just 30 minnat u re of busi ness , utes south on Intereasy access to the airstate 85. port is one of the major A report from Wright selling points of our Globa l At la nta t h i s e conom ic develop week showed Hartsment efforts. It resof ield-Jack son has nates with company retained its position officials to know they with regard to airport can leave their Coweta traffic. The Atlanta airCounty facility, drive port has remained stato the airport, park ble as the growth rate of its closest competitheir vehicle, check Boothby tor, Beijing, slowed contheir bags, get through siderably, according to Global security and be at their gate in Atlanta. an hour,” Wright explained. Greg Wright, president of “From there, companies are the Coweta County Development Authority, ref lected on the airport’s impact on Coweta. airport, page 2A winston@newnan.com

Photo by Winston Skinner

John Winters, general manager of The Newnan Times-Herald, confers with Jonathan Melville,

the newspaper’s IT coordinator.

More inside • New faces, changes at Times-Herald — page 9A • Newspaper’s origin dates to end of Civil War — page 10A • Times-Herald marks milestones through years — page 7B • Newspaper building got start as farm supply store — page 7B • Metered paywall part of website changes — page 4A

‘We are the recorder of life’ said people like different things — sports, food, movies, local news, entertainment features. The newspaper needs to have a range of features to attract as many people as possible. “I want to be able to offer a variety of things,” Winters said. C om mu n it y n e w s pap er s write about people’s births, de at h s a nd t he i mpor t a nt moments between, he points out. “The Newnan Times-Herald

By W. Winston Skinner

winston@newnan.com

“Com mun it y newspapers are still viable,” John Winters said. “I believe we’re very important.” Winters, the general manager of The Newnan Times-Herald since April, said he wants to make the Times-Herald appealing to as many potential readers as possible — and to make the newspaper the best possible option for local advertisers. “I want there to be something for everyone,” he said. Winters

vision, page 9A

Annual senior community reunion and picnic scheduled Sept. 21 By Sarah Fay Campbell sarah@newnan.com

Photo by Sarah Campbell

Willie Pritchett, center, and Clarence

“C-Bo” Bohannon share a laugh with a friend at last year’s United We Stand picnic.

The third Saturday in September mea ns United We Stand's Youth Appreciating Senior Citizens community and family reunion and picnic. The annual event, held at the Newnan Housing Authority's Boone Drive playground, features lots of food a nd

INSIDE Obituaries..................... 8A Community Up Close....3B Community Forum...... 4A Focus on Education...... 1C Sports........................... 6A Classifieds......................6C

fellowship. It's hosted by United We Stand for Positive Results, The Housing Authority, the Newnan Classic Car Club, Girls on the Move and the Dream Starter Association, with support from Newnan Utilities and Cargill. The event will run from 3 to 6 p.m. and all are welcome to TODAY

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What's the best part about supporting Coweta County students? Seeing their smiling faces. (If they ever look up that is!)

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attend, said Willie Pritchett of United We Stand. This year's event will be a special one, as it will be the last one primarily sponsored by United We Stand. Pritchett and Clarence “C-Bo” Bohannon, the founding fathers of United We Stand, are passing the torch to the Dream Starter Association, a group of young MONDAY

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20 percent chance of rain

men, many of whom went through United We Stand as teens themselves, who have formed a new organization to help youth. "We're glad the young men want to step in and become part" of serving the youth, Pritchett said. "We're old. I feel like the young people will listen to other young people a TUESDAY

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little better than they will old folks," he said. "We're not going away," he said. "We're just letting the young men continue the tradition … we'll be sitting on the porch." The event was founded as a way to bring the community

reunion, page 2A

WEDNESDAY

86 | 68 °

Clear and warm

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Rainfall (in inches)

Yesterday (as of 7 p.m.) 0.00 Monthly total 2.86 Year-to-date 45.46

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2A — The Newnan Times-Herald   |  Sunday, September 8, 2013

LOCAL

campus Continued from page 1A

August, “you won’t see anything until mid-September” said Newnan Business Development Director Hasco W. Craver IV. Classes at the new UWG Newnan campus are slated to begin January 2015. The budget for this project is $15 million and includes plans to preserve original historic

airport Continued from page 1A

within two hours of 8 percent of U.S. markets and four hours of any major North American city,” he added. Atlanta handled 95,513,828 passengers in 2012, up 3.4 percent from the previous year. That level of growth was only a little lower than Beijing Capital Airport's 4.1 percent rate, which puts the Chinese airport at 81,929,359 passengers, according to the World Airport Traffic Report from Airports Council International. A few years ago, the Beijing hub seemed poised to dethrone Ha r tsf ield-Jackson, but its ascent might have hit a wall this year. Not only did growth at Beijing Capital slow by onethird in 2012, but the city is also planning to build what would be the largest airport in the world. Atlanta, on the other hand, doesn't even have a feasible location for a second airport, according to a 2011 study conducted by Hartsfield-Jackson. Worldwide, traffic growth was up 4.4 percent to 5.7 billion passengers. While buoyed by emerging markets in 2012, growth in worldwide passenger traffic is projected to slow in 2013, according to Rafael Echevarne, ACI World’s director of economics and program development. “Overall, the traff ic outlook for 2013 is not encouraging. Although passenger traffic in 2013 is expected to grow, emerging markets in the BRIC countries are beginning to experience slowed growth,"

parts of the hospital buildings. The Georgia Board of Regents voted Jan. 8, 2012, to approve purchasing the property, and t he New n a n Cit y Cou nci l approved contracts to move the project forward on Jan. 22. The Newnan Hospital Board will donate all the land and give about $4.2 million toward the project. Coweta County will give slightly more than $500,000 over a 10-year period. Once the project is completed, the Board of Regents will buy the complex for $5 million. Echevarne said in a statement. BRIC is an acronym referring to Brazil, Russia, India and China, which are all experiencing new advanced economic development. " C om bi n e d , t h e a u s te rity measures and high unemployment in Europe as well as the turbulent recovery in the United States mean that the overall growth rate in passengers is expected to be well below 5 percent," according to Echevarne. By aircraft movements — takeoffs and landings — Hartsfield-Jackson also stayed on top with 930,310, beating out Chicago O'Hare International Airport, which posted 878,108. Hong Kong International Airport was the top cargo airport in the world in 2012, edging out Memphis. T he Memph is a nd Hong Kong facilities both handled more than four million metric tons. Candace Boothby, president of the Newnan-Coweta Chamber of Commerce, has talked often about the impact of Hartsfield-Jackson on Coweta County’s economy. Earlier this year she discussed economic reverberations that can be expected because of Porsche’s decision to put its headquarters near the airport. “When a world-class corporation like Porsche chooses to relocate its U.S. headquarters to the south region of metroAtlanta, it is like a Super Bowl TV ad,” she said. “Other companies will sit up and take notice and see the advantages in infrastructure, transportation and access to the world’s busiest airport.”

reunion Continued from page 1A

together, especially young people and senior citizens so they could "try to get a better understanding of each other," Pritchett said. And it's been very successful in that objective. "It's been wonderful. Wonderful," said Pritchett. Loca l politicia ns a re always invited to the event, so people can meet them. There will also be a small awards ceremony recognizing "people who have helped a long t he way," Pritchett said. There will be a DJ and hopes are for some live entertainment. There has been so much support over the years, from the business community, the churches, and the politicians and government officials. The night before the picnic, Bohannon, Pritchett and others stay up all night smoking meat. Members of the community bring side dishes and desserts. "Anyone wanting to be a part of the event, get in touch with one of us," said Pritchett. "We'll be glad to have them." They'll also ta ke any donations, of money and of food. Cargill donates a lot of meat for the event, but they usually buy some, as well. Cargill has "been with us a long time; they have been a blessing," Pritchett said. A ny leftovers are returned to the community. "We don't ever k now how many people will be there… it always ends up being enough," Pritchett said. For more i n for m ation, contact Bohannon at 770-658-4242, Pritchett at 678-978-4070 or Glynnis Tanner of the Newnan Housing Authority at 770253-6461, ext. 106, or e-mail gtanner@numail.org.

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Alicia Dye, Pat Harris, and June Harris, volunteers from East Newnan Baptist Church, welcome, from left,

mom, Destiny Whitney, and daughters Anslea and Natalea Whitley, who are returning to the Good News Club this year.

E. Newnan sponsoring Good News Club in Moreland East Newnan Baptist Church is again sponsoring the Good News Club at Moreland Elementary School. East Newnan is one of several churches sponsoring Good News Clubs at local schools. The clubs meet weekly after s c ho ol hou r s , w it h me e ti ngs conducted by chu rch volunteers.

“Good News Club is an exciting, fun-filled hour-and-a-half,” said June Harris, one of the volunteers working with East Newnan’s club. Club meetings include “dynamic Bible lessons, creative learning activities, meaningful fun songs, and life changing scripture memory,” Harris said. “There is always an activity

where all involved can release some of that pent-up energy,” Harris said. “The children learn respect for authority, character qualities and moral values.” Robin Meese is the Good News club coordinator for ENBC. All Moreland students from kindergarten through fifth grade may participate in the Good News Club there.

manager

ment got tired of him borrowing theirs. Winters began commuting to Washington, D.C., to attend month ly hea rings. In 1992 , Morris sent him to Washington as bureau chief. He continued covering the SRS story — creating copy not just for the Chronicle but for other Morris papers in Amarillo, Tx., and Oak Ridge, Tn., which also had plants involved in the nuclear weapons complex. One series of stories related to DuPont’s decision to leave SRS. The company was focusing on consumer products, a nd t he pluton iu m faci lit y did not fit with its image any longer. DuPont’s agreement was to run the plant for $1 per year plus expenses. Since it was company policy to give generous severance to employees at layoffs or closures, that money was also billed to the government. “Nobody would ever say the dollars, but it was in the millions,” Winters recalled. During those years, Winters was nominated for three Pulitzer Prize awards, the journalism’s highest honor, for this reporting on SRS. “It was a pretty heady time,” he recalled. “Here was little old me going up against the best repor ters a nd biggest papers in the country. Sometimes they beat me on a story, but sometimes I beat them.” In 1995, he was approached about becoming publisher of the Juneau Empire in Alaska. His recent bride, Corby, had ju st t a ken a job, but t hey ultimately decided to go to Juneau. He still remembers their shock when they figured out they could not drive cross country to their new home because Juneau could only be reached by plane. “It’s like a foreign city move. It takes forever,” Winters said. He recalled a time when he and his wife ventured out for something to eat but found ever y t h i ng closed. A fter a while, they figured out it was 3:30 a.m. and that the midnight sun had fooled them into thinking it was much later in the day. T he E mpi re wa s a g reat newspaper w it h nu merous awards. One of the highlights of Winters’ time there was a project on Alaska’s Indians and how they had handled getting large sums of money as oil drilling began on Indian lands. S om e g r o up s h a d h i r e d outside help and invested in tourism and other long-term i mprovements. Ot hers had clear cut their land and made a quick fortune that was quickly lost. Three staff members spent an entire year on the project — often sleeping on the floor in people’s homes in remote villages. “Mr. Morris always said it was one of the best journalistic endeavors his company had ever done,” Winters said. “I was really proud of my team for what they did.”

Du r i ng Wi nters’ t i me i n Alaska, the Empire was the site of a Newspaper Association of America executive com mittee conference that d rew top exec ut ive s f rom across the nation. The Internet was beginning to emerge as a communication source, and the paper won an Edge, the NAA’s top award for newspaper websites for papers with a circulation under 50,000. T here were about 50 employees at the Empire. In 20 0 0, Wi nters wa s n a med general manager at the Grand Island Independent in Nebraska, which had about 116 employees. A couple of years later, he was tapped to reactivate Morr i s Ne w s S e r v ic e . Wa lte r Jones, who also worked for the news service, suggested the Winters family look at Coweta County as a place to live. The Winters moved to Coweta, and the news service spread stories and columns to 30 newspapers in 11 states with a total circulation of 600,000. Winters selected columns on cars, home repairs, child ren’s b o ok s , mov ie s a nd wine, features, news and other subjects from various Morris papers. The bureau also covered state governments, NASCAR and the Atlanta Braves. T hey even sent repor t i n g teams to the Olympics and all four major golf tournaments. “I really had a blast doing that,” he said. Winters left Morris after 24 years. A key reason was that his wife’s parents were suffering from Alzheimer’s and dementia, and his wife and brother had to take custody of them. The family left Coweta to take care of Corby’s parents in Oklahoma for two years. After his in-laws’ deaths, t hey move d bac k to t hei r old home in Coweta County. “Newnan really had become home. The kids loved it,” Winters said. Wi nters w rote a book , “Ever ybody Needs a Sa m,” which is a about the importance of mentors, and followed it with a study guide. He also wrote “The Little Black Dress and the SONs of Thunder — Recipes on Life and Food.” When a job opened up at The Newnan Times-Herald in 2011, Winters took it. After the retirement of longtime publisher Sam Jones, he moved into the general manager post. Corby W i nter s i s a l i fe enrichment coach and speaker. Their sons are Caleb, 15, a student at Newnan High School; Seth, 12, who attends Madras Middle School; and Levi, 10, who is at Brooks Elementary. They are active in karate and Boy Scouts.

Continued from page 1A

Richard Nixon. “They worked with me, and they literally designed an entire journalism degree in a year,” Winters said. A passion for investigative reporting grew in Winters. After graduation, he got into contact with Billy Morris, who owned a chain of newspapers, and Winters got a job at the Augusta Chronicle. In August 1985, Winters went to work — covering city and county government. It was the era before cell phones and the Internet. The Herald published in the afternoon, and the newspaper paid for a telephone line at city hall so Winters could phone in stories from midday council meetings. When a law change required Richmond County to do a massive revaluation of property, Winters learned many older widows found themselves without enough money to pay their taxes on the increased value. He wrote a series of stories about the issue that the county tax commissioner passed along to t he cou nt y ’s leg islative delegation. That process led to the creation of the state law exempting senior citizens who met certain income criteria from paying the school property tax portion. Winters also began writing stories about the Savannah R iver Site, which had been started as part of the Manhattan Project during World War II. DuPont operated the plant, which manufactured plutonium a nd tritium, for the nation’s nuclear weapons complex. At that time, there were five reactors wit h about 1 5,000 employees. The University of Georgia had an ecology lab in the site. As Winters began covering SRS, efforts were under way to restart some closed reactors. “It became a huge national story,” he said. Primary coverage of SRS was being done by four organizations — the New York Times, the Washington Post, Associated Press and the Chronicle. Winters’ sources ended up including U.S. Sen. Sam Nunn a nd U. S. Sen. Strom T hurmond, other members of Congress and a South Carolina governor. Winters was interviewed for “48 Hours” and the SRS situation made the covers of Newsweek and Time as the nation came close to restarting the nuclear arms race with what was then the U.S.S.R. “It was a crazy time,” he said. S R S q u i c k l y upp e d i t s employees to about 24,000. Winters began getting reams of reports from the General Accou nt i n g O f f ice , wh ich eventually led the Chronicle to get him a fax machine — after the advertising depart-

Correction There was an error in the Sept. 4 story in The Newnan Times-Herald on repairs at 125 LaGrange St. Laura Rivers, owner of the house, said no interior walls in the home have been moved, as was incorrectly stated in the front page story. The

roof split along the crest of the home, which was for many years the residence of local educator Sally Bowen. Gina Snider, the city’s public information officer, said the city’s code enforcer confirmed “an interior wall has not been removed.”


Sunday, September 8, 2013  |  The Newnan Times-Herald — 3A

NATIONAL/STATE

Border communities say Washington debate misguided SAN DIEGO (AP) — Under the watch of a Border Patrol agent, U.S. and Mexican pastors set up two small altars — one on each side of a towering border fence — for Sunday service that spans two countries. The priests break bread simultaneously and hold up challises to the woven metal barrier. The guitar player is in Mexico, strumming a song led by clergy on the U.S. side. The buzzing of a passing Border Patrol officer on an all-terrain vehicle interrupts the music. The religious service is one of a myriad of ways life is seeping across the border post 9/11 as Congress considers spending billions on further fortification. Ranchers, deputies and lawmakers from border states have long pleaded for federal help, saying their areas were overrun by people entering the U.S. illegally and armed smugglers. Today there is growing opposition along the nearly 2,000mile boundary to more agents and fences. They include U.S. ministers, business leaders and mayors who say measures have reached their maximum effectiveness. The crackdown in the past decade should be applauded for bringing detentions of illegal crossers to historic lows — but ports of entry have been overlooked, said former El Paso Mayor John Cook, who now leads the Border Mayors Association, representing U.S. and Mexican mayors. Hours-long waits and overtaxed officers have become the norm at crossings, costing the region billions by deterring Mexican shoppers and delaying U.S. shipments. They favor expanding “trusted traveler” programs that give passes to pre-vetted crossers, digital fingerprinting and other technology to make entry more secure, though Congress hasn’t addressed those ideas. “We don’t need more Border Patrol agents — we need more customs agents,” Cook said. “Basically, we have 20th century infrastructure and for the most part, a 19th century policy to facilitate trade in the 21st century.” A far-reaching bill passed by the Democratic-led Senate

Ap photo/Kent D. Johnson

A Korean Air Airbus A380 gets a water cannon salute from Atlanta

Fire Department airport units as it arrives from Seoul to Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport on Friday morning, Sept. 6, 2013. The airline plans to start daily A380 service to Asia in October 2013. (AP Photo/Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Kent D. Johnson)

Atlanta airport welcomes the world’s largest jet AP Photo/ Gregory Bull

In this July 14, 2013 photo, Agustin Mendez, right, raises a chalice on the San Diego-side of the fence during a

cross-border Sunday religious service. As federal lawmakers thousands of miles away consider further sealing the border, many here on the ground are trying to blur the line and unite a region that was split apart by the security crackdown since the Sept. 11 attacks.

in June calls for an additional 20,000 Border Patrol agents, 700 miles of fencing and hightech detection devices. The proposed measures are tied to overhauling laws to address illegal immigration, including providing a path to citizenship for some. The Republican-controlled House favors tackling immigration with single-issue bills — starting with border security. Rep. Duncan Hunter, R-San Diego, said recently, long stretches of the border “remain dangerously open” and need fences. No action is expected until late fall, at the earliest. While billions have gone into securing remote sections, the crossings lag behind the booming trade from the North American Free Trade Agreement, said Jerry Sanders, San Diego’s former Republican mayor who now heads the San Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce. He points to the San Ysidro port of entry, the world’s busiest, where 50,000 cars and 25,000 pedestrians cross daily. The crossing has been under construction for years as Washington slowly releases money. “Better infrastructure means

better security,” Sanders said. The congressional debate comes as border communities have started reviving old ties. San Diego’s former Mayor Bob Filner, a Democrat, made that a hallmark of his term, before he resigned amid sexual harassment allegations. He lobbied for the first binational Olympic Games in the region and opened a city government office in Tijuana. The federal government also has started accommodating cross-border life. In Texas, U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials in April re-established a remote crossing along the Rio Grande in Big Bend National Park where people arrive to the U.S. via a small boat and scan passports at a visitor’s center. The unmanned crossing was closed after the Sept. 11 attacks. It was reopened to comply with a decades-old bilateral agreement that formed a binational park by linking Big Bend to Mexican wildlands, said CBP spokesman Bill Brooks. The isolated Mexican community, Boquillas del Carmen, depended on the boat crossing for tourism and getting supplies in Texas. Its popula-

tion dropped after the crossing closed. Some are now moving back, Brooks said. Federal authorities in San Diego County started giving access to the last of three border walls for a few hours on Sundays. Families unable to leave the U.S. while their immigration status is in flux talked through the barrier with deported loved ones standing on the Mexican side. On a Sunday in July, a teenage boy with a Dodger’s cap and baggy jeans cried as he touched his father’s fingertip through minute holes in the fence’s metal screen. The pastors prayed nearby. Along the same stretch, Daniel Watman planted a garden in 2007 that connects with a garden on the Mexican side. He had to rip out the U.S. section in 2008 to make way for a second steel wall. He replanted the next year but was handcuffed trying to water it before negotiating permission to tend the area. Today the garden is flourishing but few can visit it because of security restrictions. “Life at the border is way more difficult than it needs to be,” Watman said.

Join our happy family!

ATLANTA (AP) — The world’s largest passenger jet has made its first stop at the world’s busiest airport — Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. Airport officials celebrated the arrival of Korean Air’s Airbus A380 on Friday with a water cannon salute and ceremony. The double-decker, fourengine A380 is the world’s largest passenger aircraft. To accommodate the plane, the

airport widened two runways and three taxiways by more than 855,000 square feet and installed new passenger loading bridges. Airport officials say Atlanta is only the fourth U.S. city to offer A380 service to Asia. Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed says the aircraft’s arrival “underscores the prominence of Atlanta as a gateway city and a competitor in global markets.”

Sea turtles nesting in Georgia 4th straight year SAVANNAH, Ga. (AP) — Loggerhead sea turtles have had another record-setting nesting season in Georgia, where the number of nests counted has increased each of the past four years. The unofficial count along Georgia’s 100-mile coastline for the season that runs from May through August is 2,284 nests. That’s up from a total of 2,241 nests last year. The official 2013 count could go up when it’s released in mid-October. Mark Dodd, the wildlife biologist who heads Georgia’s sea turtle recovery program, says a fourth straight year of increasing nest numbers is another sign the state’s logger-

AP Photo/J Pat Carter

Two young green sea turtles are examined.

head population is recovering after two decades of up-anddown fluctuations. Loggerhead sea turtles are protected as a threatened species by federal law. Dodd says it’s possible Georgia could hit its recovery goal of 2,800 nests within five years.

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4A — The Newnan Times-Herald  |  Sunday, September 8, 2013

Community Forum

EDITORIAL

Changes to our website Starting Monday, we are switching our website - www.times-herald.com - to what is known as a “metered paywall.” Following are some questions and answers as to what it means to you.

then a final popup box on your 10th. Subscribing is painless, simply filling out a short form and paying by credit card. We will also have a direct link to the subscription page at the top of the website.

What in the heck is a metered paywall? In a nutshell, visitors to our site will be able to access a limited number of stories before they will be asked to subscribe. We are teaming with Press +, a company that specializes in helping newspapers create subscription-based websites.

What does it cost? During this introductory period, the cost is 0.99 cents for the first month for non-home delivery subscribers. Your subscription will then automatically renew every month for only $6.75. You may cancel at any time. For those who get the newspaper home delivered, the cost is only $2.50 per month. For even more savings, consider an annual subscription. The reduced rate is $70 for webonly subscribers and $25 for home delivery subscribers who wish to pay annually. People’s reading habits have changed with the introduction of the Internet. Some still like to hold a hard copy of the newspaper. Others only want to read the paper on a computer or other hand-held device. Our goal is to provide The Newnan Times-Herald to you, our readers, in the form you want. The website will include many of the stories that appear in the print edition, as well as access to the Associated Press, weather and other features. However, many photos and shorter stories will not be on the website — ­ basically the way it is now. Also during the month of September, we are offering a home-delivery subscription special for only $99 a year. This includes fiveday delivery of the paper, the Coweta Living Magazine, the digital edition and the NewnanCoweta Magazine. Finally, this month marks our 148th year of operation and there are stories in today’s edition about our history. We want to take this moment to thank you, our readers and advertisers, for your support over these many, many decades.

Why are you doing this? From a strictly business sense, newspapers sell information. That information comes in two basic categories: advertising and news. When the Internet first started, most newspapers gave away their content for free on their websites. That proved to be a disaster. No company survives giving away its product. Second, in the past we have put some stories behind a paywall and made others free. This was confusing to visitors, who rightfully questioned why one story was free and another wasn’t. All stories are now going behind the paywall. How does it work? The website will continue to look as it does now and you will still be able to read all headlines. We have developed what is known as a “responsive” website. That means the website adapts to whatever device — smartphone, tablet, laptop or desktop — you use and fits to that screen. We are one of the first newspapers in the country to move to this style, which will soon be commonplace. For this introductory period, you will be able to read 10 stories every 30 days. After that, you will be asked to subscribe. After you have clicked on your third story, a popup box will appear welcoming you to the website and offering you the chance to subscribe. You will get another popup box after your seventh story and

A SON takes a shot Youngest SON of Thunder has taken to the couch a lot lately. He is, to put it simply, a walking petri dish of Streptococcal pharyngitis. Or to use the more technical term — he gets strep throat a lot lately. If anyone at his school gets strep, he gets it as well. All it takes is a look and he’s down for the count. Based on the number of co-pays I’ve shelled out, it would have been cheaper to just pay cash for the tonsillectomy and be done with it. That’s next on the agenda. But that would result in even more missed school, so the Little Black Dress decided we needed a stop-gap measure. Back to the doctor she went with Youngest in tow. I was at work, working away, when The Dress called. It seemed she and the doctors reviewed Youngest’s medical chart and determined that since school started, he basically had strep about as much as he didn’t. The prescription drugs were not working. It was time for a shot. The reason for the call was to inform me that Youngest was, to put it mildly, beyond livid. He refused to look at, much less talk to, the LBD. Something about a traitor. So I had to play dad and convince him everything was alright and just be brave and it will be over in a second. Then I was forced to include all the necessary bribes. As I said, I was not there for the torture session, but it was recounted in great detail later. From what I understand, Youngest was told he was to get one shot in the bum. Plans sometimes change. For when it was time for the shot, not one but two nurses came in. Each with a shot. And it was explained (ha) to Youngest he would have to take one in each thigh because a bum shot meant he couldn’t sit for a month or something like that. As it was relayed to me, the LBD held his hand while the nurses commenced the torture and Youngest fell back on the table, threw his

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JOHN WINTERS

arm over his eyes and yelled “what the (put in your expletive here)!” This apparently made the nurses burst out laughing, but to their credit they maintained somewhat of a professional manner and did not break the needles in his leg. This also apparently mortified The Dress to no end, the idea of her precious baby even knowing such words. When I got home, Youngest came out to meet me, walking a bit like Frankenstein. He was quite proud of himself though, pointing out that he got the last Dr. Pepper and a lollipop with gum in the center for his bravery. He was quite emphatic to make it known to me that it was the last Dr. Pepper they had and he earned it, by golly. I then got a replay of the events. He held his fingers about 2 inches apart to show me how long the needle was. I cast a dubious look at him and he looked at his fingers then reluctantly agreed that was not the proper length. He then held his fingers 3 inches apart. I was preparing to give the life lesson on lying when The Dress approached nodding simply that it was, in fact, 3 inches long. And it took one, two, three, four, five, six seven, eight seconds to get the contents of the syringe into Youngest’s legs. He counted. But at least he is back in school. For today at least. (John A. Winters is the general manager of The Newnan Times-Herald. Follow his adventures at justflipthedog.com. You can reach him at john@newnan.com)

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Forget the abs, thighs and shoulders. The only part of me that needs a workout these days is my conscience. Mostly because I’ve lost the ability to commit a decent sin. This is one I never saw coming. I can still crank out the minor transgressions, like saying an ugly baby is cute (you know you’ve done it, too), but the Big Ones—the sins that give you night sweats and a fear of being rejected at Junior League functions — those are so few and far between now, my conscience is the size of a single grit. When I was younger nothing suited me better than a walk on the wild side. Once I found out about the Seven Deadly Sins, I couldn’t wait to try them all. I wasn’t sure what Sloth was, but figured I’d get to it after I’d plowed through Pride, Envy, Gluttony, Anger, Greed and Lust. It turned out that the Seven Deadliest were like the little girl that had a little curl: when they were good, they were very, very good, and when they were bad, they were horrid. When the consequences of bawdy behavior outweighed the fun on a regular basis, I let off the accelerator. A few years ago I put my rowdy ways in park and started watching “Breaking Bad” and reruns of “The Godfather.” I realized that second-hand sin suited me fine. I also realized that cutting back on corruption should have been hard. It wasn't. It didn’t take long to figure out that most of my problems had been solved by age and experience, better known as the buzzkill brothers. Pride is one of the biggies and I had it in spades. Not anymore. Once your hair goes AWOL and the teeth threaten to follow, Pride shrivels like a fresh-plucked prune. Problem solved. Envy is a desire for other’s abilities or possessions. The only thing I envy now is a paid-off mortgage. It’s on the way. Gluttony was one of my favorites. Whether it was food, drink or stupidity, my rule was “I ain’t never had enough of nothin.’” My new motto is “moderation rocks.”

ALEX mcrae

Greed is Gluttony’s first cousin. Most people associate Greed with money. Not me. The only thing I’m greedy for now is chocolate and barbeque. I still haven’t figured out what Sloth is. I can’t say the same about Anger. I used to get mad about anything. Enjoyed it. I took offense more quickly than a guy with a chip on both shoulders and the top of his head. Now I’m meek as a dove. Usually. I miss raging at crooked politicians, but these days, that’s a fulltime job. No thanks. And now to everybody’s favorite: Lust. First of all, anyone who says they’ve never been swept away in a riptide of lust is a saint or a liar. I know plenty of liars. Never met a saint. Surprisingly, this is one sin I don’t miss at all. Now my lust is reserved for just one hot chick: my wife. That’s allowed, by the way, even encouraged. Lucky me. My once-overworked conscience may not win a ribbon at the county fair any more, but that’s fine. And I know I’m not the only dude who finds an afternoon nap more exciting than drinking, gambling or hitting on a hussy. I’ve dealt with it, but maybe my fellow sufferers haven't learned that losing your gift for sinning doesn’t mean it's time to turn in your Man Card. A self-help book for past-their-prime sinners might be just what the ego ordered. And I’m just the guy to write it. Coming soon to a bookseller near you: “Rebel Without an Urge.” (send your email comments to: alexmmcrae@ gmail.com)

QuickVote With all the rain we've had this summer, how did your vegetable garden fare? *Excellent: 22 *About the same: 13

Do you want to Sound Off? “Sound Off” gives readers an opportunity to have their say on topics without signing their names. “Sound Off” items should be 50 words or less. All items are subject to editing.

*All I can see are weeds: 54 *Garden? It’s a mud pit: 74 *I didn’t have a garden this year: 133

Total votes: 296

To “Sound Off,” email to editor@newnan. com or mail to Sound Off, The Newnan Times-Herald, P.O. Box 1052, Newnan, GA 30264.

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Published daily by The Newnan Times-Herald, Inc. 16 Jefferson Street, P.O. Box 1052, Newnan, Georgia 30264 ISSN NO. 0883-2536 | Periodicals Postage Paid At Newnan, Georgia Official Organ, Coweta County, City of Newnan, State of Georgia POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Newnan Times-Herald, P.O. Box 1052, Newnan, GA 30264

PRESIDENT William W. Thomasson

GENERAL MANAGER John A. Winters

Vice PRESIDENT Marianne C. Thomasson

NEWS EDITOR Ellen L. Corker

SALES AND MARKETING DIRECTOR Colleen D. Mitchell

PRODUCTION MANAGER Allen Dubberly

CONTROLLER Diana Shellabarger

CIRCULATION DIRECTOR Naomi Jackson

IT COORDINATOR Jonathan Melville

ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR Winston Skinner

GRAPHICS MANAGER Debby Dye

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING SPECIALIST Rhonda Spooner

SPORTS EDITOR Chris Goltermann

PAGINATOR Will Blair

LEGAL ADVERTISING CLERK Christy Hill

ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR Doug Gorman

PHOTOGRAPHER Jeff Leo

OFFICE STAFF Lisa Garrett, Stacie Kittle

NEWS STAFF Sarah Campbell, Bradley Hartsell, Ana Ivey, Wes Mayer, Clay Neely, Celia Shortt MULTIMEDIA SALES SPECIALISTS Wendy Danford, Mandy Inman, Candy Johnson, Norma Kelley GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Maggie Bowers, Sandy Hiser, Sonya Studt CIRCULATION STAFF David Supperer, Beverly Thomas PRODUCTION STAFF Aubrey Carter, Tina Foster, Rhonda Guy, Anthony Hodo, Allen Holland, Jessiah Huckstep


Sunday, September 8, 2013  |  The Newnan Times-Herald — 5A

NATIONAL/STATE

Family income not a factor as students eat free BOSTON (AP) — Some students toted lunchboxes to the first day of school in Boston this week, but district administrators are expecting that could become a more unusual sight as parents learn about a federal program that is now providing all public school students in the city with free breakfast and lunch. The nation’s oldest school system has joined a program of the U.S. Department of Agriculture that has spread to 10 states and the District of Columbia that offers students two free meals every school day, whether or not their families can afford them. “It’s one less weight and one less burden for parents,” said Joshua Rivera, whose son is a second-g rader at the Maurice J. To b i n School in Boston’s R oxbury section. And, officials say, serving more kids actually saves them money. Known as Community Eligibility Option, the program is part of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 that authorized $4.5 billion in new program funding. For schools to qualify, federal officials said, more than 40 percent of students have to be getting food stamps or aid through certain other federal assistance programs. Besides easing hunger, school officials said, the program helps erase a stigma that plagued some students from poor families. Boston joins schools in Michigan, Atlanta, Washington, D.C., and elsewhere in a program that will be available across the country starting in the 20142015 school year. Efrain Toledano, principal of the Tobin School, said he expects the program will cut down on potential disruptions at the K-8 school by easing hunger pangs that could be linked to classroom misbehavior. “We know that calm stomachs

means calm students who are ready to learn in classrooms,” he said Wednesday. The program eliminates bureaucratic costs and expenses associated with handling cafeteria cash, officials said. Jim Weill, president of the nonprofit Food Research and Action Center, noted the program saves schools money because it’s less expensive to feed more students than to do paperwork for children who qualify for free or reduced price meals. In Boston, officials won’t have to hire couriers to drop off and pick up applications at the city’s 127 schools, Peck said. They also may be able to cancel armoredcar pickups of cafeteria money. An Atlanta Public Schools spokeswoman said students at 5 8 of the city’s 100 public schools started getting f r e e b r e a kfast and lunch this year under the program. A spokeswoman f o r District of Columbia Public Schools said 76 out of 111 district schools are part of the program, which started there in the last school year. Detroit Public Schools joined the federal program during the 2011-12 school year, and a spokeswoman said 52,000 breakfasts and 60,000 lunches were served daily to students in the last school year. In western Michigan, an administrator with Grand Rapids Public Schools said the district has been serving free breakfast and lunch for its 17,000 students since the 20122013 school year started. Paul Baumgartner, nutrition service director, said that breakfast counts skyrocketed after the program began and that it saves families the hassle of filling out applications. “The rationale is we’ve got these communities that have demonstrated severe need,” he said. “Why don’t we see if we can reduce some of these barriers?

Dive signals more treasure at US pirate ship wreck BOSTON (AP) — Fog was swallowing his ship’s bow, the winds were picking up and undersea explorer Barry Clifford figured he needed to leave within an hour to beat the weather back to port. It was time enough, he decided, for a final dive of the season over the wreck of the treasure-laden pirate ship, Whydah, off Cape Cod. That Sept. 1 dive at a spot Clifford had never explored before uncovered proof that a staggering amount of undiscovered riches — as many as 400,000 coins — might be found there. Instead of packing up for the year, Clifford is planning another trip to the Whydah, the only authenticated pirate ship wreck in U.S. waters. “I can hardly wait,” he said. The Whydah was built as a slave ship in 1716 and captured in February 1717 by pirate captain “Black Sam” Bellamy. Just two months later, it sank in a ferocious storm a quarter mile off Wellfleet, Mass., killing Bellamy and all but two of the 145 other men on board and taking down the plunder from 50 vessels Bellamy raided. Clifford located the Whydah site in 1984 and has since documented 200,000 artifacts, including gold, guns and even the leg of a young boy who took up with the crew. He only recently got indications there may be far more coins than

Model of the Whydah Gallery, 1716

the roughly 12,000 he’s already documented. Just before his death in April, the Whydah project’s late historian, Ken Kinkor, uncovered a Colonial-era document indicating that in the weeks before the Whydah sank, Bellamy raided two vessels bound for Jamaica. “It is said that in those vessels were 400,000 pieces of 8/8,” it read. The 8/8 indicates one ounce, the weight of the largest coin made at that time, Clifford said. “Now we know there’s an additional 400,000 coins out there somewhere,” he said. The final dive may have provided a big hint at where. Diver Rocco Paccione said he had low expectations when Clif-

ford excavated a pit about 35 feet below the surface and sent him down. But his metal detector immediately came alive with positive, or hot, readings. “This pit was pretty much hot all the way through,” he said. The most significant artifact brought up by Paccione was an odd-shape concretion, sort of a rocky mass that forms when chemical reactions with seawater bind metals together. X-rays this week revealed coin-shaped masses, including some that appear to be stacked as if they were kept in bags, which is how a surviving Whydah pirate testified that the crewmen stored their riches. Clifford doesn’t sell Whydah

King’s jail cell as attraction BESSEMER, Ala. (AP) — A nonprofit group is looking to raise money to turn a Bessemer jail cell that held Martin Luther King Jr. and other civil rights activists into a tourist attraction. WBRC-TV reports the Jefferson County Sheriff’s office found the original doors to the cell that held King for a night before he was sent to the Birmingham jail for disturbing the peace. Authorities say they still have the docket book with King’s name in it and his booking card. The group, Open Door to History, hopes to raise $60,000 to by Jan. 15 to open an exhibit on the fourth floor of the Bes-

Martin Luther King, Jr.

semer courthouse, where the jail is located. Organizers say they’d like to host an exhibit there through the end of February 2014.

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treasures and said he would never sell the coins individually because he sees them as historical artifacts, not commodities. But he has given coins away as mementos. Two have been sold at the Daniel Frank Sedwick LLC auction house in Florida, with the highest going for about $11,400. The price per Whydah coin would plummet if tens of thousands hit the market, but a retail price of $1,000 each is a reasonable guess, said Augi Garcia, manager at the auction. Ed Rodley, who studied Whydah artifacts during graduate studies in archaeology at the University of Massachusetts Boston, said the Whydah site keeps producing treasure decades after its discovery partly because it’s so tough to work. The site is on the edge of the surf zone, where waves start breaking toward shore. Clifford needs seven anchors to hold the boat in place and the murky ocean bottom is just as active underneath him. Rodley said any pits dug by archaeologists would collapse within hours. What Clifford has gradually gotten to, three centuries after the Whydah went down, is impressive, Rodley said. “It’s crazy the stuff that’s come out of that site and keeps coming out of that site, year after year after year,” he said.


SPORTS 6A — The Newnan Times-Herald   |  Sunday, September 8, 2013

CONTACT US

Editor’s Note Saturday’s Georgia-South Carolina football game was in progress at Times-Herald deadline. Log on to times-herald.com for a recap.

Call the Sports Desk at 770-683-1791 or e-mail to sports@newnan.com The Newnan Times-Herald encourages all high school coaches to report scores to the newspaper on a daily basis.

Sports Editor Chris Goltermann | cgoltermann@newnan.com

For up to the minute sport scores and results | www.times-herald.com

HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL

NFL/2013 Opening Sunday

Coweta’s NFL links come full circle

Alec Ogletree will play his first regular season game as a NFL rookie today at 4:05 p.m., when the St. Louis Rams host the Arizona Cardinals. AP Photo

34 years later, county’s ‘pipeline to the pros’ connects again with a Rams rookie from Newnan High

By CHRIS GOLTERMANN cgoltermann@newnan.com

By CHRIS GOLTERMANN cgoltermann@newnan.com

A constant link between Coweta County and the National Football League over the last 34 years is now back where it started. Namely in the hands of a Rams rookie out of Newnan High School. Today, Alec Ogletree follows in a steady stream of talented high school players to have reached the pinnacle of a football career when the rookie firstround draft pick lines up at linebacker for St. Louis in the Edward Jones Dome against the Arizona Cardinals for a 4:05 p.m. kickoff. The landscape of the league has changed drastically since the late Drew Hill stepped foot on an NFL field with the Rams as a rookie in 1979. Back then, the Cardinals were in St. Louis and the Rams made their home in Los Angeles. Hill was also taken in the 12th round with an untelevised phone call well before the NFL Draft became a three-day circus covering every pick among just seven. In all but six years between the debuts of Hill and Ogletree, Coweta County’s place in the league has remained secure by at least one representative, and at others by multiple. If not for a hamstring injury, Ogletree’s former high school teammate Alan Bonner — a sixth-round pick of the Houston Texans — would immediately be joining a list of at least 11 athletes since 1979 that have now seen dreams of making NFL rosters come to a reality. Bonner’s injury will keep him injured reserve to start the 2013 season. But the wide receiver out of Jacksonville State has already made an equally strong impression on the Houston staff. This year is as much a changing of the guard among that group. For the first time since 1998, Keith Brooking will be missing from the sidelines. Ogletree became the second local player since the former East Coweta star to be selected in the first round of the NFL Draft, with as much hype and anticipation for success as Brooking did as a rookie with the Atlanta Fal-

LIST OF PLAYERS IN PRO FOOTBALL FROM COWETA COUNTY SINCE 1979 Player Pos. Drew Hill WR Michael Cheever C Keith Brooking LB Karsten Bailey WR Corey Bridges WR Chris Hanson P Vernon Strickland John Keith LB Chris Young DB Alec Ogletree LB Alan Bonner WR

High School Newnan Newnan East Coweta East Coweta Newnan East Coweta LB Newnan East Coweta East Coweta Newnan Newnan

Years Played 1979-1993 1996-1998 1998-2012 1999-2003 1999-2001 1999-2010 2000-2002 2000-2003 2003-2007 20132013-

cons in 1998. Brooking, a month away from his 38th birthday, remains an unsigned free agent after contributing as a starter with the Denver Broncos during a 13-3 season that ended with a double-overtime loss to the eventual Super Bowl champion Baltimore Ravens. At least three of the 11 pros to come out of Coweta County — Hill, Brooking and Chris Hanson — had careers lasting at least nine full seasons. As for Ogletree, “I’m just taking it one day at a time,” he said this week. “We have a couple more days of practice and then we’ll be ready for the game. I’m just taking it one day at a time.” The former Cougars safety has followed a path to stardom that almost seemed guaranteed from the attention he received in high school. A playoff victory against Grayson that featured a one-handed touchdown catch and a block of a potential game-winning field goal in the closing seconds all but sealed that path, first to greatness with the Georgia Bulldogs and beyond. Much of the preseason has been hit and miss for Ogletree, who at times has looked like a first-year pro adjusting to the speed of the game, and at others, has been as ferocious a defender as he was here in Newnan and then between the hedges in Athens.

Today’s Game Atlanta at New Orleans, 1 p.m., FOX, 94.1FM game back. Of course they are different. Still, there is a convergence of factors that spike the level of excitement for Sunday’s regular-season opener between a proud Saints team trying to bounce back from the 7-9 season they endured while Payton was away, and a rival Atlanta squad that has no shortage of talent with which to defend its NFC South title.

Heritage Christian head football coach Paul Frantz more than hinted to his players that adversity would be a theme to this season. Two games in, Frantz wasn’t lying. At 0-2 following a 46-26 loss on Friday at Lafayette Christian in LaGrange, the Crusaders have dropped as many games as they did in all of 2012. B ut Fr a nt z , the lone returning member of a coaching staff that helped Heritage Christian make its first trip to an 8-man championship game in the Independent Christian Schools of Georgia and Alabama last fall, feels all the team’s goals are within reach. And they include a return trip to this year’s championship game. “I knew a key theme for us this year was going to be adversity. But we haven’t lost anything when it comes to our goals this year,” he said. “We’ve already seen a lot of improvement.” A loss on Friday to Lafayette (2-1), which opened its season with a 33-8 loss to Holy Ground, was one as much chalked up to running out of energy after teams went to halftime tied at 20 apiece. An already small roster of 16 players had been narrowed by at least two entering last week with newcomer Jonathan Howard, a speedy 6-foot-3 inch safety/receiver out with a broken hand and junior safety/ running back Austin Stover also out with an injury. Frantz’s defense held tall c on s ide r i n g t h re e s c ore s came between a pair of kickoff returns by Lafayette and an interception return brought back to the Heritage Christian 2-yard line. Another turnover inside Crusader territory led to another score.

H

“Given that it wa s a new scheme for me, I’m definitely taking a little bit more time than some of the other guys to pick up on it,” Ogletree said. “I work hard each and every day to get the scheme. Right now I feel pretty good about the scheme and what we need to do.” Despite struggling a bit in his first professional game against the Browns, Ogletree made up with it with a pair of SportsCenter-worthy plays against Denver. They included his first touchdown on a play where he stripped running back Ronnie Hillman, scooped up the loose ball and scored. Along with the touchdown and half-dozen tackles was a one-handed interception of Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning on a leaping grab not unlike the one he made as a Newnan receiver in the win over Grayson back in 2009. It was enough to both surprise and impress the future Hall of Famer.

See OGLETREE, Page 7A

Falcons brace for Superdome visit, Payton’s return in season opener N EW OR LE A NS (A P) — N FL’s schedulers always find a way to send the Atlanta Falcons to the Superdome for landmark games. In 2006, for the first one played in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina, the visitors were flattened by an emotional freight train. Now comes Sean Payton’s return from his bounty ban before a fan base that has eagerly awaited the chance to cheer for the club’s only championshipwinning coach in a meaningful game. Saints players are careful not to make direct comparisons between the first game after Katrina with Payton’s first

Crusaders battling early-season adversity

“A big difference is that (Atlanta) team today is much better than that team we played in ‘06,” right tackle Zach Strief said, adding that the emotions flowing through the Big Easy this week pertain to sport, while the first home game after the storm exhibited “the emotions of life, which is incredibly stronger.” Fa lcons qua rterback Matt Ryan was playing for Boston College in ‘06, and enjoyed the feel-good story of the Saints’ post-Katrina return to the rebuilt Superdome. He did not quibble with the suggestion that the Falcons looked like sacrificial lambs that

day, but he also said this time would be different. “Certainly I watched that game in 2006, I think as did everyone in the country. It was an awesome win for that organization at that time and I think it kind of lifted everybody’s spirits,” Ryan said. “At this point, I think they are two different things. We are just going to prepare the same way we always do ... for a tough road test. “We know it’s going to be loud. We know it’s going to be tough. And we know it’s going to be a 60-minute football game,” Ryan said. “That’s really where our mindset is.”

HCS, page 7A This Friday’s Games n Troup (1-1) at Newnan (1-2) n Sandy Creek (1-0-1) at East Coweta (1-1) n North Clayton (0-2) at Northgate (0-2) n Community Christian (1-2) at Heritage School (0-2) n Trinity Christian (1-1) at Dominion Christian (3-0) n Heritage Christian (0-2) at Praise Academy (0-3)

Youth Soccer

Prep Cross Country

Heritage boys win Dominion Dash, Powell wins girls division The Heritage School boys cross-country team captured a team title in Saturday’s Dominion Dash after placing five runners in the top 10. Lady Hawks runner Ruthie Powell won the race in the girls division. Tanner Brander (16:58) was second, Parker Jones (17:14) was fourth, Tom Pattiz (17:30) was fifth, David Martin was sixth (17:39) and John Dean Uglum was seventh (17:44). Trinity finished third in the event. Ben Peacock was the Lions’ fastest runner, finishing the race in eighth place (17:51). Trinity’s Alex Rhodes was 21st (20:01), Drew Taylor was 24th (20:25) and Daniel Leum was 43rd (21:45). Powell crossed the finish line ahead of the other runners with a time of 18:41. Teammate Ashley Wood was fourth (20:07). Trinity’s girls finished fifth. Maddie Chapman was the top finisher for Trinity was 24th (25:18), Maggie Wheeler was 28th (26:04), Brooke Koller was 42ns (29:59) and Bianca Sharpe

was 47th (32:51). Northgate competes in Covered Bridge RUN: The Northgate girls cross country team finished eighth Saturday in the Covered Bridge Run in Roswell, while the boys were 16th. Caitlin Bellora had the best finish of the day for the Lady Vikings, finishing 14th (20:51). Freshman Caroline Nelson was 28th (21:37), Erica Lee was 36th (21:53), Elise Glorvigen was 75th (22:56), Laura Rodes was 90th (23:23), Julia Fugate was 91st (23:25) and Lee Taylor scored for the Lady Vikings with a 93rd finish (23:31). Evan Vatave led the Northgate boys top finish with a 83rd-place finish (18:58). Spencer Rathmun crossed the line in 108th place (19:16), Justin Whipple was 126th (19:53), Andrew Lail was 128th (19:57), Ameer Tabbaa was 129th (19:58) and Jaelin Rainey was 133rd (20:09) and Gebe Mendez was 143rd (20:20). Northgate runs at next Saturday’s annual Carrollton Orthopedic Invitational on the GHSA state championship course.

Southern Soccer Academy’s U-19 Chelsea South girls place 2nd at Aiken Cup The Southern Soccer Academy’s U-19 Chelsea South girls soccer team recently finished second at the Aiken Cup in South Carolina while

playing their first six games together as a newly formed SSA team in the under-19 select bracket. Team members included standouts from East Coweta, Northgate and Trinity Christian’s varsity programs. Pictured are: Front row, from left, Kaylie Margeson, Bailey Rushton, Lillie Smith, Brooke Black, Meghan Lowther; Back row, from left, are Alicia Parker, SK Palmer, Mackenzie Crenshaw, Cora Gwinn, Tara Federico, Alicia Knight, Mackenzie Harris, Phebe Warren, Danielle Lewis and Coach Andy Appleton. Not pictured: Rachel Dodson.


Sunday, September 8, 2013  |  The Newnan Times-Herald — 7A

SPORTS

TV SPORTS SCHEDULE

Guest Column /adrian Anderson

TODAY ■■Auto Racing 8:00 a.m. FORMULA ONE: Gran Premio D’Italia, NBCSPORTSNETWORK 12:30 p.m. CAMPING WORLD: Iowa, Qualifying, FS1 2:00 p.m. CAMPING WORLD: Iowa, FS1 ■■Cycling 3:00 p.m. Vuelta a Espana, Stage 15, NBC ■■Golf 9:00 a.m. EUROPEAN PGA: Omega European Masters, Final Round, GLFCHANNEL 1:30 p.m. Web.com: Chiquita Classic, Final Round, GLFCHANNEL 4:00 p.m. Walker Cup, Final Day, GLFCHANNEL ■■NFL 1:00 p.m. Atlanta Falcons at New Orleans Saints, FOX 1:00 p.m. Tennessee Titans at Pittsburgh Steelers, CBS 4:15 p.m. Green Bay Packers at San Francisco 49ers, FOX 8:30 p.m. New York Giants at Dallas Cowboys, NBC ■■Major League Baseball 1:00 p.m. Boston Red Sox at New York Yankees, TBS 1:30 p.m. Atlanta Braves at Philadelphia Phillies, FSN-SOUTH 2:00 p.m. Milwaukee Brewers at Chicago Cubs, WGN 8:00 p.m. Los Angeles Dodgers at Cincinnati Reds, ESPN ■■Tennis 12:30 p.m. U.S. Open: Men’s Doubles Final, ESPN2 4:30 p.m. U.S. Open: Women’s Final, CBS ■■Yachting 4:00 p.m. 34th America’s Cup, NBC ■■Soccer 11:00 p.m. MLS: Philadelphia Union at San Jose Earthquakes, ESPN2 ■■WNBA 3:00 p.m. Phoenix Mercury at Atlanta Dream, SPORTSOUTH MONDAY ■■Major League Baseball 7:00 pm. Atlanta Braves at Miami Marlins, SPORTSOUTH ■■NFL 7:00 p.m. Philadelphia Eagles at Washington Redskins, ESPN 10:15 p.m. Houston Texans at San Diego Chargers, ESPN ■■Tennis 5:00 p.m. U.S. Open: Men’s Final, CBS TUESDAY ■■Major League Baseball 7:00 p.m. Atlanta Braves at Miami Marlins, SPORTSOUTH ■■Soccer 7:45 p.m. FIFA World Cup Qualifying: United States vs. Mexico, ESPN

AREA SPORTS SCHEDULE TODAY

■■High School Softball 6:00 p.m. Northgate at East Coweta ■■High School Volleyball 6:30 p.m. Trinity Christian at The Heritage School ■■JV Softball 4:30 p.m. Northgate at East Coweta ■■JV Volleyball 5:15 p.m. East Coweta, Fayette County, Northgate at McIntosh 5:15 p.m. Newnan, Whitewater, Starr’s Mill at Sandy Creek 5:30 p.m. Trinity Christian at The Heritage School ■■Middle School Volleyball 4:30 p.m. Trinity Christian at The Heritage School

TUESDAY

■■High School Softball 5:30 p.m. Mt. Zion-Jonesboro at Northgate 5:30 p.m. Newnan at Westlake 5:30 p.m. East Coweta at Langston Hughes ■■High School Volleyball 5:15 p.m. Tri-Cities, Morrow at Newnan 5:30 p.m. Starr’s Mill, Mt. Zion-Jonesboro at Northgate 5:30 p.m. Westlake, Langston Hughes at East Coweta 6:00 p.m. Community Christian, Stratford at The Heritage School ■■JV Softball 5:30 p.m. Whitewater at Newnan ■■JV Volleyball 5:00 p.m. Community Christian, Stratford at The Heritage School ■■Middle School Volleyball 4:00 p.m. Community Christian, Stratford at The Heritage School ■■Middle School Football 5:30 p.m. Arnall at East Coweta 5:30 p.m. Madras at Evans 5:30 p.m. Smokey Road at Lee

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Wrestling ... with wrestling (Editor’s Note: Longtime Northgate High head wrestling coach Adrian Anderson shares his views of the recent suggestion to eliminate wrestling from the Summer Olympics after 2016)

T

oday, the IOC will decide if wrestling is put on the short list of sports for — get this — inclusion in the 2020 Olympic Games. One would think that the original Olympic sport and the world’s oldest documented one referred before the written word existed never have been dropped from the world’s biggest stage. Every culture, civilization where the human race expanded took the sport with it. I am sure some Doctor of Sociology has a document somewhere listing all of wrestling’s variations, from those familiar as American Folkstyle or the more internationally accepted Freestyle and GrecoRoman, to my personal favorite — Turkish Oil wrestling. Through all its evolution, however, wrestling’s goals remain the same throughout history that only the footrace can be compared to it as the truest form of sport. All other

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Only those who learn the lessons of hard work, persistence and determination inherent to the sport in the hot humid rooms survive. Why save Olympic wrestling, you ask? Can’t you learn those things in other sports? Am I just pleading for the inclusion of those super elite who make it to that golden level of Olympic qualifier? Sure wrestling will go in places like Des Moines and Stillwater as well as backyards or gyms. And yes, you can learn these things in other sports but not at the level demanded by wrestling. But wrestling should retain its place on the world stage for those who face their own internal physical challenges, whether it’s the child born without legs, the outcast who doesn’t seem to fit in, the kid looking for a place in the world to call his own. Not to mention kids like me. I found myself too small for football, too uncoordinated for baseball, not tall enough to play basketball, yet wrestling changed my life. In high school, I lost to some of the state’s athletes, ones who eventually went on to college careers at places like Auburn, Clemson and even the University of Georgia. With Title IX leveling the

Lee, Smokey Road, Madras win The CCMSA L football season a 56-yard run. Desmond Blacksher kicked off the 2013 campaign last helped Smokey Road go up 22-0 when week with defending champion Lee, he hit Travis Johnson on a 2-point Smokey Road and Madras all posting conversion. Smokey Road added second-half victories to open the season. Defending champion Lee rolled to touchdowns from Mautavier Parks a 30-6 victory over Evans behind the on an 8-yard run and Jarrell Rosser added a 26-yard intercepeffort of Josh Russell. tion return for Smokey Russel l helped Lee CCMSAL Road, but both 2-point lead take a 14-0 lead in Standings conversions failed. the first half scoring a Lee 1-0 C.J. Powell scored both touchdown in each of the Madras 1-0 touchdowns for A rnall first two quarters. Smokey Road 1-0 in the second half. His Chris Reid gave Lee Arnall 0-1 first trip to the end zone a three-touchdown lead East Coweta 0-1 came on a 60-yard kickoff wit h a score midway Evans 0-1 return. He also scored on through the third and a 30-yard touchdown run. Joshua Martin added the Duquavis Geddins and Jaylin WilWolves’ final tally. Russell added all three 2-point liams were Smokey Road’s leading tacklers. conversions. Madras 27, East Coweta 8: Evans prevented the shutout with a Four players scored touchdowns for 1-yard run. Smokey Road 34, Arnall Madras, which racked up 309 yards of 16: Smokey Road exploded out of the total offense, sparked by a solid pergate in the first half, getting big plays formance by the offensive line. Kyle McLaren, Jeremiah Prayor from the both sides of the ball en and Nick Carter each had a rushing route to the season-opening win. A f ter Jayl i n Wi l l ia m s 6 -ya rd touchdown. Dominick Rados also caught a run and 2-point conversion helped Smokey Road get on the scoreboard, touchdown pass en route to the win. Omar Bringas finished the game T.J. Portress took over scoring on a 35-yard fumble recovery to give his with 127 yards receiving a one extra point., team a 14-0 lead in the first quarter. Robert Given led the offensive line It was the first of three touchdowns and Jack Eskew had seven tackles, for Portress. He had his second touchdown on one sack and an interception.

OGLETREE Continued from page 6A

nine full“"That guy made a pretty athletic play,” Manning told the Associated Press afterwards of Ogletree. “That guy's got long arms, obviously got a pretty wide wingspan. I was surprised he was able to get his hands on the ball." The learning curve, however, will reach its peak today with the linebacker facing

HCS Continued from page 6A

Jeremiah Winkley, making a move from defensive end to linebacker, led Heritage Christian with eight tackles and teammates Bailey Todd and Christia n Pa rkerson added seven apiece to lead the way. Through injuries and lategame cramps, less experienced players that began the season are quickly developing into ones that can be depended on by Frantz. They include firstyear player Timothy Howard, who played both defensive

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playing field for men’s and women’s sports and college wrestling programs took the hardest of hits (What? Did you think they’d cut the football team?), my fear is that without the wrestling, a sport that is growing at an unprecedented level here in the South, the IOC’s potential exclusion today will be the final straw which takes this greatest of all learning opportunities from those kids. As much as I at times loathe some of the politics that comes with the Olympic Games, wrestling needs a world stage to survive and continue to grow here in the United States. Instead, the IOC has deemed one of the nine original sports from 1896 unnecessary following the upcoming Olympics in Rio, choosing to add golf and keep other events such as sailing and table tennis. Equally, though, the Olympics need wrestling. Without the most ancient of all its sports, the Games will lose their luster and even their very legitimacy as the greatest gathering of athletes in the world. Let’s hope the IOC comes to its senses today.

Heritage School Athletics

Middle School Football

Payton Starting at

forms owe their existence to these two original athletic contests. Getting ready for our football game with Griffin this week at Northgate, in which we stood as a decided underdog, I could even see how wrestling is at the roots of America’s newest favorite pastime. Be honest, what is a block or a tackle if not just another form of wrestling? Recently, I stepped down from my position as Northgate High’s head wrestling coach, but the sport remains first in my heart. I think you will find this true among almost anyone who ever survived in the sport long enough to put his foot on the line. While I was never much of even an average wrestler, the sport ingrains itself in your very soul. It changes you forever unlike any other I have ever competed in. It builds young men and, now, young girls into self reliant, driven, goal-oriented individuals who don’t ask for a quarter from today’s world. This makes the wrestler different because it breaks the individual from the pressures to feel entitled to anything other than that which they earn. No amount of luck, talent, birthright, or genius is enough.

Lower-school Hawks defeat Flint River 28-13 The Heritage Hawks lower school football team left Woodbury Thursday afternoon with a 28-13 victory over Flint River. Heritage scored all four of its touchdowns in the first half to build a 28-0 lead at the break. Raymond Feckoury broke two long runs to help spark the Heritage offense. Branch Burns intercepted a pass and returned it for a score and Andrew Rich had a run of 40-yards for a touchdown to seal the victory. Heritage softball drops DH: The Lady Hawks softball team dropped a doubleheader to Loganville Christian. The first game ended with a 4-0 loss, and Heritage also dropped the nightcap 5-4. The Lady Hawks built a 4-0 lead, but couldn’t hold off Loganville’s seventh-inning rally. Heritage volleyball team hits the road: The Heritage volleyball teams spent a busy week away from their own gym playing at Young Americans on Tuesday and at Griffin Christian on Thursday. The Heritage varsity picked up a four-set win against Griffin (25-19, 20-25, 25-17, 25-21). Hailey Pierce had seven kills and five aces, Natalie Bunch and two aces and a kill and Zofia Powell had one ace and six kills. Against Griffin, the middle school team picked up its first win of the year (21-25, 25-22, and 15-11). The junior varsity dropped its match in straight sets. Against Young Americans all three Heritage volleyball teams lost in straight sets. Heritage hosts rival Trinity Christian on Monday.

regulars for a full game as a three-down starter. The expectations have heightened further on the 30th overall pick of this year’s NFL Draft following the release of veteran Jo-Lonn Dunbar, who had been suspended by the league due to a substance-abuse violation. “We’re all depending on each other and on him, and he knows he can’t play like a rookie,” veteran cornerback Cortland Finnegan told the AP. “He’s got to go in there and play good ball like he did in Denver, and let that carry over and we’ll be

line and cornerback, the latter for the first time in his career. “We really didn’t have a choice. He made a huge play on a toss sweep. Then they were trying to run an option and he played both the quarterback and the running back at the same time perfectly. He’s going to do some good things for us,” Frantz said. “In 8-man, playing 48 minutes, you’ve got guys playing both ways and there are going to be times where we have to find some help.”

alright.” On the field, however, is where Ogletree may feel the most comfortable. Showcasing a more reserve personality than twin brother Zander during his days at Newnan High, he was a starter with the Cougars defense by the time he was a sophomore and immediately contributed as a true freshman at Georgia, working his way into a starting cornerback position by the midpoint of his first college season. Said Ogletree, "We're ready to roll.”LIST OF PLAYERS IN PRO FOOTBALL FROM

The effort came on the heels of a 58-21 loss to Harvester Christian in Heritage’s 2013 opener, a game that got out of hand in the second quarter with a 22-point outburst by Harvester with the Crusaders trailing 14-8 after the first 12 minutes of play. Heritage turned the ball over four times and had more than a handful of bad exchanges on snaps despite putting together 300-plus yards of offense led by vetera n li nema n Jera ld

Dewveal and brothers Jesse and Christian Parkerson. T he Cr usaders now turn their attention to Friday’s trip to play Praise, which also fell to Harvester 40-22 last week. The cross-division game between Heritage (0-2) and Praise (0-3) is a chance for one of the two ICSGA programs to celebrate a victory. “Everything is still in front of us,” Frantz said. “I still expect us to be fighting in the playoffs by the end of the season.”

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8A — The Newnan Times-Herald   |  Sunday, September 8, 2013

LOCAL/NATIONAL

obituaries

Emmett “Luddie” Bennett Jr.

Mr. Emmett “Luddie” Bennett Jr Mr. Emmett “Luddie” Bennett Jr., age 61, of Newnan died on Sept. 6, 2013, at his residence. Funeral services will be held Tuesday, Sept. 10, 2013 at 1 p.m. at St. John Baptist Church - Amlajack Blvd., Newnan, Georgia. In-state viewing will begin at 11 a.m. Interment: St. John Baptist Church Cemetery. Viewing will be Monday, Sept. 9, 2013, for the public from 1 p.m. until 8 p.m. and the family will receive friends from 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. Online condolences maybe expressed to the family at www. roscoejenkinsfuneralhome.com. R o s c o e J e n k i n s Fu n e r a l Home, Inc. 182 Millard Farmer Industrial Blvd., Newnan, GA 770-253-1232

Mrs. Dorothy Louise Melear Stephens Dorothy Louise Melear Stephens, age 90, of Palmetto, GA, passed away Friday, Sept. 6, 2013, at her residence. She was born in Newnan to the late John Virgil Melear and the late Ludie Bennett. She was a member of Rico United Methodist Church in Palmetto. She was a retired dietician with the Fulton county school syste m, havin g wo r ke d at Rico Elementary School and Westwood High School. She was the widow of Thomas Earl Stephens Jr. Survivors include her son, Thomas Virgil Stephens of Sava nna h, G A; daughte r s, Elaine Stephens Br yant of Chat ta hoo che e Hill s, Nina Stephens Landers of Newnan, and Nancy Stephens Bridges of Sharpsburg; brothers, Kenneth Melear of Fayet teville, and Harvey Melear of Fairburn; sister, Edna Mitchell of Fairburn; grandchildren, Stephen Reid Bryant of Portland, OR, Scott Kenneth Br yant of Duluth, GA, Jamie Morgan Mapp and Dorothy Heather Stratton of C h e s te r f i e l d , VA , H owa r d (Butch) Morgan III of Dallas, TX, Wendy Michelle Lively of Midlothian, VA, Mary Bridges Snyder (Cathy) of Newnan, Stephanie Bridges Stewart of Broxton, GA; two step grandchildren, Terri Lynn Landers of At h e n s a n d S t a cy L e e Landers of Atlanta; and 12 great grandchildren. Friends may visit the family on Sunday, Sept. 8 from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Holly Hill Funeral Home, 431 SW Broad Street, Fairburn, GA. Funeral Services for will be held on Monday, Sept. 9, 2013, at 11 a.m. in the chapel of Holly Hill Funeral Home, Fairburn, GA. Reverend Richard Davis, Dr. Gene Tyre, Reverend Ken Rose and Reverend Searcy Jackson will officiate. Interment will follow in Holly Hill Memorial Park, Fairburn, GA.

Ministry leaders honored at 3rd annual banquet The Yahweh Ladies Women’s ministry of New Life Tabernacle held their Men and Women of Divine Influence Banquet on Aug. 24. The third annual event was held at the Carnegie Library in downtown Newnan. The banquet’s purpose is to honor men and women in ministry who have made an impact in the lives of those they serve. T h i s y e a r ’s h o n o r e e s were first lady Karen Barkley of Turin Church of God in Christ, Apostle-Elect Kim Monroe of Perpetual Praise Tabernacle of Faith, Pastor Stephanie Keith of Gateway Outreach and Deliverance, Deacon Joseph Harris, Minister DeAndre Strickland and Dr. Jake Golden IV.

Tens of thousands gather in Syria peace vigil at Vatican VATICAN CITY (AP) — Tens of thousands of people answered Pope Francis’ call for a four-hour Syria peace vigil in St. Peter’s Square late Saturday, joining Christians a nd non- Ch ristia ns a li ke in similar vigils around the world. About 70,0 0 0 people , according to an estimate by the Vatican, were present at the start of the vigil. It was believed to be one of the largest rallies in the West against proposed U.S.-led military action against the Syria n regime following the Aug. 21 chemical weapons attack near Damascus. Francis spent most of the vigil in silent prayer, but during his speech he issued a heartfelt plea for peace, denouncing those who are “c apt ivate d by t he idol s of dom i n ion a nd power ” and destroy God’s creation through war. “This evening, I ask the Lord t hat we Ch r ist ia n s , and our brothers and sisters of other religions and every man and woman of good will, cry out forcefully: Violence and war are never the way to peace!” Rainbow “Peace” flags fluttered in the evening breeze outside the square and religious leaders from a variety of Christian and non-Christian denominations joined cardinals, politicians and ordinary folk for the evening of prayer, hymns and meditation. The pope entered the square from the basilica steps, foregoing his usual high-spirited drive through in his open car — an indication of the sobriety of the evening, which capped a day of fasting for the pontiff and others. Francis announced the day of fasting and prayer Sept. 1, alarmed at the acceleration of U.S. threats to strike Syria after the chemical weapons attack. Since then, the Vatican has ramped up its peace message, summoning ambassadors for a briefing by the Holy See foreign minister on its position on the war. Francis appealed

AP photo/Riccardo De Luca

People hold Syrian flags and signs against a possible attack to Syria. Tens of thousands of people have answered Pope Francis’ call and

massed in St. Peter’s Square for a 4-hour-long prayer vigil.

AP PHOTO/Riccardo De Luca

Pope Francis attends a vigil for peace in St. Peter’s Square at the

Vatican, Saturday, Sept. 7, 2013. It was believed to be one of the first, and certainly the largest popular rally in the West against U.S.-led plans to strike Syria following the Aug. 21 chemical weapons attack near Damascus.

directly to world powers at the Group of 20 meeting in Russia, urging them this week to abandon the “futile pursuit” of a military solution in Syria and work instead for a negotiated settlement. Bishops around the world joined Francis in the daylong fast and organized similar vigils in their home dioceses.

DEATH NOTICES Mr. W.E. Carter, 86, of Hoga nsville, died T hursday, Sept. 5, 2013, at Piedm ont Ne w n a n Ho s pit a l . Funeral services will be 4 p.m., Sunday, Sept. 8 in chapel of Claude A. McKibben and Sons Funeral Home in Hogansville, with interment in Myrtle Hill Cemetery. Ms. Tobi L. Dennis, 56, of Newnan, formerly of Chicago, IL., died Wednesday, Aug. 4, 2013, at her residence. Funeral services will be Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2013, at 1 p.m. at the Roscoe Jenkins Chapel at 182 Millard Farmer Industrial Blvd. Viewing will precede funeral service, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

IN LOVING MEMORY OF

Ronald F. Reynolds “Ronnie”

M rs . Jocely n L et t ice Miller, 57, of Union City, formerly of St. Louis, Missouri, died on Monday, Sept. 2, 2013. Memorial service will be announced at a later time and will be in care of Sewell Mortuary Inc. Mr. Alton Powell, 65, of Fairburn, died Thursday, Sept. 5. 2013. Funeral services will be at 1 p.m., Tuesday, Sept. 10 in the M.L. Middlebrooks Memorial Chapel at Sewell Mortuary Inc. Visitation will be from 11:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.

IN LOVING MEMORY OF

Dustin Tolbert 7/26/1990 - 9/8/2008

12/9/1947- 8/22/2013

When you were born, you cried; your parents and their friends rejoiced. You lived your life in such a manner that when you died, your family and all your friends cried, and you rejoiced. We have precious memories. We love you and will never forget you. Until we meet again, Winnon and Rose Gilley Shane and Kay Reynolds

A million times we’ve needed you. A million times we’ve cried. If love alone could have saved you, you never would have died. In life we loved you dearly. In death we love you still. In our hearts you hold a place, no one will ever fi ll. It broke our hearts to lose you, but you didn’t go alone. Part of us went with you the day God took you home. Maw Maw, Paw Paw, Dad and Danelle

Vatican Radio reported they were taking place in Francis’ native Argentina, throughout Italy and elsewhere. Even the grand mufti of Damascus, who thanked the pope for his initiative in a letter earlier this week, invited Muslims to join the fast in solidarity. The peace vigil marked something of a novelty for the

Vatican: Nothing of its kind has ever taken place in St. Peter’s Square, though popes past have participated in daylong peace prayers in places like Assisi, known for its peace-loving native son and the pope’s namesake, St. Francis. T hat ’s not to say popes haven’t taken vigorous antiwar positions in the past: Pope Paul VI famously uttered the words “War never again, never again war” at the United Nations in 1965 as the Vietnam War raged, a refrain that has been repeated by every pope since. Pope John Paul II sent an envoy to President George W. Bush on the eve of the 2003 U.S.-led invasion of Iraq urging him to stand down — to no avail.

Va t i c a n o f f i c i a l s h a v e stressed that Saturday’s event was thoroughly religious, not political. But Francis’ message has carried distinct political overtones: He has condemned the use of chemical weapons, but has been careful not to lay blame on any one side, exhorting world leaders instead to focus on the plight of Syrian civilians and the need in general to end the violence. Other church officials, both at the Vatican and in dioceses, have been more pointed in their criticism of any internationalization of the conf lict, saying U.S.-French military strikes will only exacerbate the situation for civilians, particularly Christian minorities.

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Sunday, September 8, 2013  |  The Newnan Times-Herald — 9A

LOCAL

YOUTH & EXPERIENCE

Longtime members of the news staff, front, are Sarah Campbell, Winston Skinner and Ellen Corker. Joining them in the newsroom are, back, Wes Mayer, Bradley Hartsell, Celia Shortt and Clay Neely.

Members of the graphics staff include, from left, Sonya Studt, Debby Dye, newcomer Maggie Bowers and Sandy Hiser. Hiser and Studt are also the creative directors for Newnan-Coweta Magazine.

Plenty of new faces on Times-Herald staff

The Times-Herald’s advertising sales department includes longtime employees and newcomers. From left are, front, Mandy Inman, Wendy Danford, Norma Kelley; back, Candy Johnson, Colleen Mitchell, Christy Hill and Rhonda Spooner.

vision

Up Close and the Weekender. Winters keeps watch over the Community Forum page and Continued from page 1 writes the editorials. He wants to see more letters from local i s a c h ron ic le of C owe t a citizens, and is contemplating County. We are the recorder some longer pieces on issues. of life,” he said. “It’s a sacred “It’s important that we have trust.” One of the newspaper’s main roles is serving as a watchdog for government — keeping an eye on “how taxpayer dollars are spent,” he said. Telling readers “what is going on in the community” and serving as “an information source” for local residents are also ongoing goals. “Our job is to try to cover as much as we can with the staff that we have,” Winters said. Educating readers about issues that impact their lives takes work and commitment. He said each newspaper story should answer a basic question for a reader: Why do I care and what does it mean to me? There is more to the newspaper, however, than hard-hitting reporting and investigative different viewpoints because pieces. “The newspaper should we are a diverse community,” be fun,” Winters said — point- he stated. “I would love nothing to a recent series of “letters ing more than to increase the to the editor” from T.R. Cone, number of pages of the Comwhich resulted in road repair munity Forum because so many and some chuckles for readers. people are getting involved and Winters noted the paper has expressing their views. It’s supsome new sections — Business, posed to be a public forum, and

“I would love nothing more than to increase the number of pages of the Community Forum because so many people are getting involved and expressing their views”

that’s what I want to see.” The newspaper is one of the few places “where people actually still have a voice,” Winters said, “where they can vent or praise.” The Newnan Times-Herald will soon be implementing a paywall on its Internet site. Winters said the paper remains committed to getting stories “to as many people as possible in the format they desire.” He also said he wants to ma ke certain The Newnan Times-Herald is the number one advertising resource for Coweta County businesses. T he newspaper wa nts to “help our advertisers expand and grow their businesses,” Winters said. “The better they do, the better we do. We want every business in the county to succeed.” Winters sees a strong connection between the vitality of the business community and the newspaper’s future. He said, “I like to call them partners.” Accord i ng to Wi nters , the best part of the job is the employees. “They are incredibly dedicated to what they do and know their role and its importance to the community,” he said. “I’m just the head cheerleader. I try to stay out of their way and let them do what they do best.”

Fundraiser to draw attention to needs of homeless The Hands-Up Lockout will be held Sept. 21-22 at Resurrection Lutheran Church — drawing attention to the needs of local homeless people and raising funds for One Roof Ecumenical Outreach. “There were over 300 children in the Coweta County School System last year who were homeless. This number does not include their parents, younger siblings or older siblings,” said Derenda Rowe, executive director for One Roof. “They live with relatives who are overcrowded in motel rooms, cars, tents — sometimes buildings that are not meant for habitation. How can a child thrive in these conditions?” she asked. The Hands-up Lockout is

a fundraiser designed for the youth of Coweta County to help the homeless youth and their families in the local community. “We hope to raise awareness of the plight that people in Coweta suffer,” Rowe said. Youth ages 13 to 18 will be sleeping outside at Resurrection Lutheran Church in cardboard boxes. “The youth will have an evening of fun activities designed to give them a slight glimpse into the lives of those who have to depend on others for food and shelter,” Rowe said. The High School Youth Band from Southcrest Church will be playing during the evening. “When we asked them, they said, ‘absolutely,’” said Connie Jones, an organizer of the event. This is the second year for

the Lockout, which is planned to be an annual event. The Lockout will start at Resurrection Lutheran on Sept. 21 at 4 p.m. and end on Sept. 22, 2013 at 8 a.m. Youth can ask family and friends to sponsor them for the event and encourage their friends, family, congregation members and local community to stop by and bring monetary donations, non-perishable food items, personal hygiene items, sleepi ng bags or a ny t h i ng someone living on the street or in a motel room could use. For in formation, contact Con n ie Jones v ia ema i l at jonesconstance35@yahoo.com. Reference “Hands-up Lockout” in the subject line. Jones can be reached by phone at 678-517-0526.

As the Newnan Times-Herald celebrates 148 years, the newspaper’s staff includes many new faces — and some longtime staff members with new roles. Will Blair, who was a staff writer before becoming the Times-Herald’s paginator several years ago, is the new editor of Newnan-Coweta Magazine. The first issue under his direction was published a week ago. Sandy Hiser and Sonya Studt, longtime graphic designers for the newspaper, are now the creative directors for the magazine. Debby Dye, graphics manager for the newspaper, also is part of the magazine’s production. Maggie Bowers, who joined the graphics staff in June, is helping with design of both publications as well as with the pagination of the daily newspaper. The retail advertising sales staff — led by Colleen Mitchell, the paper’s longtime sales and marketing director — includes veteran staff members Candy Johnson and Mandy Inman plus

Norma Kelley, a former advertising representative for the newspaper who returned to the staff in December. Wendy Danford joined the ad sales staff in July. Danford, Inman, Johnson and Kelley sell newspaper, magazine and online advertising. Continuing in their longtime roles are Rhonda Spooner, who sells classified advertising, and Christy Hill, who handles legal advertising for the newspaper. John Winters, who has been on the staff since 2011, became general manager in April. Ellen Corker, news editor, and Winston Skinner, assistant news editor, have both been on the staff for more than 30 years. Joining longtime newswriter Sarah Campbell this year are Bradley Hartsell, Wesley Mayer, Clay Neely and Celia Shortt. Naomi Jackson continues as the newspaper’s circulation director, and there have been additions to the production staff, who print the newspaper.


10A — The Newnan Times-Herald   |  Sunday, September 8, 2013

LOCAL

Newspaper’s origin dates back to end of Civil War By W. WINSTON SKINNER winston@newnan.com

Coweta County’s local daily newspaper was formed through the combining of two older newspapers. The Newnan Herald was a Coweta institution for 70 years before The Newnan Times was established. The papers were competitors for a decade before they were combined. The Newnan Herald was founded by two attorneys, J.S. Bigby and J.C. Wootten, and the first issue came off the presses on Sept. 9, 1865 — exactly five months after the Civil War ended. The four-page weekly — the first paper started in Georgia after the Civil War — cost $3 per year and was published on Saturday. Soon after the first Herald hit the streets, Bigby — who became active in local politics — sold his interest in the paper to James A. Welch. Following the deaths of Welch and Wootten, the Herald was edited by A.B. Cates, a native of Tennessee and a Confederate veteran. Cates ran the Herald until late 1886 or early 1887, when the Herald consolidated with the Coweta Advertiser, which had been published by W.W. Wadsworth, a Methodist minister. After the merger of the Herald and Wadsworth’s journal, the newspaper became known as The Herald and Advertiser. James E . Brown, who later became known as Judge Brown after his appointment as a U.S. Commissioner, became editor. He served for four decades and was known for his insightful editorials. Brown was born in Marion County in 1854. Before coming to Newnan, he founded the Henry County Weekly in 1877. “Coweta County Chronicles” related that Brown served as editor there until 1886 when he came to Newnan as editor of the Advertiser, coming to the Herald and Advertiser after the merger. Brown married a Newnan woman, Kate Milner, in 1883. In 1912, Brown sold the Herald and Advertiser to Rhodes

E.W. Thomasson’s father, J.J. Thomasson, was also

Times-Herald president and owner Billy Thomasson

In 1940, Ford sold the paper to George M. MacNabb and Victor D. Armstrong. Armstrong soon left to serve in the armed forces, and MacNabb continued as editor and business manager until 1946. Miss Sarah Parrott worked with MacNabb at the Herald. “It was during the war years,” she said in 1988, describing the late MacNabb as “an intelligent young man.” She recalled, “It was difficult during the war. It was hard to get paper to begin with.” Ink was also rationed. A small staff of no more than five put out the newspaper. “We did ever y thing ourselves,” Parrott remembered. Wiley Long was among the employees during those years. The paper achieved renown from others in the newspaper field under MacNabb’s leadership. The Herald received several awards from the Georgia Press Association, including first place for best editorial and best news coverage in 1944. T he New na n Hera ld had been born in the aftermath of one war and entered a new era as World War II came to a close. In October 1946, the Herald was acquired from MacNabb by Evan W. Thomasson and James J. Thomasson, publishers of the Newnan Times. James Thomasson and his wife, Emeline Cheney Thomasson, and E.W. Thomasson and his wife, Betty Clay Thomasson, came to Coweta County from Carrollton, Ga., in 1935.

E.W. Thomasson’s father, J. J. Thomasson, was also a newspaper publisher. “Throughout the western part of the State of Georgia the name of Thomasson has come to be prominently identified with newspaper publishing,” noted “The History of Georgia,” published by the American Historical Association in 1938. T he f i rst issue of T he Newnan Times was published March 12, 1936. Emeline Thomasson died later that year. In 1938, James Thomasson married Newnan native Ida Askew. Ida Thomasson was involved in the newspaper for years, working as an editor and writing a popular weekly column, “Personally Speaking.” James Thomasson died in 1979, and Ida Thomasson died in 1981. Their son, William W. “Billy” Thomasson, is president and owner of The Newnan Times- Herald today. The Newnan Times and The Newnan Herald were published separately for about a year after the Thomassons bought the Herald. The first issue of The Newnan Times-Herald was published on Dec. 24, 1947. The newspaper has gone through many changes since that first issue — growing from weekly to bi-weekly to daily, becoming a pioneer in the use of color photography and now entering the digital age with a strong online presence.

a

The Newnan Herald in 1919 had its offices at 12 Jackson St. in the former Lindsey’s offices, now in 2013

occupied by Harwell, Brown and Harwell PC law firm. The man in the hat is James E. Brown, editor of the paper for some four decades.

Ida Thomasson, center, congratulates her husband, James Thomasson, left, and father-in-law, E.W. Thomasson, when they were presented with 50-year medals by the Georgia Press Association in 1972.

McPhail “after having guided its fortunes for nearly 25 years,” according to “Chronicles.” The sale, however, did not last. “The Herald people wanted James E. Brown and James E. Brown wanted to return to his accustomed place — which he did with Ellis M. Carpenter as an assistant,” the county history reported. In 1915, the Herald and Advertiser absorbed another rival, the Newnan News, and the paper again became known as the Newnan Herald. “Chronicles” reported, “The owners of the News are part owners of the Herald, and the owners of the Herald happy to have devoured

a troublesome rival.” Among those serving as business manager during Brown’s tenure were Edgar T. Whatley, Thomas S. Parrott and Oren William Passavant. Passavant also served as editor in 1911 and 1912 in Brown’s absence. Passava nt purchased t he paper on Brown’s retirement in 1928, serving as editor until 1936. In 1933 the paper was cited for honorable mention in editorial competition. Passavant, who was born in Uniontown, Pa., in 1882, came to Newnan to live in 1906 and married Edgar Means North. The news staff in the early 1930s consisted of Passavant

and a young woman named Roberta Lyndon, later Roberta Mayes of Atlanta. “I worked from 1934 until 1936 — when I ca me to Atlanta,” Mayes recalled in a 1988 interview. “I was a little of everything. Mr. Passavant didn’t have a large staff,” Mayes said. She remembered Passavant as “a marvelous person to work for.” In 1936, Passavant sold the paper to Hanson G. Ford. During the four years that Ford operated the Herald, his wife, D or o t hy G a rd n e r Ford , a descendant of Newnan’s Cole family, took an active role in the newspaper’s operations.

newspaper

p u b l i s h e r.


Business

Sunday, September 8, 2013  |   The Newnan Times-Herald — 1B

CONTACT US

E-mail your business news/photos to: business@newnan.com breaking news throughout the day | www.times-herald.com

Southern Living Improved

Don Phillips

Senior Vice President, BB&T

‘I want to provide my clients the very best level of service that I can possibly provide them’ By Clay Neely

Clay@newnan.com

If you met someone at a party, what would you tell them that you do for a living? The obvious answer would be that I am in the banking business. I have been in banking since January of 1969 and have seen so many changes in our industry throughout the years. When I started in banking I would jokingly say that I came from the carbon paper era. That was how we made our copies. I remember the first desktop computer used in the bank where I was working at the time. It was delivered to the bank in 1987. My secretary was scared to death to even think of using “that machine.” Took her about six months to get used to it! And now, look where we are today!

The newly-renovated home as seen from the front.

Georgia’s ‘Historical Concepts’ wins 2013 award, best makeover By Clay Neely clay@newnan.com

Georg ia-based a rch itect ure firm Historical Concepts won this year’s “best exterior makeover” for a home in Hobe Sound, Fla. The annual Southern Living awards honor the best architects

Do you have a personal business philosophy?

and designers in the South. Lontime resident of Newnan Terry Pylant was the designer for the project and is a principal with the firm, headquartered in Peachtree City. Following his graduation from Clayton State with a bachelor’s

From the rear — Before

My persona l business ph ilosophy has remained fairly simple over time. I want to provide my clients the very best level of service that I can possibly provide them. Not only do I want to bank with them, but more importantly, I want to get to know them and provide them with thoughtful solutions for both their business and personal needs. I believe in order to set that standard, I have to earn their trust and respect by listening and formulating strategies that fit their needs. I have always been willing to invest time to understand one’s business and do my level best to help them achieve their goals.

What's the best business lesson you've learned? Possess a strong work ethic, stay educated and surround yourself with highly-trained individuals, with emphasis on the latter. I have been fortunate over the years to have worked with well trained and very passionate team members whose number one goal was to take outstanding care of clients. My parents instilled a strong work ethic in me. I began working in our dry goods store at the age of 8, selling ten cent socks at the age of 10 and have been selling ever since. I have always believed in the “Golden Rule” in my approach to business. It keeps matters in perspective as we tend to our clients’ needs.

After

If you weren't doing this, what would you do? I would be in some form of sales, whether it be real estate, medical equipment or even personnel services. It is so gratifying to identify an opportunity, nurture it through the sales cycle and finally close the transaction. And, at the end of the day, if my client is happy with the results, then my day is made.

A before view of the award-winning home.

degree in architecture, Pylant formally started with Historical Concepts in 1989, the same year he moved to Newnan. Pylant went right to work with president and founder of Historical Concepts Jim Strickland, who was an architect he had admired for some time. “Seei ng t he houses he wa s designing, there was a level of detail and quality that was unseen at the time” recalls Pylant. “I was a huge fan of Neel Reid (a prominent architect in Atlanta in the early 20th century) and I studied his work. Seeing Jim’s work for the first time, I actually saw how elements were of similar detail to what Reid was doing back in the 1920s.” Pylant shares what is involved with the process of converting an ordinary house into an award-winning home. The project was requested by a repeat client of Historical Concepts, who purchased the older home in Jupiter Island. In regards to the creative process, the story and sensibility of Jupiter Island was the first thing to be examined. Its history lies in being a retreat for those from the Northeast who wish to enjoy the warmth and experience of Florida without necessarily being seen — from the likes of Katharine Hepburn to present day residents like Celine Dion. Due to the influence that Jupiter Island’s transient residents brought from the Northeast, the island developed its own vernacular of style — nothing ostentatious, just shingle-style, simple and subtle. The current resident of the renovated home is from the Northeast and wanted a summer home. The home itself was built in the 1930s and was considered to be a very simple house. “Time was a key issue,” explains

Pylant. “So we didn’t want to do anything too disruptive.” “We wanted to maintain the shell and the great elements such as the staircase — the interior was taken down to the studs. We reworked the living areas so it would flow better and work better for today.” Construction took around two years from the initial meeting to completion. When restoring a house such as this, one wonders about the potential for obstacles. With the rules and regulations on Jupiter Island being so restrictive, Historical Concepts was forced to work within very strict parameters. Though restrictive, the rules actually turned out to be a blessing. By being limited with what they were able to do, the focus turned to integrating all the architectural influences from the area, thus keeping the character of the home intact but revitalized. However, before any of these issues could be addressed, the home needed to be brought up to code — which meant raising the house — in order to rebuild the foundation. “The client wanted to move in as soon as possible and with the process of tearing down and rebuilding the house being a four to five year project, it was simply not an option,” expressed Pylant. The exterior updates to the home, coupled with the landscape improvements that incorporate indigenous tropical materials, have brought back the grace and elegance of the past. Pylant expressed that this is a “once in a while” project. “I’m blessed to work on a project such as this — something of this nature. Having a client with the means to not only bring this house

home award, page 2B

Creating an economically-sustainable environment Editors note: This week marks the first installment of a new monthly column in The Newnan TimesHerald’s Sunday Business section. Coweta Development Authority President Greg Wright, President and CEO of the Newnan Coweta Ch a m b e r of Com m e rce Ca ndace Boothby and Newnan Business Development Director Hasco Craver IV will be our contributing writers, along with other periodic guests — each focusing on their specific areas of expertise. By Hasco Craver Business Development Director, City of Newnan

Hasco Craver IV - Business Development Director, City of Newnan

The city of Newnan is a globally competitive community, connected to the modern economy, with

access to economically sustainable opportunities for entrepreneurs of all types and sizes to locate and expand a business. We operate in a hyper-competitive environment, not unlike private enterprise. The city competes with other communities for investment and occupational opportunities; the national economy and global economic trends create additional pressure. In an increasingly integrated and competitive market, all jurisdictions must work harder

to cultivate sustained economic success. Through the Newnan Business Development Department, the city has an opportunity to initiate an action strategy designed to mitigate existing challenges while simultaneously taking advantage of current and future opportunities. A successful business development strategy will incorporate and build upon current developments, while concurrently attending to future opportunities. In addition, this strategy must create a sense of collective responsibility among all stakeholder groups — public and private. The Business Development Work Plan is the means by which the city will implement its roadmap

for economic success with a focus on actions that have the greatest impact on the local economy in the short-term, while also building for long-term economic sustainability. The plan recommends five overarching goals that support Newnan’s competitiveness for private investment in a rapidly changing market, followed by strategic initiatives that will provide an achievable framework for action. The concise plan is used to inform and motivate stakeholder groups a nd pa r tners to better understand the complexities, relationships and benefits of successful economic development and take the necessary actions to advance

CRAVER, page 2B


2B — The Newnan Times-Herald   |  Sunday, September 8, 2013

BUSINESS

home award

Jo-Ann Fabric and Craft grand opening Thursday

Continued from page 1B

Jo-Ann Fabric and Craft Stores is celebrating the grand opening of the new Newnan Jo-Ann Sept. 12-14 in the Newnan Pavilion. “As we open this new store, we are pleased to offer our sewing and crafting customers more of what they want — exciting new product lines, higher quality fabrics, better in-store presentations, and regionalized product offerings,” said Travis Smith, CEO and President of Jo-Ann Stores Inc. “The passion and expertise of our store team members, combined with insightful product demonstrations and project inspiration, will make this new store a

back to its former glory but also add to it, including the landscape, made for an incredible project,” Pylant said. So what does the future hold for Historical Concepts? At the moment, expansion throughout the Southeast and beyond is currently under way, with home projects completed in Idaho, Sun Valley, Missouri, Maryland and into Long Island. “Our clients have taken us there,” explains Pylant. Studying precedent is one of the main facets to the company’s success, explains Pylant. “ We l i ke to ac t ua l ly go through and photograph and study the surroundings of each area we are proposed to work in order to study what would be a good fit.” “We are country mice and its astounding to see where we have been able to work. You have to pinch yourself.” H istor ica l Concepts h a s worked with a multitude of med i a such a s m a ga zi nes Southern Living and Garden Gun, and the company has been involved with Southern Living’s Idea House program that included two homes in Senoia in recent years. But it’s the old tried and true method of word of mouth that keeps their reputation sterling. H istor ica l Concepts h a s had quite a lot of involvement in Senoia, starting when the Senoia Downtown Development Authority hired the company in 2006 to come up with “design guidelines” for new construction and renovations in the historic district. The company did the design work on both Idea Houses, as well as the new downtown buildings

CRAVER Continued from page 1B

the determined initiatives. Over the next five months, I will be sharing the Business Development Department’s planned goals and the specific strategic objectives dedicated to actualizing each goal. I hope that the city’s commitment to

Principal for Peachtree City based Historical Concepts Terry Pylant

at 42 and 48 Main Street, and is the designer for the Gin Project adjacent to downtown. A mon g s t my pr a i s e for his work, without hesitation, Pylant makes a special point to note that Historical Concepts is a “we” company and not an “I.” “There are so many, younger smarter folks that work here that make it happen,” expressed Pylant. “I’m only a part of this wonderful, historical team.” Pylant is still very proud to call Newnan home Living just off the Court Square, he and his family enjoy the Sunday walks to First United Methodist Church. As the father of twin sons, they are also heavily involved in Boy Scouts. However, when broached on the subject of pastimes and hobbies, Pylant admits that architecture still ranks high amongst his loves. “When we travel, my wife gets onto me because we come back w it h photog raph s of architectural details with a few family pictures scattered in,” he chuckles. “It’s more than just a job. There is a real love and passion for it.”

an active business development strategy is welcomed and I invite your constructive feedback. • Goal 1: Retain & Expand Existing Businesses. • Goal 2: Recruit Quality Employment and Investment Opportunities. • Goal 3: Catalyze Redevelopment of Existing Assets.

one-stop creative destination in this community.” In celebration of this new location in the Newnan Pavilion located on Highway 34 East/ Bullsboro Drive, Jo-Ann Fabric and Craft Stores will make a donation to support local education. One school in the community will receive a $2,000 grant that will be used to fund the educational project of its choosing. In addition, coin boxes are located near store cash registers to collect donations to support the American Heart Association. The company, team members and generous customers, provided more than $142,000 to the AHA through the coin box

donations and various campaigns in 2012. Finally, this new store will participate in merchandise donation programs to benefit national non-profit partners including The Kids In Need Foundation. “As a proud community supporter, JoAnn Fabric and Craft Stores is pleased to be able to make an impact locally not only during our grand opening celebrations, but in our ongoing efforts,” states Smith. Grand opening festivities will begin Thursday-Saturday, with doors opening at 9 a.m. each day. On Thursday, a ribboncutting ceremony will take place 15 minutes prior to the 9 a.m. store opening with Newnan Mayor Keith Brady.

BUSINESSBRIEFS The Healthy Habit store closes The Healthy Habit store on Jefferson Street has closed. Store personnel will continue to offer massage services, as well as reflexology and ionic foot detox, at The Herb Shop on Dixon Street on Sept. 9.

Harvest Christian Bookstore opening Harvest Christian Bookstore opened Saturday in the South Court Square location formerly occupied by Scott's Bookstore. The store offers a large assortment of Biblically-based products including Bibles, Christian books, music, gifts, family entertainment, home decor, jewelry, cards, apparel,

a nd chu rch suppl ies a nd Media, a company helping curriculum. young adults set a strong foundation for their future by teaching them how money impacts Southern Roots ribbon cutting Sept. 10 their lives. The brass student program A Newnan-Coweta Cham- provides local high school ber of Commerce ribbon cut- teachers with materials that ting for Southern Roots Nursteach students about perery on U.S. Hwy. 29 just north sonal finance while meeting of Newnan will be held Sept. 10 educational standards. Mateat 9 a.m. Southern Roots is in the for- rials include the brass Magamer location of A&W Nurs- zine Student Edition, a lifestyle ery. All plants are grown in the magazine about "the money southeast and are personally side of life" written by young adults for young adults. There selected by the owners. is also online access to the Teacher Resource Center. Delta Community In addition to the materiannounces financial als, Delta Community Credit education program Union representatives are also Delta Community Credit available to bring "the money Union is partnering with brass side of life" directly into the

classroom. Teachers interested in having a classroom presentation should contact Maria Peifer at maria.peifer@ deltacommunitycu.com. T he brass Media student prog ra m joi ns ot her Delta Community initiatives designed to support young people, including Quaterlife, Serve and Deserve, the annual scholarship and Credit Unions for Kids, which supports Children's Healthcare of Atlanta. Ite m s for con s id e ra t ion as business briefs should be e-mailed to business@newnan. com, faxed to 770-253-2538, or mailed to Business Briefs, The Newnan Times-Herald, P.O. Box 1052, Newnan, GA 30264. E-mail submissions are preferred.

Yahoo unveils its new logo as part of makeover SUNNYVALE, Calif. (AP) — Yahoo has refreshed its logo for the first time since shortly after the Internet company’s founding 18 years ago. The new look is part of a ma keover that Ya hoo Inc. has been undergoing since the company hired Google executive Marissa Mayer to become Yahoo’s CEO. Mayer has already spruced up Yahoo’s front page, email and Flickr, as well as engineered a series of acquisitions to attracting more traffic on mobile devices. T he shopping spree has been highlighted by Yahoo’s

$1.1 billion purchase of Tumbl r, a n I nter net blog g i ng service. The redesigned logo retains some of the elements of the old one, including the company’s official color, purple. Yahoo’s familiar exclamation point is still there, too, but with a twist. When v i sitor s come to Ya ho o’s front page or a n app, t he excla mation poi nt da nces across some of the lettering before settling at the end of the company’s name. “ We k new we wa nted a logo t hat ref lected Ya hoo — whimsical, yet sophisti-

cated,” Mayer wrote on Tumblr. “modern and fresh, with a nod to our history. Having a human touch, personal.” Mayer, 38, said she spent most of one weekend figuring out what the new logo should look like with four other Yahoo colleagues.

In a n effort to dr um up more interest in the changeover, Yahoo showed some of the logos that Mayer and her helpers cast aside. Mayer’s overhaul of Yahoo has attracted a lot of attention, but so far it hasn’t provided a significant lift to the company’s revenue. Yahoo’s stock has climbed by nearly 80 percent, but most of that gain has been driven by the company’s 24 percent stake in China’s Alibaba Holdings Group. Investors prize Alibaba because it has emerged as one of the fastest growing companies on the Internet.

PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY If You Suffer From A Single One Of These Torturous Symptoms — Numbness, Tingling, Burning or Sharp Nerve Pain In Your Feet — DESPITE WHAT MANY DOCTORS MAY TELL YOU, PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY CAN BE EFFECTIVELY TREATED

Peripheral Neuropathy affects every part of your life — walking, sleeping, socializing, sometimes even sitting and so much more.

Ask Yourself These 5 Questions:

If you have tried “everything” (Lyrica®, Neurotin®, physical therapy, orthotics for your shoes, even injections) without getting the lasting results you want then you may be the perfect candidate for my Neuropathy Program. There is a simple reason that these treatments fail… because they are only covering up the symptoms. They do not address the root cause of your Peripheral Neuropathy. We all know this to be true. There is a tremendous difference between covering up your symptoms and actually fixing the underlying problem. Why settle for “band-aid” care, when you could potentially correct the problem?

The Single Most Important Solution To Your Neuropathy Has Been Years in the Making… It cost me thousands of dollars and countless hours away from my family, researching, reading, talking with experts in the scientific community and racking my brain in order to create a “No-Holds Barred”, exceedingly effective Neuropathy Recovery Program. Finally my Neuropathy program is available to you. And the best news is that the principles of my Neuropathy Recovery Program work with both diabetic and nondiabetic types of neuropathy. How does my Neuropathy Program work? Quite simply, by finding the TRUE cause of your Neuropathy and then having the “know-how” on how to remove that cause. Every patient’s case of Neuropathy will be different, so I don’t have the space here to go into more details. That is why I am offering a Special Evaluation in order to see if you can be helped with my Neuropathy Recovery Program. My patients know my insider secrets to recovery. They have already received their individualized Neuropathy Recovery Program and are having amazing results. Here is what they are saying: “This is the first time in many years that I have been able to feel my feet.” -Ben Hollis

As Seen On Atlanta & Company on 11Alive

“I have suffered from severe neuropathy in both feet for close to 10 years. My previous doctors said it was due to my Diabetes and that I would just have to live with it. After reading about Dr. Dunn, I went to go see him. I’ve completed the treatment plan that he outlined and am happy to say that I am finally symptom free.” — Bill Schwartz “Before seeing Dr. Dunn, the neuropathy in my feet was so bad that I couldn’t even drive a car. Now, I can drive myself to get groceries and go to Wal-Mart whenever I want to. Dr. Dunn truly gave me my life back.” — Mary Jenkins “After the first treatment, I noticed an immediate improvement. For the first time in many years, I was actually able to sleep through the night without my feet waking me up.” — Susie Sayer

1. Do you feel like you’re wearing an invisible “sock” over your feet? 2. Does it feel like you are stepping on thumb tacks? 3. Are you extremely sensitive to touch… Burning, Freezing or electric “shocks” into your legs or feet? 4. Are you experiencing Numbness, Tingling, Loss of Feeling or even Weakness in your legs or feet? 5. Are you starting to have balance problems now because of your feet? If you answered “YES” to any of these questions, chances are you may have Peripheral Neuropathy. If you’ve been suffering for a while and you’re tired of treatments that only give you temporary relief, then I may have the answer you’ve been waiting and hoping for. Remember, this Special Offer is only good until the 27th of September. Call today 770-450-4541 and we can get you scheduled for your consultation and exam as soon as there’s an opening. When you call, tell Kathy you’d like to come in for my Neuropathy Recovery Evaluation so she can make sure you receive proper credit for this special offer.

Now let me say this, I am not promising that I can cure everyone. I don’t even know if you qualify for my program. That is yet to be determined, and requires a thorough exam and review of your history.

Sincerely,

I know that you’ve been promised the moon and stars before and nobody has delivered the goods.

P.S. See Dr. Dunn interviewed about Neuropathy on 11Alive Morning and hear him on 95.5 FM “WSB”

That’s why I’m offering you a risk-free introduction to this program. For a limited time you will receive my Qualifying Examination Special for only $47 if you call before September 27, 2013.

Correct Diagnosis + Correct Treatment = Best Results Possible and Relief. If you are tired of the institutionalized medical merry-go -round of cover up care, then you need to try my program. You have nothing to lose and everything to gain.

Dr. Matt Dunn, D.C.

Dr. Dunn practices in Peachtree City, Georgia and specializes in the treatment of Peripheral Neuropathy and Herniated Discs. See My Patients Share Their Stories of Hope & Success:

www.FreeMyPainNow.com

To learn even more: www.tinyurl.com/neuropathyvideo


Up Close

Sunday, September 8, 2013  |   The Newnan Times-Herald — 3B

CONTACT US

E-mail your upclose news/photos to: closeup@newnan.com breaking news throughout the day | www.times-herald.com

Family Heirlooms

W. WINSTON SKINNER

KATHY BOHANNON

Baby sister arrives Quinn Kight — often referred to as “Baby Sister” by Clair Lynn — has made her arrival. Perfect hands and fingers, feet and toes. Blue eyes that already hint at turning a darker shade. An olive complexion that folks keep comparing to her Pop. I have to admit that makes me smile. My Uncle Young was particularly pleased with Quinn’s punctuality. She was born on Aug. 29, just like her mother’s doctor predicted. If anyone else in our family was ever born on the official “due date,” I don’t know it. For more than a week prior, Lynn and I went to bed and got up wondering if the baby would come shortly. One night Lynn even dreamed about her. It became clear on Aug. 28 while Sallie was filling her usual post teaching math at Newnan High, that the baby would make her appearance before long. Lynn and I got four-year-old Clair Lynn and prepared for her to spend the night at Muv and Pop’s house — always a treat for all three of us. When we went to bed, Sallie and Jim were still at home waiting for the signals that it was time to go to the hospital. About 2 a.m., both Lynn and I woke up. I checked my Facebook page and found that Jane, our younger daughter who lives in California, had sent me a message asking if I had heard from Sallie and Jim. When I said “no,” she quickly let me know that Jim had sent her a text, that they were at the hospital and that Sallie was being prepped for delivery. I reflected on what our forebears would think about such circumstances — Sallie and Jim living 10 minutes from us and 20 from the hospital, Jane on the other side of the country, Jim texts Jane, Jane sends me a Facebook message, we all know baby Quinn is on the way. As we got up to get ready for work and school, we learned that Jacqueline Jane Kight had been born at 6:52 a.m. I took Clair Lynn to school and then circled back by Piedmont Newnan to see Jim and Sallie and meet my second granddaughter. Before I got away, the other beaming grandparents, Jim and Clair Kight, arrived to welcome Quinn to the world. There were calls to be made, Facebook and email messages to far-flung family and to our church family at Allen-Lee. I picked up Clair Lynn from school that afternoon and took her by the hospital. She was very glad to get to see her Mommy and Daddy. She was at first tentative about approaching her baby sister, but quickly warmed to her and even helped Sallie hold Quinn for a bit. The next few days were a blur of excitement. I took Clair Lynn shopping to select presents for herself from Muv and Pop and two books for Quinn from big sister. We also made a trip to one of our favorite haunts, Dairy Queen. When Lynn and I took her sister, Eleanor, to lunch Saturday, we didn’t go to Red Robin or Pizza Hut or one of her other usual favorites but to the hospital cafeteria, so we could tie lunch with a visit to the Kights. By early Saturday afternoon, Quinn and her family were home — and very glad to be there. All four began settling in, starting new routines as Quinn began to comprehend the world. We got together at my parents’ on Labor Day. A highlight of the day was seeing Lynn spend a big part of the day with Quinn in her arms, on her shoulder or in her lap. At one point that afternoon, Clair Lynn said, “Pop, my baby sister keeps looking at me.” “That’s because she thinks you are the most interesting person in the world. Everything you do fascinates her.” Clair Lynn paused pensively and then reached over and gently touched Quinn’s arm. Softly she said, “I love my baby sister, too.”

MILITARY NOTES

Crafter on holiday

This photograph shows Angela Cook Moore wearing the yellow dress that has become a family heirloom.

Yellow dress passed down for generations By Ana Ivey ana@newnan.com

Vassie Brown Staley spent a lifetime sewing clothes for her family using a pedal sewing machine, store-bought patterns, and yards upon yards of fabric. Before passing away a little more than 50 years ago, Staley made one last item — a sunny yellow dress embellished with lace and ribbon for her then 2-year-old granddaughter, Angela Cook Moore. “My grandmother made the dress for me for Easter of 1960,” said Moore, now 55. “My mother liked the dress so much she had a portrait made of me wearing it when I was 2.” Moore’s mother, Mary Ann Cook, a lifetime Newnan resident, remembers the portrait sitting. She worked for Joe Norman Photography back then (and later, Newnan photographer Bob Shapiro) at a time when hand-colouring — adding colors and tints to black and white photographs — was popular. “We used transparent oils and brushes and added colors to sepia-toned prints,” said the 78-year-old Cook from her older, ranch-style home, the walls covered in antique frames filled with photographs spanning at least seven decades. Cook, who had been trained to tint photographs, applied the oil paints herself to her daughter’s portrait. The little daisy-colored frock, still in mint condition and looking more like an outfit for a baby doll than a toddler, has become the centerpiece of a family tradition that has lasted over five decades. The dress, made of muslin — a loosely-woven cotton fabric — has been worn by two generations of Cook girls for their 2-year-old portraits since that first picture was taken in 1960. In 1965, Cook’s youngest daughter, Alicia Cook McClain, posed in it when she turned 2. The dress then settled into a cedar chest for a 20-year respite. In the ‘80s, the dress made three more appearances. First in 1982, when Charlsie Corbin, Moore’s oldest daughter, wore it. Then again in 1986, when Moore’s youngest, Hillary Metts, donned it. And lastly in 1987 when

Photo by Ana Ivey

The little daisy-colored frock, still in mint

condition and looking more like an outfit for a baby doll than a toddler, has become the centerpiece of a family tradition that has lasted over five decades.

Moore’s niece, Heather Beach, put on the dress for her 2-year-old photo. By then, color film had replaced the handtinting of the ‘60s and Newnan photographer Bob Shapiro was the man behind the lens. “In 1980, when I first bought the studio (from Joe Norman), we were still doing color tinting, one, because it was very popular, and two, because it was an in-house product,” said Shapiro. “But eventually it disappeared because Kodak quit making some of the photographic paper we used to tint on. Hand-tinting died a natural death.” After the three portraits in the ‘80s, the little garment slumbered in Cook’s cedar chest for another 20-plus years. When Cook’s youngest granddaughter, Katie Cook, turned 2 in 2008, the dress emerged again and a portrait was made using digital photography. “Then last year for my birthday, momma had my sister put the dress in a shadow box for me,” said Moore. It will remain in the box, hanging in Moore’s family room and waiting for another little girl to enter the family and turn 2. “The neat thing about the whole story is our family’s history and heritage,” said Moore. “We are all from Coweta County, all of us born at Newnan Hospital. We still live on the land where my grandfather raised and picked cotton and my grandmother cooked on a wood stove. We even had an outhouse out back. I can remember my grandmother ringing the dinner bell and my grandfather walking in from the fields with his mule.” “This dress looks as good today as it did when I was 2,” continued Moore. “It has survived 53 years and it is a beautiful reminder of our family and our heritage.”

Air Force Airman Aaron P. Young

FACES AROUND TOWN

Photo by Clay Neely

Willie Jordan demonstrates his spinning

prowess.

Willie Jordan: Sign spinner By Clay Neely

Young graduates basic training Air Force Airman Aaron P. Young graduated from basic military training at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, San Antonio, Texas. The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force. Young is the son of Sandra Lindsey of Calico Loop, Grantville. He is a 2012 graduate of Newnan High School.

I’m an avid crafter. One of the perks of being an avid crafter is Christmas in July, August, September and October. Oh, I try to grumble at the July holiday sprinklings that land in my email inbox, the top of my page on Pinterest and feed into my news on Facebook. I try, but it truly makes my crafter’s heart flutter. Crafters get a preview in July with a bit of Christmas here and there, just so we will have time to make fabulous creations with what we are selling. Halloween is really big in the crafting world and though I don’t do much more than give out decorated bags of candy on Halloween, it’s fun to see what is new with cute pumpkin designs on fabric and paper. There is probably a rule out there somewhere that if you don’t promote your holiday crafting supplies by August, you’ve missed the boat entirely. Just this morning on Facebook, a floral site posted a beautiful fall wreath with a caption reminding us that Thanksgiving deserves some attention too. By early August I had already designed a few Christmas cards that I’ll be teaching soon and I put my Christmas open house on the calendar. I’ve dedicated September to sewing and papercrafting and in my crafter’s heart, I’m certain I’ll have all my class projects and Christmas gifts made by September 30. Of course, if I finish everything, I’ll have to come up with more projects to keep me busy. It won’t be difficult though. By October 1, the stores will be full of Christmas décor, the debate of “holiday” vs. “Christmas” will be in full swing and there will be more than enough people grumbling that it comes earlier every year. It may come early in October for most, but for us crafters, we’ve been at it for months. Though I have many opportunities to grumble early in July, I just can’t. I can’t, mainly because I love Christmas. I love that it is the celebration of the birth of our savior. I love that I can share gifts I’ve selected or made throughout the year — yes, I begin this in January, and I love that as a crafter, I can create beautiful things to share. Besides, with September now here, there will be enough grumbling about the stores filling shelves simultaneously with Halloween and Christmas, and a smattering of fall décor. I’m sure I used to feel pressured by the onslaught of retailers promoting the holidays out of season, but no more. I’m excited and can’t wait to shake off the heat of summer and decorate my house. I will resist, though, only so I won’t be the crazy lady in the neighborhood with a tree glittering in the window while trick-or-treaters knock at my door. The holidays come too early? Not for me. I have double sided tape, a pair of scissors, fabric and a sewing machine. Bring it, September, I’ll be on the front lines, ready and waiting. (Kathy Bohannon is a regular contributor to The Newnan Times-Herald. She is the author of two books: Dyson the Terrible Puppy and Gardens of Savannah. Both can be found at www.barnesandnoble.com .)

clay@newnan.com

Photo by Winston Skinner

Mary Ann Cook is surrounded by the members of her family who wore the dress her mother made

more than 50 years ago. From left are, front, Katie Cook; back, Hillary Metts, Angela Moore, Mary Ann Cook, Heather Beach, Alicia McLain and Charlsie Corbin.

The emergence of the “sign spinner” in front of a business is a common sight these days. Willie Jordan has been spinning signs with flair and showmanship for well over a year. You can find him most afternoons spinning his sign for Little Caesars on Bullsboro Drive. It’s very clear that he enjoys his work and takes the spinning to new heights, sometimes literally. Even in the middle of a Georgia summer, he continues the acrobatic sign maneuvers, and when asked about working in the heat, he simply smiles and says, “I just drink my water and I deal with it.” Jordan says some of the perks of the job are seeing people smile while others stop to chat with him. “I’ve had a few ladies flirt with me, too, so that’s pretty nice,” he says with a laugh.


4B — The Newnan Times-Herald   |  Sunday, September 8, 2013

Bridal &    Weddings

Mr. and Mrs. Colin Duncan

CONTACT US

E-mail your bridal & wedding news/photos to: closeup@newnan.com breaking news throughout the day | www.times-herald.com

Emmett and Betty Baker

Hines and Duncan marry Mr. and Mrs. Emmett Baker on Aug. 3 in Newnan celebrate 63rd anniversary Evelyn Hines of Newnan, G e or g i a , a nd C ol i n D u ncan of Greensboro, Georgia, were married on August 3, 2013, at Bible Baptist Church of Newnan, with Pastor Doug Anderson officiating. Following the wedding a reception was given for the

newly weds by fa m i ly a nd friends. The couple went to Pigeon Forge, Tennessee, for their honeymoon. They will reside both in Newnan and Greenboro until they establish a permanent residence.

Mr. and Mrs. Emmett and Betty Baker of Senoia recently celebrated their 63rd wedding anniversary. The Bakers were married on Aug. 25, 1950. The Bakers had two children, Ronnie and Ricky. B ot h E m met t a nd B et t y

retired from sales and spent most of their lives involved in church music. Betty plays the piano while Emmett sings and leads worship. They play music with their granddaughter, Rhiannon Gordon, who is Ronnie’s daughter. Mr. and Mrs. Casey Sherman

Miss Hirt weds Mr. Sherman

guest column

How fast do birds fly? Flying is what makes a bird a bird. To overcome gravity and use powered flight for mobility, birds evolved a set of characteristics that distinguish them from other vertebrates and also constrain their form making birds resemble one another more than do other related animals. Weight reduction is the theme throughout a bird’s body. A bird skeleton is strong, light and rigid. Bird bones contain a combination of air spaces and diagonal struts much like the frame of an airplane. A bird’s breast bone is huge relative to ours and has a large keel where all major flight muscles attach. A bird’s pectoral girdle and pelvic girdle are exceptionally strong to protect the chest cavity from the stresses created by flapping wings. Except for the lowly bat, mammals haven’t developed these characteristics and can’t fly — unless they buy tickets and stand in long lines. As similar as they are, birds come in all shapes and sizes and with various flying abilities. Quail are only adequate flyers. They are more comfortable on the ground and only fly in short bursts when forced. Hummingbirds are agile and fast. They can hover,

flight takes them across your yard. Finally, some birds fly so slowly that all the other birds are backed up behind them. STANLEY These birds usually only fly in tate the left lane and have a Florida license plate and an I’M RETIRED bumper sticker. All that considered, it’s tough to answer the quesfly backward tion, “How fast do birds fly?” and vanish instantly at the A good rule of thumb for most first sign of danger. Watching feeder birds is 20 to 30 miles them zoom and dart around per hour. The House Sparrow the yard you would swear they is among the slowest species are the fastest members of at only 15 to 18 miles per hour. the bird tribe. However, their But even slow birds can accelspeed is a size-generated illuerate faster than my 350Z if sion. I doubt one could keep up there is trouble. with a fat Canada Goose on a Some non-feeder birds can straight course. attain astonishing speeds in Physical ability is not the normal flight. Waterfowl and only determinant of a bird’s shorebirds can fly at sustained flight speed. Wind is a big con- speeds of 55 to 70 miles per tributor. Some birds have been hour. A Red-breasted Merreported to fly from Britain to ganser was clocked at 80 by Newfoundland, 2200 miles, in a chase plane. The disputed 24 hours — an average of 90 title of the world’s fastest bird miles per hour. How did they is usually awarded to the Perdo it? A tail wind pushed them egrine Falcon — it can reach faster than they could ever speeds over 200 miles an hour. flap on their own. The title is disputed because Birds don’t fly at just one the falcon only achieves such speed. They fly fastest when speeds in a dive — not in they are chasing something level flight. Some argue that they want to eat or if they are the Peregrine shouldn’t be being chased by something given credit for these speeds that wants to eat them. Then because gravity is doing most there is the steady but urgent of the work. Some even say migration speed they use to that in addition to gravity the continent-hop. A less hurried Peregrine Falcon gets the extra

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ford, Jessica Pope of Newnan, Becca Ostrom of Sanford, and Angel Johnson of Deltona, Fla. Buck Sherman of Newnan s er ve d a s b e s t m a n . T he groom’s other attendants were Cory Sherman of Newnan, Kyle Sherma n of New na n , Mike Smith of Newnan, Adam Bowen of Fayetteville, and Andrew Bellise of Newnan. Following a wedding trip to Costa Rica, Mr. and Mrs. Casey Sherman will reside in Sanford, Fla.

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speed using a HEMI — but you only hear that from the guys who watch infield owls at Talladega. How fast can a bird fly? The answer depends on who you ask.

Rochelle Hirt, daughter of Terry Hirt of Osteen, Fla., and the late Robert Hirt, became the bride of Casey Sherman, son of Angie and Buck Sherman of Newnan, Ga., on July 13, 2013, at Central Baptist Church of Sanford, Fla., with Dr. Alan Brumback and Brian Morgan officiating. Roxanne Gooding of Osteen was t he bride’s mat ron of honor. The bride’s other attenda nts were R ay na Hi r t of Osteen, Lydia Meisel of San-

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Sunday, September 8, 2013  |  The Newnan Times-Herald — 5B

FAMILY FOCUSONFAMILY

Human trafficking a dark part of contemporary culture Q: I've never kept tight controls on my teenagers. I don't enforce strict curfews or get uptight when they come in late at night. But recently, I read an article about sexual slavery and human trafficking in our community, and it left me deeply unsettled. Am I overreacting? Jim: Human trafficking is a terrible reality that impacts not only the developing world, but middle-class neighborhoods right here in the U.S. So yes, you need to be aware of this dark underside of contemporary culture. At the same time, alarmist fears are helpful to no one. You don't want to scare your kids unnecessarily. Nor is it wise to convey an attitude of suspicion or distrust to your teens without good cause. Statistically, they face far greater danger from simply riding in an automobile every day than they do from the possibility of trafficking. You know your kids best, and you're in the best position to determine whether they might be vulnerable to this kind of deception and victimization. Are they troubled in any way? Do they struggle in school? Are they slipping academically, dealing with social rejection or facing bully problems? Are they new in the neighborhood, unpopular with their classmates, insecure or low on self-esteem? If so, their innate desire for some kind of human connection could make them easy targets.

JIM DALY

The best way to prevent this is to make sure you're building strong relationships with your kids. The family should be their primary point of connection. You can protect them against all kinds of negative outside influences by forging a bond of mutual trust. Make it clear that they can always come to you with their needs, problems and concerns. While your first responsibility is to your own kids, it's also important for everyone to do their part to ensure their communities are safe. Keep your radar up for signs of suspicious activity in your community. If, at any point, you come across evidence that your children or anyone else you know have become caught up in human trafficking, contact local authorities or call the National Human Trafficking Hotline at 888-373-7888. Q: My wife has "given up drinking" several times only to end up back on the bottle. She's lost her job, our household i s show i ng sig n s of neglect, and the whole family is slowly going to pieces. What can I do to reverse this negative trend?

Dr. Greg Smalley, Vice President, Family Ministries: We're very sorry to learn about this painful situation. One thing is for certain: You can't navigate it alone. Your wife, especially, needs to enlist outside help to combat her addiction. The Lighthouse Network is a clearinghouse for substance abuse referrals. People there can help you locate a facility in your area that will help your wife take some positive steps toward recovery. They can also provide information regarding the insurance companies that are prepared to work with these facilities. You can contact Lighthouse Network at 1-877-562-2565. Another option for longterm treatment of alcoholism is the Salvation Army. This service is offered free of charge. Visit www.salvationarmyusa.org for information regarding local treatment centers. You can also find out about local Alcoholics Anonymous groups at www.aa.org . Finally, you should think about enlisting the help of a qualified professional, not only to help your wife, but to help your entire family navigate these difficult waters. Contact Focus on the Family (focusonthefamily.com) for a free consultation with one of our staff counselors, as well as a referral to long-term counseling in your area. God bless you and your family as you go through this dark time together.

From left are Judith Lowery, General Daniel Newnan Daughters of the American Revolution chapter

treasurer; Brenda Jessel, past regent and DAR Georgia state chaplain; Jane Petsch, registrar; Jeannine Jackson, membership chair; and back, Judy Gagliano, DAR Good Citizens chair; Bob Wylie, president of the Marquis de Lafayette Chapter, Georgia Sons of the American Revolution; Audrey Wylie, chapter regent; Kayla Hudson, vice regent; Anna Thompson, chaplain. Not pictured is Marci Swetmon, local DAR schools chair.

DAR chapter members attend national meeting A delegation from the local General Daniel Newnan Daughters of the American Revolution chapter attended the national DAR’s 122nd Annual Continental Congress in Washington, D.C. The nation’s capital welcomed more than 3,500 members of one of its foremost service organizations with the arrival of the DAR members. Among them were nine members of the General Daniel Newnan Chapter, NSDAR. A m on g t h e g roup we re Audrey Wylie, chapter regent, accompanied by husband Bob Wylie, president of the Marquis de Lafayette Chapter, Georgia Sons of the American Revolution; Kayla Hudson, vice regent; Judith Lowery, treasurer; Anna T hompson , chapla i n ; Ja ne Petsch, registrar; Jeannine Jackson, membership chair; Marci Swetmon, DAR schools chair; Judy Gagliano, DAR Good Citizens chair; and Brenda Jessel, past regent and GSSDAR state chaplain. They attended business meetings, luncheons

and special events during the Congress. Jessel also serves on the National Defense Committee as National Southeast Division Chair. "We are proud that so many from our Chapter attended this year," stated Chapter Regent Wylie. "It is a very exciting week with so much to learn." Highlights of the week-long event i ncluded welcom i ng respected keynote speakers and award winners during the gala evening ceremonies. Guest speakers for the opening night ceremonies were antique expert Leigh Keno, known from his appearances on “Antiques Roadshow,” who received the DAR Historic Preservation Recognition Award; and Rich Little, comedian and voice actor, who received the DAR Americanism Award given to distinguished naturalized citizens. On National Defense Night, an evening that honors America's military personnel and veterans, the keynote address was

delivered by Vice Admiral Robin R. Braun, U.S. Navy, chief of Navy Reserve, comm a nder, Nav y R e s er ve Force. Lieutenant General Claude “Mick” Kicklighter, U.S. Army (Ret.), provided remarks about the upcoming efforts of the commemoration program. Additional awards that evening were presented to the Army Nurse of the Year and outstanding volunteers for veterans. The gala awards banquet honored Ambassador John Limbert with the Medal of Honor, actress Connie Stevens was presented with the Founders Medal for Patriotism, and DAR Media Awards honored the films “Honor Flight” and “Girl Rising.”

Coweta County Remembered Students of the final class of the Mary Ray School in Raymond, Georgia, for 1947-48, are pictured on the front steps of the schoolhouse. The schoolhouse building in the community southeast of Newnan has been restored by a group of concerned community members and has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The photo is provided for Coweta Remembered by Paula Stanford of the Mary Ray Memorial Schoolhouse organization. Pictured are, from left, first row, Helen Upshaw, Carol Ann Mabry, Betty Jean Mabry, Jane Chambless; second row, Billy Mabry, Unknown, Unknown, Unknown; third row, Teacher - Mrs. Alma Morrow, Parent -Mrs. Mabry; fourth row, Alfred Beckom, Tony Beckom and Charles Abercrombie.

Newnan-Coweta Historical Society works with The Newnan Times-Herald to produce Coweta County Remembered, which appears in each Sunday issue of newspaper. To submit a photo or item, call Herb Bridges of the historical society at 770-253-4934 or contact him by mail in care of the NewnanCoweta Historical Society, P. O. Box 1001, Newnan, GA 30264. Or contact News Editor Ellen Corker at The Newnan Times-Herald office, 770-253-1576, ext. 727; fax 770-253-2538; or email at "ellen@newnan. com." Photos may also be brought to The Newnan Times-Herald office, 16 Jefferson St., P. O. Box 1052, Newnan, GA 30264; or to historical society volunteers at the Male Academy Museum at Temple Avenue and College Street, 770-251-0207. Include a name and telephone number. The museum offers permanent and rotating exhibits and has a shop with gift items including books on Coweta County history such as its "History of Coweta County, Ga." The society also operates the new McRitchie-Hollis Museum on Jackson Street at Clark.

BIRTHANNOUNCEMENTS Coley Bruce Lee Coley and Marga ret A sh leig h Wi l k i n son announce the birth of a daughter, Ashleya Hope Coley, on Aug. 5, 201 3, at P ied mont Newnan Hospital. Maternal grandparents are Johnathon and Hope Mowell of Snellville. Paternal grandparent is Shirley A. Arrington of Newnan. *** Hancock Ju s t i n a n d B e c k y H a n cock announce the birth of a son, Kellen Hancock, on Aug. 8, 2013, at Piedmont Newnan Hospital. Maternal grandparents are Doug and Cindy Roberson of Sharpsburg. Paternal grandparents are Jay and Charlotte Law of Dawson. *** Garriga Daryl and Samantha Garriga announce the birth of a son, Justin Eli Garriga, on Aug. 7, 2013, at Piedmont Newnan Hospital. Maternal grandparents are Ruby Stout of South Gate, CA, and David Stout of Aiken, SC. Paternal grandparents are Debbie Garriga of Huntington Beach, CA, and Don Garriga of Huntington Beach, CA. *** Jarvis Sheldon Jarvis and Valerie Render announce the birth of a daughter, Kylie Ashanti Jarvis, on Aug. 15, 2013, at Piedmont Newnan Hospital. Maternal grandparents are Faye and Jack ie Render of New na n. Paternal grandparents are Sharon Jarvis and Wylie Woodal of Alvaton. *** O’Neal Michael O’Neal and Brittany Montgomery announce the

birth of a son, James Anthony O’Neal, on Aug. 13, 2013, at Piedmont Newnan Hospital. Maternal grandparents are Angela Montgomery of Newnan. Paternal grandparents are Becky and Wesley Moreland of Newnan. *** Taylor Cody R. and Cindy E. Taylor announce the birth of a daughter, Brooklyn Shae Taylor, on Aug. 5, 2013, at Piedmont Newnan Hospital. Maternal grandparents are Scottie Walker of Hogansville and the late Sharon Elaine Simpson Bentley. Paternal grandparents are Albert and Lisa Taylor of Hogansville. *** Tucker

David Tucker and Ny-Keisha Russell announce the birth of a son, David Monta Tucker Jr., on Aug. 4, 2013 at Piedmont Newnan Hospital. Maternal grandparent is Vickie Russell of Gay. Paternal grandparents are Willie and Annie Tucker of Gay. *** Wright Jeujuan and Tanisha Wright announce the birth of a son, Andru Jeujuan Wright, on Aug. 17, 2013, at Piedmont Newnan Hospital. Maternal grandparents are Walter and Ernestine Moss and the late Patricia Sutton Parks of Newnan. Paternal grandparents are Josie and Jessie Wright of Newnan.

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6B — The Newnan Times-Herald   |  Sunday, September 8, 2013

CALENDAR Monday — Sept. 9 n Tommy Thompson Senior Center,

29 Hospital Rd., Newnan, has activities weekdays, Mon.-Fri. Lunch for a small fee. Director Ida Johnson. Details: 770-683-8600 or 683-8602. Morning and afternoon activities, daily Koffee-Klatch, exercise, Wii games, crafts/classes, card games, pool games, line dancing, excursions. This week: Monday, Sept. 9, Dollar Tree shopping and craft day; Tuesday, Sept. 10, Bible study and Homestead Bingo at 11; Wednesday, Sept. 11, United blood pressure clinic, 9/11 movie and flu shots; Thursday, Sept. 12, Gospel Heirs and exercises, also, Nancy Olson offers a computer class Sept. 12; Friday, Sep. 13, Diabetic Association of Atlanta visits at 10 and Bingo.

n Grantville Senior Center, 123

LaGrange St. in Grantville city hall building, meets Monday through Friday. Details on daily activities or special events at Grantville, 770-583-2706.

n Business Networking Group

meets Mondays at 5:30 p.m. in Dunkin Donuts. Free. Call to confirm: 678-461-4580.

n Laptime, a popular staple of pro-

gramming a A. Mitchell Powell Jr. Public Library for more than 20 years, returns this fall with a new leader and the same outstanding experience for 2-year-olds and their families. The program is now on its fourth teacher, Christine Barnett, who also will work at the children’s desk where she will assist patrons in finding books and information for the elementary and middle school level. Frst Laptime class kicks off Sept. 9 at 10:30 a.m. at the library on Hospital Road in Newnan. There will also be a class on Wednesdays at 10:30. If these classes become full, additional classes will be added on those days at 11:30. Details: contact Barnett or a children’s staff member at 770-253-3625, or for library services check at www. cowetapubliclibrary.org .

n Coweta-Fayette Rotary Club

meets at Senoia Coffee & Café at 1 Main Street in downtown Senoia. Mondays 6:30 p.m. Details: call Ginger Queener at 770-253-9478 or visit cowetafayetterotary.org.

n Coweta Beekeepers Association

meets at Coweta Extension Service office, 255 Pine Rd. south of Newnan, second Mondays, 7 p.m. Visitors welcome. Details: Steven Page 770-6832465 or visit www.cowetabeekeepers. org. Next: Sept. 9.

n McIntosh Lodge 735 meets 7

p.m. 2nd and 4th Mondays. On East Washington Street, Newnan. Includes dinner. Details: Curtis Grice, 770-3043249. (Sept. 9).

n Masonic Lodge 429 of Sargent

meets 7 p.m. 2nd and 4th Mondays. Details: James Jones, 770-253-5790. (Sept. 9)

n Coweta Survivors of Suicide

meets second Mondays 7 to 9 p.m. at Crossroads Church, 2564 Hwy. 154. Details: church office at 770254-0291. Local SOS group operates under the auspices of Crossroads Church’s care and counseling ministry, led by Dr. John Hobbs. (Sept. 9)

Tuesday — Sept. 10 n Coweta County Genealogical

Society Research Center is located in the historic passenger train depot in downtown Grantville. The research center is open Tuesdays through Thursdays and the first and fourth Saturdays of each month from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. If you want to join the society, send your dues — $20 for an individual, $25 for a family — to CCGS, P.O. Box 1014, Newnan, GA 30264.

n Coweta Association of Retired

Educators meet Sept. 10 at 11 a.m. at the Coweta County School System’s instructional offices at 167 Werz Industrial Boulevard, off Millard Farmer Industrial Boulevard.

n Women with Depression — Open

discussion, prayer, and continued support through difficult days for women with depression issues. Meets 7 p.m. Tuesdays at Crossroads Church, 2564 Hwy. 154, southeast of Newnan. Details: http://crossroadsnewnan.org .

n Backyard Association is Sept.

10 at 7 p.m. Mike Cunningham of Country Gardens Farm will present a program on “Growing Your Own Organic Salad Garden through Fall and Winter.” Backyard Association is sponsored by the Coweta County Master Gardener Extension Volunteers and held at the Coweta County Extension Office on Pine Road at the Coweta County Fairgrounds complex. For details call the Extension Office at 770-254-2620.

n Diabetic Support Group of

Piedmont Newnan Hospital holds afternoon meetings second Tuesdays

every other month 2-3 p.m. in the Bistro Conference Room of the hospital on Poplar Road. Remaining for 2013: Sept. 10 and Nov. 12. Diabetics and family members learn about diet, medications and other topics to aid in their disease management.Details: www.piedmontnewnan.org. n Coweta Lodge 60 Free &

Accepted Masons meets 2nd and 4th Tuesdays. Supper 6:30 p.m.; lodge Sewell Road, Newnan, opens 7:30 p.m. Next: Sept. 10.

n Job Network meets at Newnan

First United Methodist Church 6 p.m. Tues., Sept. 10. Along with a monthly speaker or program, volunteers review resumes, and Newnan Career Center, Georgia Department of Labor reps answer questions about job opportunities. Details: 770-253-7400 or www.newnanfumc.org then Job Networking under Ministries. Meetings 2nd Tuesdays 6 p.m. in Parish Hall, 33 Greenville St. All are welcome, free.

n Marquis de Lafayette Chapter,

Sons of the American Revolution, meets 7 p.m. second Tuesday each month at Heritage Bank on North Jeff Davis Dr., Fayetteville. (Next: Sept. 10)

n Marine Corps League is a

Congressional chartered, nonprofit veterans’ service organization. Clyde Thomason Detachment 1325 serves Coweta and Fayette counties. Meets 2nd Tuesdays at Christ The King Church, 4881 Hwy. 34 E., Sharpsburg. Details: Dan Springer, 770-461-3043. Next: Sept. 10, 7 p.m.

Wednesday — Sept. 11 n Newnan Community 9/11 remem-

brance program will be 9 a.m. Sept. 11 on the west side of the historic Coweta County Courthouse in downtown Newnan.

n Coweta Farmers Market open at

Powell Expo Center — Coweta’s farmers and gardeners are selling the fruits — and vegetables — of their labor at the Coweta County Farmers Market. The market is held Wednesdays and Saturdays at Powell Expo Center, 197 Temple Ave., and runs through September. In addition to fruits and vegetables, vendors often sell jams, jellies, pickles, local honey, live plants, baked goods and hand-made items. Hours are 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. All products must be made or grown locally, and by the seller or the seller’s family. “Locally” includes Coweta County as well as Carroll, Fayette, Fulton, Heard, Meriwether, Spalding and Troup counties. If you’re interested in selling, vendor fees are $3 a day, $5 a week or $20 a month. Applications are available at www. ugaextension.com/coweta or at the Coweta Extension Office on Pine Road. Details: Extension Office at 770-254-2620 or market manager Brad West at 770-402-8609.

n Our Community Farmers Market

(OCFM) operates in cooperation with Main Street Newnan and the city Business Development department. Now takes food stamps. Market is open 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesdays in the parking lot of the historic train depot between East Broad and East Washington streets.

n Cancer Support Group meetings

held at First Baptist Church in Newnan kick off the new program year Wed., Sept. 11, at 10 a.m. Church is at 15 West Washington St. Meetings are on the main church level in Room 129C. Programs focus on cancer and the needs of Coweta’s cancer patients. September program features Rev. Dan Dixon, pastor of Mt. Gilead United Methodist Church in Turin. Mt. Gilead has provided large support to expand the Survivor program of Relay For Life Coweta. All meetings are planned to include time for sharing, questions and conversation along with refreshments and fellowship. Details: Annie at 770-252-0894 or Katie at 770-502-9097.

n Travel program featuring Great

Britain, including England and Scotland, is Sept. 11, 10 a.m. at Newnan Carnegie Library. Local historian and traveler Elizabeth Beers presents the “Travels by Elizabeth” program and discussion. The Carnegie, a city-operated, non-circulating reading room, is at 1 LaGrange St. at the Court Square in downtown Newnan. Call 770-683-1347 to reserve a spot for the program. Check at www. newnancarnegie.com for more on Carnegie programs.

Thursday — Sept. 12 n Kiwanis Club of White Oak

Golden K meets at Sprayberry’s, on Bullsboro Drive, 9 a.m. Thursdays. Members gather for breakfast coffee, about 8:30. Membership: Mel Hayden at 770-304-0305; www.whiteoakgoldenk.org or email webmaster@whiteoakgoldenk.org .

n Delta Xi Chapter of Sigma Beta,

non-profit charity group, meets 2nd Thursdays. Annette 770-487-9845. Sept. 12.

n Kiwanis Club of Coweta County

CONTACT US

E-mail your calendar items to: calendar@newnan.com breaking news throughout the day | www.times-herald.com meets 2nd and 4th Thursdays 10 a.m. at Newnan Country Club U.S. Hwy. 29 N. Details: Pres. Louise Davis, 770253-7147. Next: Sept. 12.

n Country Comedy Tour, show is

Sept. 12 at the Centre for Performing and Visual Arts, Lower Fayetteville Road, Newnan.

n “Bye, Bye Birdie,” Newnan

Community Theatre Company, First Avenue, Newnan, continues Sept. 12-15. Whether you remember the 1950s, or just wish you did, you’ll rock to “Bye Bye Birdie.” It’s a gentle satire of the rock ‘n’ roll era, with Conrad Birdie (who looks a lot like Elvis Presley) at the center of the plot. To purchase tickets, and for show dates and times, visit Newnan Theatre Company’s web site at http:// www.newnantheatre.org or visit the box office before or after any performance. The theatre is located in historic downtown Newnan at 24 First Avenue.

n Bible-based 12-step substance

abuse program for addicts meets at Newnan Church of Christ. Headed by Ron Tomme. Meets Thursdays 7 p.m. at 2675 Hwy. 34 E. Details: 770253-3684 or 770-881-0454.

n Civil Air Patrol PTC-Falcon

Field Composite Squadron meets Thursdays 7-9 p.m., PTC United Methodist Church, 225 Robinson Rd., Peachtree City. For ages 12 - adult interested in aviation, radio communications, search and rescue, and drill team. Details: Lt. Col. Ed Guilbert, 770-487-9526; website www. capga116.com.

Friday — Sept. 13 n Job Seekers of Peachtree City

meets every Friday at First Baptist Church of PTC, 108 Willow Bend Rd., 7:30-10 a.m. Meetings free. Details: www.jobseekersptc.org, or email info@jobseekersptc.org.

n Newnan Rotary Club meets

noon Fridays at Newnan Country Club, U.S. Highway 29 North. Details: President Walt Thompson, 770-251-8223.

n Nineteen selected artisans

from the FAACE organization will be participating in a juried show at the Dogwood Gallery and Framers, Tyrone. The opening reception is Friday, Sept. 13, 6:30-9 p.m. the show continues through Sept. 28. A variety of fine art and crafts will be represented including fine art paintings, ceramics and stoneware, glass art, textiles and sculpture. A tent show will be held on the lawn outside Dogwood Gallery on Saturday, Sept. 14, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. featuring additional FAACE members. A donation from the proceeds of the show will benefit The Southern Conversation Trust. For additional information: www.faacega. blogspot.com, www.faace.org and Facebook.

Down The Road n Explore the Girl Scout program in

Coweta during their Day in the Park Sept. 14, from 11 a.m. – 3 p.m. While this event will not include an information session or troop formation opportunities, there will be fair-style activities such as craft booths, jump rooms, food, and games for the kids. A limited number of Girl Scout adult volunteers will be on hand to answer questions and take names of interested girls and adults. The Day in the Park will take place at First Avenue Park in downtown Newnan. Anyone interested in setting up a vendor booth at the Day in the Park event should contact cowetawood@gmail.com, or leave a message at 678-964-GIRL (4475). There is a $25 vendor fee for this event. The vendor registration deadline is Aug. 30. For more information about Girl Scouts, visit the website gsgatl.org, contact Amber Joseph, Membership Specialist, at 770-7029413, or email the Coweta County volunteer leadership at cowetawood@ gmail.com.

n Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW)

Post 2667 meets second Saturday (Sept. 14), Coweta Veterans Club, U.S. Hwy 29 North, one mile north of 34 Bypass (across from A&W Nursery). Breakfast 9 a.m., meeting at 9:30. Details: www.VFW2667.org .

n Mother’s Kitchen in downtown

Newnan will open its door for the first time ever on a Saturday, on Sept. 14, all for a good cause. Michelle Lytsell of Newnan and who worked at Caldwell Tanks next door was diagnosed with Acute Myeloid Leukemia in December. Lytsell has undergone three rounds of chemotherapy and in April, she received a bone marrow transplant. She is currently in remission. There are extra expenses, even with insurance. From 11-3, Mother’s is having a $10 plate special that includes a meat, two sides, a drink and dessert. All proceeds will go to help Lytsell. Mother’s Kitchen is located at 33 E. Broad St. in Newnan.

n Celiac Support group meets at

The 2013 Coweta County Fair is Thursday, Sept. 19 to Saturday, Sept. 28 at the Coweta County Fairgrounds south of Newnan on Pine Road, sponsored by Newnan Kiwanis Club. MegaPasses, $25, which include unlimited rides any day of the fair, and gate admission, availablee online, and at local stores. Typically, an unlimited ride armband is $25, and admission is MegaPasses for the Coweta County Fair are on $5 — and arm bands aren’t availsale which include unlimited rides on the midway able on Friday and Saturday nights. any day and gate admission. Student passes, given to students at local schools, are good on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, and now will be accepted on Sunday. New entertainment includes the Eudora Farms exotic animals and petting zoo, and a BMX show for the last five days of the fair. Returning entertainment includes Muttville Comix, the Torres Family Circus, and the Puppetone Rockers. Open Mike Atlanta and Competition Alley will return as well, and there will be local bands playing every night. In addition to the midway rides and shows, food, and entertainment, there will be the classic county fair exhibits, including canned goods, cakes and pies, the finest veggies from the garden, arts and crafts, and horticultural and agricultural exhibits.Get details at at www.CowetaCountyFair. org or Coweta County Extension Office at 770-254-2620. Piedmont Newnan Hospital, Poplar Road. For those who must eat a gluten-free diet. Meet with folks who live with this diet and learn about recipes. Second Saturdays (Sept. 14) at 1 p.m. in Bistro Conference Room, lower level. Details: email billbecker@ numail.org or call 770-683-2613. n Flint River Iris Society presents a

workshop filled with good information about growing irises at UGA Research Garden on Ellis Road in Griffin, 10 a.m. Sept. 14. Get hands-on experience while talking with growers and hybridizers. Bring a picnic lunch; club will provide drinks.” Details: Sara Russell 770-228-0704, Sue at 770227-3109 or ugagarden.com .

n Newnan Optimist Club meets first

and third Mondays 6 p.m. at Country Inn and Suites, Newnan Crossing Boulevard. Details: Tom Little, wlittle@ coweta.ga.us or Donna Rainey, 770251-4974. Next: Sept. 16.

n Carnegie Lectures — Newnan

Carnegie Library Foundation is bring-

ing scholars to share insights on civilizations from Babylon to 17th century France. Each scholar will give a 6:30 p.m. lecture at second floor meeting room of Carnegie, 1 LaGrange St. at Newnan’s Court Square. Afterward, there will be a time for conversation at a downtown cafe. Overall theme is “Lasting Legacies of the Past.” Speakers are from Auburn University. First speaker is Donna Bohanan Sept. 16, speaking on French influence on colonial America.Joseph Allen Kicklighter will speak on early Christianity Oct. 7. He is a professor of history and the history department’s undergraduate program officer. Matt Maczycki, assistant professor of history, offers insights on early Islamic north Africa Oct. 21. Ancient Babylon is the topic for the final lecture Nov. 4 featuring Michael Kozuh, associate professor of history. The Carnegie Library Foundation also plans the next Hollis lecture Oct. 1 at 6 p.m. at the Carnegie auditorium. Colin Duriez will be speaking on C.S. Lewis.

Ongoing/ Upcoming n September the Summit Family YMCA kicks off FALL with swim les-

sons, swim team, tennis lessons and soccer for youth and adult. For more information contact the YMCA, Highway 34 East, at 770-254-9622. — Fall soccer registration is open until Sept. 11 and is geared for youth ages 3-8 and to kick off their soccer career on the right foot. Practices are geared to focus on developing soccer skills and prepare players for the next level. Weekly practices are the best way to teach fundamentals and skills of soccer in preparation for Saturday Games. Prices are $45 for YMCA members and $60 for non-members. —Swim lessons are where participants learn and practice new swimming skills along with feel a sense of achievement from mastering something new that they can enjoy the rest of their lives. For even more fun, the Titians year round swim team offers swimmers to continue improving stroke skills and learn to compete effectively. Registration for both are now open. Swim lessons start at age 6months-adult and are $55 YMCA Members and $65 nonmembers. Adult lessons are free. n Newnan Citizen Academy will be held Tuesdays 6-8 p.m. Sept. 10 – Oct. 22. Graduation will be during the Oct. 22 Newnan City Council meeting. Class limited to 30 people. All participants will receive a notebook filled with information relating to each class, will participate in a group project and a certificate upon completion. Participants must be willing to commit to the required time for the program. Registration through Aug. 31. Applicants chosen first that live within the city limits. Beyond that applicants in the county will be on a first- come, first-serve basis. Contact Gina Snider at 770-2542358 or by email at gsnider@cityofnewnan.org to register or with questions. n An AARP driver safety class will be held at Newnan Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram, 53 Hollz Pkwy. off Highway 34 East in Newnan, Sept. 26. Start time 10 a.m and runs until 4 p.m. Instructor is Roger Echols. To register contact Echols, 770-927-1693 or rogrin68@yahoo.com . n Yard sale by Newnan Housing Authority senior residents is Sat., Sept. 28, 8 a.m. - 3 p.m. at Masonic Lodge, 65 Sewell Rd., Newnan. This is an opportunity to sell your own merchandise, such as clothing, household items, and other items of value, to make a personal profit and support the senior residents. Spaces available: 12’ x 12’ space is $10. Tables available for rent: 4’x 8’ $4. Chairs: $2 each (max two chairs per space). Spaces, tables and chairs are limited and will be rented on a first come first serve basis. No electricity is available for vendors, who must provide their own generator if needed. If selling food/drinks, must have a food permit from City of Newnan, and it must be displayed at the sale site. Advance registration being taken, and payment is due within 24 hours of making reservation.Reservations, details: Gladys Roberts, 404-805-8271, or Mary Thomas, 770-683-2906. n Hand-painted movie posters from the collection of Sharpsburg businessman Herb Bridges are on display at Arts Clayton Gallery, 136 South Main Street in Jonesboro in an exhibit, “Reflections of Hollywood’s Golden Era: Movies Connecting the Past and Future.” On display through Sept. 28. The hand-created posters from 1927-1940s were used at the Loew’s Grand Theater in Atlanta. Bridges will give a gallery talk at 1 p.m. Sept. 7. Hours 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays-Fridays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays. Free. Details: 770-473-5457, www.artsclayton.org/gallery. n Barbie Beach has been drawing admirers to the eastern Coweta town of Turin since it began in 2006. Now, the distinctly unique roadside attraction is the focus of a photography exhibit at the Cochran Gallery in on the square in LaGrange. Features photos by Anne Berry and Donna Rosser, and an installation of several scenes from Barbie Beach. The Barbie Beach exhibit will run through September. Cochran Gallery is on East LaFayette Square in LaGrange. Regular gallery hours: Wednesday-riday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. n Lewis Grizzard & Catfish Memorial Bike Ride — Ferst Foundation for Childhood Literacy will host a fundraising bicycle ride in Moreland Oct. 6 at 8 a.m. The ride begins at the Moreland Museum with a ride lengths optional (12, 25, 62 and 100 mile rides). Registration for individuals is $28, $75 for families. Pre-registration should be completed by Sept. 10. Signing up on-site on the day of the event will increase registration fee to $35. Lunch is included at the end of the race to every rider. Rest stops, refreshments and bike repair vehicles are available at certain intervals. Details: email Nelda at nboren59@att.net or Linda at lbrass@wspackaging.com . n Mystery Story Contest — Friends of Powell Library group is holding a mystery writing contest for youth and teens for its fall 2013 Annual Author Party, featuring Patricia Sprinkle, “a thoroughly Southern mystery writer.” Short stories should be between 1,000-2,500 words and feature a book cover. Writers and illustrators must be 10 to 18 years old. Two youths may collaborate on entry and share prize. Grand prize winner from three levels: elementary, middle and high school. Winners receive a $25 gift certificate to Barnes and Noble. Winning entries will be displayed atb A. Mitchell Powell Jr. Public Library on Hospital Road in Newnan as well as published on the library’s website. Deadline for entries is Sept. 23 at 7 p.m. Winners will be announced at the Author Party and Annual Meeting on Oct. 8 at 7 p.m. at the nearby Asa M. Powell Sr. Powell Expo Center, located in the Temple Avenue Recreation Complex. Information sheets can be found at any Coweta Library System branch. For further questions, contact Friends Board Member Jane Westberry at friendsofpowelllibrary@gmail.com.


Sunday, September 8, 2013  |  The Newnan Times-Herald — 7B

LOCAL

Times-Herald marks milestones through years 1865 — On Sept. 9, 1865, The Newnan Herald's first issue is published by lawyers J.S. Bigby and J.C. Wootten as a sideline. The four-page weekly cost $3 per year in advance and came out on Saturday. It was the first post-Civil War newspaper started in Georgia. Soon after, Bigby — who became active in local politics — sold his interest to James A. Welch. 18 8 6 -18 8 7 — A f ter t he deaths of Welch and Wootten, The Herald is edited by A.B. Cates, a Tennessee native and Confederate veteran. In 1886 or 1887 it is merged with the rival Coweta Advertiser, which had been published by First Methodist pastor, W. W. Wadsworth. 1887 — James E. Brown, who was editor of the Advertiser in 1886 — after almost 10 years at the Henry County Weekly which he founded — becomes editor of the merged Herald and Advertiser. 1912 — Brown sells the Herald and Advertiser to Rhodes McPhail, but the arrangement does not last and Brown returns with Ellis M. Carpenter as assistant. 1915 — T he Hera ld a nd Advertiser absorbs another rival, the Newnan News, and the paper again becomes known as the Newnan Herald. 1928 — Oren William Passavant, who had been editor of the Herald and Advertiser in 1911-1912 in Brown's absence, purchases the paper on Brown's retirement. Passavant has been one of several business managers during Brown's tenure, as were Edgar T. Whatley and Thomas S. Parrott. 1936 — Passavant sells the paper to Hanson G. Ford. During the four years he operated the Herald, Ford's wife, Dorothy Gardner Ford, a descendant of the Cole family, took an active role in the newspaper. — Also in 1936, Evan W. Thomasson and his son James J. Thomasson start the rival Newnan Times. 19 4 0 — Fo rd s e l l s t h e Newnan Herald to George M. MacNabb and Victor D. Armstrong. Armstrong soon leaves to serve in the armed forces, and MacNabb continues as editor and business manager. WWII — The war years are difficult for everyone, including newspapers. A small staff of no more than five put out the Newnan Herald, according to memories from Sarah Parrott. Newsprint and ink are rationed. 1944 — The Newnan Herald achieves renown — receiving several Georgia Press Association awards including first place for best editorial and best news coverage in 1944. 1946 — The Newnan Herald is acquired in October 1946 by the Thomassons, who publish the Herald and Times separately for another year. 1947 — On Dec. 24, 1947, the first edition of the combined newspaper, The Newnan Times-Herald, is published. — Also in 1947, Times-Herald owners E.W. and James Thomasson with Dan Manget Sr. start Newnan's first radio sta-

This is how the “back shop” of the Newnan Herald looked in 1919. At right rear is a Model 14 Linotype machine purchased in 1917. The printer, Claude Pitts, is at far left. O.W. Passavant, second from right, was editor of the Herald from 1928-1936.

tion, WCOH (Welcome City of Homes). WCOH signs on the air Dec. 6, 1947. 1964 — The Newnan TimesHerald is one of the first newspapers in Georgia to switch to offset printing to allow more pictures and greater use of color. 1965 — The Newnan TimesHerald celebrates the paper's 100th birthday with publication of the "Centennial Magazine," a review of the county's communities, businesses and history. 1966 — The Newnan TimesHerald operation moves to the present offices at 16 Jefferson St. Printing is switched from a 12-page capacity Fairchild News King offset press to a new 16-page King offset press. 197 2 — Ja mes a nd Eva n Thomasson are honored by Georgia Press Association for 50 years of service in the newspaper industry. 1979 — After the death of his father, James Thomasson, son William W. "Billy" Thomasson continues to operate The Newnan Times-Herald along with his mother, Ida Thomasson, and wife, Marianne. Grandfather Evan Thomasson remained an active part of newspaper into his ‘90s. Ida Thomasson died in 1981, and "Mr. E.W." as everyone knew him, died in 1983. 1985 — June 4, The Newnan Times-Herald begins twice-aweek publication with a new Tuesday edition joining the long-time Thursday edition. 19 8 7 — On May 7, T he Newnan Times-Herald Inc. becomes an associate member of The Associated Press. 1988 — The Newnan TimesHerald completes a year-long renovation of its 1914-era building, moving the news department and business offices to the second floor and revamping the lobby and production departments downstairs. 19 9 1 — T h e s w i tc h to Wednesday/Saturday publication is made on Oct. 2. 1996 — In April, The Newnan Times-Herald is among the first five newspapers in Georgia to appear online with the startup of a website, newnan.com. (The paper as of 1999 also has The Newnan Times-Herald on-line: http://times-herald.com.) — Facing the cha llenges of g row t h i n New na n a nd

Coweta County, the Thomassons bring in a new publisher to The Newnan Times-Herald, Sam Jones, in November 1996. Jones comes to Newnan after 18 years at the daily Columbus Ledger-Enquirer. 1997 — March 18, Times-Herald begins establishing a home delivery circulation system. — News Channel 9, a cable cha n nel presented by T he Newnan Times-Herald in cooperation with Newnan Utilities cable TV system, goes online with live coverage of the local school sales tax referendum in spring 1997, and the operation begins regular news programming in mid-April 1997 with a temporary studio in the building's break room. — July 10-16, 1997, the press is moved to 23 Andrews St. to consolidate printing and circulation operations. — Announcement is made Aug. 2 that The Times-Herald will begin six-day-a-week publication in October. — "Good Morning, Coweta!" greets subscribers as the daily Times-Herald rolls off the press for the first time Oct. 1, 1997. 1999 — The first f loor of the Times-Herald building on Jefferson Street gets a makeover. Space that since the 1960s served as the pressroom is transformed into offices and work stations for the retail advertising and graphics departments. What had housed the graphics department makes way for the classified advertising department, and a new television production studio and office space for the paper's cable TV operation News Channel 9. — At the 1999 Georgia Press Association convention The Times-Herald wins the top General Excellence award in its division for its first full year as a small daily. 2000 — Continued equipment improvements include the upgrading of production and business office computer systems and networking. — The Times-Herald takes second place in the National Newspaper Association's fourth annual Best of the States awards for daily newspapers less than 10,000 circulation. — On Sept. 11, The TimesHerald adds a Monday edition, becoming a seven-day-a-week

Building got start as farm supply store

daily newspaper. 2001 — Press capacity at the printing facility on Andrews Street is upgraded to allow the printing of two extra color pages in each newspaper section, providing the option for more color pictures for news columns and the availability of color for advertisers. 2003 — In spring and summer 2003, The Times-Herald adds a new color unit to its press facilities on Andrews Street to expand color printing capacity, as well as a new paper folding unit on the press. The new equipment allows more pages inside the paper to have full process color photos and advertisements. — Sept. 24, 2003, the first section is printed after the switch to the smaller 50-inch "web" newsprint size. The first edition in the smaller format, with some design changes, is debuted Friday, Sept. 26, 2003. 2005 — On Feb. 18, 2005, it is announced The Times-Herald had purchased Newnan-Coweta Magazine from Chad and Monica Watkins. Longtime newspaper staff member Angela Webster was named editor of the magazine. — September 20 05, T he Times-Herald adds two fourcolor press units manufactured by Web Press Corporation. 2006 — The newspaper's former popular summer Newcomers' Guide is transformed, pub-

the newspaper for many years before it began daily publication. A new digital edition, created in conjunction with Tecnavia Press and with new program features, is rolled out at www. times-herald.com. 2012 — The Newnan TimesHerald switches to a new publishing system using InDesign for pagination and a web-based product for creating news stories. With reporters and editors issued laptop computers, they are able to be more mobile — no longer tied to their newsroom desks. — In online developments, the newspaper adds Facebook and Twitter accounts, provides Coupons.com and an improved photo gallery for online readers, adds the newspaper’s My Connection publication to online offerings, and reintroduces a website for its bimonthly publication Newnan-Coweta Magazine at newnancowetamag.com. 2013 — Sam Jones, who oversaw the transformation of The Newnan Times-Herald from a bi-weekly to a daily newspaper, retires March 22. Jones came to the Times-Herald as publisher on Nov. 1, 1996. — John A. Winters in April is named as interim general manager of The Newnan TimesHerald, and soon after is named general manager. Winters, a 25-year veteran of the newspaper industry, has worked at the Times-Herald for the past yearand-a-half in the new department covering government and public safety issues and writing features and columns. — The Newnan Times-Herald and the newspaper’s website times-herald.com undergo major design changes, adding content and more timely online news coverage. Also receiving a makeover is the newspaper’s Newnan-Coweta Magazine, with Times-Herald Paginator Will Blair taking over duties editing the bi-monthly magazine, and Graphic Designers Sandra Hiser and Sonya Studt taking over as Creative Directors.

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By W. WINSTON SKINNER winston@newnan.com

The Newnan Times-Herald has been located at 16 Jefferson St. in downtown Newnan since 1966. The brick building was constructed as a store in 1914 by Newnan businessman Thomas G. Farmer. The store sold meat and all sorts of farm merchandise in the early days — cow feed, salt blocks, shoes, overalls, kerosene, anvils. Hay was stored in part of the building at one point. The upper floor of the building was used for a variety of offices through the mid-1950s. The local Jehovah’s Witnesses congregation met there. Servicemen returning from World Wa r II took classes upstairs — taught by Henry Kitchens and Sarah Robertson. When Newnan High School — then located nearby on Temple Avenue — became crowded, classes for eighth-graders were held on the upper floor of the building. Elizabeth Dean was among the teachers, and students included Jane Bass, June Rutledge Dunca n a nd Joel Hyde. Bobby McDonald ran Economy Auto Store, which later became Otasco, in the portion of the building that is now the

lished in August in a magazine format as "Coweta Living." Subsequent editions have followed. 2008 — July brings the move of the newspaper’s production facilities from Andrews Street to Newnan South Industrial Park off U.S. Highway 29 South. The July 14, 2008, edition is the first printed at the new building. — A revamped version of The Times-Herald online at timesherald.com debuts with a new look and increased content. — Technological improvements allow submission of print subscription payments as well as classified advertising via the website. Customer interaction with stories and opinions begins with moderated reader “com ments” a nd t he da i ly “QuickVote.” — Times-Herald.com adds a digital version of special sections produced by The TimesHerald such as the annual Football Preview, High School Honors Days, Vision, Year In Review, Bridal and Health Connection. 2009 — The mobile version— m.times-herald.com — is introduced for readers to get their news, sports, opinion, etc., on the go from anywhere with a web-enabled mobile phone. 2010 — An electronic directto-plate system replaces the process of sending pages first to film that required chemical developing. Completed pages are now converted to PDF documents and transmitted electronically from the offices at 16 Jefferson Street to the newspaper’s printing facilities in Newnan South Industrial Park. 2011 — In June, Georgia Press Association names James Thomasson posthumously to the Georgia Newspaper Hall of Fame. At the same meeting on Jekyll Island, newspaper owner William W. “Billy” Thomasson is honored for 50 years in the newspaper industry. — In July, a new and improved website photo gallery at www. times-herald.com is launched through MyCapture, offering more options for photographs and products. — On Sept. 9, 2011, the newspaper changes its masthead to read The Newnan TimesHerald — the name used by

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The brick building at 16 Jefferson St. in downtown Newnan that houses The Newnan Times-Herald was construc ted as a store in 1914 by Newnan businessman Thomas G. Farmer.

advertising and composition area of the newspaper. L i nd sey B a r ron a nd h i s brother-in-law, Willis Edwards, boug ht t he Fa r mer bu i lding in 1955. Barron, who later went into the real estate business, operated an electrical and plumbing contracting business at 16 Jefferson St. Appliances were sold, and furniture was added with upper f loor space being used as furniture storerooms. James J. Thomasson and E.W. Thomasson, publishers of The Newnan Times-Herald, purchased the building on June 7, 1966. Open house was held on

Oct. 15 of that year. Prior to the move to 16 Jefferson St., the newspaper offices had been diagonally across Jefferson Street. Renovations have been made several times since the old store building became the newspaper’s headquarters. For many years, the pressroom was located on the lower north side of the building, but it was moved when the newspaper began daily publication in 1997. The printing is now done at a warehouse in Newnan South Industrial Park off U.S. Highway 29 South.

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PAGES • 50 cENtS 4P NEWNAN, GA • COWETA COUNTY'S NEWS SOURCE • ISSUE 117 • 2 SEctIoNS, 24

Cool, sweet take on the summer sandwich buffet

East Coweta freshman scores as contest winner

— page 1B

— page 6A

COWETACOMMISSION

Recycling center OK’d on Hwy. 16 By SARAH FAY CAMPBELL sarah@newnan.com

Melanie Perry

Perry named Moreland principal T he Coweta Cou nt y Board of Education appointed Melanie Perry as Moreland Elementary School’s new principal during a called board meeting on Tuesday. Perry, a 14-year educator, began her career in education at Moreland Elementary School in 1999, when she taught first grade. From 2002 to 2007, she taught second grade there a nd then served as the school’s instructional coach from 2007 to 2011. Since 2011, she has served as the assistant principal at Moreland. Perry earned her bachelor’s degree in business administration from North Georgia College in 1991, her teaching certif ication in Early Childhood Education from Mercer University in 1999, her master’s in educational leadership from the University of West Georgia

The Coweta County Board of Commissioners voted Tuesday to grant a conditional use permit for a recycling center on Hwy. 16 West/Carrollton Highway near the Hwy. 34 Bypass, while reducing a condition that forbid the “collection or storage

of garbage” on the property. The 9.43-acre site will be Several variance used for the sorting of recyclaapproved for Fischer ble material, which will then be shipped to other locations for Crossings, page 2A final processing. The applicant is Total Recycling of Georgia LLC, and the different things garbage,” said owners of the property are OliZoning Administrator Angela ver and Beth Gentry. “In talking with the applicant White. “We wanted to make and their engineer, we all call sure everyone understands —

we don’t want trash building up on that site.” T he word “ga rbage” is changed to “putrescible waste” as defined by the Georgia Environmental Protection Division. Putrescible waste is essentially anything that can rot, such as kitchen scraps, food, and human and animal waste. Com m i s sioner A l Sm it h asked Gentry if they would be

doing metals recycling. “A ny ti me you get a permit, metals is involved,” Gentry said. “But our main focus is plastics, cardboard and paper.” Chairman Bob Blackburn asked if Gentry had visited neighbors and discussed his plans, and he said he had. “I commend you for that,”

• USA Weekend print edition • Newnan-Coweta Magazine - 6 issues per year • Annual Coweta Living magazine

SEE CENTER, page 2A

CentreStage

THURSDAY, JUNE 20, 2013

Conference center opens today

Coweta Living

a1 thursday

NEWNAN, GA • COWETA COUNTY'S NEWS SOURCE • ISSUE 117 • 2 SEctIoNS, 24 PAGES • 50 cENtS

By CELIA SHORTT celia@newnan.com

Guests arrive at the

newly-completed Newnan Centre for Tuesday’s black-tie gala. Plans are under way to construct a second entrance to the property from Lower Fayetteville Road to handle traffic with there are events at both the meeting facility and the neighboring Centre for Performing and Visual Arts.

A PUBLICATION OF THE NEWNAN TIMES-HERALD

Bands

Play On

Coweta’s flourishing music scene

The grand opening of the long-awa ited city New na n Centre events facility located next to the Centre for Performing and Visual Arts on Lower Fayetteville Road will be today at 10 a.m. Those involved with the building of the facility celebrated at a black-tie ga la Tuesday. The Newnan Centre will be a multi-use facility for the city, businesses, and members of the community. Newnan Mayor Keith Brady and members of the Newnan City Council will officially cut the ribbon to open the facility and begin the day’s festivities. A dedication and light refreshments will follow. Newnan Convention Cen-

East Coweta freshman scores as contest winner

Cool, sweet take on the summer sandwich buffet

— page 6A

— page 1B

THURSDAY, JUNE 20, 2013

NEWNAN, GA • COWETA COUNTY'S NEWS SOURCE • ISSUE 117 • 2 SEctIoNS, 24 PAGES • 50 cENtS

East Coweta freshman scores as contest winner

Cool, sweet take on the summer sandwich buffet

— page 6A

— page 1B

COWETACOMMISSION

COWETACOMMISSION

Recycling center OK’d on Hwy. 16

Recycling center OK’d on Hwy. 16 By SARAH FAY CAMPBELL sarah@newnan.com

Melanie Perry

Perry named Moreland principal

Beauty and history in

Cemeteries

T he Coweta Cou nt y Board of Education appointed Melanie Perry as Moreland Elementary School’s new principal during a called board meeting on Tuesday. Perry, a 14-year educator, began her career in education at Moreland Elementary School in 1999, when she taught first grade. From 2002 to 2007, she taught second grade there a nd then served as the school’s instructional coach from 2007 to 2011. Since 2011, she has served as the assistant principal at Moreland. Perry earned her bachelor’s degree in business administration from North Georgia College in 1991, her teaching certif ication in Early Childhood Education from Mercer University in 1999, her master’s in educational leadership from the University of West Georgia in 2005, and her educational specialist degree from the University of West Georgia in 2007. Perry will succeed Beverly Yeager, who is retiring at the end of June. Yeager is a 33-year educator who has served as Moreland Elementary School’s principal since 1988.

COWETA WRITERS

share poetry and fiction

SEPTEMBER | OCTOBER 2013

Digital Editions

a1 thursday

2013-14 GUIDE TO NEWNAN-COWETA COUNTY

The Coweta County Board of Commissioners voted Tuesday to grant a conditional use permit for a recycling center on Hwy. 16 West/Carrollton Highway near the Hwy. 34 Bypass, while reducing a condition that forbid the “collection or storage

of garbage” on the property. The 9.43-acre site will be Several variance used for the sorting of recyclaapproved for Fischer ble material, which will then be shipped to other locations for Crossings, page 2A final processing. The applicant is Total Recycling of Georgia LLC, and the different things garbage,” said owners of the property are OliZoning Administrator Angela ver and Beth Gentry. “In talking with the applicant White. “We wanted to make and their engineer, we all call sure everyone understands —

we don’t want trash building up on that site.” T he word “ga rbage” is changed to “putrescible waste” as defined by the Georgia Environmental Protection Division. Putrescible waste is essentially anything that can rot, such as kitchen scraps, food, and human and animal waste. Com m i s sioner A l Sm it h asked Gentry if they would be

doing metals recycling. “A ny ti me you get a permit, metals is involved,” Gentry said. “But our main focus is plastics, cardboard and paper.” Chairman Bob Blackburn asked if Gentry had visited neighbors and discussed his plans, and he said he had. “I commend you for that,”

SEE CENTER, page 2A

CentreStage

Conference center opens today By CELIA SHORTT celia@newnan.com

Guests arrive at the

newly-completed Newnan Centre for Tuesday’s black-tie gala. Plans are under way to construct a second entrance to the property from Lower Fayetteville Road to handle traffic with there are events at both the meeting facility and the neighboring Centre for Performing and Visual Arts.

Senoia’s water needs

The grand opening of the long-awa ited city New na n Centre events facility located next to the Centre for Performing and Visual Arts on Lower Fayetteville Road will be today at 10 a.m. Those involved with the building of the facility celebrated at a black-tie ga la Tuesday. The Newnan Centre will be a multi-use facility for the city, businesses, and members of the community. Newnan Mayor Keith Brady and members of the Newnan City Council will officially cut the ribbon to open the facility and begin the day’s festivities. A dedication and light refreshments will follow. Newnan Convention Center Authority Chairman Parks Avery said he is excited about the new facility and what it means for Newnan and Coweta County. “This is going to be a cool place,” he said as the finishing touches were being made in April. “We are going to start seeing a ton of change all at once. Everything is going to start coming in at a quick pace.” Groundbreaking for the center took place in August 2011. Early in 2012, delays began when the contractor, D. Dean a nd A s so ci ate s , h ad c a sh flow problems and a replacement had to be found. Headley Construction of Newnan was

of garbage” on the property. The 9.43-acre site will be Several variance used for the sorting of recyclaapproved for Fischer ble material, which will then be The Coweta County Board shipped to other locations for Crossings, page 2A of Commissioners voted Tues- final processing. day to grant a conditional use The applicant is Total Recypermit for a recycling center on cling of Georgia LLC, and the different things garbage,” said Hwy. 16 West/Carrollton High- owners of the property are OliZoning Administrator Angela way near the Hwy. 34 Bypass, ver and Beth Gentry. while reducing a condition that “In talking with the applicant White. “We wanted to make forbid the “collection or storage and their engineer, we all call sure everyone understands —

By SARAH FAY CAMPBELL sarah@newnan.com

Melanie Perry

Perry named Moreland principal T he Coweta Cou nt y Board of Education appointed Melanie Perry as Moreland Elementary School’s new principal during a called board meeting on Tuesday. Perry, a 14-year educator, began her career in education at Moreland Elementary School in 1999, when she taught first grade. From 2002 to 2007, she taught second grade there a nd then served as the school’s instructional coach from 2007 to 2011. Since 2011, she has served as the assistant principal at Moreland. Perry earned her bachelor’s degree in business administration from North Georgia College in 1991, her teaching certif ication in Early Childhood Education from Mercer University in 1999, her master’s in educational leadership from the University of West Georgia in 2005, and her educational specialist degree from the University of West Georgia in 2007. Perry will succeed Beverly Yeager, who is retiring at the end of June. Yeager is a 33-year educator who has served as Moreland Elementary School’s principal since 1988.

Senoia’s water needs grow along with town By SARAH FAY CAMPBELL sarah@newnan.com

If Senoia wants to continue to grow, the city needs more water. C u r r e n t l y, t h e c it y ’s water system does fine in the winter, early spring and late fall. But during the hot and dry times, it has to buy water from the Coweta County Water and Sewerage Authority. The city’s water plant can treat twice the amount of water it currently treats, if it had the supply. The city is currently limited by its permit that only allows 300,000 gallons a day to be withdrawn from the reservoir on Keg Creek. City Administrator Richard Ferry and the Senoia Cit y Cou nci l d iscussed options at Monday’s council meeting. The city currently has an agreement with the Coweta Wa t e r a n d S e w e r a g e Authority to use the authority’s water when needed, but there is no contract.

SEE SENOIA, page 2A

we don’t want trash building up on that site.” T he word “ga rbage” is changed to “putrescible waste” as defined by the Georgia Environmental Protection Division. Putrescible waste is essentially anything that can rot, such as kitchen scraps, food, and human and animal waste. Com m i s sioner A l Sm it h asked Gentry if they would be

doing metals recycling. “A ny ti me you get a permit, metals is involved,” Gentry said. “But our main focus is plastics, cardboard and paper.” Chairman Bob Blackburn asked if Gentry had visited neighbors and discussed his plans, and he said he had. “I commend you for that,”

SEE CENTER, page 2A

CentreStage

Conference center opens today By CELIA SHORTT celia@newnan.com

Guests arrive at the

newly-completed Newnan Centre for Tuesday’s black-tie gala. Plans are under way to construct a second entrance to the property from Lower Fayetteville Road to handle traffic with there are events at both the meeting facility and the neighboring Centre for Performing and Visual Arts.

PhotoS by JeFFrey Leo

The grand opening of the long-awa ited city New na n Centre events facility located next to the Centre for Performing and Visual Arts on Lower Fayetteville Road will be today at 10 a.m. Those involved with the building of the facility celebrated at a black-tie ga la Tuesday. The Newnan Centre will be a multi-use facility for the city, businesses, and members of the community. Newnan Mayor Keith Brady and members of the Newnan City Council will officially cut the ribbon to open the facility and begin the day’s festivities. A dedication and light refreshments will follow. Newnan Convention Center Authority Chairman Parks Avery said he is excited about the new facility and what it means for Newnan and Coweta County. “This is going to be a cool place,” he said as the finishing touches were being made in April. “We are going to start seeing a ton of change all at once. Everything is going to start coming in at a quick pace.” Groundbreaking for the center took place in August 2011. Early in 2012, delays began when the contractor, D. Dean a nd A s so c i ate s , h ad c a sh flow problems and a replacement had to be found. Headley Construction of Newnan was

The entrance lobby of the city’s Newnan Centre meeting facility has the feel of a luxury hotel.

SEE CENTRE, page 2A

Euro Auctions gets temporary approval company had formally requested permission to move forward. The European equipment aucThe Coweta County Board of tion company purchased the old Commissioners voted to grant Adesa auto auction property on a temporary certificate of occu- Raymond Hill Road along Interpancy to Euro Auctions USA for state 85 last fall, and has scheduled its upcoming opening auction at its first auction for June 26. But there is work that needs to the north Coweta property, but commissioners expressed displea- be done on the property before it is sure Tuesday that nobody with the considered up to code.

By SARAH FAY CAMPBELL sarah@newnan.com

The biggest requirement is the wasn’t completed the last time she planting of a 20-foot-wide buffer visited the property, but “hopearound the area where the equip- fully it will be” by the time of the ment to be auctioned will be auction. The issue was added to the stored. Other remaining issues are establishment of handicapped agenda for Tuesday’s commission parking and the marking of a fire meeting. “I wasn’t even aware that they lane. County Development Review were asking for this,” said Robert Technician Teresa Crow said the Tolleson, director of Planning and handicapped parking striping SEE AUCTION, page 2A

Robert Tolleson

‘Murder in Coweta County’ movie producer to speak at events Two nights of planned activities will take place July 10-11 as the city of Newnan and Coweta County partner to celebrate the story of “Murder in Coweta County,” which aired on CBS television network 31 years ago. According to Coweta County events services coordinator Tray Baggarly, on July 10 at 7 p.m. in the historic 1904 Court-

house in downtown Newnan, one of the movie’s producers, Dick Atkins, will give a presentation and talk about what went into turning local author Margaret’s Anne Barnes’ book into a made-for-TV movie starring Andy Griffith and Johnny Cash. In addition, several local residents will display memorabilia they have associated with

INSIDE Obituaries .................... 3A Comics .................... 8A, 9A Community Forum ..... 4A Classifieds ................... 10A Sports .......................... 6A Food .............................1B

TODAY

84° | 66°

Small chance of rain

the movie, and some who were extras in the production will talk about their experiences. The next evening, July 11, at 7 p.m. at the Carnegie Library on the Court Square, Atkins will talk about the production of the movie, followed by a screening of the movie. “Murder in Coweta County” is the true story of a brutal murFRIDAY

84° | 66° 20 percent chance of rain

der that took place in 1948 and pitted John Wallace of Meriwether County against Coweta County Sheriff Lamar Potts. The trial was the first in Georgia in which a white man was convicted on the testimony of black witnesses. The trial was held in the second floor courtroom at the Coweta County courthouse, and the guilty verSATURDAY

84° | 68° 50 percent chance of rain

dict was read there on June 18, 1948 – 65 years ago this week. Light refreshments will follow both of the July events and there is no charge to attend. For more information, contact the Coweta County Convention & Visitors Bureau at 770-254-2627 or the Carnegie Library at 770-683-1347.

SUNDAY

88° | 68°

50 percent chance of thunderstorms

Rainfall (in inches)

Yesterday (as of 7 p.m.) 0.00 Monthly total 5.34 Year-to-date 29.74

grow along Coweta’s Local Daily Newspaper, Published 5 Days a Week with town PhotoS by JeFFrey Leo

The entrance lobby of the city’s Newnan Centre meeting facility has the feel of a luxury hotel.

SEE CENTRE, page 2A

By SARAH FAY CAMPBELL sarah@newnan.com

Euro 30263 Auctions gets temporary approval 16 Jefferson Street • Newnan, GA • times-herald.com

er by To ord all ,c phone

If Senoia wants to continue to grow, the city needs more water. C u r r e n t l y, t h e c it y ’s water system does fine in the winter, early spring and late fall. But during the hot and dry times, it has to buy water from the Coweta County Water and Sewerage Authority. The city’s water plant can treat twice the amount of water it currently treats, if it had the supply. The city is currently limited by its permit that only allows 300,000 gallons a day to be withdrawn from the reservoir on Keg Creek. City Administrator Richard Ferry and the Senoia Cit y Cou nci l d iscussed options at Monday’s council meeting. The city currently has an agreement with the Coweta Wa t e r a n d S e w e r a g e Authority to use the authority’s water when needed, but there is no contract.

By SARAH FAY CAMPBELL sarah@newnan.com

The Coweta County Board of Commissioners voted to grant a temporary certificate of occupancy to Euro Auctions USA for its upcoming opening auction at the north Coweta property, but commissioners expressed displeasure Tuesday that nobody with the

company had formally requested permission to move forward. The European equipment auction company purchased the old Adesa auto auction property on Raymond Hill Road along Interstate 85 last fall, and has scheduled its first auction for June 26. But there is work that needs to be done on the property before it is considered up to code.

The biggest requirement is the planting of a 20-foot-wide buffer around the area where the equipment to be auctioned will be stored. Other remaining issues are establishment of handicapped parking and the marking of a fire lane. County Development Review Technician Teresa Crow said the handicapped parking striping

wasn’t completed the last time she visited the property, but “hopefully it will be” by the time of the auction. The issue was added to the agenda for Tuesday’s commission meeting. “I wasn’t even aware that they were asking for this,” said Robert Tolleson, director of Planning and

770-304-3373 or 770-253-1576 SEE AUCTION, page 2A

Robert Tolleson

‘Murder in Coweta County’ movie producer to speak at events

Two nights of planned activities will take place July 10-11 as the city of Newnan and Coweta County partner to celebrate the story of “Murder in Coweta County,” which aired on CBS television network 31 years ago. According to Coweta County events services coordinator Tray Baggarly, on July 10 at 7 p.m. in the historic 1904 Court-

house in downtown Newnan, one of the movie’s producers, Dick Atkins, will give a presentation and talk about what went into turning local author Margaret’s Anne Barnes’ book into a made-for-TV movie starring Andy Griffith and Johnny Cash. In addition, several local residents will display memorabilia they have associated with

the movie, and some who were extras in the production will talk about their experiences. The next evening, July 11, at 7 p.m. at the Carnegie Library on the Court Square, Atkins will talk about the production of the movie, followed by a screening of the movie. “Murder in Coweta County” is the true story of a brutal mur-

der that took place in 1948 and pitted John Wallace of Meriwether County against Coweta County Sheriff Lamar Potts. The trial was the first in Georgia in which a white man was convicted on the testimony of black witnesses. The trial was held in the second floor courtroom at the Coweta County courthouse, and the guilty ver-

dict was read there on June 18, 1948 – 65 years ago this week. Light refreshments will follow both of the July events and there is no charge to attend. For more information, contact the Coweta County Convention & Visitors Bureau at 770-254-2627 or the Carnegie Library at 770-683-1347.

(Must be paid in advance. Please allow 2-4 days for delivery to start.) SEE SENOIA, page 2A

INSIDE Obituaries .................... 3A Comics .................... 8A, 9A Community Forum ..... 4A Classifieds ................... 10A Sports .......................... 6A Food .............................1B

TODAY

84° | 66°

FRIDAY

84° | 66°

SATURDAY

84° | 68°

SUNDAY

88° | 68°

Rainfall (in inches)

Yesterday (as of 7 p.m.) 0.00 Monthly total 5.34 Year-to-date 29.74

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Education

Sunday, September 8, 2013  |   The Newnan Times-Herald — 1C

CONTACT US

E-mail your education news/photos to: education@newnan.com breaking news throughout the day | www.times-herald.com

A dream come true abroad

Linda Holloway is in her 27th year as a teacher. Currently, she teaches special education at Glanton Elementary School in Grantville.

Linda Holloway Special Education, Glanton Elementary School

“Everyday is a new day with the students and their experiences” By Celia Shortt celia@newnan.com

What is your favorite part of being a teacher? When that teacher and student connection comes through. The light bulb comes on, and the student gets it and says, “I understand.”

Why special education? Everyday is a new day with the students and their experiences. No two days are the same. The kids are lovable and always want to please you. They always try.

What is your favorite memory of being a teacher? When I taught the child of a parent who I’d had as a student and was able make that connection with them.

Maggie with her friends from “English Corner.” Pictured from left, Cindy, Cindy, Maggie and Lisa.

Northgate senior studies heritage during summer in China By Celia Shortt

nearly 3,000 student applicants. From there, Shiffert became Northgate High school senior one of the 600 semi-finalists, Maggie Shiffert had her dream then one of the final 45 students become a reality this past sum- accepted. mer when she visited Chengdu, China, as part of the National Security Language Initiative for Youth, a State Department Study Abroad Program. Shiffert was born in Chengdu, China, and was adopted by American parents when she was a baby. While in China, Shiffert par“For me personally, the trip ticipated in language classes was a chance to learn about my from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. every day, heritage and the language,” she followed by lunch and then culsaid. “But I had always wanted tural activities. to go to Chengdu and work with Aside from the la ng uage pandas as my job.” studies, Shiffert learned calligW hen Shiffert found out raphy and Tai Chi. Her classes about the summer program she included field trips to culturally quickly applied. She was one of connected places in Chengdu celia@newnan.com

“It was great to connect with my heritage and my culture”

and service projects. When she was not in class, Shiffert was able to be a part of the English Corner. “English Corner was on the corner of the street,” she said. “Chinese people would come there and speak in English in an effort to improve their skills.” Shiffert lived with a host family and was able to visit the Chinese countryside of Renshou with them. She wanted to travel there to visit the family of her host mother in her hometown. A l l t hese activ ities sup ported the purpose of this summer program of learning how to speak, write, and implement the Chinese language. Shiffert, however, wanted to do more Maggie making her dream a reality as she holds

china, page 2C

By Celia Shortt celia@newnan.com

My son is an athlete at Smokey Road Middle School. So, I watch his athletic events. I am also involved with the youth group at my church, Zion Hill Baptist Church. Once a month, I teach the Sunday School lesson and help with their activities outside of church. I am involved with activities and encouragement for younger women, including a Bible study and different projects inside and outside the church.

What is your favorite movie or movies? “Fried Green Tomatoes” Lee Daniels’ “The Butler” “The Color Purple” “The Green Mile” “Ghost”

You have to take responsibility for your own learning at some point. Learning is lifelong.

a panda cub named ChengShuang at the Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding.

StoneBridge Early Learning Center earns quality Rating

What do you do when you’re not teaching?

If you could say one thing to any student, what would it be?

Maggie on her visit to the countryside of Renshou.

Photo By Celia Shortt

Cindy Gibbons, members of her staff and some students at StoneBridge.

Front row - Bailey Tschantz, Jazmine Horton and Jacob Brooks. Back row - Jenny Woods holding Wesley Floyd, McKinley Newsome, Cindy Gibbons holding Olivia Soulen, Hudson Brown, Teresa Carlyle holding Dylan Patrick, and Tamara Harmon holding Aniyah Good.

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StoneBr idge E a rly L ea r n i ng Center in Newnan was awarded t he “Qua lit y R ated” stat us by Bright from the Start of the Georgia Department of Early Care and Learning. StoneBridge is an educational facility specializing in education from birth to five years. It is committed “to providing a nurturing environment enriched with opportunities to encourage every child to excel to his or her highest potential.” A child care center that is “Quality Rated” has agreed to meet standards that exceed the state’s licensing requirements and is committed to improving the quality of care it provides to children. Heather Allen Hamre, from Georgia Regents University, helped Cindy Gibbons, executive director and co-owner of StoneBridge, and her staff work through the process to become “Quality Rated.” “StoneBridge Early Learning Center serves as a leader in their community,” Hamre said. “The Quality Rated process enabled them to refine their skills and expertise to

meet defined national and state best practice standards.” “The Quality Rated system was designed so that any parent selecting a Quality Rated program can feel con f ident t hey have cho sen a program for their child that is committed to continuous quality improvement and meeting high quality standards,” she added. “ T h e i n - de pt h a s s e s s m e nt s through the Quality Rated Program offered guidance on how we could ensure our program exceeds the state’s basic requirements,” said Gibbons. A quality rating is important because it helps Georgia families find high quality early education and school programs where they can enroll their children. Gibbons recently opened another Stonebridge Early Learning Center at Thomas Crossroads. “For the benefit of the children in the community, hopefully all the child care centers in Coweta will make the commitment to achieve a Quality Rating from the state,” she said. “We are excited to offer the same level of standards at our new location at Thomas Crossroads that just opened this summer.”

A Night in Monte Carlo Newnan, Georgia September 19, 2013


2C — The Newnan Times-Herald   |  Sunday, September 8, 2013

EDUCATION

china

Continued from page 1C

a nd had been in contact with Dr. Sarah Bexell of the Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding during her application process. “For my career, I want to go the veterinary route and work with panda cubs under a year old,” said Shiffert. “I want to make sure that cubs grow and are healthy.” “When I went to visit the panda base, I got to hold one of the panda cubs. It was part

of my dream. I had dreamed about it for a while.” Every part of this experience was meaningful to Shiffert, and she will carry these memories and experiences with her for years to come. “This experience was a trip of a lifetime because I was able to learn a new language, experience a new culture, eat new food, and make new friends who I can still keep in touch with,” she said. “It was also great to con- Dr. Sarah Bexell and Maggie at the nect with my heritage and Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding. my culture.”

Education Briefs

Central Education Center to hold college fair On Monday, Oct. 21, the Central Education Center (CEC) is holding the College Probe Fair and Open House from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Over 50 colleges and schools will be at the CEC. It is recommended that all juniors and seniors attend. For more information, call 678-423-2000, ext. 292

Skrmetti graduates Magna Cum Laude, SCAD Ann Renée Skrmetti, daughter of Peter and Jean Skrmetti of Coweta, graduated Magna Cum Laude from Savannah College of Art and Design on June 1, with a bachelor of fine arts in fibers. Her activities while at SCAD included internships in Milwaukee and Chicago. While a Sonoma textile art intern with Kohl’s corporate headquarters in Milwaukee, Skrmetti created print designs and worked on concept boards and merchandising projects, gaining experience in product display design. While a design intern with The Paper Source in Chicago, Skrmetti worked with multiple aspects of the production process, expanding her knowledge of Illustrator and InDesign and participating in handson product sampling. Skrmetti practiced catalog typesetting, sample making for cards, kits and window displays, wedding suite styling, gift bag decorating for public relations sendoffs, and she assisted with pho-

tography shoots and market research. At SCAD, she worked as a tutor for English as a Second Language and was the education coordinator for the Fibers Force Club. Skrmetti’s honors include Dean’s List and President’s List on multiple occasions and the SCAD Academic Honors Scholarship. She received several artistic awards. Skrmetti is a 2009 graduate of Northgate High School.

3.25 or higher and will begin the season with the "torch of knowledge" patch attached to his sports uniform. "Our scholar-athletes do a phenomenal job of representing our university both in the classroom and in competition," said Dr. Kina Mallard, Carson-Newman executive vice president and provost. "This new initiative allows CarsonNewman to recognize those athletes who have reached a level of outstanding academic achievement." Owens on Dean’s List An August 26 ceremony recOwen Evans of Fayetteville ognized this year's 71 Eagle has made the Dean's List at Scholars in front of their peers, Columbus State University. teammates and coaches. Evans, who is majoring in accounting, earned a place on Stover on President’s List the list by completing the sumKathryn Stover, a Palmetto mer 2013 semester with at least resident, made the summer 12 credit hours and a 3.6 or 2013 President's List at Georhigher GPA. gia Southwestern State University and was among 401 stuSlagle earns dents recognized for scholastic achievement. Eagle Scholar honors To be eligible for the PresiToby Slagle of Sharpsburg is dent's List, a student must earn among the first ever group of a semester GPA of 4.0 and take Eagle Scholars at Carson-Newa minimum of 15 credit hours. man University. The university is the first Panter on CSU’s among South Atlantic ConferPresident’s List ence (SAC) schools to estabA m a nd a Pa nter of Fa i rlish a program that recognizes both academic and athletic burn earned a spot on Columbus State University’s Presiachievement. The Eagle Scholars initia- dent's List for the 2013 summer tive recognizes a high level of semester. Panter, who is majoring in academic achievement among Ca rson-Newma n's student- special education: general curathletes. Slagle, a football ath- riculum-reading, made the list lete, is among the student ath- for achieving a semester gradeletes with a cumulative GPA of point average of at least 3.8.

Online class based on ‘The Walking Dead’ Instructure and the University of California, Irvine announced the joint production of a massive open online course (MOOC) exploring a broad range of scholarly topics through the lens of a hypothetical zombie apocalypse. The free, eight-week MOOC, titled "Society, Science, Survival: Lessons from AMC's 'The Walking Dead,'" will be offered on Instructure's MOOC platform, Canvas Network, and will be taught by a multidisciplinary team of UC Irvine faculty: Zuzana Bic, public health; Joanne Christopherson, social sciences; Michael Dennin, physics; and Sarah Eichhorn, mathematics. T h e y we r e h a n dpi c k e d based on experience in teaching MOOCs, history of using pop culture in the classroom, and strong curricular alignment with case studies from the TV series. "Fans of the show know that 'The Walking Dead' is about more than zombies; it's about survival, leadership and adapting to situations that are perilous and uncertain," said Theresa Beyer, vice president of promotions and activation at A MC . "A MC is excited to be the first entertainment group to make the foray into the online education arena through this unique partnership with the University of California, Irvine, and Instructure. There is clearly a growing appetite for engagement with 'The Walking Dead,' and we hope this online course will drive a deep, sustained connection with the show during its upcoming fourth season and offer a legitimate educational experience that can be applied even more broadly." Enrollment in the course is currently available to anyone in the world via www.canvas. net/TWD. The first class is scheduled for Monday, Oct. 14, the day after the Season 4 premiere of AMC's "The Walking Dead." The course will run for eight consecutive Mondays through Dec. 2. Because the series will air at different times

The Walking Dead - Season 2, Episode 7

around the world, Canvas Network will put in place provisions to help international participants avoid spoilers. While using pop culture references in the classroom is nothing new, this MOOC represents a unique level of experimentation in teaching and learning by formally infusing an academic syllabus with contemporary media. It's also the first time a technology firm, entertainment company and major university have collaborated in this way. UC Irvine, which is ranked first among U.S. universities under 50 years old by the London-based Times Higher Education, has been a leader in the MOOC movement and a pioneer in open education for more than a decade. This partnership ref lects UC Irvine's next step in utilizing popular culture and flexible technology to improve outcomes in the open, online learning environment. "As an educator, I'm always looking for ways to make scholarly ideas come alive for my students," said Bic, who regularly employs pop culture analogies in her teaching on public health issues. "'The Walking Dead' provides many poignant case studies related to the scholarly areas covered in the course, and it helps that it's one of TV's most popular shows.

There will be something for everyone in this course, which will explore concepts as varied as post-disaster nutrition, the foundations of human survival and stereotypes in a Darwinian environment." "The Walking Dead" is the most-watched TV series in basic cable history and was the No. 1 show last season among adults 18 to 49, across all broadcast and cable networks. In addition to including content from the TV series, the online course will allow professors to digitally insert guest lecturers to add depth and variety to the curriculum. A recent study by Instructure and the enterprise survey company Qualtrics revealed that students are most likely to complete MOOCs if they have a uniquely engaging academic experience. "T he education industry continues to experiment with MOOCs and is yielding insights into how to economically educate on a global scale," said Instructure CEO Josh Coates. "'The Walking Dead' MOOC by UC Irvine will explore new ways to teach serious multidisciplinary academic curriculum in a popular social context that is engaging." To keep learning and to enroll for free in the course, visit www.canvas.net.

You’re Invited to a ...

in an effort to raise money for the Alzheimer’s Association What:

Savannah Court of Newnan is hosting Huckleberry BBQ of Pine Mountain Georgia!

Where:

Pick-up will be at Savannah Court of Newnan 27 Belt Road, Newnan, GA 30263

When:

Friday, November 8, 2013 10:30 am - 1:30 pm

You Get:

Half of a BBQ Chicken, potato salad, baked beans, bread, piece of cake and a bottle of water

(tax deductible)

To purchase tickets,contact: Savannah Court of Newnan 27 Belt Road, Newnan, GA 30263 770-251-6639 SCNewnan@slm.net

“All proceeds will go to the Alzheimer’s Association!” Call t for oday informmore ation.

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There’s growing scientific literature documenting the relationships between health and nutrition, exercise, mental attitude, relaxation, and other lifestyle habits. For a lifestyle that involves these relationships, call and enroll in a program under the supervision of a physician that will enable you to reach and maintain your ideal body weight, exercise your cardiovascular system and help prevent such diseases as diabetes, heart attack, strokes, hypertension, and cancer. Coweta Medical Center offers a quality weightreduction program that is supervised by F. Donald Bass, M.D. For more detailed information or an appointment, please call Coweta Medical Center at (770) 251-5597.


Sunday, September 8, 2013  |  The Newnan Times-Herald — 3C

EDUCATION

Princeton Review names UWG among best colleges in Southeast CARROLLTON, Ga. – The University of West Georgia was named one of the “Best colleges in the Southeast” in The Princeton Review’s “2014 Best Colleges: Region by Region.” University of West Georgia joins 138 other top institutions on the list including Emory University, Georgia Institute of Technology, Mercer University, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of Georgia and Vanderbilt University. "We are pleased to see the dedicated work of our faculty and staff along with the success of our students recognized by Princeton Review,” said Dr. Kyle Marrero, president of UWG. “This is a validation of the quality of our academic programs and our commitment to being a world-class institution." T he P r i nceton Rev iew endorsed only 643 colleges and universities in the entire nation for the 2014 review; approximately 25 percent of all fouryear institutions. In addition to Georgia, The Princeton Review includes the following states in the Southeast region: Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Kentucky, Louisia na , M ississippi , Nor t h Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia. The Princeton Review is an education services company widely known for its test preparatory programs and college and graduate school guides. T he selection process included student interviews from most of the nation’s 2,500 institutions including questions regarding several aspects of academic and campus life. The best institutions were chosen for their excellent academic programs and outstanding student experiences. Some were also praised for being f ina ncia lly accessible to a diverse range of students. “We’re pleased to recommend these colleges to users of our site as the best schools to earn their undergraduate degrees,” said Robert Franek, Princeton Review’s senior vice

president and publisher. “We chose these as our ‘regional best’ colleges mainly for their excellent academic programs. From several hundred schools in each region, we winnowed our list based on institutional data we collected directly from the schools, our visits to schools over the years, and the opinions of our staff, plus college counselors and advisors whose recommendations we invite. We also take into account what students at the schools reported to us. Only schools that permit us to independently survey their students are eligible to be considered for our regional ‘best’ lists.” In the study, The Princeton

Review found that students love UWG’s top-notch nursing, business and education programs. T he Adva nced Academy also received a nod for setting dual-enrolled high school students on the path to success. According to The Princeton Review, professors “really care how their students do in class” at UWG, according to an anonymous student. The students in the study mentioned appreciation for easy access to tutors and computer labs, as well as informative guest speakers. To view the full guide, please visit The Princeton Review’s website at http://www.princetonreview.com/best-regionalcolleges.aspx.

Distinguished Telly Award to UWG for ‘Go West’ branding

CARROLLTON, Ga. – The University of West Georgia’s Off ice of Communications and Marketing was recently awarded the commercial bronze Telly award for its “Go West” branded television commercials at the 34th Annual Telly Awards. This is the second t i me t h at UWG has won the prestigious awa rd for its work done with Mindpower Incorporated. “We are pleased to receive a second bronze Telly award for UWG's next generation of television spots,” said Jami Bower, associate vice president for communications and marketing at UWG. “It is rare to consistently gain national creative recognition for an ongoing branding effort, yet the “Go West” platform continues to evolve in relevance and effectiveness. A special thank you is extended to Mindpower, our marketing partner, as creator

and producer of this awardwinning series.” The Telly Awards are the premier awards honoring the finest film and video productions, ground-breaking web commercials, videos and films, and outstanding local, regional and cable television commercials and programs. This year’s 34th Annual Telly Awards received over 1 2 ,000 ent ries from all 50 states and 5 continents. This award comes to the Office of University Communications and Marketing just after being recog n i zed w it h a nationa l creative award for the “Go We s t ” c a m p a i g n a t t h e Higher Education Marketing Report’s 28th Annual Educational Advertising Awards. To view t he television commercials, please visit gowestgeorgia.com.

Jasmine Guy performing Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream Speech” at the Ebenezer Baptist Church in downtown Atlanta to commemorate its 50th anniversary.

Coweta student performs in memory of March on Washington 50 Years Later Wed nesday, Aug ust 2 8 , 2013, marked the 50 th anniversa r y of t he M a rch on Washington. The event was one of the most historic and important in American history, when Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. gave his iconic, “I Have a Dream” speech in 1963. Across the United States, many remembered the significance of that event and recognized the need to keep the dream alive. Although much progress has been made in the country, there is still a need for the freedom, justice and equality for all people. Coweta County Student, Jasmine Guy, is a sophomore at East Coweta High School. She is the daughter of Dr. Marc & Sharilyn Guy. Marc is the Assistant Superintendent of Coweta County School System, and was selected to participate in the commemorative “March on Washington 50 year Anniversary progra m.” T he progra m took place on Sunday, August 25,

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LANDSCAPE SUPPLIES

Vining Stone 211 Stewart Road Sharpsburg, GA 30277 770-252-6336 www.viningstone.com OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

LAWN EQUIPMENT

Jack Peek’s Sales, Inc. 576 Main Street Palmetto, GA 30268 770-463-3156 www.jackpeekssales.com

MATTRESSES Good Gettins Dealer for Name Brand Mattress Seconds and Such 152 Temple Ave., Newnan 678-552-4680 www.goodgettins.com

MOVING

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4C — The Newnan Times-Herald   |  Sunday, September 8, 2013 release dates: September 7-13

36-1 (13)

Mini Spy . . .

TM

Mini Spy and her friends are out sailing! See if you can find: • snake  • number 7  • ladder  • word MINI • ring  • muffin  • fishhook  • safety pin • letter Z  • pot • kite  • dolphin  • baseball bat • saw  • strawberry  • number 2  • letter D

© 2013 Universal Uclick from The Mini Page © 2013 Universal Uclick

Sailing Competition

Older than the Olympics In 1851, 45 years before the first Modern Olympic Games, U.S. sailors aboard the schooner (SKOO-ner) America defeated 15 other boats in a 53-mile race around the Isle of Wight off the southern coast of Great Britain. The trophy was named after this first winner. American yachts (yahts) This 1851 painting by artist Fitz Hugh Lane shows kept the America’s Cup in 24 the schooner America winning the first America’s challenges from 1870 to 1983. Cup race in Britain. A schooner is a sailing ship with two or more masts, where the forward mast That year, an Australian boat is smaller than the rear. became the first international challenger to win. Since then, teams from New Zealand, Switzerland and the U.S. have won the cup. An American team reclaimed the cup in 2010 by defeating the Swiss off the coast of Spain.

Meet Shawana Kemp

Birthdate: 11-29-88 Hometown: Richmond, Va.

America’s Cup sailors use specific words to describe parts of their boats and the work they do.     • Hull: the main body of the boat; a catamaran has two hulls. Bow     • Bow: the front end of a boat.     • Stern: the back end.     • Port: the left side, Starwhen facing the bow. Port board     • Starboard: the right side, when facing the bow.

• 1/2 teaspoon cumin • 1 large nectarine, chopped • 2 cups fresh spinach, chopped • 1/2 cup red bell pepper, chopped • 1 (15.5-ounce) can chickpeas, drained

What to do:

1. Cook couscous according to directions; allow to cool. 2. In a small bowl, combine lime juice, olive oil, honey, salt and cumin. Whisk to blend. 3.  In a large bowl, mix couscous with nectarine, spinach, bell pepper and  chickpeas. 4. Add dressing and stir to distribute evenly. Serves 6 to 8. You will need an adult’s help with this recipe. from The Mini Page © 2013 Universal Uclick

from The Mini Page © 2013 Universal Uclick

The America’s Cup Park and America’s Cup Village are places to watch the races and enjoy entertainment. Afterward, the area will become San Francisco’s new cruise ship terminal.

    • Hydrofoils, or “foils”: small, wing-shaped blades attached below the hull that lift it above the water, allowing the boat to go faster. A boat is “foiling” when it is out of the water  with only the foils in contact with the water’s surface.     • Nautical mile: measurement of distance in water that is slightly longer than a land mile; 1 nautical mile = 1.15 land miles.     • Knot: speed of a boat; 1 knot is 1 nautical mile per hour.

Stern

from The Mini Page © 2013 Universal Uclick

from The Mini Page © 2013 Universal Uclick

TM

All the following jokes have something in common. Can you guess the common theme or category?

photo by Abner Kingman, courtesy America’s Cup

Sue: Why did the sailboat crew member decide to jump rope? Sidney: He wanted to be the skipper!

The Luna Rossa team from Italy uses hydrofoils to increase speed during a Challenger Series race. The Golden Gate Bridge is in the background. Eleven sailors are aboard each boat. Each person has a specific job. They work together as a team to achieve the best speed and direction.

And the trophy goes to …

Youth movement The Major League Soccer champion: 2008

Wimbledon women’s and men’s tennis singles champions trophies: 1886, 1887

photo courtesy America’s Cup

Next week, The Mini Page is about Constitution Day.

• 1 (5.8-ounce) box couscous • 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice • 1 tablespoon olive oil • 1 tablespoon honey • 1/2 teaspoon salt

    • Helm: to control the direction the boat is heading. The helm is also the location where the boat is controlled, often using a large steering wheel.     • Tack: the direction a boat is heading; “tack” can also mean a  change of direction.     • Mast: a vertical column in the middle of the boat.     • Wing: the larger, main sail.     • Jib: the smaller, forward sail.

A new era on the waves

    Do you have  any trophies? The America’s Cup has been awarded 33 times in 162 years. It is older than any other trophy in international competition.     Here are some other famous sports  trophies you may know about, and the year they were first awarded:

Couscous Salad You’ll need:

Learn Some Sailing Language, Mate!

America’s Cup In this America’s Cup, teams will sail the AC72, a catamaran (CATuh-muh-ran). A catamaran is a boat with two parallel hulls that are identical in size. They are connected by a platform that sits above the water, allowing waves and air to pass between the two hulls. While earlier America’s Cup boats could not compete in rough conditions with high winds and waves, the AC72 catamarans can slice right through them. The AC72s also use hydrofoils — small wings that are lowered into the water and can lift the hulls above the water. This allows the boats to reach speeds of 50 mph or more — sometimes more than twice the speed of the actual wind.

Rookie Cookie’s Recipe

This year marks the first time that an America’s Cup competition has been held so close to a city. Spectators will be able to watch the racing from along the shore or from the water on their own boats. The course is between 6 and 10 nautical miles long. The first team to win nine of 17 races in the Finals will win the trophy.

from The Mini Page © 2013 Universal Uclick

No, you don’t have to be tall to play quarterback in pro football. Russell Wilson proved that to everybody last year, including those people who thought he was too short to succeed at the position.     A third-round draft pick, Wilson is one of the best NFL QBs who  can run, pass — and win. In 2012, he passed for 3,118 yards and 26 touchdowns, gained an additional 489 yards rushing with four touchdowns and led the Seattle Seahawks into the playoffs. Wilson starred at Wisconsin and North Carolina State, where he graduated in three years. He played pro baseball before focusing strictly on football. Wilson spent part of the offseason conducting football camps for underprivileged youth. He also has a charity to help young people in need.

TM

The Race Course

TM

Supersport: Russell Wilson

from The Mini Page © 2013 Universal Uclick

image courtesy America’s Cup

photo by BittenbyaZebra

Shawana Kemp is the leader of the soul music band Shine and the Moonbeams. Their most recent CD for  kids has the same name as the group. Shawana grew up in New York City. She has performed in several musicals and toured with the Monty Python Broadway musical “Spamalot.”     “I just loved singing,” Shawana says. When she was  a child, “it was how I used to soothe myself. I remember singing on the  steps when people hurt my feelings.” She went to a high school for the performing arts and took voice lessons there. She studied classical choral music and has a graduate degree in musical education. Shawana has worked as a teaching artist specializing in conflict resolution in the New York City public schools. She wrote songs to help her students learn to handle their emotions. This inspired her to write more songs for kids.     Shawana has also been a voice actor for the Nickelodeon TV series “As  Told by Ginger.” from The Mini Page © 2013 Universal Uclick

Height: 5-11 Weight: 206

Oracle Team USA will defend its trophy against the international winner of the America’s Cup Challenger Series. Oracle Team USA’s skipper, or leader, is Jimmy Spithill, who is Australian. This will be Spithill’s fifth America’s Cup competition and his third Finals.

image courtesy America’s Cup

photo courtesy USGS

image courtesy America’s Cup

This summer in San Francisco Bay, four teams from around the world have set sail hoping to claim the oldest trophy in international sport — the America’s Cup. The 34th America’s Cup Finals will take place Sept. 7 to 21 between the current cupholder, Oracle Team USA, and an international opponent. Teams from Italy, Sweden and New Zealand competed in July and August for the right to challenge the Americans in the Cup Finals. The Mini Page spoke with an official at America’s Cup headquarters to learn more about the sport of sailing and the historic San Francisco Bay. The gray area around the event now bay is the city of San underway Francisco. in one of America’s most famous waterways.

photo by Guilain Grenier, © Oracle Team USA

Quest for the Cup

The Vince Lombardi Trophy for the winner of the NFL Super Bowl: 1967

Tim Jeffery of the America’s Cup Event Authority says the  2013 races are meant to interest younger sailors with higher speeds and exciting competition. He says:  “Dare to dream! There are lots of  opportunities out there to sail, and you don’t have to own a boat to do it.”  The America’s Cup and U.S. Sailing have partnered to create the Start Sailing Initiative for boys and girls of all ages and skill levels, including beginners. The Mini Page thanks Tim Jeffery of the America’s Cup Event Authority for help with this issue.

The Mini Page Staff Betty Debnam - Founding Editor and Editor at Large

Lisa Tarry - Managing Editor

Lucy Lien - Associate Editor

The Mini Page®

Book of States

The Mini Page’s popular series of issues about each state is collected here in a 156-page softcover book. Conveniently spiral-bound for ease of use, this invaluable resource contains A-to-Z facts about each state, along with the District of Columbia. Illustrated with colorful photographs and art, and complete with updated information, The Mini Page Book of States will be a favorite in classrooms and homes for years to come.

Wendy Daley - Artist

Stuart:  How do America’s Cup sailors clean  their clothes? Solomon: They toss them overboard to be washed ashore! Steven:  How do retired sailors greet each  other? Simon: “Long time, no sea!” Brown Bassetews the nnd’s Hou

TM

from The Mini Page © 2013 Universal Uclick

America’s Cup

try ’n’ find

Words that remind us of the America’s Cup are hidden in the block below. Some words are hidden backward or diagonally, and some letters are used twice. See if you can find: BOW, CATAMARAN, CHALLENGE, COURSE, CUP, HELM, HULL, HYDROFOIL, INTERNATIONAL, NAUTICAL, PORT, RACE, SAIL, SAN FRANCISCO, SCHOONER, SKIPPER, STARBOARD, STERN, TACK, TEAM, TROPHY, YACHT.

This is one big cup!

O L I A S H E L M

C S I C N A R F T J C H A L L E A T M H E T N B C H R P O S A R K C A O L O R M X A C R P L N U V Y E T Y H U E I O F O R D Y H L A N O I T A N

N N M O E A O R R

A G Q A W T R C E

S E B V E P S A T

W L A C I T U A N

S K I P P E R C I

D R A O B R A T S

from The Mini Page © 2013 Universal Uclick

ready resources The Mini Page provides ideas for websites, books or other resources that will help you learn more about this week’s topics. On the Web:     • americascup.com     • startsailing.org     • training.ussailing.org/Learning/Getting_started.htm     • cleverpig.org At the library:     • “America’s Cup” by S.L. Hamilton     • “Eyewitness: Boat” by Eric Kentley

To order, send $15.99 ($19.99 Canada) plus $5 postage and handling for each copy. Make check or money order (U.S. funds only) payable to Universal Uclick. Send to The Mini Page Book of States, Universal Uclick, P.O. Box 6814, Leawood, KS 66206. Or call tollfree 800-591-2097 or go to www.smartwarehousing.com. Please send ______ copies of The Mini Page Book of States (Item #0-7407-8549-4) at $20.99 each, total cost. (Bulk discount information available upon request.) Name: ________________________________________________________________________ Address: _______________________________________________________________________ City: _________________________________________ State: _________ Zip: ________________

Please include all of the appropriate registered trademark symbols and copyright lines in any publication of The Mini Page®.


Sunday, September 8, 2013  |  The Newnan Times-Herald — 5C

WEDNESDAY • SEPTEMBER 11, 2013 Evening 7 PM

Sunday, September 8 8 p.m., PBS

Monday, September 9 8 p.m., NBC

Childhood sweethearts Celia (Anne Reid) and Alan (Derek Jacobi), both widowed and in their 70s, fall for each other all over again when they are reunited after nearly 60 years on the uplifting comedy-drama series “Last Tango in Halifax.”

Thursday, September 12 9 p.m., USA

Ryan Seacrest is the host of NBC’s “The Million Second Quiz,” an electrifying new competition where contestants test their knowledge and endurance as they battle each other in intense bouts of trivia for 12 consecutive nights.

The saga of “burned” CIA agent Michael Weston (Jeffrey Donovan) concludes as he finds himself at the end of the road, where James unleashes hell trying to bring him down, on the series finale of USA’s “Burn Notice.”

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Fast Five aaac (2011, Action) Vin Diesel. rsx

Home Videos

How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met News

Raymond

Raymond

Say Yes

Say Yes

Shaft aac (2000) not

Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Roseanne Fast & Furious aac (2009) How I Met Rules

SATURDAY • SEPTEMBER 14, 2013 Evening

9 PM

Insider

NOVA

8:30

Insider

7 PM ABC CBS NBC FOX WATL WPBA GPTV WPCH A&E AMC BET COM DISC E! ESPN ESPNCL FAM FOOD FOXSS HALL HGTV LIFE NICK SPIKE SPSO SYFY TBS TLC TNT TVLND USA WGN

11:30

Mistresses

Daily

8 PM Shark Tank

FRIDAY • SEPTEMBER 13, 2013 Evening 9 PM

Shark Tank

Sherlock Holmes

7:30

WrldNews ET

THURSDAY • SEPTEMBER 12, 2013 Evening

SUNDAY • SEPTEMBER 8, 2013 Evening 7 PM

ABC CBS NBC FOX WATL WPBA GPTV WPCH A&E AMC BET COM DISC E! ESPN ESPNCL FAM FOOD FOXSS HALL HGTV LIFE NICK SPIKE SPSO SYFY TBS TLC TNT TVLND USA WGN

Big Bang

Who You Are

Who You Are

Little

Rizzoli & Isles

Rizzoli & Isles

Rizzoli & Isles

Cold Justice

Rizzoli & Isles

Boston Legal

Boston Legal

Raymond

Raymond

Raymond

Law & Order: SVU

Law & Order: SVU

Covert Affairs

Home Videos

How I Met How I Met Parks

Raymond Parks

Raymond

Queens

Suits: Bad Faith

Graceland

Parks

How I Met Rules

Parks

7 PM ABC CBS NBC FOX WATL WPBA GPTV WPCH A&E AMC BET COM DISC E! ESPN ESPNCL FAM FOOD FOXSS HALL HGTV LIFE NICK SPIKE SPSO SYFY TBS TLC TNT TVLND USA WGN

7:30

8 PM

8:30

9 PM

9:30

Entertainment

(:07) College Football: Teams TBA z{|

CBS Atlanta SEC

Mike Molly 2 1/2 Men

Paid Prog. Paid Prog. Million Second

Criminal Minds

10 PM

Jeopardy

48 Hours

11 News

The Sunshine Boys aaa (1975) pqv The Cafe

Haunt Me

Neighbors Kping Up

Family

Family

Face/Off aaa (1997, Action) John Travolta. not

Storage

Storage

Duck

Duck

(6:00) National Treasure aac (2004)

News

American Ninja Warrior: Las Vegas

Dead Man Walking aaa (1996) not

American Masters

As Time Modern

As Time Modern

Hell on Wheels

11 PM

SNL

News

School

School

30 Rock

Cheaters

(:24) The Birdcage aac (1996)

Last Tango

Masterpiece Lord of War aaa

Modern

Modern

Hell on Wheels

Bad Ink

Waist Deep aa

Role Models aaa (2008) not

Iglesias

Mermaids: Body

Mermaids: New

Megalodon: Monster Shark Lives

Megalodon

E! News

Fashion Police

Hello Ross Soup

Maid in Manhattan ac (2002) rsx Scorebrd

30 for 30

30 for 30

Bad Ink

Treasure aac (2004)

Dumb & Dumber aaa (1994) Jim Carrey.

30 for 30

CBS

11 News

Notorious aac (2009) xXx aa (2002, Action) Outlaw agents battles Russian gang.

College Football: Teams TBA z{|

11:30 Sports

College Football Ohio State Buckeyes at California Golden Bears z{| Wheel

10:30

College Football: Teams TBA

30 for 30

30 for 30

Billy Madison aac (1995) Adam Sandler.

Liar Liar aac (1997, Comedy) Jim Carrey.

The Blind Side aaa

Diners

Cutthroat Kitchen

Iron Chef America

Diners

Cupcake Wars

MLB Baseball San Diego Padres at Atlanta Braves z{|

Chopped

Post Game Post Game Wrld Poker no}

I Married (2012)

Cedar Cove

Garage Sale Mystery (2013) pqw

Hunters

Love It

Love It or List It

Hunters

Hunters

Cedar Cove Hunters

Hunters

Hunters

Jodi Arias: aac

Sins of the Preacher (2013) Taylor Cole.

Swindle (2013)

Sam & Cat Hathaways Drake

Drake

Dad Run

Nanny

Friends

Friends

Cops

Cops

Cops

Cops

Cops

Cops

Cops

Cops

Coll. Ftbl

College Football Lamar Cardinals at Oklahoma State Cowboys z{|

Cops

Cops

Escape From Polygamy (2013) pqw

Ragin’ Cajun Redneck Gators (2013)

Robocroc (2013) Corin Nemec. pqw

Family

Big Bang

Untold ER

Family

Big Bang

Big Bang

Untold ER

Big Bang

Untold ER

Big Bang

Coll. Ftbl no~ Mega Python a Big Bang

Untold ER

Road Trip aa (2000) Untold ER

(6:30) The Book of Eli aaa (2010) not

Clash of the Titans aac (2010) rsx

At World’s End aaa

Good As It Gets aaa Raymond

Raymond

Raymond

Raymond

Loves Raymond

(6:00) 2 Fast 2 Furious aa (2003, Action) Paul Walker, Tyrese Gibson. MLB Baseball Cleveland Indians at Chicago White Sox z{|

Raymond

Queens

Faster aaa (2010) not News

How I Met Rules


6C The Newnan Times-Herald   |  Sunday, September 8, 2013

INDEX 100 - Announcements 200 - Services Offered 300 - Employment 400 - Marketplace

770-253-1576 24 Autos/Recreation

ANNOUNCEMENTS

150

Auctions

Advertise Your Auction

In over 100 newspapers for only $350. Your 25-word classified ad will reach more than 1 million readers. Call Jennifer Labon at the Georgia Newspaper Service.

770-454-6776

Times-Herald Specials

156

Take-5 Special

Advertise your real estate or pre-owned autos/ trucks, etc. 5 lines for 5 days, $25! Over 50% off! Your ad will appear in The Newnan TimesHerald for 5 days, on times-herald.com for 5 days and MyConnection on Wed. 1 listing per ad. Deadline 3 business days prior at noon. Email your ad to: classifieds@ newnan.com The Newnan TimesHerald 16 Jefferson St. Newnan, GA

770-253-1576

157

Events

Evento Gratis

Dia familiar para la comunidad Sabado el 14 de Septiembre a las 1:00. Tendremos inflables, juegos, premios, y comida. TODO GRATIS. Tambien les invitamos a el culto evangelistico Viernes a las 7:00 y Domingo a las 1:30. Auspiciado por Iglesia Nuevo Renacer 8817 Highway 54 W Sharspburg, GA

www.nuevo-renacer.com

678-572-9193

Real Estate / Rental Ad Weekend Special Friday • Saturday Sunday 12 lines print & online

$30

770-253-1576

EMPLOYMENT

TO OUR READERS The Newnan Times-Herald does not knowingly accept advertisements regarding employment which are not bona fide job offers. This newspaper is committed to providing a reliable source and marketplace for those individuals seeking employment. Be cautious when attempting to do business with any unknown person or company. Please analyze all advertisements carefully and use good judgment and common sense. This newspaper does not knowingly accept advertisements that discriminate or intend to discriminate on any illegal basis. Nor does this newspaper knowingly accept advertisements that promote illegal activities.

Admin / Clerical-Office

302

Immediate Opening

Seasonal Customer Service Representative Must be able to work with the public in a fastpaced environment. Strong clerical, computer and telephone skills required. Thompson Gas 2521 West Hwy 16 Newnan

770-253-1505

Computer-IT / Web Design

303

SMC³

in Peachtree City has open positions for a DBA, Java development and CRM development. Please visit for more details:

www.smc3.com

Drivers Trucking

306

Driver

/7

Drivers Trucking

306

Owner Operators

Drivers Trucking

306

Drivers – CDL-A

$2,000 Sign On Bonus Consistent weekly miles. Great pay of $3,500+ per week. Out for 14 - 21 days, then stay home for 5 - 7 days! Dedicated customer with dedicated routes and No Touch! Class A CDL + 1 year driving experience. To learn more, call Pam:

866-834-4284 Fleet Owners Welcome

Train and work for us! Professional, focused CDL training available. Choose Company, Owner Operator, Lease Operator or lease Trainer.

877-369-6712

www.centraltruckdrivingjobs.com

Drivers CDL-A

SOLO & TEAM Drivers Needed! Top Pay & Full Benefits Even More pay for hazmat! New Trucks arriving daily! CDL Grads Welcome!

800-942- 2104

www.TotalMS.com

Drivers:

DriveForGreatwide.com

Attention:

Regional & Dedicated Drivers! Averitt offers excellent benefits & hometime. CDL-A req. Recent grads with CDLA, 1- 5/wks. Paid Training. Apply online at : AverittCareers.com Equal Opportunity Employer.

888-362-8608

Covenant Needs Drivers!

Run FB with WTI. Be home weekends. Start up to 28% plus fuel bonus. New equipment. BCBS. Experience needed. LP available. Call:

877-693-1305

Drivers:

CRST offers the Best Lease Purchase Program! SIGN ON BONUS. No down payment or credit check. Great pay. Class-A CDL required. Owner Operators Welcome! Call:

866-546-7656

Truck Drivers are in Demand! Great benefits, stability, and earning Experienced potential! The avg. Drivers truck driver earns egional LTL runs. $700+/wk.*! No CDL? R sign-on bonus. 16 Day training avail! $1,500 Home every week; Call Today! Great Pay; Full BeneN. GA: 866-494-7434 fits; Stable Freight and or S. GA: more! CDL-A req. 866-557-9244 EEOE/AAP *DOL/BLS 2012. 800-569-9232 www.driveFFE.com

Dedicated

Driving opportunities for team and solo drivers. Quality home time, steady miles, high earnings. Enjoy Transport Americaʼs great driver experience! tadrivers.com

866-204-0648

Experienced

OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1,000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. EOE Call:

306

Home Weekends

Earn $500 ADay:

Insurance Agents Needed: Leads, No Cold Calls: Commissions Paid Daily; Lifetime Renewals; Complete Training; Health /Dental Insurance; Life License Required. Call:

1-888-713-6020

Click on...

www.bulldoghiway.com

Pemberton Truck Lines is hiring Dedicated Drivers: Tennessee, Georgia & Florida The Southeast

We Require: * CDL- Class A * Min. 1-year exp.

1-888-736-2378

or apply online at: pembertontrucklines. com

25 New Driver Trainees Needed!

Become a driver for TMC Transportation! Earn $750 per week! No CDL? No problem! Local 15 day Training!

1-877-648-2755

Now HiriNg! immediAte opeNiNgs! Do you need to upgrade your job? Do you have Assembly/Manufacturing experience? If so, come join one of the world’s leading manufacturers of utility vehicles. ResourceMFG in partnership with Yamaha Motor Manufacturing Corporation in Newnan, GA is looking for dynamic, experienced employees for the following positions:

AssemBLers

ForKLiFt operAtors

Mechanical Assemblers required. Sit, Stand Up and Reach Forklifts Some positions require hand and Tugger and Electric Pallet Jack power tools.

mACHiNe operAtors

This position requires loading, running and performing inspections.

weLders

Applicants should submit resume with maximum one paragraph, hand-written cover letter along with compensation history and requirements to: accresume@aol.com All submissions remain confidential.

Apply online at:

www.flashfoods.com

325

Security

326

General

Experienced Carpenters 770-301-1642

Parcel Delivery

Must have prior exp. Must apply in person:

Pavestone, LLC 169 Peggy Lane Tyrone, GA 30290

Schools/ Instruction

Drug test and criminal background check are required. EEO Employer

Interface located in LaGrange, GA is searching for a:

PLC TeChniCian 1sT shifT (7 am - 3 Pm) Duties: troubleshoot equip., develop, document & implement electrical projects, research electrical & mechanical components, & calibrate/setup instrumentation and field devices; manage electrical documentation & work with Engineering on equipment installations/ modifications

Requirements: • HS diploma or a GED • 5 yrs. exp. troubleshooting electrical and mechanical equip. • PLC training and exp. • Exp. with: Ethernet, Controlnet; with AC & DC drives: Powerflex, Magnatek, & Fincor; equip. startups and maintenance • Computer skills in Excel, Word, and Internet Preferences: • AutoCAD experience • Technical school degree with a major in Electronics

Apply on-line at: www.interfaceglobalcareers.com EOE M/F/V/D

336

Airlines are Hiring

Begin here – Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technichan training. Financial aid for qualified students – Housing available.Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance

866-564-9634

www.fixjets.com

Security Officers

Driver needed. Must have min. one year commercial driving exp., no CDL required. Please send resume to: wehiredrivers@ yahoo.com

Schools/ Instruction

Now Hiring:

Machine Operators Fork-lift Drivers Plant Labor

Customer Service &

Office Training!

SC Train can get you certified & ready to work! No experience necessary! Job placement after online training completed. HS Diploma.GED & PC/Internet needed!

1-888-748-4126

Medical Office Trainees Needed!

Train to become a Medical Office Assistant. No experience needed! Online training at SC gets you job ready! HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet Needed!

1-888-407-7162

336

Sudoku Solution

Welding Careers

Hands on training for career opportunities in aviation, automotive, manufacturing and more. Financial aid for qualified students – Housing available. Job placement assistance. Call AIM

Miscellaneous 413 For Sale

Part Time / Temporary

Television, excellent. $500

877-205-1779

339

Part Time

B2B Health Insurance Telemarketer in Newnan. BCBSGA, United, Aetna

Email resume to:

service@ gahealthcoverage.com

400 MARKETPLACE

Miscellaneous 413 For Sale

High-Speed Internet

is now available where you live for only $39.99 per mo. New Superfast Satellite Internet with speeds up to 15 Mbps! Ask about discounts for DishNetwork or DirecTv customers! We also now offer phone service as low as $19.99 per mo. Call Today!

1-800-283-1057

www.probroadbandsolutions.com

Hoshizaki America, Inc. Peachtree City, Georgia

These opportunities are temp-to-hire. Yamaha offers excellent benefits and has an aggressive pay progression plan.

Apply online at: www.resourcemfg.com

Also seeking:

Senoia, Newnan area Full medical, vac, sick, commission, and other benefits, including 401 k available.

Manufacturing 332

MIG Welders needed

Fayette County CPA seeks a career-minded

5-10 year CPA and 3-5 year CPA/candidate With public accounting experience. Each position requires experience primarily in business and advanced personal income tax matters and ability to work independently under budget constraints. Future ownership possible for right candidate.

Store Managers

jobs@securityacg.com

Education / Experience: High School diploma/GED. Must be able to provide. A minimum of 1-year experience in a manufacturing environment for each position.

Who has minimum 5 years experience as full charge, ability to analyze and adjust client books and records and properly prepare payroll, sales and property tax reports. Position also requires intermediate computer skills, working knowledge of Sage (Peachtree Accounting), QuickBooks, Windows applications and excellent written and oral communication skills. Full time position from January through April with flex time possible the remainder of the year. Public Accounting experience and ability to prepare income tax returns desired.

looking for:

Email resume to:

Want to work with a GREAT TEAM? Bookkeeper

Flash Foods

Immediate openings for FT/PT security officers. Experienced preferred, must have reliable transportation.

Dedicated Drivers

We Offer: * $1,000 Sign on Bonus * Competitive Pay/ Benefits * Home most weekends

323

Retail

314

Get increased exposure with our 30-day print and online special!

Insurance

770-774-4546

843-266-3731

Real Estate/Rentals

Sunday’s Sudoku Puzzle

314

Insurance

Customer Service Representative $1,000 sign on bonus, Georgia Farm Bureau regional flatbed, guar- Mutual Insurance Comantee pay, excellent pany is seeking qualipay, benefits, o/op's fied applicants for the welcome. Call today for full time position of details: Customer Service Rep800-554-5661 resentative in Coweta ext. 331 County. This position www.tlxtransport.jobs will assist the Agency Manager and assigned Career Agents, interact New Pay with policyholders on various insurance serPackage Tractor Owner Operat- vices, quote P&C covors. $1,500 sign-on bo- erageʼs, bind P&C covnus, fuel discounts-tolls erage according to inpaid, scales paid – surance regulations company Dedicated Dispatchers. a n d 2 , 5 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 m i l e s / guidelines, schedule appointments and perweek. form other marketing 888-888-7996 duties as required. Requirements: must hold a New Trucks Applicants valid Georgia InsurArriving! ance License in PropExp. pays – up to 50 erty & Casualty. High cpm. Full Benefits + School diploma or GED Q u a l i t y H o m e t i m e . required. Must have CDL-A req. proven work record, ability to handle confid877-258-8782 ential information, acwww.ad-drivers.com curacy and attention to detail, possess good Wayne Davis computer skills and Concrete Co. abilities. Now Hiring Please email your Qualified Drivers resume to: for Tyrone & Union City careers@gfb.org locations. Must have or refer to our CDL License, Class A website at: or B and Good Driving www.gfb.org Record. Experience is a EOE M/F/D/V/AA Plus. Exc. Benefits.

Insurance

800 - Commercial

FREE 6-line, 1-day ad for used merchandise $200 or less

29.85

Drivers Trucking

700 - Rentals

Bargain Buys

3 Days + 6 Lines + 25% Off Daily Rate $

600 - Real Estate

• Call 770-253-1576 • Fax 770-253-2538 • Email classifieds@newnan.com • Log on to times-herald.com

Yard Sale Special

Four options – 7, 14, 21 or 28 days with daily rates as low as $2.14.

100 300

To place your ad

P l ac An A e d

times-herald.com

500 - Autos/Recreation

Leading manufacturer of commercial refrigeration equipment is seeking candidates. All openings are posted on: www.hoshizakiamerica.com

Mechanical Engineering

Technology or HVAC with machine design and testing, knowledgable with specialized software for calculation, selection and simulation of refrigeration performance. BSME plus 2 - 4 years experience. Software: Microsoft, Microsoft Dynamics AX, Pro-E, Windchill, CAD

Data Analyst

Generate reports, trend analysis, budgeting and forecasting, conduct Customer Satisfaction Surveys, support Sales and Marketing Staff. Business Degree and/or Microsoft Certified. Must have excellent Excel and Access skills

Customer Service

Assist customers with product selection effectively communicating product and services over the phone following sales policies and procedures. 2 – 3 years experience customer service experience, proficient Microsoft Office, Integrated Sales System a plus

Manufacturing Tooling Engineer (Griffin, GA)

Design/fabricate tools and fixtures, installation of tooling and equipment. Assist with new model introductions, using lean manufacturing dseign layout of assembly areas. BSME, experience with AutoCAD, 3 -5 years experience with assembly processes.

60" Sony

770-304-1808

Ca$h In on your

Yard Sale!

Your 6-line ad for 3 days is only

$2985

in the Newnan Times-Herald and on times-herald.com 6-Line Ad Regular Rates: 1 Day: $14.45 2 Days: $27.70 Deadline: noon – 2 business days prior to publication

Want to reach even more households? Add your yard sale ad to our MyConnection for only $11.70 and reach an additional 21,500 households! Deadline noon on Friday the week prior to your sale.

Call Rhonda or Christy at

770-253-1576

or email classifieds@newnan.com

Submit resumes online to: hr@hoshizaki.com Applicants must be 18 years of age and have High School Diploma or GED, must be able to successfully pass a drug screen and background check. www.hoshizaki.com

EOE and Drug Free Workplace

16 Jefferson Street Newnan, GA times-herald.com


Bargain Buys $200-or-less

Miscellaneous 413 For Sale

Free

Wood Swing Set, Sliding board, play fort. You disassemble & move.

427

Wrought Iron

Table & 4 chairs, outside set. $50

770-254-8145

770-251-5616

Moving Sale

770-605-7115

Troy Built

678-340-0820 or 770-502-7607

500

770-304-0593

Two Radial Tires size 205-50-16. Looks new. $50

Lawn Tractor

John Deere L120, 48", 20 HP, Auto., runs. Automobiles $200

770-843-6177

30 ! 0 3 LL $

R USED U O Y SE M OVER $200 ITE

r Day R $2 2 P e (REGU L A LIN E A D) 10

ight r s ’ t d at tha item price

TO OUR READERS

it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, Wooded lots religion, sex, handicap, familial Meriwether County status or national origin, or an Water system no well intention, to make any such needed! Owner finanpreference, limitation or discing with $250 crimination.” Familial down, status 8% APR,children $104under / month includes the age678-938-8008 of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of Homes children under 18. Mobile This Sale newspaper will not For knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed thatto With acreage. Ready all dwellings advertisedFinanin this move in. Seller c inewspaper n g w i tare h available a p p r oonvan ed equal opportunity credit. Lots ofbasis. room for To complain of discriminathe price. 3 BR, 2 bath. tionrenters. call HUD toll-free at this No number: 1-800-669-9777. The 706-459-3030 toll free telephone number for LandHomesExpress.com the hearing impaired is 1-800927-9275.

1 Acre

502

Crown Victoria

'97, great condition. $2,500 678-662-4877

Lincoln

'97 Town Car Signature, garaged, great cond. $4,500

770-304-9910

DeVille

'98 D'Elegance, 184K mi., well maintained, totally functional. $1,925 OBO

770-502-9367

Trucks & Vans

506

Nissan

'90, good cond., runs great, 5-spd. $1,400

770-683-3033

sed Run your utill it sells, or up to over $200ays, for only

$ 30!!

30 d

Ad runs in The Newnan Times-Herald, times-herald.com and in MyConnection. Maximum 10 lines. No pets, no yard sales, no autos. Private party only. No refunds. One item per ad, per household.

DEADLINE:

Homes For Rent-Unfurn.

Find It! Sell It! Buy It!

704

4 BR, 2 Bath

Good cond. GRFA accepted. $925 / month

770-253-1576

770-318-8230

Homes For Rent-Unfurn.

3 BR, 2 Bath

Nice neighborhood near Thomas Crossroads, fenced backyard. $975/ month, $975 deposit.

770-251-6729

3 BR, 2 Bath

678-854-0382

Sharpsburg

Executive and Country Estate Home

$2,100

Palmetto

16 Jefferson St. • Newnan, GA times-herald.com

800

Senoia. No dep. 4 BR, 2 bath duplex. 1.6 acres. Central H/A. Great for large family. $995 / mo.

770-855-5259

4 BR, 3 BA $900

Senoia

Newnan

770-583-8864 or 770-301-8786

770-714-8054

Rent-to-Own

3 BR, $850

COMMERCIAL

3 BR, 2 bath, 2-car garage, wooded lot. $875/month, $875 deposit

Industrial Property For Sale 803

Manufactiured Homes For Rent705

20 Acres Industrial

770-599-9608

Newnan Luxury Rental Homes

Houses, townhomes, apartments All price ranges! As low as $499 770-683-1221 or 770-683-1199

columbia woods townhomes

Hwy. 29 South off ramp exit 41 of I-85.

2 BR, 2 Bath

678-423-9844

Powers Crossroads area. 14x70. $125 / week, $550 move in. Range, refrigerator, DW, Central H/A.

Lost A Pet? Found A Pet?

770-634-5518

Rooms For Rent

166 Greison Trail, Newnan

The Newnan Times-Herald will publish your ad FREE for 1 day.

710

Room for Rent

770-253-4880

$400/mo. utilities included. Serious inquiries only. On Sprayberry Rd.

2 Bedroom $691 3 Bedroom $779

770-253-1576

770-301-4043

We have handicapped accessible units available

BUYS

Needed to split expenses on 2 BR house.

770-251-7155

7 homes: 1 - 3 BRs, $375 - $785

711

Roommate

House in Sargent.

Grantville

770-490-4581

Rentals To Share

704

Refurbished

For Rent:

www.homesouthinfo.com

3 BR, 2.5 bath house with pool. Near Thomas Crossroads. Quiet 100 acre compound. $1,800 / month Call Rick:

Homes For Rent-Unfurn.

Please visit: www.jimsells.com

Newnan. $1,100 disc rent. Brooks / Madras / Northgate

Beautiful

704

new feature! ad runs for 1 week!

NAME

Look to us:

It’s the place Coweta goes to for news, events and classifieds.

or email classieds@newnan.com

Mobile Homes

704

at:

bargainbuys@newnan.com Just type “Bargain Ad” in subject line

Place your FREE ad for USED merchandise priced at $200-or-less. The line ad will run in The Newnan Times-Herald, times-herald.com and MyConnection for ONE (1) Week! Simply fill out the below form and mail it, fax it, drop it off or email it. Deadline: Friday at noon.

Interested in Online Advertising?

770-253-1576

Call Rhonda at

608

Homes For Rent-Unfurn.

FREE AD FOR USED ITEMS $200-OR-LESS

1.43 million Page Views monthly ••••• 11,400 Unique Visitors daily

NOON 2 BUSINESS DAYS PRIOR TO PUBLICATION

TO OUR READERS All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at this number: 1-800-669-9777. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800927-9275.

All real&estate advertising in Land Lots this newspaper is subject 604 to the For Sale Fair Housing Act which makes

VEHICLES MOTORCYCLES RVs/CAMPERS WATERCRAFT

Tires

RENTAL PROPERTY

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

770-880-4809

Camcorder model VLL72U Twinslim cam Zoom12. $200

DAYS

Yes,

Generator

770-304-0462

Sickle Bar mower, 5HP Briggs Stratton, runs great. $200

600 700

427

4.5 Onan, motor runs fine. $200 OBO

Sharp VHS

Bedroom sets, dining room set, sofas, paintings, kitchen dinette, fitness equipment. Moving out of state. Call for appt. to view:

FO R

Bargain Buys $200-or-less

Sunday, September 8, 2013 |   The Newnan Times-Herald 7C

Private party ads only. Price must be included in the ad. One (1) item or set per ad, per household. Phone number must be in ad. No pets or garage sales.

PHONE

ADDRESS

Mail to: Bargain Buys, The Newnan Times-Herald, P.O. Box 1052, Newnan, GA 30264 or drop off form at our front desk – 16 Jefferson Street, Newnan Fax: 770-253-2538

2013 Service Directory Ask Today how you can advertise your service in The Newnan Times-Herald and you will get:

20 days in print 30 days on times-herald.com 4 weeks in our MyConnection Reach over 676,900 in readership! Over 10,000 Unique Visitors Daily at www.times-herald.com Contact Rhonda for more information: 770-253-1576 or email: classifieds@newnan.com Concrete

Concrete

coweta

concrete service, llc

Handicap Services

Home Improvement

F&F Ornamental Iron

manny the

Prevent Falls before they happen!

Free Estimates

“When we leave.... ...it’s finished!”

slabs • patios sidewalks • driveways

pool decks tear out

Insured 25 Years Exp.

/ replace

Specializing in Handicap Ramps & Rails

celebrating

30

years in business! Call for a FREE Estimate! Gene King

Frank Fersch

678-378-4860

Painting

Francine Fersch

770-328-8936 770-599-6382

Painting

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8C — The Newnan Times-Herald   |  Sunday, September 8, 2013

NATIONAL

AUGUSTNUMBERS

US employers add 169K jobs; rate falls to 7.3 pct. WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. employers have yet to start hiring aggressively — a trend the Federal Reserve will weigh in deciding this month whether to slow its bond buying and, if so, by how much. Employers added 169,000 jobs in August but many fewer in June and July than previously thought, the Labor Department said Friday. Combined, June, July and Aug ust amounted to the weakest three-month stretch of job growth in a year. T he u nemploy ment rate dropped to 7.3 percent, the lowest in nearly five years. But it fell because more Americans stopped looking for work and were no longer counted as unemployed. The proportion of Americans working or looking for work reached its lowest point in 35 years. All told, the report adds up to a mixed picture of the U.S. job market: Hiring is steady but

subpar. Much of the hiring is in lower-paying occupations. And many people are giving up on the job market in frustration. The jobs picture is sure to weigh heavily when the Fed meets Sept. 17-18 to discuss whether to scale back its $85 billion a month in Treasury and mortgage bond purchases. Those purchases have helped keep home-loan and other borrowing rates ultra-low to try to encourage consumers and businesses to borrow and spend more. David Jones, chief economist at DMJ Advisors, said he still thinks the Fed will begin slowing its bond buying later this month. But he suspects the August data and the reduced job totals for June and July will lead the Fed to trim more gradually than it would have otherwise: The Fed could start reducing its monthly purchases by $10 billion rather than $20

billion. Jones said he expects periodic reductions of $10 billion between now and mid-2014. At that point, Chairman Ben Bernanke has said the Fed expects the bond buying could likely end. The revised job growth for June and July shrank the previously estimated gain for those months by 74,000. July’s gain is now estimated at 104,000 — the fewest in more than a year and down from a previous estimate of 162,000. June’s was revised to 172,000 from 188,000. In the past three months, employers have added an average of just 148,000 jobs. The average monthly gain for 2013 so far is 180,000, slightly below the 183,000 average for 2012. Stock prices shifted between gains and losses in morning trading as investors weighed the job report’s impact on the Fed and tensions over the pros-

pect of U.S. military action against Syria. The Dow Jones industrial average rose about 30 points. The yield on the 10 -year Treasury note fell to 2.92 percent, from 2.95 percent before the jobs report was released at 8:30 a.m. Eastern time. Investors may think the report makes it less likely the Fed will significantly slow its bond purchases. One possible concern for the Fed is that most of the hiring in August was in lower-paying industries such as retail, restaurants and bars. This continues a trend that emerged earlier this year. Retailers added 44,000 jobs in August. Hotels, restaurants and bars added 27,000. Temp hiring rose by 13,000. In higher-paying fields, the report was mixed. Manufacturers added 14,000, the first gain after five months of declines. Government, which

has been a drag on job growth since the recession ended more than four years ago, gained 17,000. It was the biggest such increase in nearly a year. The increase was all in local education departments. Federal employment was unchanged, and state government lost 3,000 jobs. Auto manufacturers added 19,000 jobs. Americans are buying more cars than at any time since the recession began in December 2007. Some of the jobs also likely ref lected workers who were rehired last month after being temporarily laid off in July, when factories switched to new models. But construction jobs were unchanged in August. And the information industry, which includes high-tech workers, broadcasting and film production, cut 18,000 jobs. The biggest losses were in the film industry.

The report contained some other positive signs: Average hourly earnings picked up, rising 5 cents to $24.05. Hourly pay has risen 2.2 percent in the past 12 months. That’s slightly ahead of the 2 percent inflation rate over the same period. The average hourly work week ticked up to 34.5 from 34.4, a sign that companies needed more labor. That can lead to larger paychecks. The modest jobs figures contrast with other recent data that suggested that the economy could be picking up. For example, reports from the Institute for Supply Management, a trade group of purchasing managers, showed that manufacturers expanded at the fastest pace in more than two years last month. And service firms grew at the quickest pace in more than eight years, the ISM found.

After years of decline, United States births leveling off? ATL ANTA (A P) — A fter falling four years in a row, U.S. births may finally be leveling off. The number of babies born last year — a little shy of 4 million — is only a few hundred less than the number in 2011, according to a government report released Friday. That suggests that lately, fewer couples may be scared away from having children because of the economy or other factors, some experts say. Among the signs of a possible turning point: The birth rate for women in their early 30s inched up for the first time since 2007. “We may be on level course or potentially even see a rise” in birth trends in the near future, said Brady Hamilton, a statistician with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Some are a bit more

pessimistic. “T he decline has slowed down, but it’s still a decline,” said Carol Hogue, an Emory University expert on birth trends. Falling births is a relatively new phenomenon in this country. Births were on the rise since the late 1990s and hit an all-time high of more than 4.3 million in 2007. The drop that followed was widely attributed to the nation’s f lagging economy. Experts believed that many women or couples who were out of work or had other money problems felt they couldn’t afford to start or add to their family. The economy officially was in a recession from December 2007 until June 2009. But well into 2011, polls showed most A mer ica n s rem a i ned gloomy, citing anemic hiring, a depressed housing market and other factors.

The new CDC report is a first glimpse at 2012 birth certificate data from state health departments, but the numbers aren’t expected to change much. H ig h l ig hts of t he repor t include: — T he bi r t h rate for a l l women of childbearing age — 63 births per 1,000 women — was essentially f lat from the year before. — Rates dropped for His-

panic women, 2 percent, and blacks, 1 percent, but less than the previous year. The rate continued to stay the same for whites, rose 4 percent for Asian-American and Pacific Islanders, and fell slightly for American Indians and Alaska Natives. — Rates fell again for women in their early 20s, down 3 percent from 2011. That’s the lowest mark for women in that age group since 1940, when comprehensive national birth records were first compiled. — For women in their late 20s, birth rates fell 1 percent. That age group accounts for more than a quarter of all of the nation’s births. The rate rose a slig ht 1 percent for women in their early 30s, who have nearly as many babies as women in their late 20s. — Rates also rose 2 percent for moms ages 35 and older, and 1 percent for women in their

early 40s. Rates in older moms have been rising slightly in recent years, despite the overall downward trend. Experts say that’s because older women generally have better jobs or f ina ncia l security, a nd a re more sensitive to the ticking away of their biological clocks. — Birth rates for teen moms have been falling since 1991 and hit yet another historic low. The number of babies born to teens last year — about 305,000 — is less than half the peak of nearly 645,000 in 1970. The teen birth rate has been cut in half since 1991, said Bill A lbert of the National Ca mpaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, who ca l led it a “st u n n i ng turnaround.” Experts attribute that decline to a range of factors, including less sex and more use of contraception. Another report highlight:

About 33 percent of births last year were delivered through Cesa rea n section — a rate unchanged from the previous two years. C-sections are sometimes m e d i c a l l y n e c e s s a r y. B u t health officials believe many are done out of convenience or unwarranted caution, and in the 1980s set a goal of keeping the national rate at 15 percent. The C-section rate had been rising steadily since 1996, until it dropped slightly in 2010. Even if the C-section rate has peaked, it’s still too high — particularly in certain states, Emory’s Hogue said. For example, last year 40 percent of births were C-sections in Louisiana, and more than 38 percent in New Jersey, Mississippi and Florida, the report found. “There’s a lot of room for improvement,” she said.

White Oak Golden K Kiwanis Club

23rd Annual Benefit Golf Tournament

Sponsor Appreciation

The members of the White Oak Golden K Kiwanis Club thank our sponsors who made last year’s Golf Tournament a financial success. Their generous support has been used to assist the community with programs and services that add to the quality of life in Coweta.

Major Tournament Sponsors

Boatwright & Co. CPA The Brass Grandchildren – Caroline, J.D., Reid & Topher Coweta Fayette EMC Dalton West Carpets Edward Jones Investments Ernst & Young H & R Block

Grandchildren of Lee & Susan Hunter – Carson & Lauren Luker McKoon Funeral Home & On-site Crematory Chick-fil-A Newnan Dwarf House Wishbone of Newnan Newnan Utilities PSS Signs & Glass SouthTowne Motor Company

Sprayberry’s Barbeque State Farm Agents of Coweta The Newnan Times-Herald Toyota of Newnan Vic Hanson’s Grandchildern – Porter Jennings, Derrick Hunter, Smith, Gambrell and Russel, LLC Westmoreland For Congress

Business Partners & Friends of Coweta Youth Arnall Grocery Co. BB&T Better Homes & Gardens – Scott Cosby MG Joe Brooks (Ret) Charter Bank Bob and Alice

Crain Oil Company Debbie’s Pool Shop The Farm Bureau Hospital Discount Pharmacy Jay and Les Lane LCDR David Jessel USN (Ret)

Friends of Kiwanis Crossroads Automotive Eddie’s Barber Shop Elliott Chiropractic Clinic Gimme Shelter Groov-Pin Corp. B&L Tire Taco Mac Hooters of Newnan J. Smith Lanier K & S Glass

Knox Company, Inc. Lee-Goodrum Pharmacy Longhorn Steakhouse Morgan Trophy Newnan Ace Hardware Olive Garden Italian Restaurant Coweta Pool & Fireplace O’Charley’s Scott’s Bookstore Savannah Court of Newnan

Lee-King Pharmacy Lindsey’s Inc. Maw & Paw Kettyle Auto Quick As A Wink Sam’s Club Office Depot

Red Lobster Restaurant Rosenzweig, Jones, Horne & Griffis, PC R.DuBose Jewelers Sargento Cheese Shane’s Rib Shack Shenandoah Collision Center The Home Depot The Cleaning Depot Jimmy and Mary Lynn Sprayberry Wal-Mart Supercenter

Regions Bank Uniglobe McIntosh Travel United Bank

2013 Tournament Newnan Country Club Thursday, October 10 2-Person Teams - Ft. Lauderdale Format Lunch Served at Noon • 1:00 PM Shotgun Start

Reservations & Information Call 770-253-5187 or 770-253-2247


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