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August 2015 Issue

MIDDLE EAST

21

www.timberdesignandtechnology.com

Green building: a key driver of timber certification The WaterNest: Timber and aluminum combine to create an eco-friendly floating house Timber buildings are cheaper to construct than traditional designs Malaysia’s Sustainable Forestry Practices, and the Certification Cost Conundrum Bar Raval: a design masterpiece crafted from sculpted mahogany

ANALYSIS

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INTERVIEWS

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DESIGN

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August 2015 www.timberdesignandtechnology.com SUSTAINABILITY | TECHNOLOGY


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Farlin group of companies are vertically integrated with an established presence worldwide in timber logs, sawn timber, plywood, panel products and coal for energy sectors.

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August 2015


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T: +971 4 8809889 F: +971 4 8809779

www.farlindubai.com info@farlindubai.com August 2015

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August 2015 Issue

MIDDLE EAST

21

www.timberdesignandtechnology.com

Green building: a key driver of timber certification The WaterNest: Timber and aluminum combine to create an eco-friendly floating house Timber buildings are cheaper to construct than traditional designs Malaysia’s Sustainable Forestry Practices, and the Certification Cost Conundrum Bar Raval: a design masterpiece crafted from sculpted mahogany

ANALYSIS

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INTERVIEWS

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DESIGN

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SUSTAINABILITY

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TECHNOLOGY

Bar Raval | Image © Jonathan Friedman/PARTISANS

August 2015 Issue 21 DIRECTOR Andy MacGregor publisher@citrusmediagroup.net +971 55 849 1574 MARKETING DIRECTOR Eric Hammond marketing@citrusmediagroup.net +971 4 455 8400 INTERNATIONAL SALES DIRECTOR James Hamilton james@timberdesignandtechnology.com EDITOR Tony Smith editor@timberdesignandtechnology.com INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENT Eamonn Ennis eamonn@timberdesignandtechnology.com +91 98676 54952 INTERNATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES Rabia Alga AntExpo Org. | Turkey +90 216 541 0390 rabia@antexpo.net

EDITOR’S NOTE The Guggenheim Helsinki Design Competition, which began in June last year and generated a record-making 1,715 submissions from more than 77 countries, reached its conclusion in June 2015, as the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation announced the winning concept: a design that invites visitors to engage with museum artwork and programs across a gathering of linked pavilions and plazas organized around an interior street. It comes as no surprise that the winning submission from Moreau Kusunoki Architectes is clad in locally sourced charred timber and glass and will comprise nine low-lying volumes and one lighthouse-like tower. Leading this renaissance of timber as a material of choice amongst designers is thermally modified timber (TMT), a concept pioneered by leading European players in a bid to enhance the durability, longevity, and dimensional stability of timber. More recently, the technology has spread to the U.S. and to Turkey with major producers investing in the large-scale production of thermally modified timber. Given the growing demand and acceptance of TMT, we profile some of the leading players across the world including the JAF Group, Novawood and Northland Forest Products amongst others. This issue also raises the question on timber certification. Datuk Wee Jeck Seng, Chairman of the Malaysian Timber Council, points to the fact sustainable forestry costs money to implement, and while countries can have their forests certified as proof of sustainability, certification may not be the ultimate panacea to ensure this. NEPCon, on the other hand, highlights the increasing use of timber in green construction as a growing global trend. Consequently its growing popularity is accompanied by a growing demand for verified legality and third-party proof of sustainability, notably FSC or PEFC certification. As always, I would like to encourage you to log on to the website - www.timberdesignandtechnology.com for the latest updates and please get in touch if you have any suggestions for subjects we should consider covering. In closing, I would like to thank our advertisers, our partners and our readers.

ELIAS AGGELOPOULOS Med Expo | Greece +30 210 2931011 info@epipleon.gr Timber Design & Technology is published 6 times a year

by Citrus Media Group (powered by WillyMac Associates FZ LLC) Level 14, Boulevard Plaza - Tower One, Emaar Boulevard, Downtown Dubai, PO Box 334155, Dubai, UAE is designed by UC Design and is printed by MASAR Printing Press Great care is taken to ensure the accuracy of the contents of Timber Design & Technology but the publishers accept no responsibility for any errors or omissions. All contents are © 2015 Citrus Media Group and may not be reproduced in any form without prior consent. Letters and readers’ contributions may be edited at our discretion.

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August 2015


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Image © Jonathan Friedman/PARTISANS

CONTENTS

06 News

48 TECHNOLOGY

The latest industry news from within the region and around the world

Treet: the tallest timberframed building in the world

12 SUSTAINABILITY

52 WOOD WORKS

The WaterNest: Timber and aluminum combine to create an eco-friendly floating house

‘Woodwork’ exhibition at Southern Guild Gallery

16 MARKET REPORT

66 INDUSTRY FOCUS

Don’t count it out - Wood coatings hold much potential

Thermally modified timber

22 ANALYSIS

72 SHOWTIME

Timber buildings are cheaper to construct than traditional designs

A preview of the top industry exhibitions coming up this season

DESIGN & DÉCOR

COMMENT

26 Heydar Aliyev

32 Bar Raval

38 NEPCon

44 MTC

American white oak helps to achieve seamless spatial flow in Zaha Hadid’s Heydar Aliyev Center

Bar Raval: a design masterpiece crafted from sculpted mahogany

Green building: a key driver of timber certification

Malaysia’s Sustainable Forestry Practices, and the Certification Cost Conundrum

August 2015

www.timberdesignandtechnology.com


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NEWS

ACCSYS TECHNOLOGIES JOINS THE WORLD WIDE FUND (WWF) CAMPAIGN AGAINST FOREST DESTRUCTION

Image © Accsys Technologies

Accsys Technologies, the chemical technology company and producer of Accoya, the world leading modified wood product, has strengthened its commitment to responsible forest trade by joining the WWF campaign against forest destruction. The campaign calls on the UK Government to close legal loopholes in the European Union Timber Regulation (EUTR), which currently mean that less than 50 percent of the value of timber products coming into Europe has a confirmed legal source. WWF’s goal is to help end deforestation around the world with a shift to 100 percent sustainable timber and wood products by 2020. Illegal and unsustainable logging contributes to deforestation and degradation across the world’s most important forest regions such as Russia’s Far East, Central Africa, Latin America and South East Asia and has a massive impact on the habitats of some of the world’s most endangered species, as well as local people and indigenous communities in some of the world’s poorest countries. By partnering with WWF, Accsys hopes to raise awareness about the transnational issue of deforestation whilst also working

towards promoting Accoya as a replacement wood product. “The principles of environmental responsibility and sustainability lie at the core of what we do here at Accsys Technologies. Using our advanced and patented acetylation technology, we provide a durable and reliable soft wood from renewable sources to rival or exceed the performance of less sustainable hardwood,” said Paul Clegg, Chief Executive of Accsys Technologies. “WWF’s campaign is critically important to our industry, and adding our support is our way of further strengthening our commitment to responsible forest trade.” Julia Young, Manager, WWF Global Forest and Trade Network UK, said: “Timber is a versatile product that will increasingly be developed into innovative products, and Accsys are right to be exploring and developing ways to bring it to more diverse uses in our markets. We are glad that they have made this commitment to responsible forest trade by joining the WWF Forest Campaign, adding their name nearly 40 companies and a major trade association, and supporting our call to the UK government and EU to take action to ensure a future for our forests.”

RAPID URBANIZATION AND TECHNOLOGY INNOVATION TO DRIVE THE GLOBAL WOOD FLOORING MARKET According to the latest Wood Flooring report by Global Industry Analysts (GIA), the global market for wood flooring is projected to reach 10.3 billion square feet by 2020, driven by rapid urbanization in emerging markets, and rise in new construction and renovation activity. Wood flooring is still a popular flooring option worldwide and wood represents a conventional building material that still continues to find favor among consumers, despite the availability of a wide range of flooring options. The trend is driven by the rising focus on eco-friendly homes. With homeowners focused on balancing the green and stylish quotient of homes, manufacturers of wood flooring have introduced a wide range of products inspired by the world of fashion. The ‘green’ image associated with wood provides the necessary impetus for demand growth. Unlike other flooring options, production of wood flooring consumes relatively less energy. Wood flooring production results in lower greenhouse gas emissions and thus a smaller carbon footprint. With growing concerns over pollution and its impact on the environment, consumers are increasingly seeking building materials that are renewable and environmentally safe. As a result, homeowners, builders, designers, and architects prefer wood flooring. Stringent government regulations calling for the mandatory renovation of aging buildings, both residential and commercial, will help drive demand for building materials including wood flooring. Manufactured floors/engineered flooring is growing in popularity in comparison to solid wood floors. Major factors driving growth in demand for engineered flooring include rising demand for flooring options that can be used in a wider range of applications. Environmentalists are also encouraging a reduction in consumption of forest and plantation resources, which is possible with the use of engineered floors. Demand is also increasing for www.timberdesignandtechnology.com

August 2015

pre-finished wood flooring products that eliminate the need for scrapping and rubbing at the installation site. Most of these products are designed with a self-lock capability to avoid messy glues that take time to cure. Wood flooring is witnessing significant competition from laminate flooring. However, much of the impact of growth in popularity of laminate has been on mosaic wood flooring.


NEWS

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The Guggenheim Helsinki Design Competition, which began in June last year and generated a record-making 1,715 submissions from more than 77 countries, reached its conclusion in June 2015, as the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation announced the winning concept: a design that invites visitors to engage with museum artwork and programs across a gathering of linked pavilions and plazas organized around an interior street. Clad in locally sourced charred timber and glass, the environmentally sensitive building will comprise nine low-lying volumes and one lighthouselike tower, connected to the nearby Observatory Park by a new pedestrian footbridge and served by a promenade along Helsinki’s South Harbor. The Guggenheim revealed that the winning design, one of six finalists, was submitted by Moreau Kusunoki Architectes, a firm founded in Paris in 2011. The design of the Guggenheim Helsinki and its woven landscape are based upon a sensitive and sympathetic approach to the context and nature of Helsinki. The design encourages people to flow within a new cultural core that is linked to the rest of the city, through the port promenade and the pedestrian footbridge to the Observatory Park. This flexible access welcomes not only visitors but also serves as a key cultural destination for the community. The museum skyline is composed of independent volumes, highlighted by a landmark tower. These fragmented art exhibition spaces allow strong integration with outdoor display and events, while the lighthouse offers a new perspective over the city. This new museum concept together with the charred timber façade echoes the process of regeneration that occurs when forests burn and then grow back stronger. Jury Chair Mark Wigley, Professor and Dean Emeritus of the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation at Columbia University, announced the decision of the competition’s 11-member international

Image © Moreau Kusunoki Architects

Image © Moreau Kusunoki Architects

Image © Moreau Kusunoki Architects

MOREAU KUSUNOKI ARCHITECTES WINS GUGGENHEIM HELSINKI DESIGN COMPETITION

jury at a press conference held at the Palace, a landmark of 20th-century modernism that overlooks the site of the proposed museum on Helsinki’s South Harbor. “Moreau Kusunoki has titled its proposal ‘Art in the City,’ a name that sums up the qualities the jury admired in the design,” said Wigley. “The waterfront, park, and nearby urban area all have a dialogue with the loose cluster of pavilions, with people and activities flowing between them. The design is imbued with a sense of community and animation that matches the ambitions of the brief to honor both the people of Finland and the creation of a more responsive museum of the future.” The jury determined ‘Art in the City’ as the winning design by a majority vote. The official jury statement, available on the competition website, notes that, ‘Art in the City’ would cohere around a covered street that can expand and contract according to its interaction with the discrete pavilions, which are “distinctive and contemporary” in their forms and materials. “The jury found the design deeply respectful of the site and setting, creating a fragmented, non-hierarchical campus of linked pavilions where art and society could meet and intermingle.” In a joint statement, Nicolas Moreau and Hiroko Kusunoki said, “Thanks to the bold vision of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation and the City of Helsinki, the international open competition process offered a unique challenge for practices around the world to partake in this exceptional project. Such events represent great hope for architects. We are delighted and honored to have been selected from among 1,715 entries. We are happy to share this victory with all the people we work with: our staff, our partners, and our clients. This great adventure brought us energy, joy, and dreams. The adventure now continues with the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, the people of Helsinki, and lovers of architecture and art.” August 2015

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NEWS

GLOBAL WOODWORKING TECHNOLOGY MARKETS REMAIN POSITIVE IN 2014 The top five exporting countries of woodworking technologies - Germany, Italy, China, Taiwan and Austria - recorded positive figures in 2014. Only the U.S. closed 2014 with a negative (-0.7 percent), a sign of stability and a consistently upbeat domestic market for the past two years. Germany closed the year with much better results than expected after the first half of 2014 - a positive 0.44 percent increase in the first six months was followed by a 2.3 percent increase over 2013 in the second half of the year, with an export value close to EUR 1.8 billion. Made-in-Italy exports amounted to EUR 1,169.8 million, which represented a 5.3 percent increase compared to 2013. Unfortunately, annual growth rate fell short of the 7 percent achieved in the first half of 2014, which meant that Italian exports in the second half was less ‘lively’. The second half of 2014 saw China doing better. In the January-June period, exports were EUR 376 million, a 13.6 percent increase year-on-year. The growth rate of Chinese export was twice that of Italy; the proportion has now changed further to 4:1 (+22 percent for China; +2.3 percent for Italy). In absolute value, the gap has shrunk to just EUR 200 million approximately (1,169 versus 964 million). However, ‘Made-in-Italy’ can be satisfied with an export growth rate in 2014 double that of Germany. The U.S. is the world���s biggest market for woodworking technologies. Imports amounted to EUR 987.6 million, up 18.1 percent from 2013. Russia closed 2014 with imports worth EUR 554.3 million, a 4.5 percent increase. Germany remains the third biggest ‘consumer country’ (EUR 401.3 million, +5.8 percent), followed by China (EUR 331.6 million), with imports down by 6.2 percent from 2013; Canada (EUR 249.7 million, -0.14 percent); France (EUR 247 million, +9.1 percent); and Belarus (EUR 221 million, +143.2 percent).

From September 22 - 25, 2015, HOMAG is presenting innovative machines, plants, and service concepts at an exhibition area spanning over 10,000 sqm in Schopfloch. Fantastic insights into transparent production and the presentation of the new ‘CompetenceCenter Surface’ will make a visit to the HOMAG Treff an experience not to be missed. Small to large-scale solutions, all in line with the motto ‘Growing with the HOMAG Group’, show that the main theme of LIGNA - furniture production on the way to Industry 4.0 - is not reserved exclusively for industrial businesses. Networked machines and integrated data flows are the key to being competitive today, regardless of whether the business is a small trade or an industrial operation. In the throughfeed range, HOMAG will present numerous special features in edge technology: from processing shaped parts in throughfeed mode, through edging 45° corners, up to door rebate gluing with airTec and a thick edge for robust edges with a zero joint look. Especially designed for today’s craftsmen, HOMAG will present the new KAL 370 edge banding machines and clever unit combinations on the machines for the new Ambition range, providing individual solutions for trade and industry on an optimized platform with price and performance advantages. For industrial companies, there will be a live high-tech demonstration of batch size 1 plants for furniture and www.timberdesignandtechnology.com

August 2015

construction element production, with impressive features. The show will also include a focus on surface processing in the new ‘CompetenceCenter Surface’. Anyone wanting to produce high-quality surfaces will be impressed by the sanding options offered by BÜTFERING as well as the surface lamination provided by the one-sided HOMAG laminating machine, not to mention the reacTec process and the latest technology for profile casing specialists. ‘Everything under control’ is the motto in the manufacturing of component parts, with the presentation of the new BMB 800/900 powerProfiler machine concept live in action. Global experience from 20 years of CNC processing centers for timber window production is the basis for the new generation of machines. A key highlight at the event will be the new Venture range, which allows individuality to become the standard, from CNC entry-level models to hightech five-axis processing centers or machines with gluing technology. Given that all HOMAG CNC processing centers are fitted with the new generation of extraction hoods, they allow for optimized collection and removal of chips, and combine a better suction result with lower air requirements. This solution has reduced the energy required in sample processing by up to 30 percent while also improving the degree of suction by 25 percent.

Image © HOMAG

Image © HOMAG

HOMAG TREFF


NEWS

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The American Hardwood Export Council (AHEC), the leading international trade association for the American hardwood industry, has announced plans to host two seminars for importers, traders, manufacturers and end users of American hardwoods in Amman and Dubai in September, in cooperation with the National Hardwood Lumber Association (NHLA). The seminars will help attendees obtain a better understanding of the physical properties, grades and the potential for applications offered by the different species of American hardwoods, and reflect AHEC’s commitment to cater to and expand further in the MENA region, which has demonstrated a consistent and healthy appetite for U.S. hardwoods. AHEC is partnering with the Jordanian Furniture Exporters Association (JFEMA) for the seminar in Jordan. The seminars are free to attend and will be delivered by Dana Spessert, NHLA Chief Grading Inspector, who will also provide an introduction and a practical demonstration of the NHLA rules for grading North American hardwood lumber, which form the basis of every successful transaction in American hardwoods. The dates and venue for the seminars have been announced as follows - Monday, 14th September at the Grand Hyatt Hotel in Amman, Jordan; and Tuesday, September 15, at the Murooj Rotana in Dubai, UAE. The seminar in Amman will commence at 10am and will be followed by a lunch reception whilst the Dubai seminar will commence at 6:30pm followed by a networking dinner. “Demand for U.S. hardwood lumber and veneers in the Middle East has softened a little at the start of this year but this is due to the cyclical nature of the construction sector, rather than the start of a sustained downward trend. Despite a few challenges, the significant housing, healthcare and education needs of Saudi Arabia’s large and fast-growing population are set to drive construction for many years to come, while hospitality, commerce and retail development will keep the UAE buoyant

Image © AHEC

Image © AHEC

Image © AHEC

Image © AHEC

AMERICAN HARDWOOD SEMINARS FOR TRADERS, IMPORTERS AND END USERS IN AMMAN AND DUBAI

for the foreseeable future,” said Roderick Wiles, AHEC Director for Africa, Middle East, South Asia and Oceania. “The UAE, in particular, has become both a timber trading hub and a wood processing center for the whole Middle East, as well as for markets well beyond. It is imperative then that we engage with the different elements of the ‘timber chain’ and help them make the best use of the American hardwood resource.” Dana has served as the Chief Grading Inspector of the NHLA for the past five years, where his responsibilities range from managing a staff of nationally and internationally-based inspectors to rules interpretations. Dana has also traveled to a number of countries teaching and representing the NHLA hardwood lumber inspection rules. Although the NHLA grading rules were originally conceived for the U.S. marketplace, a reasonable knowledge is essential for buyers worldwide in order to attain their expected degree of quality. These seminars are aimed at making the most of Dana’s valuable experience, which encompasses over twenty years as an inspector of hardwood lumber, in a bid to educate buyers of hardwoods in the MENA region. “American hardwood lumber is graded to the rules of the NHLA, which aims to maximize both the yield and the value of sawn wood, which in turn minimizes waste and reduces pressure on the environment. As such, the NHLA grading rules provide both the buyer and seller with a consistent language for conducting hardwood lumber transactions. Through these seminars, we hope to increase the understanding of the grading rules amongst importers, traders and end users as part of our overall mission to raise awareness on the working properties and variety of commercially available American hardwoods. We have organized similar seminars in collaboration with NHLA before and the response has always been very positive, and so we are confident that we can generate the same level of interest,” concluded Wiles. August 2015

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10 NEWS

Image © TRADA

TWISTING WOODEN PAVILION CREATED FOR TIMBER EXPO

TRADA has partnered up with the Architectural Association’s (AA) School of Architecture to create a wooden pavilion for the Timber Expo, at this year’s UK Construction Week. The Twist explores the bending and twisting capacity of timber, integrating structural and spatial performance into an elegant architectural solution. The project is a collaboration between students from the Emergent Technologies and Design Programme at the AA and TRADA. Constructed from 4mm and 6mm birch plywood, supplied by TRADA member Hanson Plywood, the pavilion will be on display throughout Timber Expo at the Birmingham NEC, from October 6 - 11, 2015, before being displayed in Bedford Square, London, in January 2016, as part of the Architectural Association’s Public Programme Exhibitions series. The students recently completed a residential week at Hooke Park, a

350-acre working forest owned by the AA, during which they worked on prototyping and designing the project. In addition, they used CNC routing technology to bring the sculpture to life. Discussing the design, Evan Greenberg, Studio Master, Emergent Technologies and Design at the Architectural Association, said: “We are excited to continue our exploration of timber systems with both TRADA and Hanson Plywood, and to seeing our design on display at such a big show as UK Construction Week. We look forward to discovering new material possibilities for the development of innovative architectural constructs.” Nathan Garnett, Show Director at UK Construction Week, hoped that the design would be a ’show-stopper’: “The design possibilities offered by timber are truly breath-taking and we’re aiming to offer as much inspiration at the show as we can to architects, specifiers and designers.”

WWF-UK PUBLISHES TIMBER SCORECARD The construction industry has come out as a clear leader in a new WWF-UK timber scorecard published in July. Having analyzed over 100 businesses to see if they are transparent and informative when it comes to using sustainable timber, the report authors found that Travis Perkins, Mace, Saint-Gobain and Carillion all scored the maximum ‘3 trees’ rating. This indicates the companies have made public commitments and there is visible evidence that they have set up the right policies to ensure sustainable timber is being used as much as possible in their products. Also leading the way are major supermarkets such as Morrisons and Sainsbury’s, plus Macmillan Publishers and M&S. Several brands occupy the middle ground on the journey to transforming their supply chains and are making solid progress, including Boots, IKEA, and Penguin Random House. However, many businesses have a long way to go, including several publishers, card companies, furniture retailers and musical instrument suppliers. The scorecard looks at companies’ practices and policies in relation to sustainably sourced timber and timber products, against a backdrop of increasing deforestation. Helpfully, the scoring process has raised awareness with companies of the perils of forest destruction, which leads to habitat loss and contributes to climate change. Recent WWF-UK research shows that consumers do care about the type of timber used and where it’s from, but they are left wanting; information for consumers around buying products made from sustainable timber is far less available than that on animal welfare in food, or fair trade coffee and chocolate. Julia Young of WWF-UK’s forest team explains that “as with many www.timberdesignandtechnology.com

August 2015

agricultural products such as meat or eggs it is just as important to know where our timber products are coming from. If we don’t then UK consumers could be contributing to deforestation.” The scorecard shows, however, that change is possible, and that many household names are making progress on using sustainable timber. Young adds: “Some are in fact making great progress but it’s behind the scenes - they need to shout about it and make customers aware. Some of the companies who didn’t fare so well have engaged with WWF-UK since they were given their scores, to look at how they can improve their policy and communication around sustainable timber. As a result, we have decided to update the scores in the autumn to reflect immediate changes made by businesses.” The scorecard will be repeated in full at least twice more before 2020, building on the WWF-UK’s Save Forests campaign, which aims to get UK businesses to pledge to buy timber products from sustainable sources by 2020, and to support a move to a 100 percent sustainable timber market by 2020. The campaign also calls for the European Union Timber Regulation (EUTR) loopholes to be closed by making it apply to such products as books, chairs and toys, currently not included in the regulation. This means they can currently be imported and sold legally in the EU even if they are not shown to be made from legally logged wood. The campaign is designed to show that businesses can be part of the solution rather than part of the problems facing our global forests today, by publishing clear policies and stating how well they are doing in sustainable sourcing.


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Sustainable Softwoods America’s forests produce over 80 million cubic metres of sawn timber a year, making America the largest timber producer in the world.

Modern forest management ensures that felled trees are replaced and that every year more wood is grown in US forests than is harvested. 1.6 billion seedlings are planted in the US every year, equal to 4.4 million trees every single day of the year. As a result, the US has more trees today than 70 years ago.

People you can do business with info@americansoftwoods.com

August 2015

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12 SUSTAINABILITY

The WaterNest: Timber and aluminum combine to create an ecofriendly floating house

Image Š Giancarlo Zema

Luxurious floating home sleeps a family of four and is completely powered by the sun

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August 2015


SUSTAINABILITY the different housing or working needs. As well as being used as a residential unit, it is possible to set up as an office, lounge bar, restaurant, shop or exhibition space. The selected furnishings in the EcoFloLife catalogue are well designed, eco-friendly and elegant, and thus meet the most demanding contemporary needs. The WaterNest 100 can be positioned along river courses, lakes, bays, atolls and sea areas

wishing to live independently, exclusively and in complete harmony with nature. The interiors of the WaterNest 100 are characterized as being warm and welcoming, contemporary style and innovative. The scent of the wood structure invades the space. The large windows allow light to enter and illuminate the interiors. Further, the furnishings are made from a recycled and recyclable material - the result of a rigorous

The interiors of the WaterNest 100 are characterized as being warm and welcoming, contemporary style and innovative with calm waters. Up to 98 percent of the structure is made of recycled materials, including a laminated wooden supporting frame, and curved wooden cladding and partition walls that are treated to be weather-resistant. In addition, thanks to a sophisticated system of internal natural micro-ventilation and air conditioning, it is classified as a low-consumption residential habitat. As such, the WaterNest 100 is the ideal solution for those

selection of the most renowned and established eco-friendly contemporary design companies, thus meeting the trendiest style requirements.

Layout The WaterNest 100 has a 100 sqm circular layout, 12m in diameter, with balconies conveniently located along the longer sides. The largest model measures 12m (39ft) in diameter and 4m (13ft) tall, with

100 sqm (1,076 sq. ft) of space plus balconies. However, other homes can be made to order with the company offering the option of 60 sqm (649 sq.ft) and 80 sqm (861 sq.ft) versions. The ability to configure the WaterNest 100 means that it can serve as a house/resort; office/lab; shop/exhibition space; or lounge bar/restaurant. House/Resort This version of WaterNest 100 is ideal to accommodate a young couple or a family of four, wishing to live in a new, eco-friendly and non-conformist manner, without sacrificing comfort, elegance or style. WaterNest 100 includes in its interior a living room, dining area, bedroom, kitchen and bathroom. The selected furnishings in the EcoFloLife catalogue allow one to embellish the space with a touch of color and joy. Office/Lab This version of WaterNest 100 is more suited for a young and dynamic work team wishing to communicate and work in a single, one-of-a-kind space, in close contact with nature. The

Image Š Giancarlo Zema

Following years of research, the architect Giancarlo Zema, already famous for his water creations, has designed exclusively for British firm EcoFloLife, an eco-friendly floating housing unit - the WaterNest 100. The luxurious floating home, which has a 12m (39ft) diameter and is 4m (13ft) tall, offers a floor space of 100 sqm (1,076 sq.ft), large enough to accommodate a family of four with two bedrooms. Made entirely of recycled glued laminated timber and a recycled aluminum hull - all of which are completely water resistant - the home is powered by a 60 sqm (646 sq.ft) solar roof and can be placed on any lake or river. Balconies are conveniently located on the sides and thanks to the large windows, allow for fascinating views over the water. Bathroom and kitchen skylights are located on the wooden roof, as well as 60 sqm of amorphous photovoltaic panels capable of generating 4 kWp, which is used for the internal needs of the residential unit. The interior of the circular pod-like structure can include a living room, dining area, bedroom, kitchen and bathroom or have other configurations according to

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August 2015

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Image © Giancarlo Zema

14 SUSTAINABILITY

STAGE (B)

STAGE (C)

WOOD COVER

COMPLETE UNIT

Image © LoremZema Ipsum Image © Giancarlo

STAGE (A) MAIN WOOD STRUCTURE

WaterNest 100 can fit separate or adjoining workstations, a bathroom, storage and archive. The EcoFloLife catalogue has refined furnishings such as desks, chairs and floor lamps, which are made entirely of recycled flame-retardant cardboard in different colors. Shop/Exhibition This version of WaterNest is best suited for those wishing to open an innovative floating business or exhibition gallery. A large open-space that can be modelled according to the various business needs with storage, dressing room and toilet. The EcoFloLife catalogue has refined furnishings such as reception, armchairs and floor lamps, made entirely of recycled flame-retardant cardboard.

The supporting frame of the WaterNest 100 superstructure is molded laminated wood, while the cladding and partition walls are curved wood Lounge Bar/Restaurant This version of WaterNest 100 is the ideal design to accommodate an innovative and charming, as well as entirely environmentally friendly restaurant for bio products or an intriguing floating bar. An open-space with bar, stools, tables, chairs, kitchen and toilets allow for a maximum capacity of 40 people.

Production The WaterNest 100 spindle-shaped casing is entirely made of laminated wood, an innovative product, produced on an industrial scale

www.timberdesignandtechnology.com

August 2015

using a technological process where natural wood is pressure bonded, reducing the defects typical of solid wood. In addition to the exceptional sustainability, affordability and aesthetic characteristics of the product, there are several advantages such as a high ratio of mechanical resistance to weight. Furthermore, the laminated wood structures have an excellent fire resistance, in fact, combustion occurs slowly due to the good thermal insulation given by the carbon surface layer. The supporting frame of the

WaterNest 100 superstructure is molded laminated wood, while the cladding and partition walls are curved wood, treated to resist weathering easily. In addition to the exceptional sustainability, affordability and aesthetic characteristics of this material, there are several advantages such as a high ratio between mechanical resistance and weight. The WaterNest 100 hull is made entirely of aluminum, a light alloy, highly resistant to impact, corrosion and 100 percent recyclable, requiring no maintenance. The tapered shape is achieved by means of aluminum plates, which are cut using CNC machines supported with a CAD/ CAM system and braced with reinforcing bulkheads. As well as ensuring excellent buoyancy, the


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hull contains the technical facilities necessary for the residential unit. The flooring and the spacious balconies of the WaterNest 100, which allow you to enjoy fascinating views over the water, are made entirely of high-quality teak to withstand temperature variations, humidity, saltiness and the attacks of atmospheric agents. Like yacht decks, the size of the slats is sufficient to reduce leakages while having the greatest visual impact.

Sustainability

Image © Giancarlo Zema

Image © Giancarlo Zema

Image © Giancarlo Zema

60 sqm of amorphous photovoltaic panels capable of generating 4 kWp are installed on the wooden roof of the WaterNest 100 and are used for the internal needs of the residential unit. This type of panel differs from the conventional ones due to the low energy consumption required for their production, making them environmentally friendly. Moreover, from an aesthetic point of view, they can be curved to fit almost any type of roofing. The WaterNest 100 also has a sophisticated integrated system for the purification and filtering of gray and black water (bathroom and kitchen waste, etc.), which can be partly reused for water or completely purified and admitted back into lakes, seas and rivers. The only maintenance required approximately every six months is the clearance of simple biological waste products from the internal filter. Naturally, only ecological detergents and soaps can be used on board. For fresh water, the tank capacity is a substantial 1,500 liters. Zema is no stranger to designing innovative aquatic residences. His previous concepts have included the Trilobis 65 yacht-cum-home, a semi-submerged cliff-side dwelling and a five-level floating apartment block. Unlike these designs, however, the WaterNest 100 feels practical and like something you might actually live in one day. Commenting on his design, Zema says: “the inspiration came from observing the aquatic nests of water birds all over the world where they can live and grow their babies in total harmony with nature. So I thought of designing something similar that can help us to embrace life and allow us to live a floating experience in a natural and energy saving habitat.” August 2015

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16 MARKET REPORT

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August 2015


MARKET REPORT

17

Don’t count it out - Wood coatings hold much potential Shankar Rampalli and Liza D’souza from MarketsandMarkets throw the spotlight on the growing market for wood coatings Urbanization has driven the increasing need for improved aesthetic appeal of furniture and other wooden products, making wood coating a very important part of the woodworking industry. The use of wood coating dates back to 600 years when bee-wax, gelatin, or oil were used as furniture finishes; from then on, the wood finishing industry has evolved as a result of new product developments, costeffective manufacturing processes, and awareness of the benefits of wood coating. Lack of a coating would expose the wooden substrate to moisture, mechanical abrasion, exposure to chemicals, UV rays, and other factors, causing it to deteriorate. Hence, the application of wood coating ensures maximum durability of the product. The market for wood coating - according to a study conducted by MarketsandMarkets, titled ‘Wood Coating Market - Trends &

Canada U.S.

Forecast to 2020’ - is segregated on the basis of types, into stains and varnishes, shellacs, wood preservatives, and water repellents. This market is also segmented on the basis of end-user applications (furniture, cabinets, sidings, floors, and decks). The study covers the market demand in terms of value and volume of wood coating, in major regions and countries. Shankar Rampalli and Liza D’souza, Analysts in Packaging, Construction and Mining domain at MarketsandMarkets throw the spotlight on the growing market for wood coatings.

Regional Analysis: AsiaPacific Projected to Grow at the Highest Rate The Asia-Pacific region accounted for 57 percent of the wood coating market in 2014. Factors such as the increasing rate of industrialization in China, Japan, and India, along

market in countries such as China and Japan. Malaysia is the tenth-largest furniture exporter in the world and it exports around 80 percent of its furniture produced, according to the Malaysian International Furniture Fair (MIFF) in 2015. Malaysia is known for its wooden furniture; the government of Malaysia has set a target for the annual growth of the wooden furniture market to 6.5 percent. Foreign buyers of high-end products in furnishing often look for options from Malaysia. However, the Chinese and Vietnamese markets for furniture at a lower price pose a threat to the Malaysia market.

with increasing population and awareness regarding the benefits of wood coating in these countries, are driving the growth of the Asia-Pacific wood coating market. Asia-Pacific is also a leading producer and exporter of wooden furniture. The rise in new construction projects, both commercial and residential, and repair and renovation activities would increase the demand for furniture and cabinets, which would thereby influence the wood coating market. In the Asia-Pacific region, wood coating is widely applied on furniture. In terms of value, stains and varnishes accounted for the largest market share, followed by wood preservatives. Increasing awareness regarding the impact of non-eco-friendly building materials on the environment, and sustainable construction is majorly driving the low-VOC wood coating

Mature markets comprise of leading players Countries such as the U.S., Canada, the U.K., Germany, and France are considered to be mature markets with respect to wood

U.K.

Germany

France

China Japan

Saudi Arabia Africa

Malaysia

Brazil Australia

<4.50% CAGR

4.50%-7.00% CAGR

7.00%<CAGR

August 2015

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Image © MarketsandMarkets Analysis

Mexico

India


GROWTH (VOLUME)

Image © MarketsandMarkets Analysis

18 MARKET REPORT

The growth of the market for wood coating is projected to be directly proportional to that of the protective coating market

minimal use of VOCs. Government regulations regarding specified volatile organic compound (VOC) content in wood coatings has driven companies to engage in product developments. Also, the commercial usage of wood coating is checked by regulatory bodies so as to prevent or control any of its harmful impact on its immediate environment. Some of the regulatory authorities associated with wood coatings are the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. Green Building Council, Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED), Business and International Furniture Manufacturer’s Association (BIFMA), and the Kitchen Cabinet Manufacturer’s Association (KCMC).

Image © MarketsandMarkets Analysis

Competitive landscape

coating consumption. Leading wood coating manufacturing companies such as The SherwinWilliams Company (U.S.), The Dow Chemical Company (U.S.), Ashland Inc. (U.S.) and RPM International Inc. (U.S.), AkzoNobel N.V. (The Netherlands), BASF SE (Germany), Arkema SA (France), and Hempel A/S (Denmark) are all based in the European and North American regions. The future of wood coating in the European and American economies is strongly influenced by environmental regulations and increasing raw material prices. Companies in the European region and the U.S. are involved in collaborations to develop environment-friendly products.

Radiation-cure coatings, which are water-borne coatings, are witnessing growing demand in Europe.

Government Regulations Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) are chemical compounds used in the manufacturing of wood coatings. They dissolve solids before application, and also soften and condition the substrate thereby improving the adhesion of the coating. However, if these VOCs are used in excess, they can cause several health issues to human beings. Under certain conditions, they even create ground level ozone. Hence, governments of countries such as the U.S. and U.K. have drafted regulations for the

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The global market for wood coating is dominated by major players of the coatings and chemical industry, such as AkzoNobel N.V. (Netherlands), The SherwinWilliams Company (U.S.), The Valspar Corporation (U.S.), BASF SE (Germany), Nippon Paint Co. Ltd (Japan), RPM International Inc. (U.S.), The Dow Chemical Company (U.S.), Hempel A/S (Denmark), Ashland Inc. (U.S.), and Arkema SA (France). Mergers and acquisitions formed the major strategy adopted by most of the players in the wood coating market. Companies such as The Valspar Corporation, AkzoNobel, Hempel A/S., and The Sherwin-Williams Company were the key players that acquired newer companies to expand their business. The rising demand for wood coatings as well as high growth in emerging markets has encouraged major players to adopt this strategy. Companies are trying to enter new regions by merging with or acquiring new companies in emerging markets. Apart from mergers and acquisitions, expansions and investments were adopted by companies, which accounted for 37 percent of the developments by the key wood coating companies. New product launches also formed an important part of the developments in the wood coating industry; the Sherwin-Williams Company added Deckscapes, a waterborne

semi-transparent stain, which is an exterior wood coating. This coating provides UV protection and is long lasting.

Future Outlook The growth of the market for wood coating is projected to be directly proportional to that of the protective coating market. Increasing disposable income of people in developing countries, remodeling and renovation activities by households and corporates, and the changing preference of people toward sustainable coating products are some of the drivers and opportunities factoring the growth of the wood coating market. * This article contains text from the ‘Wood Coating Market Trends & Forecast to 2020’ report prepared by MarketsandMarkets. For more information or to buy the report, please visit: http:// www.marketsandmarkets.com/ Market-Reports/wood-coatingmarket-214618873.html

About Markets andMarkets MarketsandMarkets is a global market research and consulting company. It is World’s No. 2 in terms of premium market research studies published annually. Serving as a business intelligence partner to Fortune 500 companies across the world, it provides multiclient reports, company profiles, databases, and custom research services. MarketsandMarkets covers seventeen industry verticals, including advanced materials, aerospace and defense, agriculture, automotive and transportation, biotechnology, building and construction, chemicals, energy and power, food and beverages, industrial automation, medical devices, mining, minerals and metals, packaging, pharmaceuticals, semiconductor and electronics, and telecommunications and IT.


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20 ADVERTORIAL

INNOVATIVE CANADIAN WOOD STRUCTURE & DESIGN TECHNOLOGY SEMINAR – NOVEMBER 15 (DOHA) AND NOVEMBER 18 (DUBAI)

W

ant to learn more about how you can use wood in your next building design? The Government of Canada’s Trade Commissioner Service and the Quebec Wood Export Bureau (QWEB), with the support of the Government of Canada’s Department of Natural Resources, are offering a seminar to developers, architects, engineers, designers and other construction sector representatives in the Gulf region. The seminar will be held on November 15, 2015 in Doha, Qatar and on November 18, 2015 in Dubai, UAE. Participants will learn about the various structural and appearance applications of wood. In this article, we showcase two projects where wood is an important design element. These projects will be presented in greater depth during the seminars as case studies.

The Montréal Symphony House – Classic and Elegant Use of Wood

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August 2015

Image © Stéphane Brügger

Image © Stéphane Brügger

Image © Stéphane Brügger

Image © Stéphane Brügger

The Montréal Symphony House is a concert hall located in downtown Montréal, Quebec, Canada and is the new home of the Orchestre Symphonique de Montréal. It is difficult to remain indifferent to the Montréal Symphony House, a veritable architectural gem. Commissioned by the Ministry of Culture and Communications of the Province of Quebec (Canada) to host the Montréal Symphony Orchestra, the auditorium seats 2,100 and is comprised of 18,580 square meters of beech wood. This expressive orange color wood species covers the walls, floors, stairs and the front of the balcony, wrapping the audience in a cocoon of comfort and wellbeing. This is complimented by the red maple wood adorning the floor scene and grids. Three main factors have contributed to making wood a leading material

for this project. “There was a desire by the architects to use material that satisfies the principles of sustainable development,” explains Michel Languedoc, Ædifica architect for the firm that piloted this project in collaboration with the firm Diamond & Schmitt. “It also responded to a request from the Minister of that time to value wood. Also, there was a desire by musicians to perform in an intimate concert hall, with warm colors. And for many musicians who have played with the Montréal Symphony Orchestra elsewhere, they found that warmth in concert halls made of wood.” Indeed, the Auditorium is a study of the possibilities of wood and how it can unify a space on a visual and auditory level. Horizontal and vertical, curved and flat, smooth and rugged, wood is providing both a warm atmosphere and exceptional acoustics. Maestro of the Montreal Symphony Orchestra, Kent Nagano says, “Alive and organic material, wood has always been preferred in music for its resonance.”


ADVERTORIAL

Image © Sonny Girard/Cecobois

The Port of Saguenay in the Province of Quebec, Canada, recently built a ‘welcoming pavilion’ at its cruise ship terminal. This pavilion was built using leading-edge technology and the materials for which the region is famous: wood, granite and aluminum. A gateway for international passengers of the most prestigious cruise ships that dock in Saguenay, the pavilion covers an area of 1,115 square meters. The pavilion allows passengers to explore the various artisan booths, a tourism kiosk and café that are housed within the pavilion. There is even a space for community events. With a forest area equivalent to one-fifth of Quebec, the Saguenay Lac Saint-Jean region is one of the largest wood resource regions in Quebec. It is also known under the name of Aluminum Valley. Both materials have greatly inspired the designers of the welcoming pavilion for the city of Saguenay. Located in the port, the pavilion is the flagship of this multifunctional terminal and blends in perfectly with the environment. The architects Alain Voyer and Stéphane V. Lapointe, from Planitech Consulting Group, explain how and why wood was incorporated into this building’s design: “The structure of the central part, high and very visible, consists of long curved beams and laminated wooden columns and a softwood lumber roof deck. This exposed structure meets the aesthetic requirements while taking into account the constraints of resistance,

behavior and cost savings. The wings structure that is not visible, but located on either side of the central hall was created by using prefabricated wooden trusses. Most doors and interior furnishings are comprised of a presswood core. Wood has also been integrated within the landscaping, particularly for the outdoor terrace.”

Image © Sonny Girard/Cecobois

Welcoming Pavilion in the Saguenay Port – Innovation in Design

21

Innovative Canadian Wood Structure & Design Technology Seminar

November 15

November 18

The seminar represents a unique opportunity. Come and learn how wood can be used in many types of buildings, from single-story homes to multi-story offices, schools, industrial facilities, recreational centers and arenas - thanks to its proven versatility and environmentally friendly footprint. You can be at the forefront in introducing these novel design concepts to the region, furthering the Middle East’s leadership in building technology and creative design. For more information about our upcoming seminars in Doha and Dubai, including the exact location and date, please visit us at: www.tradecommissioner.gc.ca/eng/offices-united-arab-emirates.jsp

Intercontinental Hotel Doha

Shangri-la Hotel Dubai

9.00 am onwards

9.00 am onwards

Seminar organized by

The Embassy of Canada to the UAE The Embassy of Canada to Qatar

For more details on the seminars, please contact Ms. Ana Ferro, Trade Commissioner at the Embassy of Canada to the UAE, by e-mail anamargarita.ferro@international.gc.ca or by phone +971 2 694-0376.

Financial support from

Natural Resources Canada

Partner

Ressources naturelles Canada

August 2015

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22 ANALYSIS

Timber buildings are cheaper to construct than traditional designs Forest and Wood Products Australia publishes study comparing costs of four building types in both timber and conventional construction

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August 2015

A new study shows that timber buildings can be up to 10 -15 percent cheaper to construct than traditional designs in several different building types has been recently published. The study - Commercial Building Costing Case Studies - Traditional Design versus Timber Project - was developed using realistic timber costing information from building professionals in the non-housing building sector. The report contains detailed designs of four building types in both timber and conventional construction, with a quantity surveyor comparing cost


estimates between them. The study compared the cost of constructing four commercial building types in timber and using traditional materials. The building types were a seven storey office building, an eight storey apartment building, a two storey aged care facility and a single storey industrial shed. Each building type was designed and then independently costed for a timber option as well as a more conventional concrete framed or steel framed building in an urban location. The researchers, together with experienced practitioners from the design,

Image Š Australand Parkville Construction

Image Š Australand Parkville Construction

Image Š Australand Parkville Construction

ANALYSIS 23

engineering and timber industries, developed new representative designs for each building, as privacy and intellectual property issues would otherwise have prevented publishing specific building information. According to the report, for building professionals in the nonresidential sector, constructing multi-storey buildings in timber has been an opportunity seldom taken advantage of. As a consequence, and to demonstrate the opportunities available, the research project developed a set of realistic construction cost

comparisons for four commercial building types when built in timber or using traditional materials, such as steel or concrete. In all cases, the comparison showed the building constructed in timber had potentially lower costs than for the so-called traditional competing nontimber solution. Commissioned by Forest and Wood Products Australia Ltd, the report was collated by Timber Development Association, NSW. The University of Technology Sydney codeveloped the research method and collaborated on design, cost and site issues with Arup, AECOM, Studio August 2015

505 and Fitzpatrick + Partners. Building Cost Information System, part of the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors, provided costs for timber compared to concreteframed or steel-framed building. For commercial and residential building designs, costs associated with heating, ventilation and airconditioning, facade and acoustic considerations were also analyzed. The research however did not take into account savings that could be garnered from using timber as a solution to sites with poor ground conditions, or as an off-site modular and prefabricated www.timberdesignandtechnology.com


24 ANALYSIS solution for sites with restricted access. There was also a sole focus on construction savings, and not on the environmental benefits over a building’s lifetime, which could contribute to savings - not to mention that with greater demand for timber, there would have to be more trees planted. It was assumed each building was to be built in a suburban location of a large Australian city. As such, the project comprised four steps: developing a model design for each of the four building types; designing each building in timber and a traditional material; developing an independent cost plan for each building type; and providing a commentary on each building type so that design professionals know why decisions were taken and what was considered in the cost plan. Each building was independently costed by an experienced industry quantity surveying company for a timber option as well as a more conventional concrete framed or steel framed building. The research revealed that constructing the building in timber resulted in cost savings of 13.9 percent for the two storey aged care facility, 12.4 percent for the seven storey office building, 9.4 percent for the single storey industrial shed, and 2.2 percent for the eight

storey apartment building. The researchers believe that the future for timber in commercial building construction is promising and that the greatest potential benefits to the timber industry are in the industrial shed, aged care and office building markets. The researchers also believe that as the commercial supply chain for timber construction develops, further savings are possible for timber buildings. The timber structural solutions were found in all cases to be significantly less than the

According to the report, the greatest potential benefits to the timber industry are in the industrial shed (girts and purlins), aged care and office building markets. The industrial shed (girts and purlins), and aged care markets are a ready to go opportunity for the timber industry but lack awareness by designers. Significantly, the report points out that the current timber industry supply chain could be easily adapted to supply the industrial shed’s girts and purlins, and aged care market with a little change to

The study compared the cost of constructing four commercial building types in timber and using traditional materials competing non-timber solution. The costs of each of the main components were found to be significantly cheaper in timber for each building. The gross savings were found to be even greater however the fire protection to some of these structural elements, the extra engineering cost (fire engineering) and the cost of termite protection reduced the cost savings. For the office and apartment building the major cost savings were generally found in the Preliminary Costs, an area not fully recognized when comparing costs.

current supply arrangements. The report goes on to point out that the next best opportunity for the timber industry is the office and institutional building markets as both building forms are similar. This market segment has great potential as the building design showed the significant cost savings particularly if a decorative ceiling is omitted. Looking ahead, further investment into research and knowledge would result in even further savings. To the design professional, a timber building design for commercial buildings application offer the

greatest opportunity to reduce costs as they are less known, they are lightweight and can be utilized in off-site construction formats. The future for timber in commercial building application then is very promising especially when one considers how cost effective timber buildings can be in comparison to traditional nontimber building design. Given that non-timber building designs are relatively well known, have been applied many times throughout Australia and have a well-developed supply chain, there is little opportunity to reduce their costs further. In contrast, timber design is not well understood and has in its infancy a developing commercial supply chain, making it conceivable for further savings with timber buildings than what has been considered in the report. . * This article contains text from the ‘Commercial Building Costing Case Studies - Traditional Design versus Timber Project’ report prepared by the Timber Development Association (TDA) for Forest and Wood Products Australia (FWPA). For more information or to download the complete report, please visit: http://www.fwpa.com.au/images/ marketaccess/PNA308-1213-Final_ Report_Commecial_Building_Cost_ Plan_Final.pdf

Image © Architekturagentur

About Forest and Wood Products Australia

www.timberdesignandtechnology.com

August 2015

Forest and Wood Products Australia Limited (FWPA), a not-for-profit company, is the forestry and wood industry’s service provider, investing in research and development, and providing research results to the forest and wood products industry in Australia. FWPA aims to improve the competitiveness and sustainability of the Australian forest and wood products industry through innovation, and investment in effective and relevant R&D.


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26 DESIGN & DĂ&#x2030;COR

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August 2015


DESIGN & DÉCOR 27

Image © Hufton + Crow Photographers

American white oak helps to achieve seamless spatial flow in Zaha Hadid’s Heydar Aliyev Center

August 2015

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Image © Hufton + Crow Photographers

28 DESIGN & DÉCOR

Image © Hufton + Crow Photographers

Zaha Hadid Architects was appointed as design architects of the Heydar Aliyev Center following a competition in 2007

As part of the former Soviet Union, the urbanism and architecture of Baku, the capital of Azerbaijan on the Western coast of the Caspian Sea, was heavily influenced by the planning of that era. Since its independence in 1991, Azerbaijan has invested heavily in modernizing and developing Baku’s infrastructure and architecture, departing from its legacy of normative Soviet Modernism. Zaha Hadid Architects was appointed as design architects of the Heydar Aliyev Center following a competition in 2007. The Center, designed to become the primary building for the nation’s cultural programs, breaks from the rigid and often monumental Soviet www.timberdesignandtechnology.com

architecture that is so prevalent in Baku, aspiring instead to express the sensibilities of Azeri culture and the optimism of a nation that looks to the future. The design of Heydar Aliyev Center establishes a continuous, fluid relationship between its surrounding plaza and the building’s interior. The plaza, as the ground surface; accessible to all as part of Baku’s urban fabric, rises to envelop an equally public interior space and define a sequence of event spaces dedicated to the collective celebration of contemporary and traditional Azeri culture. Elaborate forms, including undulations, bifurcations, folds, and inflections modify this plaza surface August 2015

into an architectural landscape that performs a multitude of functions: welcoming, embracing, and directing visitors through different levels of the interior. In this way, the building blurs the conventional differentiation between architectural object and urban landscape, building envelope and urban plaza, figure and ground, interior and exterior. The Heydar Aliyev Center is a national symbol for Azerbaijan, a catalyst for regeneration and, in the broadest sense, a regional showpiece. Constructing Zaha Hadid Architects’ audacious design for the Center drew on expertise from Turkey, the United Arab Emirates and the Commonwealth

of Independent States, as well as further afield. This explains the feel-good factor and can-do mentality, which made it possible. It was a labor of love and one that clearly paid off, given that it was named Design of the Year 2014 by the London Design Museum - a first for an architectural project. It is in the design of the auditorium that Zaha Hadid Architects’ approach can be seen at its most formalistic, and its swirling free-form geometry in American white oak was one of the practice’s principal challenges to the project team. For specialist Ankarabased contractor, İkoor, who were responsible for the construction of the auditorium, free-form meant


Image © Hufton + Crow Photographers

DESIGN & DÉCOR 29

anything but a free-for-all. The architects expected the outcome of their design exploration to be replicated to the letter, providing little scope for rationalization and no possibility of “design creep.” The forms of the auditorium, appearing to metamorphose in algorithmic sequence from one bay to the next, could not be reduced to repetitive modules. At the outset, İkoor were unsure how to proceed, evaluating the alternatives of a five-axle CNC router-milled solid wood shell, 45 mm thick for optimum acoustic performance, and a timber-clad carcass. They also considered CNC router-shaped polystyrene, strengthened with fiberglass and

veneered with timber. Concerned about accuracy, unsatisfactory wood grain patterns, expansion and contraction, İkoor rejected these options for a fourth they called “engineered craftsmanship”, that involved working with Rhino software to accurately construct a carcass from horizontal and vertical MDF members. These members were CNCformed, so they could be assembled to form a shape, which is a precise offset of the finished surface as modeled by Zaha Hadid Architects. Next, this surface was covered with four layers of accurately dimensioned 10 mm x 10 mm American white oak strips, successively glued, nailed, worked,

Image © Hufton + Crow Photographers

Image © Hufton + Crow Photographers

Such was the scale of the construction project that, overall, 230 cubic meters of American white oak were used in the auditorium

and adjusted until they precisely matched the geometry modeled by the architect, checked with digitally generated templates. This was the crafted stage of the operation. Each bay of the auditorium comprises three sections, one for the ceiling and two for its flanking walls, assembled from 8 to 15 subcomponents. Such was the scale of the construction project that, overall, 230 cubic meters of American white oak were used in the auditorium. Melih Gün, co-founder and owner of İkoor says that American white oak was chosen for the principal reasons that it “would perform well in an application where temperature and humidity levels would vary, it August 2015

is homogeneous in texture with the right color for the desired end result, it has good working properties and, especially important for this project, its has good acoustic performance.” İkoor was not only the contractor of this project, but also was responsible for the acoustics and coordination tasks related to the auditorium. The company worked together with Dr. Mehmet Çalışkan from Mezzo Stüdyo Acoustic Consulting, also from Ankara. For acoustic reasons, the internal surfaces were constructed as a shell within a box. Once this box was constructed, the internal shell was attached to a secondary steel frame, with rubber pad connections www.timberdesignandtechnology.com


Image © İkoor

30 DESIGN & DÉCOR joined by a common acoustically transparent surface, known as a coupling aperture. The core concept relies on unequal time requirements for sound decay in each space. This entails excess energy in one space during the decay process, which is transferred to the other. This can produce a sound decay that is suitable for the desired acoustic qualities within a space. In the case of the Heydar Aliyev Center, an unused ceiling void adjacent to the proscenium opening provided an opportunity to construct an enclosure with reflecting surfaces to act as the coupling volume. The configuration of flaps opening into this space was optimized through acoustic simulations involving 8,751 plane surfaces derived from Zaha Hadid Architects’ model, using ODEON software. This configuration of multiple apertures provides a better diffusion and flow of surplus energy from the coupled room into the main hall than would be achieved with one large opening. “As with all of our work, the Heydar Aliyev Center’s design evolved from our investigations and research of the site’s topography and the Center’s role within its broader cultural landscape. By employing these articulate relationships, the design is embedded within this context; unfolding the future cultural possibilities for the nation,” concludes Zaha Hadid Architects.

Image © İkoor

Image © İkoor

The Heydar Aliyev Center’s design evolved from our investigations and research of the site’s topography and the Center’s role within its broader cultural landscape

to the internal faces of its structure. An intermediary shell of multilayered sound insulation and steel wire suspension cables provide further acoustic isolation. Although this wasn’t a routine operation for the project team, its greatest challenge was the auditorium’s roof acoustics. This challenge was partly inherent in the project’s brief, requiring a space for conferences, which need low reverberance, so speech can be heard clearly, and music, which benefits from more reflection and richer acoustics. The proposed use of the auditorium for opera and ballet as well as concerts was an additional complication, because each requires a different configuration of orchestra shell and pit. Zaha Hadid Architects’ prescriptive geometry, choice of reflective surface finishes and unwillingness to entertain acoustic enhancements that would transform the appearance of the auditorium according to its use, wound up the ratchet still further. This wasn’t just an acoustic formfinding exercise. Mezzo Stüdyo, no stranger to headstrong architects’ visions for auditoria or conflicting requirements in clients’ briefs, was unfazed and, like other project team members, accepted Zaha Hadid Architects’ detailed proposals as a given. Mezzo Stüdyo also knew a deus ex machina was to hand: coupled-volume room acoustics. This involves two or more spaces

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Image © İkoor

DESIGN & DÉCOR

Project Details Project Name

Heydar Aliyev Center

Client

The Republic of Azerbaijan

Location

Baku, Azerbaijan

Architect

Zaha Hadid Architects

Design Team

Image © İkoor

Zaha Hadid and Patrik Schumacher with Saffet Kaya Bekiroglu

Project Architect Saffet Kaya Bekiroglu

Auditorium Wooden Cladding İkoor

Main Contractor and Architect of Record DiA Holding

Acoustic Consultant Mezzo Stüdyo

Area

111,292 sqm

Auditorium Capacity Image © İkoor

Image © İkoor

1,000

August 2015

Project Timespan

September 2007 - May 10, 2012

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32 DESIGN & DÉCOR

Bar Raval: a design masterpiece crafted from sculpted mahogany PARTISANS designs stunning interior to rival the art nouveau histories of Barcelona’s famed ‘pintxo’ bars

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August 2015


Image © Jonathan Friedman/PARTISANS

DESIGN & DÉCOR 33

August 2015

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34 DESIGN & DÉCOR

Carefully hewn from what look like unbroken Mobius strips of sinuous mahogany, the interior design is fundamentally corporeal commitment to actualizing every minute detail surpassed all our expectations.” The team got to work on a design concept that would transform the rundown commercial space in

Little Italy into an almost sentient architectural sculpture. Carefully hewn from what look like unbroken Mobius strips of sinuous mahogany, the interior design is fundamentally corporeal. In a stand-up-only

Image © Jonathan Friedman/PARTISANS

Bar Raval is a 21st-century response to Spanish Art Nouveau design. The brainchild of celebrated Canadian chef Grant van Gameren and wunderkind mixologists Mike Webster and Robin Goodfellow, Raval introduces Toronto to the ‘pintxo’ bar - a tapas-style bar that is a cornerstone of social and gastronomic culture in northern Spain. Following the success of Bar Isabel, van Gameren handpicked PARTISANS to execute an ambitious vision for his next location: to create ‘an art piece’ - a space that would become an enduring Toronto institution. The exquisite bar acts as a surreal and sensational food and design stage for chef Grant van Gameren and renowned mixologist Mike Webster to showcase their skills and wow their customers. Named after ‘el raval’, a once seedy district in the Catalan capital, crafted from sculpted mahogany, the bar transports you into an entirely different world that is draped in wood and metal, and brings together the compositional beauty of the contemporary world with the eclectic charm of Spanish Art Nouveau. “Working with Pooya, Alex, and the rest of their team was inspiring,” says van Gameren. “From the early conceptual planning all the way through to the final stages of construction, they pushed us to envision beyond what we imagined possible. And as our vision grew, their dedication, honesty, and

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August 2015

environment, the rippled - and rippling - surfaces encourage patrons to get comfortable, lean into their soft edges, and become a part of the woodwork. Raval’s molten quality fosters fluid circulation and close encounters, honoring the spirit of its Spanish pintxo counterparts. Its sculptural aesthetic is also intended to mirror muscle tissue. Part of what distinguishes PARTISANS is their design team’s technological appetite and agility. “Bar Raval was an opportunity for us to use advanced digital methods to reinterpret - not replicate classical Art Nouveau tropes for the 21st century,” says PARTISANS co-founder Alex Josephson. The team developed a highly detailed digital model of the space in order to develop prefabricated components that could be inserted directly into the building’s existing fabric with minimal disruption. In order to realize PARTISANS’ novel tool paths, the team worked directly with fabricators MCM Inc, who in turn enlisted Mastercam to adjust the software code they would eventually use to mill over 9 km of engravings on 75 panels of wood. “The design developed out of a connection between the formal


Image © Jonathan Friedman/PARTISANS

Image © Jonathan Friedman/PARTISANS

Image © Jonathan Friedman/PARTISANS

Image © Jonathan Friedman/PARTISANS

Image © Jonathan Friedman/PARTISANS

Image © Jonathan Friedman/PARTISANS

DESIGN & DÉCOR 35

August 2015

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36 DESIGN & DÉCOR histories of art nouveau, the plethora of cured slabs of meat, and the anatomy of the chefs themselves: a tattooed muscle bound group of intellectuals,” explains Josephson. “Our design is a three dimensional tattoo manifest in pure CNC’d mahogany.” Spread across 200 sqm, the sculpted mahogany interiors fill the entirety of the volume. The wood is sculpted into voluptuous bulges and scored with an intricate pattern of

bar and reimagine it as a stage for performance, interaction, and awe. The team also worked closely with engineers to develop customized acoustics and a tailor-made sound system. The result is a marvel. For those who have braved the daily lineups to get into the bar, they describe feeling as though they’ve exited Toronto and entered an entirely different world. Passers-by can also admire the artistry - the

Image © L Jonathan Friedman/PARTISANS

Raval’s molten quality fosters fluid circulation and close encounters, honoring the spirit of its Spanish pintxo counterparts lines generated by computer code. Further, the bar itself is solid, oiled to a lustrous finish; a little terraced protrusion on top that evokes architectural models, or the stump of an ancient hardwood tree. While Raval is introducing a new culinary genre to Toronto, its other chief objective is to elevate mixology to the heights of a culinary art. PARTISANS was challenged to re-evaluate the functional aspects of the classic

handcrafted steel latticework PARTISANS designed to clad the front and side windows. But like van Gameren’s mouth-watering pinxtos, the filigree only offers a tantalizing taste of what lies within. “Bar Raval will be as much an art piece as a restaurant; the architects we hired are the only people in Canada and perhaps the world capable of achieving my vision for one of the greatest bars in the world,” concludes van Gameren.

Project Details Project Name Bar Raval

Client

Grant van Gameren, Mike Webster & Robin Goodfellow

Location

Toronto, Canada

Size

93 sqm (1,000 sq.ft)

Architects PARTISANS

Contractor

Image © Jonathan Friedman/PARTISANS

Grant van Gameren

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August 2015

Wood Fabricator MCM Inc

Wood Installation MCM Inc

Photography Credits Jonathan Friedman / PARTISANS


37

CUTTING TO THE HEART OF THE MATTER

Timber Design & Technology Middle East is a bi-monthly magazine (in hard copy and online) for the buyers, end users and specifiers of wood and related machinery and products in the Middle East. The publication offers news, analysis and in-depth features examining all issues relating to the regional timber sector, targeting a wide spectrum of readers including furniture, manufacturer, joinery companies, specifiers (architects & designers), importers and distributors, woodworking professionals and flooring specialists among others.

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38 COMMENT

Green building: a key driver of timber certification

Growing emergence of timber as the green building material of choice

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August 2015

The use of timber in green construction is a growing trend worldwide. Backed by innovative techniques, its eco-friendly characteristics spell golden times for sustainable timber as a sought-after material. Worldwide, timber and wood products are seen as increasingly integral to low environmental impact green building. For this and other reasons, timber-based construction systems are gaining ground, and the use of sustainable timber in buildings is set to grow across the world.


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COMMENT 39

The green building no brainer Of course, the natural characteristics of wood are central to its green building potential and broader appeal in an increasingly environmentally sensitive construction sector. “Construction still accounts for a huge share of carbon emissions,” said Michael Green of Vancouverbased MG-Architects, famed for his impassioned pro-timber TED talks. “But, while man-made building materials generate carbon

in production, timber absorbs and stores it, at one tonne per cubic meter. It requires less energy in processing. It’s renewable and delivers less energy greedy structures. It is the green building no brainer.” But Green and other construction professionals stress, there’s increasingly more to timber’s green building bow than these inherent properties. Adding to its appeal is the emergence of innovative, eco-friendly building approaches, for which timber is particularly

appropriate. Also, a new generation of high specification wood products are capable of competing with concrete and steel in demanding structural applications.

Game-changer 1: Offsite construction Among the former, said Craig White of UK architects White Design, is offsite house prefabrication. “Offsite construction is faster and more efficient, and in the UK seen as key to meeting our 100,000 per year house construction shortfall,” August 2015

says White. “Because components are made in controlled factory conditions, it also delivers more air-tight, better insulated buildings. As a result, the UK government additionally regards it as a means for achieving its 2016 goal for all new homes to be zero carbon, and it’s targeting tenfold offsite growth.” According to White, timberframe is especially appropriate for offsite as it doesn’t require masonry’s drying processes. It’s also lightweight, so easy to handle

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40 COMMENT

While man-made building materials generate carbon in production, timber absorbs and stores it, at one tonne per cubic meter in large sections. In fact it currently accounts for 90 percent of UK offsite output and White Design sister company Modcell uses it for its own panelized engineered wood, and straw-insulated houses. “Manufacturing offsite, we can get seven houses erect and weather-tight in ten days,” added White.

Image © Marks & Spencers

Game changer 2: BIM and Life Cycle Analysis

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August 2015

Added momentum for timber comes from growing adoption of Building Information Modeling (BIM) software, for raising construction efficiency and building performance, and life cycle analysis (LCA) to map cradle to grave eco impacts. “Engineered wood and prefabricated timber systems are

suited to BIM and timber’s carbon credentials mean it scores well in LCA,” adds White. “In fact, LCA calculations show timber building is an optimal solution for carbon capture; costing EUR 26 per tonne, against EUR 70-90 for fossil fuel sector methods.”

Game changer 3: Engineered wood products For Michael Green, another game changer for wood in green building, and construction per se, are latest generation engineered or masstimber products, notably glulam and cross laminated timber (CLT). Engineered wood consists of wooden particles, strands or fibers bound together by an adhesive. These are the products behind ground-breaking high rise timber buildings, including ten-storey


COMMENT 41 blocks in London and Melbourne, Bergen’s new 14-storey, 52.8m Treet tower and MG-Architecture’s 6-storey Wood Innovation Design Center in Prince George, Canada’s tallest timber structure. Some architects now see CLT projects of 20-30 storeys on the horizon. And the material provides the structure for the 42-storey block blueprint developed by Chicago practice SOM under the Timber Tower Research project. “Mass timber is our first new mainstream structural material in 150 years,” says Green. “It’s not just the construction media for the low carbon era, it is enabling us to rethink architecture.” Green also sees pressure growing for green building schemes, like LEED, Green Globes and BREEAM, to give greater recognition to masstimber’s inherent carbon and other values. “They’re still behind the curve here,” he said. “But there’s a groundswell for them, and general building codes, to address this.” Benton Johnson of SOM says engineered/mass-timber is an especially valuable urban construction solution. “Urbanization is an accelerating worldwide demographic shift and mass timber provides a low carbon footprint, quick build route for us to cope.” Underlining America’s growing confidence in the sector, he pointed to a new collaboration between DR Johnson Lumber and ecotech investor OregonBEST to develop America’s first structural grade CLT plant. The more it’s used, the more engineered wood’s wider performance benefits are being appreciated and adding to its impetus. For instance, besides the 819 tonnes of carbon stored in its 1,090 m3 CLT structure, lightness was a key attraction for employing the material for London’s new 7-storey Kingsgate House apartment block. “It’s a fifth the density of concrete and a third the weight,” said Steve Cook, of contractor Wilmott Dixon. “In towns that’s a benefit as it means less intrusive foundations and risk to complex underground services.” CLT is also quieter to build with and its strength to weight ratio means fewer, bigger construction components. Cook is quick to point

out: “For Kingsgate we only needed 23 deliveries for main structural elements, versus an estimated 200 for reinforced concrete frame.”

Demands for sustainable timber Modern timber’s eco-friendliness remains core to making it the green building material of choice. Consequently its growing popularity is accompanied by a growing demand for verified legality and third-party proof of sustainability, notably FSC or PEFC certification. “A central reason for us and clients choosing timber is to reduce environmental impacts, so we want categorical evidence we’re not contributing to illegal trade and deforestation,” adds Green. “We want more, and more rigorous third-party verification, and a greater role for government auditing the auditors.” Benton Johnson at SOM also predicts still greater emphasis on timber’s ‘environmental paper trail’, including validation of ‘carbon

content and life cycle criteria’. Meanwhile, White Design now only specifies FSC or PEFC certified timber. “The exception is locally sourced material,” adds White. “Then we’ll check woodlands ourselves.” In the UK, growing demand for certification is reported from self-builders at one end of the construction spectrum (who build 15,000 houses annually), to major contractors at the other. According to Cook, the UK Contractors Group, comprising 30 companies with a turnover of GBP 33 billion, is now committed to buying only certified timber, and regular reporting on its use. Several of NEPCon’s certified UK clients already benefit from these trends. Smartroof Ltd builds complete roof structures in fully insulated panelized form, delivered to site in a single load, which assembles in just hours. With the reduction of on-site labor and the associated safety benefits, Smartroof is experiencing strong

It’s not just the construction media for the low carbon era, it is enabling us to rethink architecture

August 2015

growth within the house-building sector. “With our PEFC certification, our customers can see Smartroof is a progressive company in both design and manufacturing output”, states Peter Norden, Managing Director, Smartroof. Timber roof window manufacturer - Keylite Ltd - has also benefited from the growing demand for certification. Managing Director John Duffin says: “Keylite’s strong year-on-year growth demonstrates the lasting appeal of the natural warmth and aesthetic appeal of our windows. Our FSC certification shows the builder and end user that we are a company that cares about the materials we use.”

FSC and PEFC schemes set to benefit The schemes themselves also see green building increasing certification demand. “Of FSC’s 29,600 certificate holders, 3.2 percent are construction contractors and 3.3 percent building product manufacturers,” said Brad Kahn of FSC US. “Many other FSC wood processors and traders, distributors and importers are also part of the certified construction value chain. The sector is of

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42 COMMENT

enormous importance to us.” “It’s disappointing (some European) codes still give FSC products relatively few credits,“ adds Kahn. “But the single credit awarded in LEED has been transformational globally - 40 percent of LEED projects now earn it.” The PEFC also views this as a significant market direction. “We’ve seen a rise in national green buildings councils, from BREEAM to Green Globes, recognizing the benefits of sustainably sourced, certified timber and rewarding PEFC

material with extra credits,” said Ben Gunneberg, Secretary General at PEFC. “The sole exception for us is LEED. But we’re liaising with them and others to consolidate this trend.” Green building’s growth is also predicted to increase demand for project certification, where the certificate applies to timber throughout a development, or specific timber-based structures within it. So far 71 FSC project certificates have been awarded, with 28 more in the pipeline, and 50 percent are in the UK. But FSC

Knowing that your responsible choice of material supports the world’s forests adds to the pleasure of a comfortable home

expects the spread and number to rise, with proposed higher profile international promotion after next year’s project standard revision, where the level of full FSC-certified, mixed or post-consumer material it requires looks set to rise from 50 percent to 70 percent. Machiel Spaan of the Dutch M3H Architecten says: “We’re now going for FSC project certification of most of our design and build commissions. This enables clients to be sure of the origin of every element, even if it’s hidden in a structure or component. It makes everyone in the process aware that using certified wood is an important common goal.” To date PEFC project certification, which requires 70 percent PEFC material, has only been taken up on

one major development, London’s Kingsgate House. But it’s also expected to grow. “It seems clear that construction will be the next big driver of timber certification. FSC and PEFC are both likely to benefit from this trend,” predicts Elisa Colpo, Deputy Manager at NEPCon UK & Ireland. Colpo strongly believes that certified timber is set to play a major role in construction in the future. “This is about taking care of our environment and climate, but also about new and exciting design. In addition, certified timber tells a story that lasts all through the building’s lifetime. Knowing that your responsible choice of material supports the world’s forests adds to the pleasure of a comfortable home,” concludes Colpo.

Image © Marks & Spencers

About NEPCon

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August 2015

NEPCon is an international, non-profit organization that works to promote the responsible use of natural resources and to safeguard sustainable livelihoods. The organization helps transform business practices and consumer behavior through innovation projects and delivery of certification services. Learn more at www.nepcon.net.


Image © dwp

Image © AHEC

Image © AHEC

COMMENT 43

American Hardwood Seminar The American Hardwood Export Council (AHEC) cordially invites you to attend a seminar on American hardwoods on Tuesday 15 September at the Al Murooj Rotana Hotel, Dubai. The seminar will focus on all aspects of the American hardwood resource, sustainable forest management, production, kiln-drying and the wide range of species available. It will also provide an introduction to the National Hardwood Lumber Association (NHLA) rules for grading hardwood lumber, including a practical demonstration. The two main speakers will be Mr Roderick Wiles, AHEC Regional Director, based in Singapore and Mr Dana Spessert, NHLA Chief Lumber Grading Inspector, based in Memphis, Tennessee. Media Partner

The seminar is free to attend and will be followed by a complimentary dinner and drinks. All hardwood importers and end users (furniture & joinery manufacturers) are welcome to attend, but AHEC would appreciate registrations in advance, as spaces will be limited. To register, please write to mena@americanhardwood.org Or contact Mr Richard Wilson on +971 50 849 4841. For more information on American hardwoods, please visit: www.americanhardwood.org Venue: Murooj Rotana, Dubai, U.A.E. Date: 15 September 2015 Time: 5:45 pm onwards August 2015

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44 COMMENT

Image Š MTC

Malaysiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sustainable Forestry Practices, and the Certification Cost Conundrum www.timberdesignandtechnology.com

August 2015


There is also little commercial evidence to suggest that consumers are willing to pay a higher price for certified timber sustainable forest management, our forestry resources have continued to exist substantially. At the Rio Summit in 1992, the Malaysian government pledged to retain half of the country’s land area as natural forests. Today, 61.6 percent of Malaysia’s land area remains covered in natural forests. All states in Malaysia also subscribe to common policies enshrined in the National Forestry Policy (NFP) 1978 (Amended 1992) and the National Forestry Act 1984, although Sabah and Sarawak have their independent forest management policies

which contain similar provisions to the NFP. In 2011, the National Commodity Policy was formulated to ensure long-term sustainability of the plantation and commodities industry, taking into account the well-being of the stakeholders (people), environmental sustainability (planet), and economic viability (profit).

Forest conservation and economic development: A delicate balancing act Malaysia’s forests are categorized into Permanent Reserved Forests (PRF), ‘Stateland Forests’ that

Image © MTC

Malaysia has been practicing sustainable forestry management for more than a century, long before it became fashionable. Sustainable forestry costs money to implement, and while countries can have their forests certified as proof of sustainability, certification may not be the ultimate panacea to ensure this. There is also little commercial evidence to suggest that consumers are willing to pay a higher price for certified timber, despite such claims by some parties. Datuk Wee Jeck Seng, Chairman of the Malaysian Timber Council, highlights the environmental credentials of the Malaysian forestry resource. As a major producer and exporter of tropical timber, Malaysia has made tremendous efforts to ensure that it is able to supply timber that is sourced from sustainably managed forests. We are the first tropical timber-producing country to establish a forest and timber certification system as proof to the international market that the nation’s forests are sustainably managed. In fact, we have been practicing Sustainable Forest Management (SFM) since 1901 when the first (British) forestry officer was appointed, long before it became a global trend. If we look back on our modern history, we have actually benefitted from many of the legacies left behind by the British, particularly the acts and ordinances aimed at protecting the environment, and the concept of sustainable forest management. Thanks to over a century of

Image © MTC

COMMENT 45

August 2015

are earmarked for non-forestry uses, and ‘Totally Protected Areas’ (TPA). TPAs encompass national and state parks, wildlife and bird sanctuaries, wetlands, virgin jungle reserves, protection forests and marine parks, and are off-limits for commercial forestry activities. About 79.06 percent or 12.61 million hectares of the total forest area in Malaysia is PRF with each state responsible for drawing-up their Forest Management Plans based on SFM practices. SFM ensures three important aspects of forestry - the commercial aspect (by allowing controlled logging in PRFs); the social aspect (ensuring that communities that rely on the forests for their livelihood can continue to do so); and the environmental aspect (by stipulating strict criteria to conserve the forest environment and delicate ecosystem). At the same time, in order to ease the pressure on natural forests by the demand of raw materials, the Malaysian government has implemented the ‘Forest Plantation Development Programme’, wherein 25,000 hectares of forest would be planted annually. This programme, which began in 2005, is set to last 15 years and aims to establish 375,000 hectares of forest plantations by 2020, with fastgrowing species like Rubberwood and Acacia, which are highly suitable for furniture, flooring, as well as builders’ carpentry and joinery products. It is with these practices that Malaysia continues to safeguard www.timberdesignandtechnology.com


Image © MTC

46 COMMENT

its valuable national reserves and forests, and to execute a delicate balancing act with policies that support socio-economic growth and progress.

Putting SFM into practice There are several key criteria that need to be met under Malaysia’s SFM practices. There must be a proper pre-felling forest inventory carried out by the Forestry Department staff. Trees that are big enough and suitable to be felled will be identified and marked clearly. Usually, only 7 - 12 trees that have reached the minimum cutting size can be felled per hectare. ‘Mother trees’ or ‘Seed trees’ that produce seeds, and trees near river or water sources must be marked to ensure they are not felled. After logging, a post-felling inventory is conducted by Forestry Department staff to determine the status of the forest stand (area). Appropriate ‘silvicultural’ treatments, if necessary, will be applied to rehabilitate the logged-over forest area. This will help the forests regenerate and return to their former state more quickly. The rotation period for harvesting zones in PRF is usually 25-30 years. By this time, the smaller trees would have grown big enough for felling and the whole cycle can be

repeated. These general principles of SFM form the basis of forestry management activities in the PRF in all states in Malaysia, with some variation in execution from state to state. The forestry department of each state strictly enforces all these criteria for loggers to adhere to. By practicing SFM, we ensure that there is adequate economic harvest and sufficient residual stock for the next cutting cycle, and that the integrity of the forest ecosystem is maintained.

certification system, the Malaysian Timber Certification Scheme (MTCS) - a voluntary national scheme that provides independent assessment of forest management practices. Developed by the Malaysian Timber Certification Council (MTCC), the MTCS was first endorsed by the Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC) in 2009, with a further fiveyear re-endorsement in 2014. MTCS is the first tropical timber certification scheme in the Asia Pacific region to be endorsed by

There is also the danger of believing that certification is the ‘be-all and end-all’ in terms of attaining sustainable forest management recognition Globally recognized forest certification system Malaysia’s forest management practices and certification scheme are benchmarked against established international standards and practices. As a member of the International Tropical Timber Organization (ITTO), Malaysia’s timber policies and practices are in line with ITTO Objective 2000, with SFM being accepted as a national commitment. Recognizing the uniqueness of tropical forestry, we have developed our own forest

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August 2015

the PEFC, which represents over 200 million hectares of certified forests worldwide. As a member of PEFC, the MTCS is recognized in countries like Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, New Zealand, the Netherlands, Switzerland and the UK. The MTCS has also been accepted by the Public Procurement Policies of Australia, Canada, Japan, Italy, the Netherlands, Singapore, the UK, the UAE (Abu Dhabi) and the USA. Currently, 4.66 million hectares of forests in Malaysia have acquired

the MTCS Forest Management Certification (FMC) and 310 timber companies have gained MTCS CoC (Chain of Custody) certification. The first tropical plantation certified by MTCS is the Samling plantation forest in Sarawak. When it comes to forestry, Malaysia continues to perform a delicate balancing act between ensuring the economic viability of our forest resources while maintaining the sustainability and biodiversity of the forest’s ecosystem. However, several concerns remain.

Who’s footing the bill for SFM? Considerable resources and efforts go into ensuring that our forest management adheres to the certification policies and procedures that have been put in place. Naturally, this translates into a heftier price tag for certified timber products that has to be borne by some party in the supply chain. There have been claims by Western ‘green’ NGOs that consumers are willing to pay a 15 - 25 percent premium for certified timber, according to their surveys. Unfortunately, the reality on the ground is that these consumers are few. In markets like Europe, which has not really recovered from the Global Financial Crisis, the timber and


construction industry has become even more price-conscious, and this puts certified tropical timber at a more significant commercial disadvantage, particularly against temperate timbers which are likely to be plantation-sourced and, therefore, less costly to manage. The big question is: are consumers willing to pay a higher price for certified timber? And if they are not, then who are we ultimately doing this for? For countries like Malaysia, who has been managing her forests sustainably even before certification existed, the additional cost of fine-tuning existing processes might not be that significant. However, for countries starting from ground zero, the costs can prove too prohibitive to implement. Additionally, for developing economies that are still focusing on providing its people with basic needs such as food, certification is probably not high on their agenda - but in order to be able to trade their resources in environmentally-conscious markets and get their people out of poverty, they still need to adhere to these conditions. In such instances, the requirement for certification becomes an inequitable burden and is effectively a non-tariff barrier to these developing economies. There is also the danger of believing that certification is the ‘be-all and end-all’ in terms of attaining sustainable forest management recognition. If certification is akin to a national registration identity card (NRIC) or passport that proves someone is Malaysian, just because the NRIC or passport is not seen does not mean the person is not Malaysian. Similarly, just because a forest is not certified, this does not necessarily mean that it is not sustainably managed. It just does not have a certificate to prove that it is sustainably managed. Fortunately for Malaysia, all natural forests belong to the state, making it easier for us to implement sustainable forestry management and certification. Our main argument is that more markets and consumers should be continuously encouraged to ‘walk the talk’ so that they are more willing to pay a premium for certified timber products.

Image © MTC

COMMENT 47

About the Author Datuk Wee Jeck Seng holds a degree in Business Management from the University of Sunderland, UK. He had served as Political Secretary to a former President of the Malaysian Chinese Association and as a Deputy Minister of Youth and Sports. He was elected as a Member of the Johor State Assembly for Pekan Nanas for the term 2004-2008 and has been the Member of Parliament for Tanjung Piai in Johor since 2008. He was appointed as Chairman of MTC by the Minister of Plantation Industries and Commodities Malaysia. His current term of office runs from 1 January 2015 to 31 December 2016. For more information, please visit: www.mtc.com.my

August 2015

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48 TECHNOLOGY

Treet: the tallest timber-framed building in the world Structural system for the 14-storey building will consist of meterthick glulam columns in a stacked modular design Due for completion in November this year, a 14-storey luxury apartment block in central Bergen, Norway, will be the world’s tallest timber-framed multi-family project at 49 meters (160 feet) breaking the current record holder - Melbourne’s Forté building - which stands at 32 meters tall. The building is called ‘Treet’ or ‘The Tree’ and is the brainchild of the Bergen and Omegn Building Society (BOB), which aims to be at the forefront of developing homes for the future, with a strong focus on energy consumption, sustainable development and communal outdoor spaces. The idea of building a high-rise building by the Puddefjord Bridge

project, BOB considered various systems for high-rise timber buildings, including the use of solid cross-laminated timber. This system model has been used both in Sweden (Växsjö), London (Murray Grove) and a variety of places in Austria. However, the developers arrived at the conclusion that combining prefabricated building modules with a glulam structure was the best way to successfully realize their vision. Designed by architects Artec and engineered by Sweco Norway, the structure comprises a mix of cross-laminated timber and glulam, built on concrete ground floor. The tower will consist of a

The developers arrived at the conclusion that combining prefabricated building modules with a glulam structure was the best way to successfully realize their vision was originally suggested by the architect Geir Brekke of Lund & Partnere in 2005, when the site was being zoned. The project was subsequently developed by BOB with significant inputs from Rune B. Abrahamsen of Sweco AS, who designed the loadbearing structure and the use of modules in collaboration with Artec Prosjekt Team. Further, Trefokus AS, the Norwegian Institute of Wood Technology and NTNU have provided expert advice on the development of the project with additional support also coming from Innovation Norway. During the planning of the

glulam load-bearing structure and prefabricated modular flats, made from engineered timber manufactured by Moelven Limitre using only Norwegian wood. The concept involves the modules being stacked four storeys high, with two platforms (above on the 4th and 9th floors) being anchored to the glulam frame. These platforms are supported and reinforced by 3m-high glulam lattice beams. Another four storeys of modules are then stacked on top of each platform, thereby enabling the developers to build 14 storeys in total. The building will offer a total of

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August 2015


Image Š Berfn and Omegn Building Society

TECHNOLOGY 49

August 2015

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50 TECHNOLOGY concrete elements have been installed on the top of the 5th and 10th floors, and on the roof. The concrete elements are not a part of the structural system but have been installed to add weight in order to reduce movement within the building,” says Ole Herbrand Kleppe, Chief Project Manager at BOB. All the main load bearing structures are wooden. In addition, two internal decks as well as the top deck are made out of concrete. Further, Tricoya® wood, corten steel and glass is used in the façades. The building’s apartment modules have been designed to comply with the Passivhaus sustainability standard and have been constructed in a factory in Estonia and then shipped to Bergen. Despite the initial cost being somewhat higher than that of a steel and/or concrete structure, the erection time is significantly shorter with the developers able to erect 4 storeys of modules in only 3 days. To protect the glulam construction against the weather in Bergen, two of the sides have balconies and a curtain wall façade. The two other sides are made with extra insulation (total of 430 mm of insulation), and then covered with

rusty metal plates, which require no future maintenance. Inside the main staircase, all of the glulam constructions will be fully visible, together with the CLT walls in the corridors. According to Kleppe, the building is a pilot project to demonstrate that it is possible to build modern city residences out of materials that meet tomorrow’s standards for sustainability and greenhouse gas emissions, while still achieving a high plot ratio. Using timber instead of non-renewable construction materials represents an important step towards reducing global warming. The role of forests as ‘carbon sinks’, whereby the wood stores carbon as long as the tree is alive or is used in a structure, is expected to become increasingly important in the future. Studies indicate that one cubic meter of structural lumber stores 0.9 tonnes of CO2, which the tree has absorbed from the air. In addition to directly storing CO2, the glulam in the structural frame replaces materials such as concrete and steel. This is even more important than the CO2 directly stored by the wood as research shows that the combination of stored CO2 and the replacement of

Using timber instead of non-renewable construction materials represents an important step towards reducing global warming.

Image © Bergen and Omegn Building Society

62 apartments - 11 one-bedroom apartments (43 sqm) and and 51 two-bedroom apartments (64-66 sqm). The apartments on the 5th and 10th floors will have to accommodate the load-bearing structure, which will make them slightly smaller. However, most of the flats will have their own balconies. There will also be a terrace at the top of the building, on the top of the 13th and 14th floors. The 9th floor will include a communal gym that offers beautiful views over the city and the fjord. In addition, the side facing the sea will feature an esplanade and marina; while towards Damsgårdsveien, residents will have access to a park and recreation area. To protect the glulam structure, the building will have glassedin balconies on two sides. This will give the building a unique appearance, with the glulam structural elements being visible through the glass facade. The gable walls will be lined and insulated, enabling the project to meet passive house standards, further enhancing its environmental credentials. The project has received a grant from Enova to help it meet those standards. “A key challenge in building a 14-storey high timber building is preventing it from swaying in strong winds. As such, the glulam frame has been reinforced with diagonal glulam braces whilst

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August 2015

non-renewable materials avoids approximately two tonnes of CO2 emissions per cubic meter of structural lumber. Kleppe estimates that the building will probably use about 9,500 cubic meters of lumber in its load-bearing structures thereby avoiding approximately 18,000 tonnes of CO2 emissions. This is equivalent to avoiding driving a good 105 million kilometers in a petrol car that consumes 7.5 liters per kilometer or avoiding more than 210 million crossings of the Puddefjord bridge in Bergen. In addition, there is also the CO2 stored in the wood in the prefabricated building modules. Overall the building will avoid more than 21,000 tonnes of CO2 emissions. “We wanted the project to be a pilot project for the industrialization of the construction process. The aim is therefore to use a high degree of prefabrication, both of the building modules and glulam load-bearing structures. Floor and wall linings in corridors, stairwells, balconies and lift shafts will also be prefabricated, in order to reduce the on-site construction time. The quality of the individual products will be higher, as they will be manufactured indoors in a factory, in a dry, controlled environment. Overall, we expect this to improve the final results quality,” concludes Kleppe. *For more information, please visit: www.treetsameie.no.


51

Image © Bergen and Omegn Building Society

Image © Bergen and Omegn Building Society

TECHNOLOGY

Project Details Client

BOB Eiendomsutvikling AS

Architect

Artec Prosjekt Team AS

Structural engineering, fire safety, acoustics and building services Image © Bergen and Omegn Building Society

Image © Bergen and Omegn Building Society

Sweco AS

August 2015

Supplier of glulam structures Moelven Limtre AS

Supplier of prefabricated building modules Kodumaja AS

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Image © Justin Patrick

52 WOOD WORKS

‘Woodwork’ exhibition at Southern Guild Gallery

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August 2015

‘Woodwork’ is the third dynamic exhibition of South African collectible design to open at Cape Town’s Southern Guild Gallery. An exploration of wood in all its forms, the collection of pieces has been curated to encapsulate the diversity of the medium and will be a first of its kind in South Africa. These limited edition works, produced by 26 of the country’s most recognized names in design, will reflect the natural sensibility of the material, while also showcasing its immense diversity. “Wood is natural, organic and elemental, and reflects a sense of homeliness and warmth

that people crave as we head towards the winter season,” says Trevyn McGowan, co-founder of the gallery. “While some of our designers use the medium in very traditional ways, others tackle it with innovation and technological processes that uniquely highlight its organic qualities. It’s fascinating how wood can be shaped and altered so that an art created by nature is enhanced by the art of the designer.” The exhibition opened on June 5 and is set to run until August 28 at the Southern Guild Gallery. We take a closer look at some of the key pieces from the collection.


WOOD WORKS 53

‘EGG CUP CHAIR’ BY ADAM BIRCH

Image © Adam Birch

Adam completed a Fine Art degree in 2000 and has worked with timber in a variety of ways since. His fascination and experience with timber as a medium is multi-faceted. The natural shape of each piece informs the sculptural approach, and although the end result is refined and sophisticated, the essence of the individual tree is still present. Adam’s functional sculptures are hewn using hand tools, and are one-off pieces that carry the spirit of the journey of discovery that formed them.

August 2015

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54 WOOD WORKS

‘HAWKER BENCH’ BY TONIC

Image © TONIC

The large catalogue of high-end furniture that Greg Gamble and Philippe van der Merwe of TONIC produce represents almost a decade at the forefront of the country’s design industry. The TONIC range consists of both bespoke and limited-edition pieces. Traditional craftsmanship, and the unorthodox use of materials are two enduring characteristics of the work of the studio. A refined, sophisticated, modern elegance is explored in various design-driven projects. A limited edition piece made from American walnut and maple, the uniquely South African ‘Hawker Bench’ is reminiscent of the way in which hawkers set up shop by placing a plank between two chairs on which to sell their wares.

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August 2015


WOOD WORKS 55

Uncompromising attention to quality, detail and originality is what sets David Krynauw’s work apart. A desire for a fresh approach leads him to experiment with different shapes and forms to produce unconventional and inspiring pieces. The bulk of his work consists of original and unique creations and the focus is rather on establishing a synergy between client and product as opposed to mass production. Designing and creating unique furniture is what motivates him. While exploring the art of woodwork he discovered the perfect way to express himself.

August 2015

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Image © David Krynauw

‘KAS’ BY DAVID KRYNAUW


56 WOOD WORKS

Stanislaw Trzebinski is a Cape Town based artist and sculptor working out of his studio in Woodstock. Recent sculptural works in clay and bronze are part of an ongoing experiment in subject matter and medium resulting in some interesting pieces as he works on perfecting new styles. Living in Cape Town away from his home country of Kenya has given him time to think about the direction of his artistic message. Trzebinski’s ‘Triton’s Table’ has been inspired by his muse - the sea. Like much of his sculptural work, the legs of this table have been constructed to resemble a living reef and that although heavy by nature and sterile by means of its material, bronze, appears weightless and alive.

www.timberdesignandtechnology.com

August 2015

Image © Stanslaw Trzebinski

‘TRITON TABLE’ BY STANISLAW TRZEBINSKI


WOOD WORKS 57

Growing with the HOMAG Group

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Edge banding machine Highflex 1430

Processing center Venture 109

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Panel saw HPL 300

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Intelligent woodworking solutions August 2015 www.timberdesignandtechnology.com


58 WOOD WORKS

‘NAW NAW’ CHAIR BY BABACAR NIANG

Image © BABACAR Niang

A veritable explosion of newness, Babacar Niang’s designs are as abundant as they are spectacularly multiform - from tables with fragile bowed legs that look like a giraffe taking its first steps, to molded and plaited leather chairs with a pagan West African sensuality. Based in Senegal, Niang works with wood and improbable shapes, combining these with various materials - either recuperated or natural (wood, leather, horn, fish skin) - to create objects charged with identity. This year’s Woodwork exhibition has been dedicated in loving memory of Babacar Niang, Senegal (25-09-1964 to 25-03-2015).

www.timberdesignandtechnology.com

August 2015


WOOD WORKS 59

‘NESTOR’ BY OSTERWALD AND SONS

Image © Osterwald And Sons

Osterwald and Sons Cabinetmakers employ traditional cabinetmaking techniques in conjunction with modern manufacturing standards to produce long lasting and high quality custom designed furniture. Established in 1984 the company has continued to deliver superb service on literally hundreds of bespoke projects both locally and internationally. The ‘Nestor’ table is made of solid prime maple, American poplar, and inlaid indigo black hi-pressure laminate, parcel-painted by hand with casein.

August 2015

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60 WOOD WORKS

‘TIME STOOD STILL’ BY JOHN VOGEL

Image © John Vogel

John Vogel has a design background in architecture and started making furniture as a student. He feels a strong affinity for timber and most of his inspiration comes from the natural world and the exploration of organic forms. Core design values are simplicity and imagination, which translate into refined shapes that are exquisitely finished, beautifully comfortable and timeless. For Woodwork, Vogel created the ‘Time Stood Still’ writing table as a thought space incubator, resembling a breaking wave at the moment its form reaches fullness ... the moment before it collapses into chaos and dissipates. Capturing the brief moment between perfect expression and chaos. This moment can be compared to being in the zone, or being in the experience of an inspired moment, where time stands still.

www.timberdesignandtechnology.com

August 2015


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‘ASSEGAI CHAIR’ BY XANDRE KRIEL

Image © Xandre Kriel

Cape Town designer Xandre Kriel painstakingly creates each of his sculptural pieces with consummate dedication. The Assegai Chair celebrates the slouch (a manner of sitting that was frowned upon in his strict Afrikaans upbringing) and is the fist in a range of ‘Palm Chairs’. This chair keeps the body in a reclined position like a big hand. Being the first, the Assegai Palm will be the most primitive made piece of this range. Only ten of these chairs will be painstakingly hand made by the designer himself religiously following the lines of the first draft. This basic form will be the backbone for the automated steel manipulations to follow.

August 2015

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62 WOOD WORKS

‘SOUL ARCH’ BY JASPER EASLES

Image © Jasper Easles

As a lifelong surfer and ocean enthusiast, with a passion and understanding to create refined, functional beauty, ‘Soul Arch’ was a perfect opportunity for Jasper Easles to express his vision. The selection of locally sourced timber in the form of Ficus and South African Kiaat for ‘Soul Arch’ was a natural one, given the South African origin and unique qualities of the wood. The choice to contrast the refined hand shaped wooden form with an equally gracious raw reinforced fiber cement base was to complement one another in their natural, but sophisticated beauty. 10mm marine grade aluminum was machined to form the locking system. This is where technology and design are introduced as a highly functional but subtle detail.

www.timberdesignandtechnology.com

August 2015


WOOD WORKS 63

‘UNTITLED’ BENCH BY LAURIE WIID VAN HEERDEN

Image ©Laurie Wiid van Heerden

Laurie Wiid van Heerden’s ‘Untitled’ (after W.B) bench is based on the techniques he learnt through working for the South African artist Wim Botha. The construction techniques employed in the creation of this bench have been developed and tailored over years. Each timber component is hand machined and fitted with careful consideration to present the ‘energy’ or ‘movement’ of the piece. The main source starts with intricate timber joints that create a cluster of sharp beveled angles. This cluster or source (origin), starts to break down into lines and facets, spreading through the length of the bench. Meeting the end of the piece, the angles are aligned and placed accordingly to form a controlled point, bringing the piece to completion. ‘Untitled’ (3.4m timber & steel bench) for Woodwork is made from a reclaimed timber beam that is estimated to be over 100 years old.

August 2015

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64 WOOD WORKS

‘ESSENTIAL’ BY GUIDELINE MANUFACTURING

Image ©Guideline Manufacturing

Guideline Manufacturing combines contemporary design with more than 20 years of furniture manufacturing experience and German master craftsmanship. Being a German Master Craftsman, Managing Director Christoph Karl has a strong influence on design and quality. Through the natural evolution of master craftsmanship and cutting edge technology, the highest quality pieces are created using a level of precision that is unquestionably superior. Through 3D computer engineering programs, designs are rendered into a working program that is fed into CNC machinery. Components are shaped with maximum accuracy and minimal waste. This conforms to the highest international standards still using classic joinery methods such as ‘mortise and tenon’ joints. This results in classic contemporary furniture pieces that resonate tradition and clean-lined modernism.

www.timberdesignandtechnology.com

August 2015


WOOD WORKS 65

‘BATTLESHIP TABLE’ BY MEYER VON WIELLIGH

Image © Meyer von Wielligh

Combining workmanship excellence, creative ideas and the very best materials, Meyer von Wielligh works across a wide range of design styles. With nearly 30 years of combined furniture industry skills and international qualifications in joinery, cabinet making and carpentry, Norman Meyer and Abrie von Wielligh are passionate nature lovers who find inspiration in natural surroundings. The Meyer von Wielligh approach to furniture design favors the gentle lines and intricate textures of nature. The Battleship Table was produced from an old oak tree that had fallen over and flattened 6 cars in its wake.

August 2015

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66 INDUSTRY FOCUS

Thermally modified timber

Image © Leo A. Daly Architects

Over the past twenty years or so, leading European players have been perfecting thermal modification of timber as a means to enhance their durability, longevity, and dimensional stability. More recently, the technology has spread to the U.S. and to Turkey with major producers investing in the large-scale production of thermally modified timber (TMT) an exterior-grade wood species that is typically not used outdoors. The demand for environmentally friendly wood products has challenged the timber industry to supply markets with durable timber without using additional chemicals. While a new generation of effective biocides for the timber preservation industry is providing a partial solution to this conundrum, the development of thermal modification techniques offers a

completely different approach. Thermal modification uses heat and steam to fundamentally change the properties of wood, making it hydrophobic, or non-absorbent, so the wood does not expand and contract with the fluctuation of moisture. The agent of thermal modification is heat between 160° C and 230° C, with reduced oxygen concentration. This can be achieved by steam, oil bath, inert gas (nitrogen) or vacuum. Generally, all wood species can be modified thermally, although those with a low raw density are better suited. The intended positive modification effects include: increased biological durability against wood decay fungi; increased dimensional stability (i.e. reduced swelling, shrinking and deformation); reduced equilibrium moisture content (in the hygroscopic range); reduced thermal conductivity; and an altered (darker) color. The only side effects, not intended and mostly negative, are reduced strength and increased stiffness and brittleness. The last is a drawback, which is intrinsically tied to thermal modification and thus cannot be avoided completely Thermally modified wood can be used in a range of outdoor applications such as siding, decking, and patio furniture, and in interior applications such as flooring, moldings, windows, and doors. In principle, thermal modification allows lower-cost species to compete with naturally durable and higher- cost species. The majority of the global TMT volume is produced by Finnish companies using the Thermowood® process. This protected trademark stands for both the process and products. The manufacturers are organized under the International Thermowood Association, whose members are established kiln manufacturers and TMT producers from Sweden, Turkey and Japan amongst others. Given the growing demand and acceptance of TMT, we profile some of the leading players across the world.

JAF THERMALLY MODIFIED DECKING SET THE STAGE FOR YOUR LIFE W Inserat_Dubai_Thermoholz_394x129mm_abf.indd 1

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ROCKWOOD TIMBER GROUP

Image Š Rockwood Timber Group

The Rockwood Timber Group offers a diverse selection of thermally modified wood products, which includes domestic American hardwoods and imported European softwoods. The companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s domestic thermally modified wood supplier has been in operation for over seven years in the United States and its European thermo-wood production line has been in operation since 1998. As such, the company supplies thermally modified American hardwoods in Ash and Satin Walnut finishes and European softwoods in a Nordic Pine finish. The company offers thermally modified American hardwoods that are harvested and cooked domestically using a patented process specifically developed for thermally treating American hardwoods. During this heat treatment process, the sugars and fibers that serve as a food source for fungus, mold, and decay (deterioration factors for traditional lumber) are baked out of the wood. Further its relationship with top-tier thermally modified wood producers allows it to deliver affordable high quality TMT that customers can use in a variety of applications. Rockwood uses only electric heaters for its patented thermal modification process. On account of the size of the chamber and a short cycle time, the company is able to remain flexible and cater to smaller orders. As a result, its energy consumption, thanks to good insulation and the compact size of its chambers, is significantly less than European thermo-treatment processes. Finished thermo-wood profiles include 4/4 Satin Walnut Decking & Porch Flooring, as well as 5/4 Pine Decking. A limited supply of thermowood blanks is also available upon request. Rockwood finished profiles and blanks can be used in numerous projects and applications - from beautiful wood decking surfaces and outdoor wood furniture projects, to woodlined spas and saunas. Rockwood can even be used as a rich exterior wood paneling for a home. For more information, please visit: http://thermotreatedlumber.com

Thermally modified decking produced by the JAF group impresses with dimensional stability, durability and aesthetic appearance. Our thermally modified timber shows elegant shades paired with the wonderful characteristic grain of European woods. Interested? Please contact our JAF Global Sales Team: globalsales@jaf-group.com

www.jaf-group.com

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68 INDUSTRY FOCUS

LUNAWOOD

Image © Lunawood

Lunawood Ltd is an innovative pioneer in the thermal modification of wood and has grown to be a global ThermoWood® market leader. Thermal modification improves the wood’s properties, thereby expanding the range of applications in which the wood can be used. As a result of thermal modification, Finnish wood species pine and spruce, known for their poor durability and insufficient dimensional stability, are transformed into durable and stable products suitable for extreme climates. The thermal modification process of Lunawood® utilizes only high temperatures and steam. Therefore the end product is completely natural and chemical free. ThermoWood® process respects the natural properties of wood. The patented production process is based on the gradual thermal modification of wood, wherein the chemical and physical properties of the wood undergo permanent change. Lunawood is natural wood product and suitable for both indoor and outdoor use. The main end use applications include façades, deckings, solar shades, pergolas and saunas. Using mainly Finnish PEFC-certified wood in its production, it works closely with its suppliers to select and use only the raw materials that are best suited for production in terms of type and quality. For more information, please visit: www.lunawood.fi/en

Image © SWM-Wood

SWM-WOOD SWM-WOOD is a leading Finnish company manufacturing thermally modified wood, focusing on the thermal modification of spruce and pine up to a thickness of 50 mm. The standard of its heat-treatment services is ensured by means of several heat-treatment process parameters with special attention being paid to air circulation and the appropriate use of steam. In this way, a particular heat-treatment grade that is found to be a success can be replicated time after time. SWM also offers heat-treatment services to the wood trade, wood product industry and the sawmilling industry. SWM-WOOD is the only Finnish manufacturer of thermally modified wood able to offer both Thermowood® and Stellac®Wood trademarks. The Stellac®Wood product classification is based on the results of process and equipment development carried out at Stellac Oy whilst the Thermowood® product classification is based on the research work carried out at VTT Technical Research Center of Finland. This provides the basis for the introduction of the Thermowood® product classification in 2002 by Lämpöpuuyhdistys ry / Finnish Thermowood Association. SWM-WOOD offers its customers tailored thermal modification services matched to meet the requirements of the end-use purpose. For more information, please visit: www.swm-wood.com/en/home_en

Brenstol OÜ is a leading Estonian manufacturer of thermally modified solid wood flooring, decking, cladding and sauna products. Founded in 1997 in Tallinn, the company has developed expertise in two business areas and has become the leading European manufacturer of profiled sauna wood using aspen and alder, and thermally modified ash for interior and exterior uses, with a current annual thermo-treatment capacity at 22,000 cubic meters. The company’s initial foray into thermal modification was in 2001 when it purchased a kiln from Finnish manufacturer Tekma-Heat to thermally modify aspen and alder for the construction of saunas. The following year it invested into another kiln provided by the Finnish manufacturer Stellac Oy. This technology enabled it to expand the treatment process to ash and other high density hardwoods. Currently, Brenstol is almost exclusively focused on ash due to the exceptional properties it forms after thermal modification. It procures ash from Central Europe and North America, which are regions with a track record of sustainability. Given that ash is available in good volume in the Northern hemisphere, thermally modified ash takes the pressure from exotic tropical wood species as well as from oak. For more information, please visit : http://thermory.com/en www.timberdesignandtechnology.com

August 2015

Image © Brenstol

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INDUSTRY FOCUS 69

JAF GROUP

Image © JAF Group

confident that with the widespread growth and demand for thermally modified timber, kilns and treatment plants will be installed closer to the source. Thermal modification of other wood species such as kempas or any other sustainably harvested Asian species will also soon become commercially feasible. In addition, new and semi-finished thermally modified products, such as laminated panels and beams will be introduced to global markets as well. In Asia, Middle East and North Africa, thermally modified timber has not yet penetrated the market in the same way as it has in Europe and North America, where chemical free and locally harvested wood has a direct appeal to consumers. Given that thermally modified timber tolerates some amount of salty water, is mostly stable (no twisting or shrinkage and swelling) and that wood eating insects will not eat it, the company believes that acceptance in these markets will occur very rapidly.

Company: JAF group No. of Kilns: 1 Primary species: ash, pine Markets: Central Europe Annual Capacity: 3400 m³ Key contact: globalsales@jaf-group.com Website: www.jaf-group.com

Image © JAF Group

With an annual capacity of over 3,400 cubic meters, the predominant species that the company treats is ash. However, in contrast to other thermo-wood producers, who, for, example import large amounts of American ash, the company obtains its raw timber for producing thermowood exclusively from controlled European growing regions. Future plans include testing poplar and beech as commercially viable TMT species. The primary markets that it supplies to include Austria, Romania, Bulgaria, Italy, Czech, Slovakia, Turkey and Azerbaijan and the main use for its products is in decking and cladding. As a full service supplier of sawn timber, the company has direct access to the best forests and saw mills of Europe and imports high quality sawn timber from its partners in all continents. Supply for its TMT operations is therefore not a major challenge for the company. Looking ahead, the company is

Image © JAF Group

JAF Group entered the thermal modification market through its investment into a new thermal chamber from the Finnish manufacturer, Jartek, at the end of 2011. Treatment in the circa 20 tonne stainless steel thermal chamber initiates various reactions, making the wood extremely durable. Currently, mainly ash and pine are thermally modified, however other European woods such as oak, linden or beech can also be made more durable by this method.

August 2015

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70 INDUSTRY FOCUS

BINGAMAN & SON LUMBER

Image © AHEC

Incorporated in 1968, Bingaman & Son Lumber today consists of a main lumber yard in Kreamer, a second yard in Clarendon, and sawmills in Nicktown, Mill Hall and St Marys. All the company’s facilities are located in the heart of the Appalachian Mountains of Pennsylvania, a region known globally for the color and texture of its hardwoods. With a view to enhance the versatility of its native Pennsylvania hardwoods, the company was one of the first producers of thermally modified timber in America. Its high-temperature thermo-treatment transforms the wood to a striking, exotic brown, adding high weather resistance and stability for outdoor applications. As such, it is ushering in the next generation of responsibly manufactured, high performance outdoor wood products, all from locally-grown and well-managed Pennsylvania forests. Currently, the company applies its thermo-treatment to a range of American hardwoods including poplar (tulipwood), soft maple, white ash and white oak. The thermally modified lumber is profiled for different purposes, such as siding, decking, decorative trim and mouldings, and exterior doors. For more information, please visit: www.bingamanlumber.com

Image © Northland Forest Products

NORTHLAND FOREST PRODUCTS Cambia by NFP® is a venture formed by Northland Forest Products to manufacture and market thermally modified lumber as an environmentally responsible choice over tropical hardwoods or petrochemical-based wood alternatives. From America’s well-managed hardwood forests, Cambia by NFP provides an affordable, environmentally friendly alternative to imported exotic hardwood species. In addition to its dark rich tones, it is also non-toxic, highly durable, and dimensionally stable. Cambia by NFP is offered as siding; trim; ripped blanks; pulled widths; and rough lumber. The wood that Cambia thermally modifies is manufactured in the United States by local sawmills with logs harvested from sustainably managed forests and is available with FSC certification. The thermal modification process uses high heat in a controlled atmosphere to improve the durability of the wood as well as to increase its dimensional stability. Currently the company offers thermally modified lumber from two American hardwoods - tulipwood and white ash - which are both widely available. Cambia lumber is a great choice for architectural millwork, cabinetry, furniture, flooring, paneling, and trim. For more information, please visit: http://cambiawood.com/index.php

Produced from the abundant North Central forests of the USA, Arbor Wood Co. (AWCo) offers innovative thermally modified timber for a variety of outdoor and indoor applications from housing installations to decorative fixtures and product components. AWCo Thermally Modified Timber (TMT) joins together regionally harvested wood, a value added heat modification process, and local Minnesota milling to bring finished TMT goods to a wide range of markets. The company sources it’s raw material from regional sources and accepts only select or better lumber to be thermally modified. Given that sustainability of the resource is a primary philosophy at AWCo, the company works with public, private and third party certifiers to ensure responsible lumber is a process that goes into every piece of material harvested, thereby ensuring a truly sustainable end product. AWCo offers siding, decking and flooring in several species and aesthetics. Working with the client to find the correct species and thermal modification temperature ideal for the look and performance for their project, its TMT raw stock then is processed by local mill workers to the desired specification. For more information, please visit: http://arborwoodco.com www.timberdesignandtechnology.com

August 2015

Image © Arbor Wood

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Image ©ThermalWood Canada

THERMALWOOD CANADA Located in Bathurst, Canada, ThermalWood Canada offers high quality thermally modified wood products for a wide range of indoor and outdoor applications. The company applies its thermal modification process to all wood species following the parameters governed by the Thermowood Association and has processed a variety of species since its establishment in 2008. Other than selling products, ThermalWood Canada also offers a service of thermal modification. The company prides itself on being a leader in the thermal modification manufacturing of wood products. Its thermal modification kiln was built by Valutec, which uses the technology developed by ThermoWood, completely out of stainless steel to resist the stress caused by high temperatures, acids and other compounds that evaporate from the wood. Using only heat, steam and water, the wood temperature is raised quickly to around 1000C. Building on its experience in the local wood products industry, the company has carved out a niche to complement rather than compete with other local wood manufacturers. The thermal modification method they use can be applied to a variety of species, but the company is narrowing in on hardwoods such as ash and maple. For more information, please visit: www.thermalwoodcanada.com

NOVAWOOD

Image © Novawood

Novawood was the first company to introduce the thermal modification technology in Turkey and is today one of the world’s biggest producers of thermally modified wood offering a wide range of high quality products. Located in the Bolu Gerede industrial site, the Novawood plant produces 14,000 m3 of novathermowood lumber and 500,000 m3 of novathermowood finished goods annually. . Novawood produces Exterior Cladding, Panel Cladding, Decking, novathermowood Decking Tiles, Solid Flooring, Engineered Flooring, Laminated Beams, Solar Shading, novathermowood Door and Window Profiles, novathermowood Pergolas and Fences. Novawood constantly improves and develops upon its range of products to meet the needs and requirements of the industry without compromising quality. With its customer satisfaction and quality driven approach, Novawood also manufactures custom products for architectural projects and customer requests. With four world-class facilities, Novawood products are shipped to 47 countries worldwide including England, Switzerland, Canada, Germany, Spain, Japan, Russia, Iran, Azerbaijan, Finland, People’s Republic of China, India and Saudi Arabia. For more information, please vist: http://novawood.com

Image © Thermoarena

THERMOARENA Thermoarena OÜ is a producer of thermally modified lumber and different products made from thermally modified wood. With over a decade of experience in thermal modification, it has developed considerable expertise in the production of high quality thermally modified lumber. In addition, Thermoarena also offers several innovative solutions that help to minimize the cost and time for installation of the products it produces. Using modern and efficient kilns, Thermoarena’s product range covers both hardwood and softwood species, indoor and outdoor factory-finished goods as well just thermally modified lumber or thermal modification service for its customers. All of the lumber it uses is grown in sustainably managed forests, well selected and kiln dried to obtain the highest-grade product. It has also been awarded both FSC® and PEFC certifications. The company offers thermally modified lumber; profiled products for decking, siding, cladding, and flooring; and customized products made from thermally modified lumber as per customer orders. Currently, it uses redwood and whitewood (both softwoods) from Finnish PEFC-certified sawmills and imports ash, oak and other hardwoods from American and EU suppliers. For more information, please visit: http://thermoarena.com August 2015

www.timberdesignandtechnology.com


72 SHOWTIME

Top Industry Exhibitions Coming Up This Season TECNO MUEBLE INTERNACIONAL (TMI)

Image © TMI

Image © Forst Messe Luzern

organized as a common platform by key national associations and training providers.

Mexico’s most important trade exhibition for the furniture and wood industry, Tecno Mueble Internacional (TMI) will take place from August 19 - 22, 2015 at the Expo Guadalajara. Expected to host over 250 local and international exhibitors and over 10,000 trade buyers, the show is the brainchild of the Jalisco Furniture Manufacturers Association (Afamjal), which is the leading association for the furniture industry in Mexico. It is also fitting that the event is taking place in Guadalajara, which is a leading economic hub in the country. The exhibition will throw the spotlight on a wide variety of machinery and supplies for the furniture industry. In essence, the show is two exhibitions in one as it includes finished products (furniture) and suppliers who provide the components and materials for the furniture. The exhibit profile will include abrasives, accessories, hardware, tools and equipment, timber and plywood, machinery, glue and adhesives, paints and coatings, polymers, services, software, and textiles, leather and vinyls.

August 20 - 23 Allmend Exhibition Center | Lucerne, Switzerland www.forstmesse.com WOODTECH INDIA

Expo Guadalajara | Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico www.tecnomueble.com.mx FORST MESSE LUZERN (INTERNATIONAL FORESTRY TRADE FAIR) There are but a few trade fairs comparable with Forst Messe Luzern (International Forestry Trade Fair), which is held in Lucerne. Not only is the event Switzerland’s leading trade fair for the forestry industry with international prominence, but also a key social meeting point for the forestry and timber industry as well as its suppliers. With 26,000 visitors and 280 exhibitors taking up a total floor area of 30,000 sqm, the International Forestry Trade Fair has developed continually since first being held in 1971. Held every two years, it remains the industry’s most highly regarded exhibition and combines tradition with innovation. According to the organizers, all of the latest developments in equipment and processes related to the forestry and timber industry will be on display over the course of its four-day run. The main attraction at the International Forestry Trade Fair is always the ‘Forst, Forêt, Foresta’ special show, which is jointly www.timberdesignandtechnology.com

August 2015

Image © WOODTECH India

August 19 - 22

The third edition of WOODTECH India is due to be held in Chennai from August 21 - 24, 2015 at the Chennai Trade Center in Chennai, India. The show is India’s largest trade fair for woodworking machinery, furniture hardware & fittings, power tools, adhesives, plywood & panels, laminates, flooring, wood composites, particle boards, raw materials, coatings, veneer, timber & lumber, doors & windows and more products. Offering a platform for the wood and woodworking industry where demands and solutions meet together, the show allows exhibitors the opportunity to target furniture manufacturers, architects, builders, interior decorators, saw millers, timber merchants, wood workers, carpenters, hardware dealers and distributors, plywood, particle boards manufacturers, wood based products, craftsmen, forest officials, doors and windows manufacturers. The show hosts specialized trade visitors who are knowledgeable and serious business buyers from all over the world so that they can strengthen


SHOWTIME 73 ties with new customers and catch up on the latest trends and technological developments. The exhibition also offers them a chance to interact with top decision-makers in the industry and increase their visibility amongst the leading manufacturers, importers, traders, distributors, converters and endusers in the woodworking industry.

August 21 - 24 Chennai Trade Center | Chennai, India www.woodtechindia.in AFRIWOOD EXPO 2015

and software, new products and innovations, wooden components, billets, elements. In addition, companies involved with bioenergy raw materials and their manufacture, manufacturing methods and equipment, combustion plants, power plants, fuel producers, undertakings and projects related to renewable fuels, services, and supplementary functions are also present. The show is supported by the Finnish Forest Industries Federation; PRAGroup / Aalto University; Finnish Timber Council; Association of Finnish Wood Industry Technicians and Engineers; Association of Furniture and Joinery Entrepreneurs; Association of the Finnish Small-Scale Sawmilling; Entrepreneurs; Finnish Woodworking Engineers Association; Association of Finnish Sawmillmen; Finnish Sawmills Association; and EUMABOIS. According to the organizers, leading professionals from both the wood and bioenergy industries are expected to attend the event, which has been firmly established as a leading event of its kind in Finland on account of the fact that the entire chain of the wood industry is represented at the show.

September 2 - 4 Jyväskylän Paviljonki | Jyväskylä, Finland www.puumessut.fi/?lang=en

After two successful years in Kenya, the organizers of AFRIWOOD have decided to launch the show in Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania with a view to target the entire East African region. Spread over a period of three days, the event brings together decision makers and influencers as well as technical experts and professionals from leading companies involved in the wood machinery and tools, materials and supplies, and furniture machinery within Africa and around the globe. The show will be held on the sidelines of Buildexpo 2015 - the International Trade Expo on Building & Construction Products, Equipment and Machinery - which is the largest trade event held annually in Tanzania. The exhibition attracts exhibitors from more than 30 countries and visitors from all over East & Central Africa, thus giving exhibitors an excellent opportunity to explore several countries in one time. Though Tanzania by itself is one of the biggest markets in Africa, major emphasis is being laid upon attracting traders and importers from neighboring countries.

August 22 - 24 Mlimani Conference Center | Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania www.expogr.com/tanzania/woodexpo WOOD AND BIOENERGY 2015 Finland’s biggest trade show for the wood and woodworking industry - Wood and Bioenergy - aims to provide ‘a boost for the entire wood industry’ by hosting the latest innovations and the leading companies from the industry on an annual basis. The exhibitor profile includes sawmill industry machines and equipment, machines and equipment for the further processing of sawn wood and wood panels and the joinery industry, other technical systems and equipment for industrial processes, process accessories and raw materials, services, business management systems

Image © EXPODREV

Image © AFRIWOOD

EXPODREV

The 17th edition of EXPODREV takes place this year from September 8 - 11 and will showcase technologies, machinery and equipment for timber logging; sawmill equipment, technologies and equipment for woodworking industry; technologies and equipment for furniture production; component parts; and tooling for furniture and woodworking production, etc. According to the organizers, the show will also include sections of large-sized special equipment, machinery, wrapping and shipping equipment. In addition, the show will also feature a plenary session, panel discussions and specialized seminars. Among the topics of discussion will be the issues of forest exploitation, restoration and cultivation; environmental issues; and bioenergy development issues. The event aims to showcase the newest equipment for timber procurement, woodworking and furniture industries; create a business platform for equipment manufacturers and suppliers, specialists and investors; extend the inter-sectorial and inter-regional relations; and promote advanced timber industry technologies, equipment and tools in Russia and beyond.

September 8 - 11 Siberia ExpoCenter | Krasnoyarsk, Russia www.krasfair.ru/en/events/expodrev_en

August 2015

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74 SHOWTIME

Furniture Manufacturing & Supply China 2015 (FMC China 2015) will be staged at the Shanghai World Expo Exhibition & Convention Center (SWEECC) and Shanghai New International Expo Center (SNIEC) from September 9 - 12, 2015. The show, which has been successfully held for over 20 years, will run simultaneously with ‘Furniture China’ over the course of four days. FMC China is split into two exhibition halls, which cover Woodworking Machinery, Woodworking Saws & Tools, Furniture Hardware & Fitting/ Office Furniture Components in SNIEC and Adhesives & Chemicals Products, Furniture Fabric & Leather, Upholstery Supplies, Furniture Panels & Surface Deco in SWEECC. FMC Premium, which is being organized in the World Expo Exhibition Hall, will gather both domestic and foreign high-grade products and brands of the industry. According to the organizers, the association with Furniture China will promote the interaction of upstream and downstream industrial chains. Furniture China will host around 3,000 furniture manufacturers including modern furniture, branded furniture, sofas, original designs, office furniture, classical furniture, outdoor, and dining table and chair. This covers the upstream areas of FMC China, such as woodworking machinery, upholstered machinery, knife saws, hardware and office accessories, thereby enabling collaboration between upstream and downstream suppliers and buyers. The Shanghai World Expo Exhibition & Convention Center will host highquality and affordable cost-effective furniture products with unique local characteristics from China’s 40 major furniture industry clusters in Hall 1. FMC Premium will be held in Hall 2 with famous exhibition groups from various countries including America, France, Switzerland and Malaysia. In addition, Hall 3 will include furniture fabric and leather, upholstery supplies, furniture panels and surface deco and powerful exhibition groups including Asia International Exhibition Group, Dama Textile Exhibition Group, Yuhang Textile Exhibition Group and Haining Textile Exhibition Group. A campaign titled ‘Replacing Labor with Machine’ and sponsored by the China National Furniture Association (CNFA) will kick off at FMC China this year. This is the first time for the CNFA to lead a large-scale exhibition activity linking upstream furniture and downstream machinery production equipment. The aim of this initiative is in line ‘Made in China 2025’, a broadbased initiative to comprehensively upgrade Chinese industry, particularly the furniture manufacturing industry. The furniture standardization international forum will invite International Furniture Standardization Organizations and domestic experts/professors and all members of the National Technical Committee on Furniture of www.timberdesignandtechnology.com

August 2015

Image © FMC China

Image © FMC China

FMC CHINA

Standardization Administration of China. The seminar will focus on interpreting the quality safety requirements of furniture products, standardized technical requirements of furniture manufacturing technique. In 2014, FMC joined hands with the Raw and Auxiliary Material Specialized Committee of CNFA and successfully held the first China International Wood Trade Meeting, which attracted positive interest across the industry. Building on the success of last year, the organizers have announced plans to host a similar meeting this year as well. Aiming to cultivate people’s interest in DIY woodworking, lead the DIY lifestyle, and also offer an offline communication platform for woodworking enthusiasts, the show will feature a new section - ‘Woodfast - DIY Woodworking Experience and Creativity Exhibition’. Sponsored by Woodfast, the aim is to focus on presenting the woodworking club, DIY equipment and tools and opening up a talented class to teach the DIY courses for free on the site.

September 9 - 12 Shanghai New International Expo Center (SNIEC) and Shanghai World Expo Exhibition & Convention Center (SWEECC) | Shanghai, China www.fmcchina.com.cn/en-us


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76 SHOWTIME

Shanghai will become a focus point for global furniture industry in September with the annual Furniture China show being held simultaneously at the Shanghai New International Expo Center (SNIEC) and Shanghai World Expo Exhibition & Convention Center (SWEECC) in Pudong, Shanghai. Held successfully for more than 20 years, Furniture China 2015 will position Shanghai on the grand stage for global furniture industry. New this year are the Industrial Clusters Exhibition Area; a new theme featuring steel furniture, solid wood furniture and traditional Chinese styled furniture; and the O2O Experience Zone. With an exhibition area of around 350,000 sqm, the show will host approximately 3,000 enterprises from 25 countries and regions. In addition, the organizers have confirmed a host of linked events including the Shanghai Home Design Week; Shanghai International Interior Design Festival; Asian Furniture Conference; China Furniture Design Conference; Designers’ Night; Techno-Experience 3; DOD Design Forum; Gold Idea Design Award; and the China Furniture Product Innovation Award. Pavilions from France, Belgium, Spain, Portugal, Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia, Korea, Turkey and Australia have been confirmed. The exhibitor line-up includes leading names such as Ligne Roset, Parisot, Alsapan, Sifas, Gautier, CountryCorner, Meubar, Evan, VincentSheppard, Verdon, Interstil, Actona, Rowico and Tvilum. Additionally, exhibitors from Italy like Euroluce Lampadari SRL, Linea Argenti SRL, Alessanderx SPA, Composad, Consorzio CID and Gruppo Industriale Buoninfante SRL have also confirmed their participation.

September 9 - 12 Shanghai New International Expo Center (SNIEC) and Shanghai World Expo Exhibition & Convention Center (SWEECC) | Shanghai, China www.furniture-china.cn/en-us SAMULEGNO SamuLegno, the 19th biennial woodworking technology and machine trade show, will be held from September 15 - 18, 2015 at the Pordenone Fair. The event is aimed at its traditional target audience of potential exhibitors, manufacturers and distributors of machines and technologies for the furniture, surface finishing, robotics, and automation and industrial logistics industries. Production systems for ‘turnkey’ and customized contract jobs will be at the center of the 2015 event. This choice is dictated by economic indicators that signal this market segment as the only one with definite signs of growth in the furniture sector. With an economic recovery that is beginning to produce its first tentative signs, the upcoming edition of SamuLegno will be the only showcase of www.timberdesignandtechnology.com

August 2015

the year for companies in the sector. It is expected that Pordenone will give indications of possible scenarios, market trends and technological developments in the field. As such, the show will serve as a showcase for the latest technologies, production software and more advanced logistic systems that enable companies to quickly respond to market demands, even the most fragmented, and therefore minimizing inventories. Alternating with Xylexpo in Milan, SamuLegno has an objective of retracing its illustrious past as the reference event in Italy, while addressing its exhibition offer abroad. The show is intentionally held in Pordenone, which is located at the center of the area with the highest concentration of companies producing finished furniture and components in Europe. Although the event is mainly addressed to the producers of this area, it attracts visitors from the markets of Central Europe and the Balkans.

Image © SamuLegno

Image © Furniture China

FURNITURE CHINA 2015

September 15 - 18 Pordenone Fair | Pordenone, Italy www.samulegno.it/en LISDEREVMASH The 14th International Specialized Trade Fair for Machinery and Equipment for the forestry, woodworking and furniture industry will take place on September 22 - 25, 2015 at the International Exhibition Center in Kiev, Ukraine. As the most important trade expo for the industry in the country, the exhibition is supported by the State Forestry Agency of Ukraine, the Ukrainian Woodworking Machinery Association and by the European Federation of Woodworking Machinery Manufactures (EUMABOIS). Exhibitors are set to display their products and solutions under four broad categories including: Wood Machinery; FurniTech; Wood Energy; and Wood Products. As such, the show will provide a platform to demonstrate machinery, equipment, technologies, components and tools for the forestry and wood processing and an informative forum for furniture manufacturers. In addition, it will also focus on wood products including timber, panels, and other finished and semi-finished products. According to the organizers, over 6,000 experts, who work in the domain of furniture manufacturing, woodworking, building and timber industry, are expected to attend the show.

September 22 - 25 International Exhibition Center | Kiev, Ukraine http://lisderevmash.ua


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Image © BIFE-SIM

Image © BIFE-SIM

Image © BIFE-SIM

BIFE-SIM

This autumn, the focus of furniture professionals will be set on Romania. The Bucharest International Furniture Exhibition (BIFE-SIM) will be held from September 19 - 23, 2015 at the ROMEXPO Exhibition Center offering five days of great business opportunities and a great show. BIFE-SIM will offer trade visitors the opportunity to view the latest products and services from over 300 companies, who will occupy more than 30,000 sqm of net exhibition area. A major furniture producer in Europe, Romania is a country endowed by nature with a rich wood inheritance and has a broad experience in wood processing. The furniture industry in Romania has developed constantly over the years, taking advantage of qualified employees, smart and inventive designers and qualitative wooden raw materials. Romanian factories produce furniture for home, office, commercial and public spaces, hotels, boarding houses and holiday houses. Moreover, statistics confirm that Romania is the 13th furniture exporter and the 28th furniture manufacturer, worldwide, with significant increases over the last year. Figures for the first quarter of 2015 show that production volume increased in Romania to EUR 633.5 million in comparison to EUR 610.5 million for the same time period last year. In addition, exports also grew from EUR 477 million in the first quarter of 2015 to EUR 516.7 million for the first quarter of this year. Overall, the number of employees has increased from 57,300 persons in 2014 to 58,500 persons in 2015. Testament to the quality of Romanian furniture across the globe, exports have grown by 8.3 percent.

According to the organizers, about 90 percent of the exhibitors will be Romanian companies that will make every effort to confirm the high quality of Romanian design, the large range of styles that made their frame and their commitment to sustainability. As such, visitors will have the opportunity to meet a large number of Romanian furniture and furniture-related producers and source a variety of quality products. In addition, the show will feature the creations of young Romanian designers who have been shortlisted as part of the National Furniture Design Contest. Over 325 producers, importers and furniture, equipment and accessories distributors from Romania and other countries including China, Denmark, Germany, Italy, Republic of Moldavia, Poland, Spain, Turkey and Ukraine participated in the 2014 edition of the show. Moreover, the show attracted 23,422 local and international trade visitors last year. With even more exhibitors and a greater variety of products on display, the organizers are confident of an even greater turnout this year.

September 19 - 23 ROMEXPO Exhibition Center | Bucharest, Romania www.bife-sim.ro/en

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78 SHOWTIME CALENDAR

Tecno Mueble Internacional (TMI)

SamuLegno

August 19 - 22 Expo Guadalajara Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico www.tecnomueble.com.mx

September 15 - 18 Pordenone Fair Pordenone, Italy www.samulegno.it/en

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Forst Messe Luzern

Wood Processing Industry of Siberia

August 20 - 23 Allmend Exhibition Center Lucerne, Switzerland www.forstmesse.com

September 15 - 18 SibExpoCenter Irkutsk, Russia www.sibexpo.ru

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WOODTECH India

Woodworking

August 21 - 24 Chennai Trade Center Chennai, India www.woodtechindia.in

September 17 - 19 Kazan Expo Center Kazan, Russia www.expokazan.ru

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AFRIWOOD Expo 2015

BIFE-SIM

August 22 - 24 Mlimani Conference Center Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania www.expogr.com/tanzania/woodexpo

September 19 - 23 ROMEXPO Exhibition Center Bucharest, Romania www.bife-sim.ro

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Wood and Bioenergy 2015

LISDEREVMASH

September 2 - 4 Jyv채skyl채n Paviljonki Jyv채skyl채, Finland www.puumessut.fi/?lang=en

September 22 - 25 International Exhibition Center Kiev, Ukraine http://lisderevmash.ua

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International Famous Furniture Fair

Salon Maison Bois

September 3 - 7 Guangdong Modern International Exhibition Center Houjie, Dongguan, China http://www.2f.com.cn/e/

September 25 - 28 Parc des Expositions Angers, France www.salon-maison-bois.com

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Furniture China 2015

Woodworking 2015

September 9 - 12 SNIEC and SWEECC Shanghai, China www.furniture-china.cn/en-us

September 29 - October 2 Manege, 20/2 Pobediteley Ave. Minsk, Belarus http://woodworking.minskexpo.com/en

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EXPODREV

MIFIC Expo

September 8 - 11 Siberia ExpoCenter Krasnoyarsk, Russia www.krasfair.ru/en/events/expodrev_en

September 30 - October 3 ExpoCenter St. Petersburg, Russia http://en.mificexpo.ru

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FMC China

MUMBAIWOOD

September 9 - 12 SNIEC and SWEECC Shanghai, China www.fmcchina.com.cn/en-us

October 1 - 3 Bombay Convention & Exhibition Center, Goregaon East Mumbai, India www.mumbai-wood.com

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Image © Lester Ali Image © Lester Ali

Image © Lester Ali

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Middle East Design. American Hardwood. Dubai based design practice Anarchitect use American white oak to help evoke a Scandinavian freshness coupled with a New England crafted quality at No.57 Boutique Cafe. Architects and designers all over the world have embraced American hardwoods for the range of colours, grains and textures they offer, as well as for their consistency in grade, quality and supply and their sustainable credentials. For more information visit www.americanhardwood.org Follow us on fti

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Timber Design & Technology Middle East - August 2015