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Wednesday, January 9, 2013

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February 5, 2014

MyConnection Published every Wednesday and delivered free by The Newnan Times-Herald

Check Out the Classifieds on Page 7

see ad on page 6 for details

New in Newnan: The Leaf and Bean By Bradley Hartsell bradley@newnan.com

After a tough few weeks, downtown Newnan has its coffee shop back. T he L ea f a nd Bea n , for merly Espresso Lane, reopened Monday under new ownership, and based on the crowd early Wednesday, people are certainly eager to have their coffee hangout back. One group in particular was a Bible study group, comprised of several ladies who had made meeting at the coffee shop a tradition. Now that it’s back, they couldn’t be happier. “We like coming up here because it’s very convenient. We really are thrilled that they’ve reopened. I shuddered to think it wasn’t going to be a coffee shop anymore,” said Connie Posey. The ladies, after their Bible study, debated and ultimately decided the new Meryl Streep movie, “August: Osage County,” isn’t very good. It’s a simple and lighthearted conversation, but it’s one they couldn’t have otherwise, as no other place in town gives them the same comfort to “hang out.” “We didn’t have anywhere to go when it was closed,” said Carolyn Schuett. “It’s a great place to meet. You never know who you’ll run into here.” On Dec. 21, Espresso Lane closed its doors without much ado. Many in the community thought the coffee shop

Photos by Bradley Hartsell

Cher McWilliams, new owner of The Leaf and Bean, is excited to give downtown Newnan a coffee shop again.

The Leaf and Bean recreates the “hang out” atmosphere of Espresso Lane, which pleases large groups like this bible study group. Carolyn Schuett, second from left, says of The Leaf of Bean, “It’s a great place to meet. You never know who you’ll run into here.”

was just shutting down for the holidays, but it became apparent more was going on. The change in ownership brought in Cher McWilliams, and almost immediately, she and her team began revamping the shop. McWilliams says she’d have a handful of people a day pop in during the renovation and asking when they were reopening. It was important for

McWilliams to stay visible in the time the shop was closed. “We definitely saw people were interested in what we were doing,” said McWilliams. “I left the door open for people who came in while we were working. We were definitely working our hardest to get it back [up and running]. “If only half the people come in who

came while we were painting, we’ll be good,” she joked. McWilliams has 20 years experience in the health field, currently working in health coaching at Piedmont Fayette Hospital. She loved the idea of the downtown coffee shop, but with a healthier twist, given her expertise in the field. “I love being around people, serving

people and just providing a service,” she said. “I wanted to bring a healthier spin to what’s been going on in the space.” As the name suggests, The Leaf and Bean will offer more tea options than Espresso Lane. Opening with a soft launch, the shop will introduce

New, page 3

Serve a satisfying soup Nothing warms like a steaming bowl of home made soup i n s i de

Two warm ing and flavorful soup recip es ➤

PAGE 3

Ryan Kennedy, left, works on the set of his movie, “The Projectionist,” set to release on the movie’s website.

Welcome to Hollywood

24-year-old East Coweta graduate becomes filmmaker By Bradley Hartsell bradley@newnan.com

Most 21-year-olds are stuck t r y i ng to decide bet ween majors. Most don’t direct movies. Ryan Kennedy, a member of East Coweta’s Class of 2007, however, left Newnan for New York after graduating with the single-minded pursuit of making movies. Fast-forward to 2014, and Kennedy, now 24, is releasing “The Projectionist” at the end of the month, a movie he wrote and ultimately directed more than three years ago. The film tells the story of a veteran battling PTSD, getting a job as a projectionist at a movie theater, and struggling to adapt to civilian life. Kennedy grew up in Camden County before moving with his parents to Newnan at age 14. Kennedy says he went back and forth between Newnan and Camden County, but he spent his last two years of high school at East Coweta. While there, Kennedy was a student at the Central Educational Center, where he studied video production. Even as a boy, Ken nedy knew he wanted to make films.

His grandfather was a projectionist and shared with him a great knowledge of film, and he began saving early in an effort to one day film his own movie. While Kennedy was attendi ng E a st Cowet a , Cowet a County began exploding as a Hollywood haven. Though Kennedy always loved film, watching the explosion happen in his own backyard kept the self-doubt from creeping in too much. “I wasn’t’ sure if I should even try [to make movies]. I thought maybe I should just get a regular job. I thought, ‘Regular people like me don’t rea lly brea k into the f ilm industry,’” recalled Kennedy. “But then being in Newnan [at 14 years old], I was able to meet people in the movie industry and was able to see that this world did exist outside of Los Angeles. With Hollywood now surrounding him and Kevin Pullen, who ran the video production class at CEC, telling his students Newnan was about to explode as a film hub, Kennedy felt the surge of inspiration he needed.

“That confidence I received led me to believe I could direct a feature film,” he said. A r med w it h con f idence and a ton of ideas, Kennedy headed to New York where a family member had an apartment where he could live. Still, he had to work, in restaurants primarily, to survive in a cutthroat city. He’d work his day job then work on “The Projectionist” script, all at just 20 years of age. “He’s always been quite the go-getter, ever since he was young,” said his father, Danny Kennedy. “He’d be quoting lines from movies. And just the fact he went to school [and went to New York], he’s always been very independent. He’s not afraid of any challenges.” With a $30,000 budget of his own money, an extremely small amount for a film, Kennedy was prepared to make “The Projectionist” all on his own. It’d be expensive, lowbudget and less than ideal quality, but it’d be the movie he wanted to make. T hen , a producer ca me along who liked Kennedy’s

Kennedy, page 3

Pork Chop Noodle Soup

(Family Features) “If I wasn’t a BBQ expert, I’d be cooking soups like this one all day long,” said Chef Ray Lampe, BBQ expert and author of the just-released cookbook, “Pork Chop.” He’s referring to his modern interpretation of a classic comfort food dish, Pork Chop Noodle Soup - a dish he says is “a better cure for the common cold,” filled with chunks of juicy, perfectly seasoned pork as well as carrots, celery, a blend of savory herbs and tender rotini pasta.

Flavors that take you back Like many feel-good foods have the tendency to do, Chef Lampe’s pork chop soup recipe takes him back to his youth, when “soup day” was an extra-special time for his family. “Anytime my mom took

the big pot out of the cabinet and got all the different ingredients ready, we knew it was going to be a good day,” he said. “Today, when I get a craving for my mom’s cooking, I often add something that makes it all-around heartier and tastier - like bone-in ribeye pork chops. The hardest part is not eating the chops before the soup is ready.”

Warm, comforting dishes After simmering all day on the stove, a bowl of Chef La mpe’s soot h i ng, hea r twarming, pork-f illed soup is the perfect complement to a grilled Swiss cheese sandwich or a fresh salad whether you’re feeling under the weather or just craving a little pick-me-up. Remember, for juicy and tender chops as an ingredi-

ent or center-of-the-plate star, cook to an internal temperature between 145°F (medium rare), followed by a three-minute rest and 160∞F (medium), using a digital thermometer to ensure accuracy. For more inspiration on giving comfort food favorites past and present a fresh twist with pork, download the National Pork Board’s f ree “Cook i ng For Comfort” eCookbook at www. PorkBeinspired.com/ cookingforcomfort.

Short on time? Ita l i a n-St yle Green s & Bea ns Soup is a shortcut that you will turn to again and again. This hearty, rustic bean soup with homemade from-scratch flavor can be on the table in about 20 minutes. This quick, but satisfying soup recipe can be found with Pork Chop Noodle Soup on page 3.


4 Steak 6 $ 42CROSSWORD ¢ $ 04 ¢ $ 24 $ 15 ¢ 4 95 Broil 4 Swiss97 Steak 4 7 London93 U.S.D.A. Select Beef

Fresh Lean

10 Pk., .73 oz. Milk Chocolate Original or W/Marshmallows 2 MyConnection   |  Wednesday, February 5, 2014

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McRitchie-Hollis Museum February 5 - May 1 10 a.m. - noon, 1 p.m. - 3 p.m, Tuesday through Saturday

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1

Center Cut Loin

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The Centre for Performing and Visual Arts February 6 7:00 p.m.

Pork Chops...........

National Players, America’s longest running touring company performs Shakespeare’s twisted tale of Macbeth. The story examines the brutal consequences of unchecked ambition. Tickets for the performance cost $10 and may be purchased online at The Centre’s website

Center Cut Loin

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Weather Connection COWETA AND SURROUNDING AREA

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Squash

1 66 1

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U.S.D.A.Inspected, Inspected,Any AnySize SizePackage Package U.S.D.A.

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page 5

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48° 27°

delivered free

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SUNDAY

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28 oz. Original Meatballs, 20 oz. Breaded Mushrooms or Toasted QUALITY 12.01-33.5 oz. Ravioli, 26 oz. Mozzarella Cheese Sticks Asst. Flavor or 24.75 oz. Stuffed Jalapeno Poppers 16 oz. Culinary Spaghetti, Thin Spaghetti or Circle Farm Rich * Elbow Macaroni

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Feb. 6-9

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$ 99

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$ 39

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86

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93

27 $ 78 2 Crab Meat

1

1 95

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$ 75 Activia

$ 99

Granulated Bowl Sugar Margarine

Info: 770-251-0207 www.newnancowetahistorical society.com

2

$ 45

Pork

Pork Chops.............

The first exhbit at the McRitchieHollis Museum, “Victory at all Costs,” interprets life from the Coweta home front during World War II. Learn how families and businesses alike changed during wartime with locally donated and loaned objects.

4 County offering¢ $ 23

...

$ 95 ¢ 15 Danish Ribs........... 19

$ 18 $

Boneless Sirloin Tip Roast

......

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$ 75

Activia Yogurt

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victory at all costs

Wedne sday, Januar

..............

2 Smoked Sausage $495 Breakfast Ham $313 $ 64 6 Smoked Sausage $199 Smoked Sausage $283

Quarterloin

Info: 770-253-3625 www.cowetapubliclibrary.org

$

lb.

U.S.D.A. Select Beef

Boneless

lb.

$ 17

169

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Wednesday, February 5, 2014   |  MyConnection 3

Community/Recipe Connection

new

Continued from page 1

and more items over the next few weeks, like a juice bar and a wider lunch menu. The tea aspect was a hit with Hope Thamert, another lady in the Bible study group. “I like the new name, The Leaf and Bean. I’m a tea drinker, so it’s very inclusive. And I’m just glad it’s reopened. This is just a great place to sit and talk,” said Thamert. McWilliams, who grew up in Jackson, knows the importance of a coffee shop in downtown Newnan — for coffee, but also for healthy food and drink options she feels is lacking in the area. “We want to be that community hangout place,” said McWilliams. “We want every-

body to come hang out here, feel comfortable and be at home. I’ve been here about 10 years, and I love being at the square. Growing up, that was the place to be, that was all that existed. It’s great getting to know the people here [on the square].” “I love the downtown,” said Chris Salter of her Bible study group. “I like places we can frequent and enjoy, like this coffee shop, because all live in different parts of the city.” “The coffee shop is a quaint amenity to the Court Square,” added Nell Hyatt. Linda Daugherty enjoys the comforts of being able to sit and talk with her friends and not feel pressured by an impatient staff. “I like the fact we can arrange the table to accommodate the group we have and they don’t kick us out,” joked Daugherty.

Courtesy of Chef Ray Lampe, Dr. BBQ, from his cookbook “Pork Chop” (2013, Chronicle Books)

Yield: 8-10 servings 3 ribeye pork chops, bone-in, about 3/4-inch thick Salt and pepper 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 2 cups chicken broth or pork stock 4 cups unsalted vegetable broth 1 red onion, chopped 4 carrots, chopped 2 large celery sticks, chopped 2 garlic cloves, crushed 1 teaspoon dried thyme 1/2 teaspoon dried basil 1 cup dried rotini pasta Season pork chops with salt and pepper. Heat oil in Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add chops and cook for about 4 minutes, until golden brown. Flip and cook for 4 minutes more, until golden brown. Transfer chops to plate and set aside. Pour half of chicken broth into pot, scraping all browned bits from bottom. Add remaining chicken broth, vegetable broth, onion, carrots, celery and garlic. Mix well and bring to a simmer. Add 1 quart water, thyme, basil, 2 teaspoons salt and 1 teaspoon pepper. Mix well and bring to a simmer. Add chops back to pot and return to a simmer. Reduce heat and simmer for 90 minutes, stirring occasionally, being careful not to break up chops. Transfer chops to plate, trying not to break them up. Set aside to cool. Raise heat and bring soup to a boil. Add pasta and cook for about 12 minutes, until tender. When chops are cool, pull them apart, discarding all bones and fat. Add meat back to soup and stir well. Taste for salt and pepper, and add if needed, before serving.

kennedy Continued from page 1

much he offered to finance the project in an effort to give “The Projectionist” a bigger budget, legitimate actors and higher quality cinematography. Like the thousands of screenwriters trying to make a name for themselves in Hollywood, this was “the big break.” But Kennedy wasn’t satisfied with just signing over his script for a check to cash. Kennedy offered his script only if he was the director, something he had never done before. D e spite u nder st a nd a ble skepticism from the producers, Kennedy’s confidence and desirable script landed him the biggest gig of his life. “It was huge for a 21-yearold kid to direct his own film,” Kennedy said. “We shot for 35 days on a great camera that we had no business having access to. The movie ended up turning out even better than we expected, and we had high hopes for it from the start.” Kennedy knew optioning off his script early on could put him in a box making it even harder to ever break into directing. Despite his request, he knew the time to strike was right then, to prove to everyone he could wear both hats. “It’s like trying to get a credit card when you’re young, it’s catch-22,” Kennedy said. “You need a credit card to build credit but you have to have credit to get a credit card. It’s the same way with directing a film, but I was fortunate enough to be able to prove I could direct a film. I had something somebody ultimately wanted and that was a script. And people really responded to it.” ���I just wanted to tell an interesting story about a soldier with PTSD, and I successfully fooled a lot of people into thinking I could do something that was definitely a gamble,” joked Kennedy. “It worked, though, and me and my producer can laugh about it now.” “We’re very proud of Ryan. It’s amazing the endeavor he took on for this movie, as a writer and a director. It really is amazing,” said Danny Kennedy. “There’s always been something special about him, though. For Christmas, we’d buy h i m bo ok s on mov ie making. “He’s a very bright guy,” he added. “There’s not a topic he can’t talk about. I know he’s our son, but sometimes as parents, we go to him for advice.” Kennedy won’t brag but he’s aware of his unique place in the movie world. Oscar-nominated directors like Christopher Nola n (“ T he Da rk Knight” trilogy) and Darren A ronofsk y (“Black Swa n”) started making do-it-yourself movies in their late 20s on an even lower budget than Kennedy. For Kennedy, he hopes his career trajectory points in the same direction as those esteemed directors. There’s reason to believe he’ll reach that point, if releasing a movie at age 24 isn’t enough. Kennedy isn’t a flash in the pan with a gimmick. He draws from prominent American director Paul Thomas Anderson and foreign f ilm

Pork Chop Noodle Soup

Italian-Style Greens & Beans Soup Preparation Time: 10 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes Servings: 3 to 4 1/2 cup chopped onion 1/2 cup crumbled Italian sausage 1 teaspoon minced garlic 3/4 teaspoon Italian seasoning blend 1 can (14.5 ounces) reduced-sodium, fat free chicken broth 1 can (15 ounces) READ Greens & Beans with Sausage 1/4 cup finely chopped red bell pepper 1/2 cup thinly sliced kale or spinach (packed) Shredded Parmesan cheese (optional) 1. Cook onion, sausage, garlic and Italian seasoning in large nonstick saucepan over medium heat until sausage is completely cooked, about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. 2. Add broth, Greens & Beans and red pepper; simmer 3 minutes. Stir in kale. Sprinkle with cheese, if desired. Note: Recipe can be doubled.

Ryan Kennedy, who graduated from East Coweta in 2007, moved to New York after school to pursue a career in filmmaking.

and studies their form and the craft. Every script he begins work on, he searches first for the human element, he said. His next movie, for instance, will show Kennedy’s ambition for filmmaking. In six different languages and locations, the movie will focus on six lives impacted by the July 7, 2005, London bombings — something that hasn’t really been touched on in film yet. “ T he P rojec t ion i st ” h a s already established Kennedy, by clearing the massive hurdle of proving he can direct at such a young age. With a burgeoning career, he hopes to gain enough respect to base himself back in Georgia one day. “Being able to grow up in a town like [Newnan] was the best of both worlds,” Kennedy said. “I had a normal childhood away from the ha rd, thick skin of New York. But I also got exposure to the movie industry.” Kennedy is especially excited about Pinewood Studios opening in Fayette County, which he says will allow even the biggest Hollywood blockbuster to be made right here in the area. His father noted just how excited Kennedy is for Pinewood Studios, saying that when it opens up, “the sky is the limit.” “To be able to have t he opportunity to make films in my own backyard, to sleep in my own bed, that’s huge,” he added. “That’s a rare opportunity. It gives me the chance to have a family and have a normal life while pursuing movies.” *** “The Projectionist” is launching a 45-day limited release on Jan. 31 on www.theprojectionistmovie.com. The release will not only help finance the nationwide theatrical release, but a portion of the proceeds will be donated directly to The Wounded Warrior Project. Kennedy also hopes to bring “The Projectionist” to Newnan theaters this year. “Praise ye the Lord. Praise, O ye servants of the Lord. Praise the name of the Lord. Blessed be the name of the Lord from this time forth and for evermore. From the rising of the sun unto the going down of the same the Lord’s name is to be praised. The Lord is high above all nations, and His glory above the heavens.” Psalm 113:1-4

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4 MyConnection   |  Wednesday, February 5, 2014

Community Connection

What is important? To this day, I can recite the Quadratic Formula. I can do this thanks to Mrs. Brewer, my eighth-grade algebra teacher. She came up with a little tune and we would all stand up and sing the formula in class. “Negative b, plus or minus, the square root of … b squared minus 4ac, all over 2a .a .a” (we added the last two “a’s” for fun to make the song work. I know they aren’t part of the equation.) I can also, to this day, recite the slogan on a can of Budweiser — “This is the famous Budweiser beer. We know of no other brand produced by any other brewer which costs so much to brew and age. Our exclusive Beechwood Aging process produces a taste, a smoothness and a drinkability you will find in no other beer at any price.” I did not learn this in school, but rather from my fraternity pledge trainer. I have never used the quadratic formula si nce t hat eighth grade class. I no longer drink Budweiser. I bring this up because I came home the other day to a rather stressed out Eldest SON of Thunder, who was being quizzed by the Little Black Dress for an upcoming test. The subject matter of said test was the capitals of the 50 states. “Why do you have to know

this,” I asked. “ It ’s for a test ,” E ldest replied. “I understand that, but who cares? Just Google it for pete’s sake,” I said. Now, I know the capital of Maine is Augusta, which is somewhat interesting to me because I started my journalism career in Augusta, Georgia. I also know the capital of New York is not New York City, but rather Albany, which most people don’t realize. I have no idea what the capital of South Dakota is, nor do I care. Change that, South Dakota’s capital is Pierre. I Googled it. I, too, had to learn the state capitals in high school. Since then I have never shared that information on any resume. Nor have I ever asked any job applicant the capital of California (Sacramento, not Los Angeles as most think. And no, I did not look that one up. I remembered). So what? In today’s world, the entire vast knowledge of the world is available at our fingertips. Most kids today have smartphones and can answer any quest ion w it h i n seconds , depending on how strong their signal is. I hope after cramming to learn the state capitals, information that most likely will only be used again during a

JOHN WINTERS trivia game, we move on to more important skills. Things like knowing how to read and write. To this day I am amazed how many college graduates have no idea of the difference between their, there, they’re; its and it’s; cite, site, sight; and your and you’re. Not a big deal? Any employer worth his or her salt facing two equally skilled applicants is going to take the one who can spell — every time. Life skills are sorely lacking. Most young people have no idea how to do a personal budget or understand the dangers of credit cards. Their understanding of money is scary, and not in a good way. They have no concept of living within their means. I hope within the time spent learning the state capitals and other mundane information, schools will focus on helping students prepare for the real world and not Trivial Pursuit. And the capital of Arizona is? (John A. Winters is general manager of The Newnan Time s-He rald . Follow hi s adventures at justf lipthedog. com. You can reach him at john@newnan.com)

Highs and lows U.S. presidents are often remembered as much for their words as their deeds. Abraham Lincoln warned us that when electing leaders we should remember that “nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man’s character, give him power.” John F. Kennedy appealed for a renewal of patriotism with: “Ask not what your country can do for you. Ask what you can do for your country.” Richard Nixon said, “I am not a crook.” For months it seemed like B a r a c k O ba m a wou ld b e immortalized for promising, “If you like your doctor, you can keep your doctor.” But maybe not. He may become even more famous for saying marijuana is no more dangerous than alcohol. During an interview with The New Yorker Obama said, “A s h a s b e en wel l- do c u-

mented, I smoked pot as a kid, and I view it as a bad habit and a vice, not very different from the cigarettes that I smoked as a young person up through a big chunk of my adult life. I don’t think it is more dangerous than alcohol.” To his credit, the president did not glamorize or endorse pot use, saying, “Smoking marijuana is not something I encourage, and I’ve told my daughters I think it’s a bad idea, a waste of time, not very healthy.” T he W h ite House web site goes beyond “not very healthy,” saying: “The National Drug Control Policy’s official stance on marijuana is that it can cause permanent brain damage and carries more carcinogens than tobacco smoke.” Obama didn’t mention that. The president also pointed out that poor and minority marijuana offenders receive

ALEX mcrae

ha rsher sentences for pot crimes. The statistics bear him out. He said legalization would put an end to that form of institutional injustice. If so, that’s a good thing. Whether the crime is marijuana or murder, if the circumstances are the same, the guilty deserve identical punishment, no matter how poor the perp. Or how rich and famous. O.J. Simpson’s “not guilty” verdict on charges of killing his exwife comes to mind. On the down side, legalization of pot may harm the First Lady’s push for healthier eating. Colorado and Washington just legalized marijuana. Officials say the fastest-growing segment of marijuana users in Colorado don’t smoke weed,

find it  f irst

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HANDYMAN

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JEWELRY REPAIR

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The Newnan Times-Herald 16 Jefferson Street Newnan, GA 30263 770-253-1576 www.times-herald.com

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Free state parks guide now available Cabins, yurts, group getaways and a new state park at Lake Lanier are featured in a free “Guide to Georgia State Parks and Historic Sites” that is now available. With spring just around the corner, many Georgians are beginning to think ahead to warmer weather and weekend escapes. The newly published “2014 Guide to Georgia State Parks & Historic Sites” is a handy resource for planning a spring break, summer

864-7275 or stop by any Georgia State Park or State Historic Site. An online version can be found on GeorgiaStateParks. org. Additional park details, including events, rates, maps and photo galleries, can be found on GeorgiaStateParks. org. Outdoor enthusiasts and history buffs can keep up with the latest by signing up for the park system’s monthly e-newsletter at GeorgiaStateParks.org/e-news.

vacation or family reunion. The free booklet is filled with tips on the best hiking trails, fishing spots, wedding venues and accommodations. It also includes Georgia’s newest state park, Don Carter, which opened last yea r on La ke Lanier. Produced annually by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, the guide features colorful photos that make for a scenic “armchair tour” of the Peach State. For a free copy, call 1-800-

Pennies for Patients starts Feb. 10 Unity Elementary School in Luthersville will hold a Pennies For Patients fundraiser starting Feb. 10. “Pennies for Patients will begin Feb. 10 and run for two weeks until Friday, Feb. 21,” said Erika White, the school’s counselor. She said information about the project would go home with each student. A week of ac t iv it ies i s planned. “The class that raises the most money will receive a pizza party and will participate in Mohawks for a Mission. Everyone in the class will get to wear a mohawk at school,” she said. In addition, some school leaders “have agreed to kiss a pig if the school meets our goal,” White said. This year’s goal is $2,300. If

they eat it. Vendors can’t keep legal marijuana “edibles” on the shelves. Can an epidemic of “pot bellies” be far behind? The president’s marijuana remarks were labeled as everything from “courageous” to “stupid.” Time will tell. His remarks on another topic, however, can only be described as reprehensible. The subject was the September 11, 2012, terrorist attack on the U.S. Embassy in Benghazi, Libya, in which Ambassador Chris Stevens, embassy information officer Sean Smith and former Navy SEALs Tyrone Woods a nd Glen Doher t y

Pennies for Patients small donation box.

the goal is met, a schoolwide assembly will be held. The Leukemia and Lyphoma Society sponsors Pennies For Patients. Since 1994, millions of dollars have been raised in pennies and other spare change by more than 10 million elementary, middle and

high school students throughout the country. Prizes such as computers, electronics and sports equipment are presented to the top schools in each area. The Pennies for Patients campaign began in the society’s North Carolina Chapter.

were killed. It took over a year for the Obama administration to officially label the killers as terrorists. But Obama made it clear they weren’t in the same league as bin Laden’s global gang, calling the Benghazi attackers “jihadists who are engaged in various local power struggles and disputes, often sectarian.” The president also said, “The analogy we use around here sometimes, and I think is accurate, is if a jayvee (junior varsity) team puts on Lakers uniforms that doesn’t make them Kobe Bryant.”

Imagine how the families of the four dead felt when the president said their loved ones were killed by B-Team terrorists. At least the president didn’t call the deaths a secondstring sacrifice. Obama was right when he said that wearing a Lakers jersey doesn’t make someone Kobe Bryant. Someone should remind him that wearing the title of U.S. president doesn’t ma ke someone Abra ha m Lincoln. Sometimes, it doesn’t even make them presidential. Send your email comments to alexmmcrae@gmail.com

N E W N A N - C OW E TA C H A M B E R CHAMBER ANNUAL REPORT

2013

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Chamber Mission: To cham

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Wednesday, February 26, 2014 A link to the Annual Report will be provided to all Chamber members PLUS this section will also be published online for an entire year at times-herald.com with over 1.4 million page views per month! Extra copies will also be given to the Chamber. All links in your print ad will be clickable on the web edition.

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Wednesday, February 5, 2014   |  MyConnection 5

Community Connection

Regions Bank opens riding forward scholarships across 16 states

The third block of CEC’s Golden Hammer Award Competition was Construction or Carpentry 1. From left, Josh Morse, Bradley Cobb; Rebecca Crocker and Bernard Williams at saw horse; in back, Josh Skoworn; far right, Trevor Ray.

CEC Golden Hammer Award recognizes first female winner By Celia Shortt celia@newnan.com

The Central Educational Center recently hosted its bi-annual Golden Hammer Awards Competition for students in its construction program, and for the first time one of the winners is a girl. “Sometimes the best man for the job is a woman,” said winner Rebecca Crocker. Crocker won the third block of the competition, Carpentry I. In addition to this competition she has also been recognized as the sixth consecutive SKILLS USA Regional Electrical Wiring Winner and participated in last year’s state event. Later this month, she will compete in the regional competition. According to CEC Cons t r u c t i o n D i r e c t o r To m Ba rnett, Crocker is being recruited by the Atlanta Electrical Contractors Association for entry into the union training program. “Ladies tend to be a lot more detail-oriented, better organized, etc., and companies are looking for those non-traditional employees just as … men in nursing or some other typically female dominated occupation,” he said. “We normally don’t have a lot of girls, however when we do, they are really interested and they tend

to do well.” T he Golden Ha m mer Awards is a competition that begins with interactive training on construction safety, tool identification, careers, construction fasteners, and processes. “Believe it or not there is some skill involved in driving a nail,” said Barnett. “Participants are required to wear necessary PPE or Personal Protection Equipment which at the minimum are approved safety glasses. The final part is a competition between team members to determine the best and fastest nail driver of the group.” The competition is divided into four different blocks — Fu nda menta ls of Constr uction, Eight h Grade Academy, Carpentry I, and Fundamentals. The competition is between team members to achieve first place for each block. It is open to students in the CEC construction program. “Team members (students) are very competitive, and you would be surprised how much pride team members take in being recognized,” said Barnett. “Even more surprising is when you see them on the street years later; they will remind you that they remember the competition, espe-

cially if they won they will remind you.” “It is widely known among the student population and usually from day one they ask when the ‘Golden Hammer Award’ competition will take place,” he added. The competition is at the start of every semester and also when hosting the “Habitat for Humanity Homeowner Training.” The competition recognizes first place and a runner up for each block. They are recognized by the school and awarded a certif icate. The winners and runnerups in January’s Golden Hamm e r Aw a rd C om p e t it ion include: First block - Fundamentals of Construction • First place - Jacob McKensie • Runner up - Cody Landry Second block - Eighth Grade Academy • First place - Avery Rush • Runner up - Noah Adams

Regions Bank is offering high school seniors and college freshman, sophomores, and juniors an opportunity to celebrate the contributions of African-Americans, and earn money for college. Regions will award a total of 32 Regions R iding Forward® Scholarships across the 16 states served by the company. The selection is based on a competitive essay contest: High School seniors may apply for a $5,000 scholarship based on an essay about an African-American who has inspired them. College freshman, sophomores and juniors are eligible for a $2,500 scholarship based on an essay about an AfricanAmerican who has inspired them and influenced their col-

on our young people and their perspectives on Black History,” said Lajuana Bradford, head of Regions Corporate Social Responsibility. Appl ic at ion s a re b ei n g accepted until February 27. Awards will be announced in April. For details, visit www. regions.com/ridingforward. For questions about the application or submission process, contact ISTS Customer Care at 855-670-ISTS (4787) or via email at contactus@applyists.com. Hours are Monday Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. central time. I n for m at ion rega rd i ng Regions Financial Corporation and its full line of products and services can be found at www.regions.com.

lege career. Additional entry details, official rules and complete eligibility requirements are available on the campaign’s website: regions.com/ridingforward. To d a t e , R e g i o n s h a s awarded 57 scholarships to high school and college students totaling nearly $250,000. The Riding Forward Schola rsh ip is pa r t of a la rger Regions Bank campaign to celebrate Black History Month. In addition to the scholarship program, Regions has created an online learning module about African-American History – “306: African-American History ” – available to select high schools. The online module was developed by Everfi. “The Riding Forward program allows us to shine a light

Broadway star to guest direct UWG’s ‘Snapshot’ production Actor and guest lecturer Bill Bowers returned to the University of West Georgia in Carrollton on Jan. 6 for a fiveweek residency. During his residency, Bowers is directing the upcoming UWG Theatre production of “Snapshot,” a dramatic anthology created for the Actors Theatre of Louisville Humana Festival of New Plays. “Snapshot” is a series of scenes based on the famous Mo u nt R u s h m ore , S o ut h Dakota, 1969 photo by Lee Friedlander. The show will run Feb. 12-16 at the Townsend Center for Performing Arts. This will be the second show Bowers has directed at UWG. In 2008, Bowers directed a rambunctious production of Moliere’s Scapin. “This fresh, utterly original and brilliantly skilled performer evokes new depths from his art form,” said play-

formed on Broadway as Zazu in Disney’s “The Lion King” and Leggett in “The Scarlet Pimpernel,” among other roles. Off broadway, he has also written and performed in his own original shows, “It Goes Without Saying,” “Beyond Words” and “Under a Montana Moon,” to critical acclaim. Last summer, Bowers received five-star reviews for his performances in the Edinburgh Fringe, the world’s largest theater festival. Bowers holds an MFA from Rutgers University and an Honorary Doctorate of Fine Arts from Rocky Mountain College, where he received his undergraduate degree. He has presented master classes, residencies and performances at UWG, Harvard, Princeton, New York University, UCLA and numerous other major professional actor training programs.

In addition to many years of experience as an actor and mime, Bowers has performed in all 50 states, in Canada and in Europe.

wright John Pielemeier. “In fact, he enlarges it. The heights he reaches bring us into different and unexpected worlds.” In addition to many years of experience as an actor and mime, Bowers has performed in all 50 states, in Canada and in Europe. Bowers has per-

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FamilySTRONG conference promotes healthy parenting

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Convenience store busted for gambling

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Patients face coverage deadline

Piedmont Healthcare working to resolve contract dispute with Aetna/Coventry By Clay Neely clay@newnan.com

a contract dispute between P ie d mont He a lt hc a re a nd aetna /Coventr y i nsura nce might leave Coweta County area policyholders searching for an alternative to their current physicians and hospitals

Bill would legalize sale of raw milk for human consumption

by Feb. 1 if a resolution is not reached. last week, local customers of aetna/Coventry received a letter in the mail from Gregory Hurst, CeO of Piedmont Healthcare, explaining that the two companies have been in negotiations over a contract dispute that is currently set to

expire on Jan. 31. accord i ng to Hu rst , t he agreement would include not only Piedmont Fayette Hospital and Piedmont Newnan Hospital, but also more than 1,000 physicians who make up the Piedmont Physicians Group, Piedmont Heart Institute Physicians and Piedmont Clinic.

“We are optimistic about completing negotiations and reaching agreement within the next few weeks,” said Hurst in a press release. “However, if the contract expires, aetna/ Coventry will be forcing HMO members to f ind new doctors, and both HMO and PPO patients with aetna/Coventry

may incur higher out-of-pocket costs for care they receive at Piedmont hospitals and with Piedmont physicians as out-ofnetwork providers, beginning February 1.” “While there is no cause for great alarm at the time, it is important that you have the facts,” continued Hurst. “We

1 wednesday

diSpUTE, page 2

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014

Dog fighting sting nets 34 arrestsPatients in face coverage deadline Piedmont Healthcare working to resolve contract dispute with Aetna/Coventry Meriwether

TRAiNWRECK

NEWNAN, GA • COWETA COUNTY'S NEWS SOURCE • ISSUE 16 • 1 SEctIoN, 14 PAGES • 50 cENtS

FamilySTRONG conference promotes healthy parenting

County teams take on region opponents

See page 6

By SaraH Fay CaMPBell sarah@newnan.com

raw milk — milk that is unpasteurized and non-homogenized — is prized for the antibodies, probiotics and enzymes it contains, and for its delicious taste. raw cow and goat milk have become popular as health foods for those seeking a natural diet, and small farmers across Georgia produce and sell raw milk to eager customers. But the state of Georgia doesn’t allow the sale of raw milk for human consumption. To get around that, raw milk producers must label their milk fo r “ p e t u s e only.” a n e w bi l l introduced i n t he G e orgia legislature aims to change that. State rep. Stover David Stover, r-Palmetto, is one of many co-sponsors of House Bill 718, which would allow the sale of “ungraded raw milk” as long as the milk is prominently labeled as such. “It’s ludicrous to think we can’t buy that product for human consumption,” Stover said. He said he is not a milk drinker, but he is "a person who believes in organic foods and natural foods. That is just where I stand. I feel it is healthier for you.” If you research the pasteurization process, “it won’t make you feel good about what you are drinking,” Stover said. “This is something people have been asking me for.” rep. Scot Turner is the bill’s main sponsor. Georgia is currently one of 17 states that forbid the sale of raw milk for human consumption. It is one of only four that allow the sale for pet food. Only 12 states allow the retail sale of raw milk, with some restrictions. Some other states allow on-farm sales. Though natural food proponents rave about raw milk, government officials decry it as dangerous. according to the federal Centers for Disease Control, from 1998 to 2011, there were 148 separate outbreaks related to consumption of raw milk or raw milk products reported to the CDC. These resulted in 2,384 illnesses, 284 hospitalizations and two deaths. Between 1993 and 2006, there were a total of 121 dairy-related disease outbreaks reported to the CDC. Of those, 60 percent (73 outbreaks) were related to

are working diligently to renegotiate this contract on behalf of our five hospitals and physicians without creating undue a n x iet y or wor r y for ou r patients.” according to aetna/Coventry public relations spokesman

By Clay Neely by Feb. 1 if a resolution is not clay@newnan.com reached. last week, local customers a contract dispute between of aetna/Coventry received a P ie d mont He a lt hc a re a nd letter in the mail from Gregaetna /Coventr y i nsura nce ory Hurst, CeO of Piedmont might leave Coweta County Healthcare, explaining that area policyholders searching the two companies have been in negotiations over a contract dispute that is currently set to

Coweta officials involved in operation By WeS Mayer

news@newnan.com

Photo by JeffRey leo

The tractor trailer, filled with hay, was cut in half by the train, and there were no injuries.

Train splits hay truck in half at Moreland rail crossing By WeS Mayer news@newnan.com

a train cut through a tractor-trailer rig stuck at an intersection in Moreland in south Coweta County on Tuesday, sending hay flying and sparking a dangerous materials threat. The truck, carrying a load of hay, was stuck on the tracks facing the highway at the intersection of Dingler road and U.S. Highway 29 in Moreland when a train rolled t h rough t he i ntersection and split the trailer in half. according to initial information from photographer Jeffrey leo of The Newnan Times-Herald after speaking with officials at the scene, the driver of the truck had exited the cab prior to the accident, and there were no injuries. The train, however, was

What is described as a large dog fighting operation in Meriwether County was put to an end by multiple law enforcement agencies late Sat u rday — with help from Coweta authorities. around 10:30 p.m., authorities w it h t he Meriwet her C o u n t y S h e r i f f ’s O f f i c e , C owe t a C o u n t y S h e r i f f ’s Office, Georgia Department of Natural resources, Woodbury Police Department, Greenville Police Department, Spalding County Sheriff ’s Office and animal control converged on a suspected organized dog fighting event on Happy Hollow Drive off Highway 362, according to a press release from the Meriwether County Sheriff’s Office. The Coweta Sheriff’s Office and DNr provided helicopter air support for the raid. “O u r n a rcot ics u n it h a s worked tirelessly on gathering intelligence on the event, and at a moment’s notice, they ‘rallied up’ and met at the training center where a briefing was conducted,” according to Meriwether County Sheriff Chuck Smith in the press release. Sm it h sa id off icers f i rst formed a perimeter around the event, then helicopters shined spotlights on the participants and spectators — who f led and ran into the arms of waiting authorities. Suspects who attempted to hide in bushes were located using the Coweta County helicopter’s FlIr — forward looking infrared —

for an alternative their curcameras, said lt. Col. to Jimmy rent physicians and hospitals yarbrough with the sheriff’s office. a total of 34 people were taken into custody. authorities found a large fighting pit with an injured and bleeding female pit bull terrier inside, the Meriwether sheriff said. animal Control Officer Beth Miller was able to take the injured dog and another into protective custody. authoritiesByalso more SaraHseized Fay CaMPBell than $28,000sarah@newnan.com in cash, 26 vehicles of thoseraw arrested, iveis milk — milk fthat unpasteurized and non-homogguns, two generators, lightenized — is prized for the antibodies, probiotics and enzymes ing equipment, the fighting pit it contains, and for its delicious and a catering truck, the shertaste. raw cow and goat milk have iff said. a large catering truck become popular as health foods for those Wings seeking a natural diet, ca lled express was and small farmers across Georserving friedgiachicken fish produce andand sell raw milk to eager customers. to those gathered atstate theofevent, But the Georgia doesn’t allow the sale of raw Smith said. milk for human consumption. To get raw milk “according toaround FBIthat, intelliproducers must gence, one of the offenders is label their milk fo r “ p e t u s e wanted by U.S. Marshals on only.” a ne w bi l l a federal indictment accusing introduced him of dog fighting,”i naccordt he G e orgia legislature i ng to Sm it h . “Oneaims ofto change t he that. seized guns was reported stoState rep. Stover David Stover, len to the Manchester Police r-Palmetto, is Department.”one of many co-sponsors of House Bill 718, which would “I am saddened by what I allow the sale of “ungraded raw milk” scene,” as long as thethe milk saw at this crime is prominently labeled as such. sheriff said. “It’s ludicrous to think we can’t buy that product for “However,human I amconsumption,” very proud Stover said. He said he is not a milk of all these drinker, law enforcement but he is "a person who believes in organic We foods officers that were involved. and natural foods. That is just know in the dog world, wherefighting I stand. I feel it is healthfor you.” these events ier carry the highest If you research the pasteuriprocess, “it won’t make potential of zation being extremely you feel good about what you dangerous. are alldrinking,” officers Stoverdissaid. “This is something people have played the highest level been asking me for.”of prorep. Scot Turner is the bill’s fessionalismmain while showing sponsor. is currently one ‘armed’ force Georgia to minimize theof

Bill would legalize sale of raw milk for human consumption

Convenience store busted for gambling

See page 8

expire on Jan. 31. accord i ng to Hu rst , t he agreement would include not only Piedmont Fayette Hospital and Piedmont Newnan Hospital, but also more than 1,000 physicians who make up the Piedmont Physicians Group, Piedmont Heart Institute Physicians and Piedmont Clinic.

“We are optimistic about completing negotiations and reaching agreement within the next few weeks,” said Hurst in a press release. “However, if the contract expires, aetna/ Coventry will be forcing HMO members to f ind new doctors, and both HMO and PPO patients with aetna/Coventry

See page 3

may incur higher out-of-pocket are working diligently to renecosts for care they receive at gotiate this contract on behalf Piedmont hospitals and with of our five hospitals and physiPiedmont physicians as out-of- cians without creating undue network providers, beginning a n x iet y or wor r y for ou r patients.” February 1.” according to aetna/Coven“While there is no cause for great alarm at the time, it try public relations spokesman is important that you have the diSpUTE, page 2 facts,” continued Hurst. “We

Dog fighting sting nets 34 arrests in Meriwether

TRAiNWRECK

Coweta officials involved in operation By WeS Mayer

news@newnan.com

Photo by JeffRey leo

The tractor trailer, filled with hay, was cut in half by the train, and there were no injuries.

Train splits hay truck in half at Moreland rail crossing

What is described as a large dog fighting operation in Meriwether County was put to an end by multiple law enforcement agencies late Sat u rday — with help from Coweta authorities. around 10:30 p.m., authorities w it h t he Meriwet her C o u n t y S h e r i f f ’s O f f i c e , C owe t a C o u n t y S h e r i f f ’s Office, Georgia Department of Natural resources, Woodbury Police Department, Greenville Police Department, Spalding County Sheriff ’s Office and animal control converged on a suspected organized dog fighting event on Happy Hollow Drive off Highway 362, according to a press release from the Meriwether County Sheriff’s Office. The Coweta Sheriff’s Office and DNr provided helicopter air support for the raid. “O u r n a rcot ics u n it h a s worked tirelessly on gathering intelligence on the event, and at a moment’s notice, they ‘rallied up’ and met at the training center where a briefing was conducted,” according to Meriwether County Sheriff Chuck Smith in the press release. Sm it h sa id off icers f i rst formed a perimeter around the event, then helicopters shined spotlights on the participants and spectators — who f led and ran into the arms of waiting authorities. Suspects who attempted to hide in bushes were located using the Coweta County helicopter’s FlIr — forward looking infrared —

cameras, said lt. Col. Jimmy yarbrough with the sheriff’s office. a total of 34 people were taken into custody. authorities found a large fighting pit with an injured and bleeding female pit bull terrier inside, the Meriwether sheriff said. animal Control Officer Beth Miller was able to take the injured dog and another into protective custody. authorities also seized more than $28,000 in cash, 26 vehicles of those arrested, f ive guns, two generators, lighting equipment, the fighting pit and a catering truck, the sheriff said. a large catering truck ca lled express Wings was serving fried chicken and fish to those gathered at the event, Smith said. “according to FBI intelligence, one of the offenders is wanted by U.S. Marshals on a federal indictment accusing him of dog fighting,” accordi ng to Sm it h . “One of t he seized guns was reported stolen to the Manchester Police Department.” “I am saddened by what I saw at this crime scene,” the sheriff said. “However, I am very proud of all these law enforcement officers that were involved. We know in the dog fighting world, these events carry the highest potential of being extremely dangerous. all officers displayed the highest level of professionalism while showing ‘armed’ force to minimize the

Your greatest access to Newnan and Coweta County! A firefighter walks beside a train tanker filled with a sodium hydroxide solution checking for leaks after it was involved in a trainversus-truck accident.

pulling six or seven tanker cars containing a dangerous sodium hydroxide solution, so the Coweta County Fire Department’s hazardous materials truck was dispatched to the scene to check

for possible leaks. Fortunately, no leaks were found, officials said. For more on this story, look in Thursday’s print and digital edition of The Newnan Times-Herald.

Cowetans volunteer on MLK Jr. Day

You’ll love The Newnan Times-Herald and times-herald.com. All the information you need is at your fingertips... no need to go anywhere else! clay@newnan.com

“look at all these awesome people,” said One roof executive Director Derenda rowe. “They’re like ants,” she said, motioning toward the volunteers who hurried about, carrying boxes and sorting food at the One roof alliance outreach. In observance of Dr. Martin luther King Jr. Day on Monday, Georgia Power employees along with many other volunteers donated their time sorting food for Coweta Community Food Pantry at Newnan's One roof ecumenical alliance Outreach on Temple avenue. Plant yates Citizens of Georgia Power employees — as well as employees from around the company's Metro South region — used Monday, a company holiday, for volunteer service and community enhancement.

vOLUNTEERS, page 2

STOvER, page 2

INSIDE

Community Forum ........4 Sports ............................... 8 Obituaries ..................... 5 Comics .....................10, 11 Healthy Living ................6 Classifieds ..................... 13

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The second suspect believed to be involved in a recent Newnan shooting turned himself in at the Coweta County Jail. Taurean raven Morris, 19, surrendered to authorities on Jan. 15 and was charged with aggravated assault and was being held at the jail without bail. The other suspect Dekarri Marveno ruffin, 21, is also being held in the county jail without bond. The shooting occurred the night of Jan. 8 in an apartment on Christian

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SUSpECT, page 2

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STOvER, page 2

for possible leaks. Fortunately, no leaks were found, officials said. For more on this story, look in Thursday’s print and digital edition of The Newnan Times-Herald.

Cowetans volunteer on MLK Jr. Day

INSIDE The second suspect believed to be Community Forum ........4 Sports ............................... 8 involved in a recent Newnan shootObituaries ..................... 5 Comics .....................10, 11 Healthy Living ................6 Classifieds ..................... 13 ing turned himself in at the Coweta County Jail. Taurean raven Morris, 19, surrendered to authorities on Jan. 15 and was charged with aggravated assault and was being held at the jail without bail. The other suspect Dekarri Marveno ruffin, 21, is also being held in the county jail without bond. The shooting occurred the night of Jan. 8 in an apartment on Christian

SUSpECT, page 2

outreach on Monday.

TODAY

41° | 26°

pulling six or seven tanker cars containing a dangerous sodium hydroxide solution, so the Coweta County Fire Department’s hazardous materials truck was dispatched to the scene to check

“look at all these awesome people,” said One roof executive Director Derenda rowe. “They’re like ants,” she said, motioning toward the volunteers who hurried about, carrying boxes and sorting food at the One roof alliance outreach. In observance of Dr. Martin luther King Jr. Day on Monday, Georgia Power employees along with many other volunteers donated their time sorting food for Coweta Community Food Pantry at Newnan's One roof ecumenical alliance Outreach on Temple avenue. Plant yates Citizens of Georgia Power employees — as well as employees from around the company's Metro South region — used Monday, a company holiday, for volunteer service and community enhancement.

dOgS, page 2

news@newnan.com

A firefighter walks beside a train tanker filled with a sodium hydroxide solution checking for leaks after it was involved in a trainversus-truck accident.

17 states that forbid the sale of raw milk for human consumption. It is one of only four that allow the sale for pet food. Only 12 states allow the retail sale of raw milk, with some restrictions. Some other states allow on-farm sales. Though natural food proponents rave about raw milk, government officials decry it as dangerous. according to the federal Centers for Disease Control, from 1998 to 2011, there were 148 separate outbreaks related to consumption of raw milk or raw milk products reported to the CDC. These resulted in 2,384 illnesses, 284 hospitalizations and two deaths. Between 1993 and 2006, there were a total of 121 dairy-related disease outbreaks reported to the CDC. Of those, 60 percent (73 outbreaks) were related to

2nd shooting suspect in custody

By Clay Neely

By WeS Mayer

news@newnan.com

a train cut through a tractor-trailer rig stuck at an intersection in Moreland in south Coweta County on Tuesday, sending hay flying and sparking a dangerous materials threat. The truck, carrying a load of hay, was stuck on the tracks facing the highway at the intersection of Dingler road and U.S. Highway 29 in Moreland when a train rolled t h rough t he i ntersection and split the trailer in half. according to initial information from photographer Jeffrey leo of The Newnan Times-Herald after speaking with officials at the scene, the driver of the truck had exited the cab prior to the accident, and there were no injuries. The train, however, was

Cool and sunny

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Yesterday (as of 7 p.m.) 0.00 Monthly total 2.86 Year-to-date 2.86

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6 MyConnection   |  Wednesday, February 5, 2014

Community Connection

Newnan-Coweta Chamber luncheon postponed

New Year brings reinstatement influx at Dept. of Driver Services

The Newnan-Coweta Chamber of Commerce annual meeting luncheon is rescheduled due to this week’s winter weather. The new date will be March 5, said Candace Boothby, Chamber president and CEO on Wednesday. “We have 300 people expected to attend this year’s meeting and are concerned about everyone’s safety,” added outgoing Chamber Chairman Dean Jackson of the decision to reschedule. The “Magic of Prosperity” annual meeting will be at the Newnan Centre with networking at 10:30 a.m. and the program at 11:15. The event was originally scheduled for today, featuring Atlanta magician, mentalist and speaker Joe Turner. The meeting will also include awards and the passing of the gavel to next year’s chairman. Tickets are $50. Tables of 10 are $500. For more information or to make reservations, visit www.newnancowetachamber.org, e-mail info@newnancowetachamber.org or call 770-253-2270.

A new year and income tax season brings a seasonal influx of customers needing to reinstate their driving privileges at Georgia’s Department of Driver Services offices. DDS Com m i s sioner Rob Mikell reminds customers of a way to save valuable time — the agency’s new Online License Reinstatement Services available at www.dds.ga.gov. More than 7,000 customers have utilized the service since it was unveiled. “A high priority has been to improve the reinstatement process, which is the most timeconsuming transaction,” said Commissioner Mikell. “Having customers choose to reinstate and request a free replacement license online will directly affect the wait times at DDS customer service centers.”

Solution to puzzle on page 2

Online License Reinstatement enables customers to check their driving reinstatement eligibility, view, print or email a list of their specific reinstatement requirements, pay fees and reinstate driving privileges online — all without a visit or telephone call to DDS. A recent enhancement to this program now enables eligible customers to request that a free replacement of their original license be mailed directly to them. The license will be mailed within 7-10 business days, eliminating the need to visit the DDS in person. To access the new reinstatement services, visit the DDS website at www.dds.ga.gov or at https://online.dds.ga.gov/onlineservices/account/login.aspx.

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336

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CDL training available. Train to become a MedC h o o s e c o m p a n y ical Office Assistant. No driver, owner operator, experience needed! lease operator, or lease Online training at SC trainer. gets you job ready! HS 877-369-6712 Diploma/GED & PC/Inwww.CentralTruckternet Needed! DrivingJobs.com

1-888-407-7162

TO OUR READERS All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at this number: 1-800-669-9777. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800927-9275.

High-Speed Internet

is now available where you live for only $39.99 per mo. New Superfast Satellite Internet with speeds up to 15 Mbps! Ask about discounts for DishNetwork or DirecTv customers! We also now offer phone service as low as $19.99 per mo. Call Today!

1-800-283-1057

EXPERIENCED WRITER

Selected applicant will be responsible for the timely and accurate delivery of payroll and related client service, including recordkeeping and reporting. Required Licensure: Certified Payroll Professional, American Payroll Association preferred. Minimum Education: Bachelor of Business Administration Minimum Experience: Five years

Sudoku Solution

2 BR, 2 Bath

Powers Crossroads area. 14x70. Range, refrigerator, Central H/A. $125 / week, $550 move in

Mobile Homes For Rent

For our expanding department. Home-based or freelance writers do not need to apply. Writer will work in our Peachtree City office as part of a project team to write funto-read health, finance, and household tips self-help books for the senior consumer market. Writer must be able to adapt their writing style to match FC&A’s conversational writing style. Applicant must have a proven track record as a professional writer; a college degree in journalism or related field; and excellent research, interviewing, and reporting skills. Applicant must be computer literate and have mastered online research. Applicant must be willing to take a lengthy writing test at our office. If you would enjoy working in a deadline-sensitive, wholesome, and non-smoking environment and meet the qualifications, call Barbara at 770-487-6307 or fax resume and writing sample to her at 770-631-4357

Bargain Buys

427

Love Seat

Navy blue with small design. Great shape. $40.

Homes For Rent-Unfurn.

404-314-5518

Wheelchair

704

3 BR, 2 Bath

1 800 wheelchair. $195. Paid $299. 18 in. seat. Used 3 times. Back in box.

Brick, central heat and air. Convenient to I-85, Northgate School District. $895/month.

770-253-6909

770-253-6589

707

Small Home & Mobile Homes Starting at $100 per week. Newnan & Lu the r svi l l e. Sa fe areas. Low deposit required 770-927-9276

RENTAL PROPERTY

Miscellaneous 413 For Sale

FC&A Publishing needs an

Payroll Administrator

Manufactured Homes For Rent 705

601

700

Drivers

www.probroadband solutions.com

West Georgia Health, LaGrange GA

678-340-6078

678-326-9804

New Pay-for-experience program pays up to $.41/mile. Class A Professional Drivers call for details:

Classifieds

2 BR, 1 Bath

Very nice. Rent or sale. $575 per month.

Sharpsburg.

www.bulldoghiway.com

www.Super ServiceLLC.com

704

2 BR, 1 Bath

843-266-3731

877-277-7298

Homes For Rent-Unfurn.

770-634-5518

OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1,000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. EOE Call:

770-253-1576

To apply please see full posting at:

Printer

Pulaski Bedroom Suite. Stanley, head/footboards, armoire, dresser, nightstand, beveled mirrors/ marble tops, carvings, mahogany. $1200/set. Call after 6.

Run FB with WTI. Be home through the week and weekends. Start up to 28% plus fuel bonus. New equipment. BCBS. Experience needed. LP available.

Drivers CDL-A Covenant and work for us! Needs Drivers! Train Professional, focused

www.wghealth.org/work-here/ current-job-openings

Furniture

www.driveforprime.com

Watersource Plumbing has an opening for an experienced repair plumber. Excellent pay and benefits. All inquiries confidential.

MyConnection Sudoku Puzzle

770-252-5458

Drivers:

HR P.O. Box 27

Drivers Trucking

To be a Professional Truck Driver through Primeʼs Student Driver Program. Obtain your commercial license, then get paid while training!

427

Color Inkjet Epson Stylus N11. In the box. Excellent cond. $40

877-258-8782

• Call 770-253-1576 • Fax 770-253-2538 • Email classifieds@newnan.com • Log on to times-herald.com

Drivers Trucking

Bargain Buys $200 or less

MARKETPLACE

Pet & Rider Program. Up to 50 cpm. Full benefits + quality hometime. CDL- A Req.

To place your ad

Admin / Clerical302 Office

Wednesday, February 5, 2014 | MyConnection 7

Fantastic Newnan Rentals

Houses, townhomes, apartments All price ranges! As low as $525 770-683-1221 or 770-683-1199

Vacation Rentals

Vacation Property

Advertise your vacation property to more than 1 million Georgia newspaper readers. Your 25-word classified ad will appear in over 100 Georgia newspapers for only $350. Call Jennifer Labon at the Georgia Newspaper Service at:

11,400 Unique Visitors daily.

770-454-6776

It’s the place where Coweta goes for news and events!

or online at:

www.gapress.org/georgia newspaperservice.html

20 TAX PREP 14 DIRECTORY CALL 770.253.1576 TO PLACE YOUR TAX PREP AD

free

federal form 1040ez

free electronic filing • open year round Shenandoah Office Park, Newnan • 770-253-7530 Thomas Crossroads • 770-253-1660 802-C Lower Fayetteville Rd., Newnan • 770-254-9812 9165-E Roosevelt Hwy., US 29, Palmetto • 770-463-9443 50 Carriage Oaks Dr., Tyrone • 770-306-8818

Why pay a nonprofessional to do work that demands a professional? CPA SOUTHEAST $50 Off ACCOUNTING Tax Preparation AND FINANCE for New Clients www.seafinc.com 770-487-4555

2014 Service Directory Concrete

Home Improvement

coweta

manny the

concrete service, llc

“When we leave.... ...it’s finished!”

slabs • patios sidewalks • driveways

pool decks tear out

/ replace

celebrating

30 years in business! Call for a FREE Estimate! Gene King

handyman • home improvement & repairs • finished basements • electrical / plumbing • drywall / trim work • pressure washing • int. - ext. painting • all types of flooring • kitchen / bathroom remoddeling • roofing / siding / gutters • windows / doors • decks /screen porch No Job Too Large or Small Over 33 years experienced For your FREE Estimate call:

678-378-4860

770-940-4057

Painting

Plumbing

Home Improvement

NewtonMore construction

Service & Repair

Lawn Sprinklers Service & Repair

Water Leaks Detection & Repair

Sewer

CARPENTRY WORK

Drain Cleaning

Backflow Install & Testing

“The Single Source For All Your Plumbing Needs”

www.watersourceplumbing.com

Over 30 years experience Locally owned and operated / Fully licensed and insured

twitter.com/wsplumbing

facebook.com/watersourceplumbing

J. Veitch Construction, Inc.

F&F Ornamental Iron

Licensed • Insured

• Outdoor Living Spaces & Masonry • Specializing In Customer Service

senior & veteran discounts

Call Jason for a Free Estimate!! 678-859-8492

c la

expert

tree removal stump grinding Trimming, Chipping, Debris Removal, Hauling Licensed & Insured Experienced Excellent References

call mike:

678-416-5684

painting by bobby davis

• New Homes & Garages

since 1979

interior commercial

Tree Services

Tree & Outdoor Services

free estimates

Family Owned & Operated

Special Offer:

10% Off

Any Service Up to $2,500 w/maximum allowance of $250

Must present coupon at time of estimate. Can not be combined with any other offers.

• Tree Removal • Stump Grinding • Pruning & Trimming • Bobcat Work • Brush Clearing • Storm Clean Up • Pressure Washing

Call today for reasonable rates! Top Quality Work free estimates!

770-584-7181

770-328-8936 or 770-599-6382

Times-Herald

Service Directory Ads • 20 Days in Print • 30 Days Online • 4 Weeks in MyConnection

email: Jeremy@s2tree.com

To advertise in The Newnan Times-Herald Service Directory, call 770-253-1576.

exterior residential

and more!

Specializing in: Gates, Rails, Handicap Rails

Office: 770-253-5883 Drug Free Licensed Insured Work Place www.S2Tree.com

&

• Rotten Wood Replacement • Sheetrock Repair • Pressure Wash • Water / Fire Damage • Fences

• Sun Rooms & Screen Porches

nton’s

Painting

Restoration • Installation Customized Iron Works

• Interior/Exterior Painting & Staining

WATER Source Water Heaters

Ornamental Iron

• Tile Showers, Floors & Back Splashes

Tree Services

Service, Inc.

Home Improvement

• Kitchen & Bathroom Remodeling

free estimates

709

770-253-1576


8 MyConnection   |  Wednesday, February 5, 2014


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