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SPRING 2010

Inside Trenton’s Search And Rescue Team A Modern Voyageur - What A Trip The Controversial Case Of The Aylwards

COVERING THE ARTS, OUTDOORS, HISTORY, PEOPLE AND PLACES


shop, dine, rest, seek... adventure

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Marmora Tourism Centre 613-472-1515 www.marmora.info


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Contents VOLUME 3, ISSUE 1, SPRING 2010

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CO-PUBLISHER & EDITOR

Nancy Hopkins 613 395-0499 CO-PUBLISHER & EDITOR

John Hopkins 613 395-0499 ART DIRECTOR

Jozef VanVeenen SALES DEPARTMENT

Michael Beeston michael@countryroadshastings.ca

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613 395-6226 CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Brandon West • www.westphotography.ca Bill Bickle • www.bilbickle.com HOW TO CONTACT US Telephone: 613 395-0499 Facsimile: 613 395-0903 E-mail: info@countryroadshastings.ca Website: www.countryroadshastings.ca For written enquiries you can reach us at: PenWord Communications Inc. P.O. Box 423, Stirling, ON K0K 3E0 COUNTRY ROADS, Discovering Hasting County is published four times a year by PenWord Communications Inc. Copies are distributed to select locations throughout Hastings County including the ­communities of Bancroft, Belleville, Madoc, Marmora, Stirling and Tweed. Copies are also delivered to select homes within southern Ontario.

F E AT U R E S

6 - Rapid Response Search and Rescue unit always ready to roll

12 - Dive right in Scuba enthusiasts go under in Marmora

14 - The Hanging of the Aylwards Controversy remains over 1862 murder trial

18 - The simple life

Subscription rates: 1 year: $10.50 2 years: $18.90 3 years: $27.30 All prices include G.S.T.

‘Voyageur Bob’ finds new challenges in the rough

The contents of this publication are ­ rotected by copyright. Reproduction of p this publication in whole or in part without prior written permission of PenWord Communications Inc. is prohibited.

D E PA R T M E N T S

The advertising deadline for the Summer 2010 issue is April 29, 2010. Cover Photo: Flat Out Weekend, drags, drive-in and swap meet, Shannonville, July 2009. Jozef VanVeenen Photo

22 - The Amazing Journey Historic church celebrates major anniversary

24 - Cross Roads The sweet smell of success • Field of dreams • A change of pace

28 - Country Calendar Things to see and do in Hastings County

29 - Marketplace 30 - Back Roads A Novel Railway Feat

Spring 2010 • Country Roads

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discovering hastings county

fall In love WIth

Comfort Country • Shops • Hiking • Heritage Sites • Accommodations • Sumptuous Dining • Live Entertainment • Antiques • Artist Studios & Tours • Lakes and Rivers to Explore March 21, 11am - 5 pm MADOC

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Options for healthy living and a greener lifestyle featuring health-care practitioners and services, locally grown agricultural products and much more. Kiwanis Centre, St. Lawrence St. E. Admission

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MARMORA

April 17 & 18

MACKfest –Annual Marmora & Area Canoe and Kayak Festival

Participate or watch the Spring run-off whitewater paddling on 7 area rivers! Ambassador River Trips, Silent Auction, Raffle, Vendor Booths & more www.macKfest.ca

STiRliNG

April 30- May 2

Antique Car Show & Flea Market Stirling Fairgrounds Admission- $5/ Children 12- under- FREE! www.stirling-rawdon.com

TWEED

MAY

A month long exhibit featuring the art of local school children. Discover Tweed then and now as you tour the heritage and art galleries at the Tweed & Area Heritage Centre. www.tweedartscouncil.ca

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MARMORA

TyENDiNAGA TOWNSHip

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May 30 11 am - 4 pm - Lilac Tea Art Show Featuring the work of 10 Artists & Artisans at the Tyendinaga Township Public Library, 852 Melrose Road, Tyendinaga AdMiSSion FREE

deseronto 62

How The Stories Spring Forth People often ask us how we come up with the ideas for the articles in Country Roads. Well that’s an interesting question and we have to tell you that deciding what to include and making it happen are the most enjoyable aspects of producing the magazine. Each season in preparation for the upcoming issue we pour over a list of story ideas with the reader foremost in our mind. This list resides in a brightly marked binder in the office. Every time we have the germ of an idea rolling around our heads we record it in the binder. These ideas come from a variety of places. During our travels throughout the county we often see or hear something that piques our interest. Often we’re engaged in conversations with folks excited about some aspect of this community, whether it be a person, place or event. We receive emails from residents and visitors alike. As we decide what to pursue for possible stories we try to keep in mind the season we’re profiling and do our best to include a cross section of articles that we hope will entertain, inform and keep readers coming back for more. And as a magazine that strives to bring attention to this great county of Hastings we do our best to take our geography into account. Then we get started on the content and see where it takes us. And even though we start out with a few brainstorming sessions, and follow this loosely formed system, to be honest we never truly know until later in the game what it will all add up to. There are always surprises along the way. Sometimes stories evolve differently than initially anticipated. Some have to be postponed to a later date and indeed some don’t ever come to fruition while others might grow into more than anticipated. So now you have a little insight into how this particular issue came to include stories on search and rescue (a newspaper article), scuba diving (someone told us about the Marmora site), the life of a modern day voyageur (saw a You Tube clip), maple syrup (it’s Spring in Ontario), Tweed Muskies (we were intrigued), Christ Church in Tyendinaga (we were browsing the Hastings Heritage Atlas and their short story caught our attention), a modern reaction to a mid 1800’s hanging (an historical piece), the art of basket making (arts are never a bad thing). As varied as they are we believe these subjects hold true to what we want to convey. On the front of Country Roads, Discovering Hastings County we say Covering The Arts, Outdoors, History, People And Places because we believe these are the things that make a community its own unique place in the world. And make no mistake about it, Hastings County is one of a kind. We welcome story ideas, feedback and your thoughts in general on how we’re doing. We honestly are most motivated to provide stories that readers want to read. Hopefully we’re hitting the mark and the binder isn’t letting us down. Z

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...and more.

STIRLING 14

TO KINGSTON

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DESERONTO

TO TORONTO TRENTON

Corrections For more information on events, attractions, places to dine, accommodations, shopping and more.

www.comfortcountry.ca

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In the Winter 2009/10 issue of Country Roads there was an error in the Rock This Town article. In the story we stated that the Bancroft Curling Club originally used a Quanza hut. The correct name for the structure is Quonset hut. We apologize for the error.


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APID ESPONSE

BY JOHN HOPKINS

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The CH-146 Griffon helicopter is well suited for dropping SAR Technicians into tight spaces on rescue missions. Here a SAR Tech from 424 Squadron is suspended from a Griffon during hoist training in Pemberton, BC. CF Photo by Master Corporal Tom Trainor

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All distress calls come into the Joint Rescue Coordination Centre in Trenton, where Mission Co-ordinators get details and then plan Search and Rescue efforts. Photo By John Hopkins

On Nov. 10 of last year the rescue of a ­teenage boy from an ice floe in Hudson Bay made ­international headlines. In addition to the ­teenager, who had been on a ­hunting expedition with his uncle, four other men who had been part of the initial rescue effort were also retrieved.

Search and Rescue unit always ready to roll

The search and subsequent rescue were co-ordinated some 3,000km away by the Joint Rescue Coordination Center (JRCC) based at 8 Wing Trenton. That incident was one of 3,527 calls that came into the Trenton JRCC in 2009. Not all events made international headlines and some were what could be termed ‘false alarms’. But no matter the situation, the JRCC is on a 24-hour, seven day a week standby, ready to respond to an emergency often within 30 minutes of receiving a call. The unit in Trenton is the largest and busiest of three such command centres in Canada, which between them cover the country like a blanket. The JRCC in Victoria deals with emergencies in British Columbia and the Yukon, while a similar command centre in Halifax takes care of the eastern seaboard. Spring 2010 • Country Roads

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Its long range and robust nature make the CC-130 Hercules an ideal tool for the Search and Rescue team based out of Trenton. CF Photo by Corporal Igor Loutsiouk

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About two-thirds of the Trenton JRCC’s calls are marine related, and the vast majority of those come during the summer months, keeping the Coast Guard side of the operation busy. Photo courtesy Canadian Coast Guard

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Major Don Paul is the Officer in Charge at JRCC Trenton. A native of Edmonton he has spent 25 years with the Search and Rescue program all over the country. Photo By John Hopkins

The rest of the country, an area of around eight million square kilometres, is in the hands of Trenton. Each centre combines the resources of the military and Canadian Coast Guard. In Trenton, the military component is handled by 424 Squadron and the Officer in Charge is Major Don Paul, a 50-year-old native of Edmonton. His equivalent on the Coast Guard side is the Regional Supervisor for Maritime Search and Rescue, 54-year-old Wayne McCrae, from Trenton.

Major Paul and McCrae are responsible for most of Quebec, all of Ontario, the prairie provinces and the entire Arctic in their roles. If it seems like a lot of ground to cover, well it is. However, they do have a lot of help. In addition to the primary resources on hand, there is a wide array of secondary resources that can be called on in an emergency. Other federal government vessels or aircraft can be enlisted in a search and rescue mission and there are a number of volunteer organizations that are able to work in conjunction with the JRCC. On the marine side there is the Coast Guard Auxiliary, and the JRCC will team up with federal, provincial or regional police agencies, fire departments and park rangers if necessary. “The key thing is to get an asset [airplane or marine vessel] moving,” Major Paul explains. “I can get an aircraft anywhere in our territory within eight hours. On the water, we can get anywhere on the Great Lakes within two or three hours. But that’s not to say we need to wait that long. If we have secondary resources in a remote

area that we feel can do the job then we’ll bring them into service.” The JRCC’s primary air resources consist of the CH-146 Griffon and Cormorant helicopters, along with Hercules and Buffalo aircraft. The Hercules and Griffons are stationed in Trenton, and both are distinguished by their long range capabilities. The Griffon has a range of 1,018km, about twice that of the Cormorant, while the Hercules has a range of anywhere from 3,960 to 9,790km. “For inserting and extracting SAR [Search and Rescue] technicians, the helicopter is ideal,” Major Paul says. “But the Hercules has long legs and good endurance, and a quick start time. The best of both would be a Hercules with a rotor – a fixed wing aircraft that could get into austere and remote locations!” On the marine side the Trenton unit has nine 47-foot Motor Life Boats located on the Great Lakes, and from late May to September six Inshore Rescue Boats are available. “The ships keep getting smaller,” says McCrae. “We’ve gone from 90 feet down to 47 feet, while Continued on page 10

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rapid response

A short history of Search and Rescue

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Members of the Greenwood Pararescue team in the late 1950s. Back row (from left to right) Roy Farmer, Bruce Moase and Army Armstrong; front row (from left to right) C. Hegadoran, Henry Decorby and Bob Crebo

Improvised rescue missions began with the air force in 1940 but in 1943 and ’44 Wilfred (Wop) May, a World War I veteran, organized a rescue team that was able to parachute into a crash site and administer first aid. In 1945 the first Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) Para Rescue unit was set up with a training school in Edmonton. In 1949 four Search and Rescue regions were established with five Rescue Co-Ordination Centres. They were set up in Halifax, Rockcliffe, Winnipeg, Edmonton and Vancouver and staff totaled 21. In 1950-51 a sixth RCC was set up in Torbay, NL and Trenton replaced Rockcliffe. In 1968, with the unification of the Army, Navy and Air Force under the Canadian Armed Forces, the SAR squadrons were renamed, and the Trenton outfit became 424 Transport and Rescue. In 1972 the SAR Tech designation was created for the ‘at the scene’ rescue personnel, and the program had grown to 472 personnel. In 1976-77 an upgrade programme was undertaken, with $30,000,000 allocated. There is a rich history attached to 424 Squadron. It was formed in England on Oct. 15, 1942 as 424 Bomber Squadron but disbanded after the war. It reformed as 424 Light Bomber Squadron (Auxiliary) at RCAF Station Hamilton on April 15, 1946 before disbanding again on March 31, 1964. On July 8, 1968, 424 Communications and Rescue Squadron stood up at RCAF Station Trenton.

Photo courtesy the National Air Force Museum of Canada, 8 Wing/CFB Trenton, ON

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Spring 2010 • Country Roads

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Members of 424 Squadron deal with a simulated air crash during exercises in Gander last fall. Each year the SAR community conducts an exercise, (SAREX) to develop rescue co-operation, test alerting and notification systems, and crosstrain in rescue procedures and techniques in the event of a large-scale search and rescue operation. CF Photo by Corporal Darcy Lefebvre

the speed has increased from 10 knots to 20-25 knots.” He then adds with a laugh, “We’ve been losing the comfort of the ride.” All the unit’s primary marine resources are prepared to be underway within 30 minutes of a distress call. The aircraft are on standby for a 30-minute deployment from 8:00am-4:00pm Monday to Friday, and two hours all other times. More than 700 people are involved with Canada’s Search and Rescue program. Attention at the scene of an incident is provided by SAR technicians, who are specially trained in advanced trauma life support, land, sea and arctic survival, rescue techniques from helicopters, parachuting, diving, mountain climbing and repelling. The SAR team’s primarily responsibilities are aeronautical and nautical, such as a search and rescue involving an aircraft in Canadian domes-

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A native of Trenton, Wayne McCrae is a veteran of the Canadian Coast Guard and JRCC Trenton. Photo By John Hopkins

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Dana Watling of the Canadian Coast Guard mans his post. During the summer months his shift can be non-stop activity as he deals with marine distress calls. Photo By John Hopkins

tic air space, or a similar situation with a marine vessel on Canadian water. The group can also supply humanitarian or civil aid, however, such as transporting medical resources or assisting in forest fire or flood evacuations. The hub of the operation, the nerve centre if you will, is a large room just steps away from the offices of Major Paul and McCrae. Here military and Coast Guard personnel, SAR Mission Co-ordinators, sit at individual work stations with a phone at their fingertips and a bank of computer screens in front of them. When an emergency call comes

in they immediately start inputting details into a computer system and begin planning the search and rescue operation. In the case of an air incident on land, computer mapping will give the Mission Co-ordinator in Trenton details like the terrain of the area where the search must be undertaken and allow them to plot out search grids. They can instantly determine what resources are nearby and make a decision on what rescue aircraft need to be deployed, whether it’s Hercules from Trenton or smaller planes or helicopters from a secondary location closer to the scene of the incident.


rapid response

In the case of a marine emergency, the Mission Co-ordinators can use the computer system to view drift patterns, so they can pinpoint the location of a missing vessel two, four or eight hours after a call has come in. The system is highly specialized to the work of the JRCC and is a far cry from the resources available to the coordination centre 15 or 20 years ago. “In the old days we would pull out a map and figure out everything from there,” recalls Captain Pierre Bolduc, who works on the military side of the operation and has been with the JRCC since 1986. “Now we are able to visually plan a search. The phone is still the primary method of initial contact, but with good information and descriptions, and working very closely with our partners we can work faster.” The system is also valuable in that all the information pertaining to a search is permanently stored, so that it can be easily reviewed and methods can be refined and enhanced. As with most elements of the computer age, however, the upgrade in technology hasn’t necessarily made the job of the JRCC easier. “There’s more responsibility, more information and more resources involved, from the police to volunteers,” Major Paul points out. “It’s a different, more efficient service. We’re now being held to a higher standard.” Improvements in communication have also led to more co-operation between people in emergency situations. “It seems in the past couple of years we’re seen more people helping each other,” says Dana Watling, a Canadian Coast Guard member who has been with the JRCC since 2001. “There just has been better communication available with cell phones and things like that.” The computer systems between the Trenton, Victoria and Halifax JRCCs are all integrated, so if in the event of a disaster the Trenton centre was incapacitated, one of the other two regions could take over its case load. Similarly, on a smaller scale, the entire Trenton unit can quickly be relocated should circumstances make that necessary. The Trenton JRCC also works closely with search and rescue organizations in the United States, particularly with operations in the Great Lakes. “The Americans and Canadians are very well integrated,” Major Paul points out, “even though we are organized along slightly different lines.” Also sharing office space with the JRCC is the Canadian Mission Control Centre (CMCC), one of about 35 such organizations around the world that tracks a selection of satellites orbiting the earth. The CMCC provides another level of detail to the JRCC’s work. But despite all the technological wizardry available, Major Paul says, no search and rescue mission can get rolling until that initial call is placed. The JRCC phone number (1-800-267-7270) is among the emergency listings at the front of the phone book and boaters, pilots and anyone travelling in remote areas are encouraged to have it on hand. The key to rapid response is communication,” Major Paul says. “The worst consequences can result from a delay in calling. There is also a common misconception regarding cost recovery, that

you will be sent the bill for a rescue effort. That is not the case. “Education is also important. All boaters should have a VHF radio and universally recognized flares. If you send out a distress call on your radio other boaters will hear you. A cell phone is of limited use in that situation.” Of the 3,527 emergency calls JRCC Trenton received in 2009, about two-thirds of them (2,223) were maritime-related, perhaps no big surprise given the unit’s proximity to the Great Lakes. And there is no question that the vast majority of those calls occurred during the summer months, between the Victoria Day Weekend in May and the Labour Day Weekend in early September. Those are the most hectic times for the operators in the control centre. “There are summer days I’ve come in to start a shift at 8:00am and by the time it’s over I still haven’t had my lunch,” Watling says. Coast Guard Mission Co-ordinators work 12hour shifts, while the air side is divided into a nine-hour day shift followed by a 15-hour night shift. There is always at least one air and one marine operator available to take a call, along with an assistant for each. Without a doubt the busy schedule and obvious pressures of work in the JRCC require a special kind of individual on the job. “I think the most successful recruits can think on their feet, have good common sense and aren’t easily rattled,” says Major Paul.

Major Paul joined the military 25 years ago specifically to become a part of the JRCC. Initially he flew Labrador helicopters out of Trenton, then was posted in a variety of locations, working as part of the JRCC in both Victoria and Halifax. This summer will mark his second year as Officer in Charge of the Trenton unit. Generally postings last three years. His experiences having given Major Paul a broad view of the unique challenges of each JRCC region. “They’re all probably equally difficult,” he explains. “In the Maritimes you deal with a lot of deep sea work, here there’s a lot of geography and weather to deal with and on the west coast you have all that vertical real estate. There’s always something new.” McCrae provides the continuity of JRCC Trenton. He has been posted on the base for 25 years and before that spent 12 years on the Great Lakes with the Canadian Coast Guard. He finds the most challenging aspect of the job to be dealing with worried family members during a search and rescue operation. “It’s important that we maintain constant contact with next of kin,” he points out. “If we’re using secondary resources they will obviously play a role at the source, but we like to be involved from this end as well.” The work may not be non-stop, but when a distress call comes in decisions have to be made quickly, and the JRCC is always ready to roll. Z

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Spring 2010 • Country Roads

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Photo courtesy Canadian Sport Divers

Respect for the underwater environment and its preservation are at the forefront of the diving community.

Scuba enthusiasts go under in Marmora

Virtually every Saturday and Sunday through the summer months people congregate in the Marmora area to take in some of the great local scenery. They aren’t there to check out the remains of Saint Mathilda’s Church, marvel at the beauty of the trees and rocks, or gaze over the bridge at the flowing Crowe River. No, the objects of their fascination reside about 30 feet under water, below the dam behind the town’s old medical centre. In short, Marmora is a hot spot for scuba diving and it attracts enthusiasts from across southern Ontario. To be sure, the Crowe River doesn’t hold the magic of the great coral reefs or other exotic, tropical locations. But it does enjoy splendours of its own and, what’s more, it is conveniently located for Ontario enthusiasts. It is also considered an excellent training spot for new divers. “People come from Oshawa, Durham, Peterborough,” says local resident Tim Butcher, an instructor with Peterborough-based Adventure Divers. “They’re diving there about every weekend. We’ll be in the water after the Long Weekend in May through to November, as long as the water is still warm.” A number of factors make the spot popular, Butcher says.

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“There are some wonderful rock formations, and old logs,” explains the 48-year-old. “And great fish. They’re almost tame by the end of the summer. They’ll eat snails right out of your hand and follow you wherever you go. Some of them you get to recognize and see them year after year. “In the spring there are always interesting things that have gone over the dam, and other diving groups will put interesting things in the water for you to see.” According to Butcher a variety of water conditions combine to make the spot popular as a training area. “There’s not a lot of current,” he points out. “Outside of the dam area it’s shallow, below the dam it’s about 30 feet deep. A lot of folks do their training there. “In Ontario, unless you move toward Kingston, there are very limited areas to do diving. There’s nothing really to the west, and in the northern lakes, once you get below 20 feet the water is pretty cold. Even in Belleville there’s not a lot. This really is one of the best areas for it.” There is not a lot Butcher hasn’t seen in his years of diving, so when he speaks so highly of the diving in Marmora he is not simply talking up the local attractions. An instructor with Adventure Divers for five years, Butcher has swum with

BY JOHN HOPKINS

the sharks off the Galapagos Islands and shared the ocean with hundreds of rays and dolphins. “I’ve always been interested in the water,” Butcher says. “I used to snorkel as a kid. One year my wife bought me scuba lessons and that was it.” What is the biggest appeal of diving? “For me, it’s the calmness and the quiet in the water,” Butcher continues. “Others like to see the fish and the coral. I enjoy the feeling of weightlessness and the motion in the water.” Another local diver who speaks highly of the Crowe River at Marmora is Keith Chaplin, president of the Belleville-based Canadian Sport Divers. “It’s easy to access, there’s nice steps, nice topography to see,” Chaplin confirms. “That sort of combination is tough to find in the area. And the depth is around 35 feet, which is pretty good for a river.” While Hastings County itself may offer limited diving opportunities beyond Marmora, you don’t have to travel too far east to find some even more spectacular spots. Drive about 45 minutes along Highway 401 from Belleville and you’ll come to Kingston, which is considered one of the world’s true hot spots for seeing shipwrecks. “In my opinion it’s the best freshwater diving for shipwrecks in the world,” says Chaplin, who esti-

Photo courtesy Tim Butcher

Dive right in


Photo courtesy Tim Butcher

Photo courtesy Canadian Sport Divers

Dive Right in

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A variety of conditions make the Crowe River an ideal venue for training new divers.

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mates he’s made between 500-600 dives around the world. “The fresh water and the colder temperatures seem to keep the wrecks well preserved.” Among the most impressive wrecks in the Kingston area, according to Chaplin, is the dredge Munson, which went down in 100 feet of water on April 26, 1890. The ship went down off Lemoine Point while travelling to do work on the Bay of Quinte bridge in the town of Rossmore. The ship sits upright under the water and is “remarkably preserved,” Chaplin says. Indeed, a collection of plates, bottles, cups and bowls is still on display for visiting divers to admire. Another of Chaplin’s favourites is the City of Sheboygan, a three-masted schooner that sunk off Nut Island on Sept. 25, 1915 during a storm. The boat sits upright in a depth of 95 feet, and like the Munson is in an impressive state of preservation. “Swimming across her deck is like getting an instant lesson in 19th century marine architecture,” enthuses an article in Diver magazine. “Remains of the capstan, catheads and pinrail are still show-

ing on the forecastle deck. The steam winch is in place near the forward hatch and broken spars, blocks and rigging litter the midships. Deadeyes and chainplates, favourite subject matter for underwater photographers, are present on the ship.” Indeed, the City of Sheboygan is credited with launching the sport of wreck diving when it was discovered in July, 1963, according to the Diver article. The pursuit has recently become more popular thanks to the presence of zebra mussels in the area, the article adds. The mussels filter vast amounts of water and as a result have cleaned the water up, improving visibility and making wrecks more accessible. While Chaplin is happy to see more divers taking advantage of the treasures stored underwater, he also cautions that great care must be taken to preserve popular diving spots as well. “Divers should respect these areas and the environment,” he points out. “We are certainly guests of the environment and a lot of people in a small area can destroy that environment.”

An organization called Preserve Our Wrecks, Kingston was formed in July, 1981. The group’s mandate includes researching the fate of local shipwrecks and preserving their legacy. Treated with respect, however, the underwater world in this area offers many remarkable opportunities. Whether you swim with the fish and admire the natural wonders of the Crowe River, or step back into time and discover the shipwrecks off Kingston is really up to you. Z

The Crowe River at Marmora attracts scuba diving enthusiasts from May right through to November.

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Spring 2010 • Country Roads

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The hanging of the Aylwards

Graphic from the Historical Atlas of Hastings & Prince Edward Counties / Book provided by the Hastings County Historical Society

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Controversy remains over 1862 murder trial BY JOHN HOPKINS

Almost 150 years after the fact, the controversial trial and ­subsequent hanging of Richard and Mary Aylward can generate debate.

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On Dec. 8, 1862 the husband and wife were hanged publicly in downtown Belleville for the murder of their neighbour, William Munro, earlier that year. Mary Aylward was alleged to have killed Munro with a scythe during an argument in a field. The dispute stemmed from hens belonging to Munro trespassing in the Aylwards’ wheat field. The two families lived in North Hastings, the Aylwards in Monteagle Township and the Munros in Wicklow Township. Their properties were separated by the road dividing the two townships. The incident took place on May 16 but Munro lived for 12 days before finally succumbing to his injuries. The trial was held on Oct. 20, 1862 in Belleville, about 125km south of the scene of the crime. The jury heard testimony from 10 witnesses and then

deliberated for two hours before passing sentence, finding the couple guilty of murder, but strongly recommending mercy. However, the presiding judge, Chief Justice William Henry Draper, instead sentenced the pair to death. The death sentence resulted in calls for clemency from many quarters, particularly the Roman Catholic Church. Indeed, the crime and punishment exposed religious rifts in the community, since the Aylwards were Catholic. The appeals were ignored, however, and the husband and wife hanged on a cold winter’s day, just a couple of weeks before Christmas. In the context of today’s legal system, there are many troubling aspects regarding how the Aylward

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Although the murder of William Munro took place in North Hastings, the trial took place 125km to the south in Belleville, in the pictured Court House.

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The hanging of Richard and Mary Aylward focused significant attention on the barbarism of public executions.

case was handled from start to finish and one wonders how the matter would have been dealt with in 2010 as opposed to 1862. To help put some perspective on the trial and its aftermath Country Roads enlisted the help of noted Hastings County historian Gerry Boyce and


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Nicole Maracle (left) and Katelyn Brant (centre) took the characters of Mary and Richard Aylward, respectively. They discovered that their parts in the drama were largely non-speaking roles! Whitney Donahue (right) acted as their defence counsel.

Photo by John Hopkins

Photo by John Hopkins

The hanging of the Aylwards

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Photo by John Hopkins

Crown Attorney Adam Wilson, played by Nicolas Van Exan, called nine witnesses to the stand to testify against the Aylwards.

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The son of the murder victim, Alexander Munro was the prosecution’s star witness. The role was played at St. Theresa’s by Alexandra Danahy (right). Andrew Perry took on the role of Chief Justice William Henry Draper.

members of the Renaissance Society at Belleville’s St. Theresa’s Catholic School. Under the guidance of Boyce the 18 Grade 11 and 12 students in the Renaissance Society replayed the trial, using the actual court transcripts from 1862. Afterward they discussed the process, highlighting the obvious inconsistencies that existed and the differences between justice in the mid-19th century as compared to current practices. Certainly according to the facts presented at the trial there appears to be little question that Mary Aylward was responsible for Munro’s death. The key witness for the prosecution was Alexander Munro, the son of the victim. Alexander had been with his father when the standoff with the Aylwards had begun, but he did not see the

actual crime being committed. He had been shot by Richard Aylward early in the dispute and had retreated home before his father was struck by the scythe. Indeed, the only people in the courtroom who had actually been witness to the crime were Mary and Richard Aylward, yet neither was called to give testimony. It sounds shocking now, but according to Boyce that was very much the convention of the time. Ten witnesses were trotted up before Chief Justice Draper, and nine were called by the prosecution. For the most part the prosecution witnesses testified that Mary Aylward had boasted of the crime and clearly shown some predisposition to kill William Munro.

“After deceased was hurt, I went to prisoners’ house,” said prosecution witness Theophilus Golder on the stand. “I saw the prisoner Mary. She said she was glad ‘Old Baldie’ was dead; that if he was alive she would cut the head off him again, or any person who would do anything to her.” Perhaps the most damning testimony came from Mary Ann MacRae, who said the Aylwards were at her house a week before the attack, sharpening the scythe. “One of my children asked prisoner Richard whither he was going haying,” MacRae said. “He replied yes; he was going haying. There was no grass then. There was a little snow still left.” The lone witness called by defence attorneys James O’Reilly and John Finn was a man named John Rous, from Maynooth. His testimony was brief although he did imply that Munro did not want the Aylwards arrested. “He said he had no business interfering with prisoners,” Rous testified. The stark imbalance in the number of prosecution witnesses as opposed to defence witnesses in the trial was a source of particular concern to the members of the Renaissance Society. The set-up was in marked contrast to our current view of what constitutes a “fair trial.” Part of the disparity could be accounted for by the practicalities of the period. Even though the crime was committed in the North part of Hastings, Belleville was the closest courthouse. In 1862 the journey from north of Bancroft to downtown Belleville would have been a long and arduous one. Many friends and neighbours of the Aylwards who

Spring 2010 • Country Roads

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The hanging of the Aylwards

Photo by John Hopkins

Country Roads, Discovering Hastings County would like to thank Gerry Boyce for his ­assistance and his voluminous ­resources regarding the Aylward case. We would also like to thank Gerry for his ­efforts in organizing the trial re-enactment at St. Theresa’s Catholic School, and Joe Stafford and the Renaissance Society for staging the re-enactment.

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Noted historian Gerry Boyce helped ­arrange a re-enactment of the controversial trial with the ­students of the Renaissance Society and St. Theresa’s Catholic School.

may have been in a position to speak in their defence would not have been able to make the trip. The prosecution would have had far greater resources to find and deliver witnesses to Belleville to bolster their case in court. Not all the prosecution witnesses were crossexamined by defence counsellors Finn or O’Reilly, and when the defence lawyers did cross-examine, they drew out little that would call the prosecution’s case into question. Given the overwhelming evidence presented against the Aylwards it is perhaps not surprising that in 2010 the students of St. Theresa’s Renaissance Society delivered a guilty verdict against the couple. There were other troubling elements to the court case, however. One was the rather comical disappearance of the alledged murder weapon. The police were transporting the scythe to Belleville when they left it outside a Madoc watering hole while they grabbed a refreshment. “I took the scythe, it was carried off by some person – I don’t know who – as I was stopping at a tavern on my way to Belleville,” said William Edes,

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The participants in the re-enactment were: Chantal King, Erica Brennan, Sarah ­Lesage, Nicolas Van Exan, Whitney ­Donahue, Stephanie Slack, Alexandra ­Danahy, Andrew Perry, Jessica Donnan, Nicole Maracle, Katelyn Brant, Sarah ­Ferguson, Kaitlin McCann, John Rich, Aundrea Hubble, Eric Tran, Brett ­Masterson, Liam Arendt. For more information on the Renaissance Society visit www.canadianhistorylive.com, where you can also sign a petition requesting Canadian History be made mandatory for Grade 12 classes.

who had arrested the Aylwards, in his testimony. “I have not been able to recover it.” Indeed, not even the pistol Richard Aylward was purported to have shot Alexander Munro with was produced as evidence in court. In 1863 a 16-page account was published in Quebec by an H. E. Doherty titled ‘The Aylwards and Their Orphans’, with the subtitle ‘unjust hanging of prisoners at Belleville, C.W., trial for murder and proofs of their innocence.’ In his writings, Doherty admonished the government for not overturning the verdict against the Aylwards, or at least reducing their sentence, and reviewed the evidence presented at the trial. He highlighted inconsistencies in the testimony of Alex Munro and Mary Ann MacRae and drew attention to the lack of evidence presented on behalf of the defence. Doherty noted that Alex Munro testified that, moments before he was shot in the back, he “saw [Richard] Aylward point the gun at him.” Yet under cross examination he said that he was not looking at Aylward, and that Aylward had placed the gun “on the back of him.”

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MacRae gave conflicting testimony about the times she had seen the alleged murder weapon, Doherty noted, and he downplayed Mary Aylward’s boasts about killing William Munro by referring to Isabella MacRae’s testimony that, “I did not think much of this at the time. She [Mary Aylward] would talk in this boasting style of what she would do.” Finally, Doherty raised the point that no one could conclusively say how William Munro had died, since the only witnesses to the crime were Munro himself and the Aylwards. “As to the words used by the prisoner Mary they were no doubt violent – but a woman is excitable – particularly after so terrible a scene,” he wrote. “We do not positively know anything whatever of the scene between her and Munro. Alex Munro had fled when he saw her at the place of the fight. There is no direct evidence whatever to show that the prisoner [Mary] struck with the scythe. Might not Munro have fallen on the scythe – we have only the words of the poor frightened woman with regard to the wound received by Munro.”

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The hanging of the Aylwards

Perhaps these inconsistencies played on the minds of the jurors in 1862 when they deliberated for two hours. While they did indeed deliver a guilty verdict they strongly recommended mercy. It must have come as a shock to the courtroom, then, when Chief Justice Draper ignored that recommendation and instead sentenced the couple to hang. Interestingly, it appears a previous court case may have influenced the judge’s decision. Immediately before the Aylwards’ trial, a Belleville man named Morris Moorman was acquitted in the stabbing death of a local citizen. Chief Justice Draper was apparently rendered speechless by the jury’s decision. An article in the Hastings Chronicle described the Moorman verdict as, “inexplicable, misguided and erroneous.” Is it possible that in the light of this decision Chief Justice Draper had resolved not to be embarrassed again? The possibility that the Moorman verdict had clouded Chief Justice Draper’s judgement was perhaps one of the most significant challenges brought to the verdict against the Aylwards. It was cited in numerous appeals in the intervening weeks before the delivery of the guilty verdict and the scheduled date for the hanging. Robert Read, a prominent citizen of the area at the time, sent a petition to the Governor General with the signatures of 39 other individuals, in which he noted, “just before the trial took place, a man named Moorman was tried at the same assizes for causing the death of a person named Taylor, and, contrary to all expectations, Moorman was acquitted; people were astonished, and it is believed that the surprise created in this community on account of that trial, caused the conviction of the Aylwards.” In a sermon delivered after the hanging of the Aylwards, Reverend John Brennan of St. Michael’s Parish in Belleville noted, “After that [the Moorman] trial my friends, some people in this town, who boast of their acquaintance with the law, made use of these fearful words ‘Aylward and his wife are doomed.’”

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In addition to Read’s, three other petitions were forwarded to the Governor General in November of 1862, two of them signed by Finn. In his final appeal, submitted on Nov. 22, the defence attorney said he had even secured the signatures of William Munro’s wife and son, lending credence to Rous’s testimony that the elder Munro had not wanted the couple arrested. The circumstances surrounding the crime itself also elicited support for the Aylwards in some quarters. There was the thought that, if Mary Aylward had acted in self defence or if the crime had not been premeditated, it was not unreasonable that her life should be spared. “There is no record in British law, or in British history where a man defending himself on his own soil has been condemned to death because his house is his castle,” Reverend Brennan said. “There is another extenuating circumstance in her favour. She did not repeat the blow. You see, my friends, how frivolous was the quarrel which led to this terrible result?” In a particularly moving letter written in her jail cell Mary Aylward similarly tried to put her actions into some perspective. “I protest before God and man that the unfortunate blow I struck in defence of my husband on my own soil and near my own home, among my own helpless children,” she wrote. “I say in my lonely cell and on the brink of the grave, that I had not the least thought of killing Munro, that I did not premeditate the unfortunate blow.” A final question that could be asked is, if Mary Aylward did indeed commit the crime, why was her husband sentenced to hang as well? This matter is particularly disturbing as the couple had three young children. Mary Aylward’s final note to her daughter is rather chilling in its frankness and her acceptance of the situation. “God has willed it that your Pa and Ma will suffer death on Monday next,” she wrote. “I hope He will have mercy on our souls. My wish is that when

you, my dear infant children, will come to the use of reason, that you will pray to the Almighty God for the repose of the souls of your Pa and Ma, who loved you dearly…” Despite the weight of support for some sort of leniency, the Aylwards were hanged in the early afternoon of Dec. 8, 1862. About 5,000 spectators were on hand to witness the event, according to the Hastings Chronicle, many who had travelled 60 to 75 miles to be sure to see the spectacle. Based on the newspaper descriptions, the eager throng might as well have been attending a hockey game. Mary Aylward reportedly took 90 seconds to die once the bolt was drawn, Richard a further minute. According to the Chronicle, their bodies remained suspended a further 35 minutes. If the trial and conviction of the Aylwards raised concerns about the administration of justice in the mid-19th century, their hanging also caused many to reflect on the merit of public executions. “In the immense crowd we saw numerous instances of young men drunk and unable to stand without assistance,” the Chronicle reported. “And quarrelling, hooting and yelling combined to make it one of the most terrible and heart-rending scenes we ever witnessed. And we cannot but pause and ask what good effects arise from these disgusting public executions. Do they not rather pander to the vitiated taste of low morals, than act as warnings to others? If a fellow creature has really forfeited his life, and the law deems it necessary to execute him as an example to evil doers, would not every purpose be answered by a private execution, at which only a limited number of persons were present – the officials of the County, etc…” Following the execution of Richard and Mary Aylward, Reverend Brennan of St. Michael’s parish was named Treasurer of a fund to aid the three Aylward orphans. Six years after the execution of the Aylwards, in 1868 public executions were outlawed in Great Britain and Canada held its last public execution. Z

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‘Voyageur Bob’ finds new challenges in the rough

Bob Abrames, or ‘Voyageur Bob’, spends about four months out of the summer ­retracing the old fur trading routes. Photo courtesy Bob Abrames

The simple life BY JOHN HOPKINS

You live about a mile off the highway, at the end of a winding, rutted road carved out of the forest. Your home is a 200 square foot, two-room wood cabin. You have no television, no furnace, no refrigerator. A wood stove provides your heat. Kraft dinner is a treat.

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f you do, maybe you should spend some time with Bob Abrames. ‘Voyageur Bob’, as he is popularly known, has lived this type of lifestyle for the past two years. His home is a very slightly converted hunting camp just south of Marmora. Abrames describes his lifestyle as the realization of a “boyhood dream. I always wanted to see what bush life was like.” When he and his wife separated two years ago he found the perfect excuse to fulfill his fantasy. He had bought 50 acres of land about six years

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Think you can hack it? previously as a hunting camp. Turning it into a full time residence seemed like a perfectly natural plan. Abrames comes by his enthusiasm for his new life honestly. He has always had a sense of adventure and a keen appreciation of the outdoors. Growing up around Alexandria, near the Ontario/Quebec border some 50 years ago he spent a lot of time hunting and trapping. “I was always a big hunter and enjoyed doing the outdoors thing,” he explains. As an adult Abrames went into business and became especially successful as an entrepreneur.

He was a key figure in the growth of Sunquest Vacations. In the 1990s he turned his attention to public speaking, conducting leadership, teamwork and sales conferences. A key turning point in his life came in January, 2005, when he read a newspaper article describing a television series in which a group of modern day adventurers would retrace the steps of the early fur trading Voyageurs. The company producing the show was looking for applicants to fill the roles of the hardy travellers, and Abrames decided to throw his hat in


The Simple Life

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His new life off the grid is simply an extension of the Voyageur experience for Abrames. Now, instead of roughing it for four months, he tackles its challenges and reaps its rewards year-round. Photo courtesy Bob Abrames

from a four-month summer excursion into a daily lifestyle had its challenges. “It’s more work than I thought about, but it’s not as difficult as one would imagine,” he explains. “What I mean is the work is hard, but everything is very manual. It’s not complicated. What you learn living like this is you have to live with nature; you can’t fight it at all. Everything has consequences. When the weather is

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The Voyageur journeys are meant to recreate the lifestyle of the fur traders from 200 years ago.

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Abrames does his cooking by simple means. A beef and barley stew is on the menu on this particular winter afternoon.

Photo courtesy Bob Abrames

Photo by John Hopkins

the ring. From over 800 applicants he was one of the nine chosen to take on the journey, which would lead the group from Lachine, QC (near Montreal) to Winnipeg. The Voyageurs covered the distance in exactly the same manner in which it was done in 1806, paddling a 26-foot birch bark canoe. The production, titled Destination Nor’Ouest 2005, ran as an eight-part series in early 2006, carried on TFO and TVA. The Voyageur adventures have become an annual summer rite for Abrames. In May he will

depart from Lake Winnipeg and travel north to the Beaufort Sea, a distance of 4,000km in 120 days. “We try to travel the original fur trader routes,” Abrames explains. “The number of participants varies; the most we’ve had is nine and I’d go with a minimum of two. You need at least two.” His experiences as a ‘Voyageur’ helped prepare Abrames for his life off the grid. He had developed an appreciation for making do with the bare necessities and being at the mercy of Mother Nature. Still, taking the experiences

nice, you chop wood, for example. You don’t wait to do it another time. You cannot afford to procrastinate, or you learn your lessons.” Abrames’ diet is simple. On the day of our visit the aroma of a beef and barley stew fills the cabin. “It’s pretty basic,” he explains. “I like my chick peas, fish. When you’re preparing meals for one it’s more difficult because a lot of products are designed for two people. It’s especially challenging in the summer because you have trouble keeping food fresh. If I can’t boil it or fry it, I don’t eat it. “Interestingly, I eat less now even though I’m more physically active than I used to be. There’s no question I’m living a better lifestyle than I used to.”

Spring 2010 • Country Roads

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The Simple Life

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Home for the past two years has been this hunting camp, located a mile or so off the highway just south of Marmora. Photo by John Hopkins

Does he think the change has added years to his life? “Absolutely,” replies Abrames, who will turn 57 in May. One might think that the cold and forbidding winter would provide its greatest challenge to someone roughing it in the bush, but Abrames says that’s not the case. “To be honest with you winter is easier,” he points out. “It’s easier to keep food, there’s no bugs around. As long as you’ve got wood you’re in pretty good shape. I thought winter would be a lot tougher.” Does he have a favourite season? “Fall might be my favourite,” he says. “The colours, temperature, the lack of bugs. But each season has something. There’s the smell of spring, and winter’s the easiest. I don’t see much of summer with my Voyageur travels.” In case one gets the wrong impression, Abrames has not cut himself off from civilization – far from it. Indeed, he continues to pursue his speaking engagements, travelling around the world nine months of the year. With the help of his laptop computer and an internet stick he is able to maintain his website, take emails, shop for Voyageur supplies on eBay and listen to the CBC or his favourite Country Music radio station out of Belleville. He also has a cell phone on hand, although he finds most of his communication comes via email. So is there anything Abrames truly misses from his old lifestyle, anything perhaps he likes

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to indulge in when he does travel to his speaking gigs? “If there’s anything I miss it’s a hot shower,” he smiles. “When I go on the road, the first thing I do when I check into my room at a hotel is take a hot shower.” Other comforts of modern life, however, hold no appeal to him. “I used to be a big TV watcher,” he recalls. “And I thought when I was travelling I would go back to that. But now when I go into a hotel I find I don’t bother with it. I’ll turn it on, flip through the channels and find I’ve seen it all before or it just holds no interest for me. Then I’ll turn it off and read a book. By and large I think there’s very little positive about it. Looking back, I can’t believe how much time I wasted watching TV. “Two years ago I finished an expedition and I was asked what I didn’t miss while I was on the trip, and I said, ‘noise and light’. You have no idea how much noise pollution there is in the world. It is non-stop. Here, the biggest treat is there’s no noise. There’s no question I sleep better. I find the lack of air in some of the bigger hotels a real problem. I don’t sleep as well.” Balancing his time in the bush with the hustle and bustle of the 21st century has given Abrames something of a unique perspective on our society. “From the outside looking in, there are a couple of things that challenge my value system,” he says. “The first is people living beyond their means, and the other is the fact we have become


The Simple Life

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Abrames began his Voyageur adventures in 2005, when he was one of nine participants chosen from 800 applicants for a role on a Quebec-based television series. Photo courtesy Bob Abrames

such a ‘stuff ’ society, a consumer society. If I have something and I can’t see it on the wall, I get rid of it. I think if you go back 50 years that was the reality, we were more about function than show. I think we’re heading back that way, but it’s going to hurt a lot of people.” Abrames has three children, a daughter and two sons ranging in age from 24 to 27. His daughter is a teacher in Manhattan, an irony that’s not lost on Abrames. While she isn’t such a big fan of living in the remote woods the boys are somewhat more attuned to it. “I think when she [his daughter] found out what I was doing, she thought ‘the old man’s really gone off his rocker now,’” Abrames laughs. “She’s been here once or twice, but it’s just not her thing. The boys are fairly regular though, and I could see the youngest having a place of his own one day.” Abrames acknowledges that his lifestyle isn’t for everyone, but he also points out that it is certainly accessible to anyone who is willing to make the step. “I think for most people it would get boring,” he admits. “Especially if they were young. Youth in general seem to always be terrified of missing something. But it’s different for me. I’ve done all that stuff; it’s past. “You also have to remember that I’m lucky because I’ve chosen this lifestyle. If it wasn’t by choice, maybe it wouldn’t appeal to me so much. “To live this lifestyle you have to be physical. And most people aren’t that physical and they’d get frustrated. I hear people say all the time that

they couldn’t do without their shower, or their TV. That’s bullshit. With a little bit of health anyone could do this. They’re just afraid to. “Out here you’re governed by nature and you learn to accept it. For me that wasn’t a problem, but for someone with less experience of the outdoors it might be.” It is perhaps significant that the subject of money doesn’t come up until late in our interview. While Abrames is paid well enough for his speaking engagements, he explains the revenue is not what appeals to him. “Two of my greatest pleasures in life are speaking and my Voyageur trips,” he says. “And the money from speaking helps take care of the Voyageur expenses. “I’m not hurting at all. I could probably live on $500/month. In the other world, where it’s first class and high end, you could have a salary of half a million a year and find it tough to live. Here I have light and heat, and there’s no meter running.” With a lifestyle that brings so much pleasure every day and that frees him from the stresses that we have come to accept as part of daily life, it is perhaps no surprise that Abrames can’t pinpoint one particular event that has left a big impression on him since his move two years ago. “The biggest moment?” he repeats before considering the question again. “That would probably be whenever I go to the outhouse in the middle of the night and look back at the cabin, and think how great it is to be here.” Z

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BY JOHN HOPKINS Christ Church, Her Majesty’s Chapel Royal of the Mohawks, was built in 1843 and was almost destroyed in a fire in 1906. Photo by John Hopkins

The Amazing Journey Historic church celebrates major anniversary 22 I

Country Roads • Spring 2010

In April, 1710 four Mohawk chiefs from Fort Hunter, NY travelled to England. Their purpose was to ­request military aid and a ­missionary from the British crown. A year later Queen Anne’s Chapel was built near what is now Johnstown, NY and as a gift the Mohawks received a seven-piece double silver communion set from Queen Anne. Three hundred years later the communion set remains as a symbol of the alliance forged between the Mohawks and the British crown. Perhaps remarkably, the contents of the set remain intact, divided between the Mohawks of Tyendinaga and Brantford. Each group has possession of a chalice, a paton and a flagon. The seventh piece, an alms basin, is with the Brantford group. The pieces of the communion set belonging to the Tyendinaga Mohawks are officially in the possession of Christ Church, Her Majesty’s Chapel Royal of the Mohawks, a Gothic-style Anglican church located in Deseronto. The communion set had an interesting journey between Fort Hunter and Deseronto. After backing the British in the American Revolutionary war, the Mohawks left New York but buried the seven pieces for safe keeping. They relocated to Lachine, QC, then in 1784 to southern Ontario, where they were split between the current Tyendinaga Territory and the Six Nations Group in the Brantford area. The land they settled on was apparently provided as a gift by King George III in return for their loyalty to the crown. At some point in 1784 the Mohawks returned to Fort Hunter to retrieve the silver communion set. The chalice now in the possession of the Tyendinaga church reputedly has a small dent on it caused by a shovel hitting it when it was being dug up. “I don’t think that’s likely,” says Reverend Father Bradley Smith, Chaplain of Her Majesty’s Chapel Royal of the Mohawks in Deseronto, reluctantly dispelling the legend. “The pieces are very light and if a shovel had hit one of them it would have probably shattered.” When they first settled in Tyendinaga the Mohawks built a log church, but it was replaced by the current stone structure in 1843. The church can seat about 200 people and is located on the top of a hill, not far off Highway 49 in the town of Deseronto. Although the silver communion pieces are not kept in the church, it does house numerous historic artifacts given to the Mohawks by the British, including a triptych and bell donated by King George III and a bible given by Queen Victoria. More recently, the church received a communion chalice from Queen Elizabeth II in 1984 to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the coming of the United Empire Loyalists to Ontario. The triptych consists of three sections. One segment contains the Apostles Creed, the middle


The Amazing Journey

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Dr. Oronhyatekha, one of the area’s most famous residents, is buried in the cemetery adjacent to the church. Photo by John Hopkins

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The 300-year-old sterling silver communion pieces now in possession of Christ Church in Deseronto include the chalice on the left, paton and flagon. The chalice on the right was a gift from Queen Elizabeth II in 1984. Photo by Marilyn A. Brant / Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory

portion lists the Ten Commandments and the third has the Lord’s Prayer. All are written in the Mohawk language. A Royal Coat of Arms, also from King George III, which hung over the west door of the church, was unfortunately destroyed in a fire in 1906. The blaze was caused when the spire was struck by lightning. King George V donated a Coat of Arms to replace it. The fire destroyed the ceiling of the church although among the valuable pieces to survive the blaze was the graystone baptismal font, which displays horizontal cracks due to its exposure to the extreme heat. The church also contains a memorial window from Dr. Oronhyatekha, who is buried in the adjacent cemetery. Born on the Six Nations Reserve near Brantford in 1841, Oronhyatekha led a full life, becoming the first aboriginal to receive a medical degree and campaigning for the national Conservative Party.

Leona

Dombrowsky, MPP Prince Edward-Hastings

Contact my office for Provincial matters. Belleville 81 Millennium Pkwy, Unit 3 P.O. Box 575 Belleville, ON K8N 5B2 Tel: 613-962-1144 Open M–F 9:30 to 4:30 Bancroft Satellite Office 33 Station Street, Unit C Tel: 613-332-5850 Open Wednesday 9:30 to 4:30 Picton Satellite Office 206 Main Street, Unit 4A Tel: 613-476-9616 Open Friday 9:30 to 4:30

In 2004 Christ Church was elevated to the status of Chapel Royal, making it one of only six Anglican churches outside of Great Britain to enjoy that distinction, and it is believed to be the only one of those six to function throughout the year. The term ‘Chapel Royal’ means the church comes under the direct jurisdiction of Queen Elizabeth II, rather than a bishop serving underneath her, although for practical purposes, since the church is not located in Great Britain the Bishop of Ontario oversees it. “The title is honourific more than anything,” explains Father Smith. “Traditionally these would have been the churches where the monarch worshipped, although that obviously isn’t the case here.” While the co-operation between the British crown and the Mohawks has its roots in 1710, the alliance was strengthened through a common bond in times of conflict. In addition to fighting

as British allies during the American Revolution from 1775 to 1783 the Mohawks again came to the defence of the crown in the War of 1812, fighting in the decisive battle at Chrysler Farm. Christ Church attempts to blend the Mohawk traditions with the Anglican tenets, particularly during the Mohawk Landing celebration in May, which marks the arrival of the Mohawks at Tyendinaga in the spring of 1784. “We try to bring back the language foremost,” Father Smith says. “And we also take the Mohawk theology where it fits.” Queen Elizabeth II is scheduled to visit Canada in the summer of 2010, and Father Smith is hopeful that she will pay a visit to Christ Church to commemorate the 300th anniversary of the epic journey of the four Mohawk chiefs that led to the close ties between the British and the Mohawks. “It would be our hope that she will take the time to visit,” he says. Z

LOCALLY MADE PRODUCTS Amazing Crafts and Collectibles Melissa & Doug Toys Paintings and much more

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613-395-1100

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Step back in time by visiting our charming 1908 shop 22 Mill Street, Stirling, ON K0K 3E0 613 395-6210

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• cross roads • The sweet smell of success France may be known for its wine, ­Germany for its beer and sausage and Italy for its pasta. Canada’s culinary tastes, however, appear to be defined by maple syrup.

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The tapping of trees generally begins in early March, although maple syrup producers are at the mercy of the weather. Photo by Lisa Wessels

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Charles and Bonnie Robinson live off the grid on their farm in Eldorado. Charles’s father started the maple syrup production that continues to this day.

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Photo courtesy Spring Creek Maple/Robinson Family Farms

Photo courtesy Spring Creek Maple/Robinson Family Farms

It is sold in airport duty-free shops and given to visitors from around the world. A television commercial playing during the recent Winter Olympics said that after Norwegian cross-country ski coach Bjonar Hakensmoen helped the rival Canadian team win a Silver Medal in the 2006 Games, he was inundated with maple syrup deliveries from grateful Canucks. The great appeal of maple syrup, apart from its sweet taste, may lie in the fact that its production signals the end of a long, cold winter. Once temperatures start to consistently get above the freezing mark tapping of the maple trees and production of the syrup starts to take place. Maple syrup production is at its strongest in Quebec, but Ontario is very active in the industry as well. According to data from the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs there were about 2,600 maple producers in Ontario in 2001, but that total could be as high as 3,600, ranging from hobby level operations of fewer than 100 taps to major producers with more than 3,000 taps. The Harvest Hastings website (www.harvesthastings.ca) lists eight producers of maple syrup in Hastings County. One of those is Spring Creek Maple/Robinson Family Farms, located in Eldorado. Charles Robinson is the third generation of his family to run the farm and his father started maple syrup production on the property. “We tap between 1,200 and 1,300 trees,” Robinson says. “That’s a decent size for around here. When you get to over 1,000 trees it’s not a hobby anymore. This is a very good area for syrup. We have good maple trees.” Robinson’s farm is distinctive because he and his wife Bonnie live off the grid, using solar and wind power to obtain their electricity.

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Tapping trees is really only the start of maple syrup production. After it is collected it must be boiled, and for every litre of syrup produced, 30 to 40 litres of moisture must be boiled off.

“I hadn’t really planned to go off the grid,” explains Charles, who is a Madoc Township councilor. “I was doing different work with solar, and experimenting. I was going to use my own power and also use the grid once in a while, but the cost would have been prohibitive; it made more sense for me to just go off the grid. We actually use more electricity now than we did when we were on the grid.” Hay is the main crop on the Robinson farm, and it also produces firewood and lumber in addition to maple syrup. Sustainable living practices extend to all of the farm activities, although Charles admits that maple syrup is generally “a pretty natural product” to produce. “I think the only difference might be that I don’t use vacuum pumps, I use gravity,” he says. Maple syrup is produced from the sap in the trees. The freezing of the trees during the winter months and spring nights causes the trees to produce large quantities of carbon dioxide gas, and the gas allows the sap to flow upward inside the tree during the warming cycle of the day as it moves from a point of high pressure to lower pressure. Sap can flow anytime this change from freezing to warmer temperatures occurs, but obviously it is more common during the late winter and early spring. “Generally I start tapping in early March and it can last to the first week of April,” Charles Robinson says. “If it warms up earlier I can start earlier and I’ve started tapping as early as Feb. 20. The ideal temperature range is from about plus five [degrees] to minus five.” Getting the sap out of the tree is only part of the process, however. After the sap is collected it must be boiled to remove the water from it. According to a LandOwner Resource Centre and

Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources guide to backyard maple syrup production, for every litre of syrup produced, 30 to 40 litres of moisture must be boiled off. The final product has a sugar content of about 66 per cent. After boiling it can be filtered and bottled. Sugar, black, red and silver maple trees are considered the best for producing syrup, although other species of trees can also be tapped. According to Charles Robinson, birch trees also produce sap although tapping them is more of a specialized process, since they don’t produce as much sap and they tend to be ready just after the grueling process of tapping maples is completed. While maple sap may contain two to four per cent sugar, Robinson explains, birch sap is closer to one per cent. The Robinsons sell their syrup at the farm gate and they are located at 59 Robinson Road. Other producers of maple syrup in Hastings County are: Shaw’s Eldorado Maple -- Cyril and Isabella Shaw sell their product at Ivanhoe Cheese Factory Outlet, Drain’s Poultry, The Root Cellar and the Madoc and Marmora Farmers’ Markets. The Shaws also boil sap for other people. Rockfield Farm – Cec and Caroline Stamp are located in Boulter and sell their products at the farm gate. Trillium Ridge Sugarworks – Terry and Vickie Gervais’s family farm is located at 254 Maple Sugar Road, Tyendinaga Township. Apple Gates Orchard -- Bobbie Gates makes maple syrup each spring at their farm on Stockdale Road, north of Trenton. The Gates sell the maple syrup at the Trenton Farmers’ Market. Murphy Farms -- Mike Murphy and his son-inlaw Kevin Young make maple syrup in their new sugar shack, near Tweed, using the traditional open pan method. They are located at 62 Murphy Road and sell at the farm gate. Grills Orchard -- Randy and Diana McPherson sell maple syrup on their farm at 886 Grills Road, just west of Belleville. Z


• cross roads • Field of dreams Football’s Grey Cup is considered one of the most prestigious trophies in Canadian sport and the teams that have won it are among this country’s most storied sports franchises – the Toronto Argonauts, Edmonton Eskimos, Hamilton Tiger Cats, Winnipeg Blue Bombers, to name a few. In 1996 a U.S. businessman made a bid to add the Tweed Muskies to that list.

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In November of 1996 local newspapers ran this ad as part of a season ticket drive for the Tweed Muskies. Graphic courtesy the Tweed Heritage Centre

The Muskies were the brainchild of Russell Moon, a real estate lawyer based in Norcross, GA. Although born and raised in the U.S., Moon was a rabid Canadian Football League fan from the time he was in Grade 4 and attending school in Washington, D.C. Moon also had ties to the village of Tweed. His grandmother, Frances Woodcock had lived there and her grandfather was reputed to be Richard Woodcock, the first white settler in the area. Moon thought the community of 1,500 would make the ideal location for a CFL franchise, since it was located halfway between the cities of Hamilton, Toronto, Montreal and Ottawa, which at the time made up the league’s Eastern Division. He reasoned that a properly organized team with strong ties to the community could make a go of it in the world of professional sports, not unlike the very successful Green Bay Packers of the National Football League. Although he made his living in real estate law, Moon was no stranger to professional sports promotion or the CFL. In 1978 and ’79 he had put together the Moon Radio Network, a group of 27 northeastern U.S.-based radio stations that carried the Grey Cup broadcast. The network also had deals to cover World Hockey Association playoff games and action from the National Hockey League’s Atlanta Flames. In 1987 Moon had worked toward putting together an all-Francophone CFL team for Quebec. He gave a $5,000 deposit but couldn’t raise more funds. In 1973 he had worked for the Winston-Salem Red Sox minor league baseball team, where he developed a knack for special game day promotions. What Moon proposed for the Tweed Muskies was a far cry from the traditional business plan for professional sports franchises, and in the end that likely played a role in its downfall. Some of his ideas were also well ahead of their time. Moon’s vision involved a football team that thrived on a strong connection with the community rather than corporate involvement. “I will operate the company in a manner different from that of other sports teams,” he wrote in his business plan. “The company’s raison d’etre will be one of community service rather than financial profit.” Moon was a man of strong religious conviction and that played heavily into his project. He said that part of the inspiration for launching the bid for a CFL franchise came from reading Mother Teresa’s book A Simple Path. “What if Mother Teresa, instead of organizing a group of nuns who were more or less nurses, what if she organized a pro sports team,” he said in a Globe & Mail article on Oct. 1, 1996. “This is about an opportunity to contribute, to do the Lord’s work.” Among Moon’s expectations for his staff was that every employee of the team would participate in community and charitable activities for at least one day each week. The most obvious shortcoming facing Moon was the fact that Tweed had nothing approaching a modern professional sports stadium. What it did have, however, was a lot of open space, and Moon thought that if he could acquire bleachers for about Spring 2010 • Country Roads

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• cross roads • 15,000 spectators he could make it work. He had even made enquiries to the Molson Indy car race organizers in Toronto about using their stands for the football team. Through conversations with various people involved with the CFL, Moon reasoned that his team would require an operating budget of about $3,000,000 for its first year. With seating for 15,000, and tickets priced on three levels between $10 and $60, Moon calculated that if he sold out all nine regular season home games he could raise $2,970,000 through ticket sales. He also saw an opportunity to raise money through a booster club modeled on U.S. College Football, where fans could pay $400 to $10,000 for membership. Moon wanted to target families and the disabled as his fan base. He wouldn’t sell alcohol or tobacco at the games, or have alcohol or tobacco companies as team sponsors. The games would be played during daylight, so children could attend without being out too late and cheerleaders would be in a more ‘traditional’ style, as opposed to the scantily-clad dancers more popular around professional sports. Rather than have separate seating sections for the disabled, Moon planned to include them in the regular seating plan. He also said he would make a point of hiring a large number of disabled employees, even players. He also planned to develop team literature geared specifically to schools as a means to encourage reading among students and grow a youthful fan base. Perhaps his most novel promotional idea was televising all games on the Internet. While that is considered common now, few people in 1996 would have seen its potential. Moon presented his business plan to the Reeve of Tweed, Dr. A. Gibson Allen, on Oct. 1, 1996 and on Nov. 9 a season ticket drive was launched, with ads running in newspapers throughout the region. Ticket prices ranged from $105 to $625 for the 1997 season. Moon boasted that if 4,000 fans from the Peterborough/Kingston/Belleville-Trenton ‘triangle’ bought four season tickets each, he could take his proposal to the CFL Governors during Grey Cup Week later that month. Unfortunately Moon’s plan didn’t work out, and on Dec. 9 he issued a press release saying the Tweed Muskies were dead. “The people of the eastern townships of Ontario have not shown the willingness to meet in Tweed to support the team,” he said in his release. “The response [to the season ticket campaign] was not nearly enough.” Moon paid special thanks to Dr. Allen and his wife for their support. “If it were not for Gib Allen, I would not be here,” he said. “If it were not for Gib Allen, the people of Canada would not have heard of the Tweed Muskies.” Moon apparently returned to Georgia a disillusioned man, having seen his concept for a groundbreaking, community-driven professional sports team flounder. Z

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A change of pace Eldorado artist Brenda Crawford’s life has truly been one of contrasts.

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Anything that nature serves up can be incorporated into one of Crawford’s baskets, such as this antler. Notice how a piece of the antler has also been placed in the middle of the basket.

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Crawford’s work has been on display in Belleville, Bancroft, Tweed and Madoc. In August it will be on show in Toronto. Photo courtesy Brenda Crawford

Photo by John Hopkins

She has gone from the high powered lifestyle of Toronto to the quiet and seclusion of a farmhouse just north of Madoc. And she has abandoned the frenetic pace of working for technology giant IBM to developing a small and successful business weaving traditional native baskets. Crawford’s work has been displayed and sold throughout Hastings County. She has attended juried shows in Belleville and Bancroft and has had her work displayed in the Quinte Arts Council gallery, the Tweed Heritage Museum, the Madoc Cultural Centre and the Bancroft Art Gallery. In August her work will be on display as part of the Art For All Canada series at the Rainbow Gallery in downtown Toronto. Crawford began making baskets in 1997 although her interest in the practice goes back much further. She grew up in Vancouver, where she was exposed to a wealth of native culture and she became a collector of native art and artifacts. “I always did something creatively,” she recalls. “I made dolls, I sewed. I had an aptitude for art.” Despite her artistic leanings Crawford went into the brokerage business when she left university and later joined IBM’s marketing department. A three-year stint based in Victoria reinforced her appreciation of native art. In 1996 Crawford left IBM and she and her husband bought a 55-acre hobby farm in Eldorado, complete with farmhouse dating back to 1835. “We knew the area,” she explains. “We wanted something remote. We started looking in Picton and gradually kept moving up.”

Crawford’s original plan was to have a consulting business based out of her new home, but about a year after moving in a new pursuit caught her imagination. “Through the internet I came across a course in native basket weaving being run out of Geneva Park, near Orillia,” she explains. “I’d never woven a basket but I thought I’d give it a try. It was a fabulous experience. There were famous basket makers from all over the world, and little old me sitting there, who hadn’t done anything like this before. It lasted four days and I went from never having done it to completing my first basket.” Soon after Crawford began weaving baskets from pine needles, a tradition she says began with Native Americans in the southeast. They would use the needles from the Long Leaf Pine and coil them into a variety of items, which would then be coated with sap to make them waterproof. Crawford uses the same technique and sews the baskets with a waxed linen thread. They are then painted with beeswax and baked in the oven to make them strong and durable. The Long Leaf Pine needles measure between 15 to 18 inches in length, making them preferable for weaving. Crawford says Native Canadians used local needles in their work, but generally needles in this area are shorter and tougher to work with. She does use them occasionally, along with needles from the Ponderosa Pine on Vancouver Island, although for the most part she imports Long Leaf Pine needles from Florida. Crawford enhances the look of her baskets with local materials for embellishment, such


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Brenda Crawford shows off her first basket, which she made during a course in Orillia in 1997. Photo by John Hopkins

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Growing up and working in Vancouver and Victoria helped sow the seeds of Crawford’s interest in native baskets. Photo courtesy Brenda Crawford

as day lily leaves, sweet grass and leeks. Some of these items she obtains herself, others are provided by well-meaning friends and relatives. “I will use whatever I can find,” she says. “I’m working a lot with leeks now, and I grow my own sweet grass. I’ve had people send me antlers from out west, or sometimes the dogs will bring something home.”

Ideally situated in the heart of Eastern Ontario; Deseronto is nestled on the shores of the Bay of Quinte in the County of Hastings, located just minutes from Prince Edward County.

Specialty Stores & Services Restaurants & Accommodations Waterfront Parks & Boating Facilities Arts, Entertainment & Recreation Business & Development Opportunities

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Crawford looks forward to the opportunity to show her work in Toronto and expose her baskets to a fresh new audience. Z To see more of her work, go to www.brendasbaskets.com. For more information on the Art For All Canada show visit www.artforallcanada.org.

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Albert College...........................................2 All Seasons Market..................................23 Anderson Equipment Sales.....................11 Artists in Motion........................................2 Bancroft Chamber of Commerce, Gemboree...............................................27 Best of Hearing Centre.............................2 Black Dog Family Restaurant & Lounge...............................29 CAN ASIA Imports....................................5 Changing Seasons Home Décor, Gift and Party Centre................................2 Comfort Country.......................................4 Deer Fence Canada..........................13, 29 Deerhaven Farm & Garden Ltd.................9 Deseronto, Town of.................................27 Drummond BMR Building Material & Renovations.............................2 Eco Alternative Energy............................13 Elizabeth Crombie, Royal LePage ProAlliance Realty...................................31 Elm Tree Collectibles...............................29 Expedia Cruiseship Centers......................2 Farmgate Gardens..................................32 Goodnight Vienna Antiques, etc.............23 Greenley’s Bookstore................................5 Hearts to God Christian Books & Gifts..........................................29 Jean Finlayson, Studio Finlayson............29 Johnston’s Pharmacy & Gift Shoppe.......17 Jutta Shoe Boutique.................................5 Kelly’s Flowers & Gifts.............................29 Kim’s Kollectibles....................................29 L’Auberge de France Bistro & Bakery.......5 Leona Dombrowsky, MPP Prince Edward-Hastings..................23 Marmora Farmer’s Market.........................2 Marmora Inn..............................................2 Marmora Tourism Centre..........................2 Memory Lane............................................2 Mill Creek Spa.........................................29 Old Tin Shed...........................................17 Om Worx.................................................21 Organic Underground...............................5 Plumbing Plus..........................................31 Quinte Gardens Retirement Residence...31 Quinte Global Foods..............................29 Regent Theatre.......................................13 Scotia McLeod........................................16 Source, The.............................................29 Stirling Festival Theatre...........................20 Sun Volts Unlimited.................................29 Lilac Tea Art Show, Township of Tyendinaga..........................31 Village Green..........................................29 Village Shoppe..........................................5 Ward’s Marine............................................9 Wild Rose Sandwich Shop......................29 Wilson’s of Madoc...................................17

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Things to see and do in Hastings County To submit your event listing email info@countryroadshastings.ca or call us at 613 395-0499.

ART GALLERIES/EXHIBITIONS Art Gallery of Bancroft, 10 Flint Avenue, Bancroft, 613-332-1542 www.agb.weebly.com March 3 - 28 - The Michal Manson Memorial Student Art Show. Four area High Schools participating March 31 - April 25 - Works in Transition. Works by Joe Weissmann. April 28 - May 30 - Invitation 2010 (28th Juried ­Exhibition). June 2 - 27 - Works by Alejandro Rabazo. Belleville Art Association 392 Front St., Belleville, 613-968-8632. March 9 - March Madness:Spring! April 13 - Artists Choice May 11 - Friends John M. Parrott Gallery, Belleville Public Library, 254 Pinnacle Street, Belleville 613-968-6731 , ext. 2240 www.bellevillelibrary.com 2nd Tuesday of each month - Open Studio 10 am -1 pm; open to beginners and professionals 2nd Friday of each month - Musical Gifts 10:30 – 11:30 am –A musical interlude, with pianist Rick Penner Gershwin, Liberace, Carmichael, Peterson and more! Admission free. Coffee and treats available. April 8 – 28 Galleries One and Two – Variations 2010 - Art in the Schools returns showcasing the work of the region’s high school students. Meet these young artists at an opening reception on Thursday, April 8th from 6 – 7:30 p.m. May 6 – June 3 Galleries One and Two - Expressions 2010 - members of the Quinte Arts Council present their annual juried show of fine art and craft. June 10 – July 15 Galleries One and Two - Music as Muse is the Gallery’s own theme-based, juried show, showcasing the work of our talented local artists for the 8th year running. Tweed and Area Heritage Centre Gallery, 40 Victoria St. N., Tweed 316 478 3989 Open daily 9 to 12 and 1 to 5 (closed Sunday). Call for abstract art to be hung in the gallery in October. Contact suzannecavers@sympatico.ca March 4 – April 28: Bob McIntosh, Barbara Bering and Carl Reed & dioramas by Maia Heisler. May 1- 26 - Artwork from the school children of Tweed. June 3 – 29 - Life Work: A personal collection of close to 90 years with artists Roberta Fisk, Laszlo Szilvassy and Winifred-Mary Gutsell.

THEATRE/LIVE ENTERTAINMENT Bancroft Village Playhouse 613-332-5918 www.bancroftvillageplayhouse.ca March 26, 8 pm - Valdy, one of Canada’s best-known and best-loved singer-songwriters, with nearly 40 years of recording and touring worldwide. www.valdy.com) Tickets $20 (reserved seating) available at Harvest Moon, Posies. Presented by November Theatre, 613.332.5302 or 613.332.0707 Apr 14-24 - Better Half Dead by Jean Torres. ­Bancroft Theatre Guild May 13-22 – Anything Goes by Cole Porter High School production May 29 & 30 - Will Ye No Come Back Again? Community Choir Annual Spring Concert Belleville Theatre Guild 613-967-1442 www.bellevilletheatreguild.ca April 8 – 24 - The Mousetrap by Agatha Christie. A play about a group of strangers in a boarding house during a snow storm, one of whom is a murderer. Stay on the edge of your seat until the surprise switch finish. Director, Lise Lindenberg Non-Subscriber Tickets: $18.00 ea. Empire Theatre, 321 Front Street, Belleville, 613-969-0099, www.theempiretheatre.com April 22 - Rodney Carrington April 25 - Angels Among Us April 27 - Faber Drive “Can’t Keep A Secret Tour” with The New Cities and Jesse Labelle April 30 - Classic Albums Live perform The Rolling Stones “Let It Bleed” May 7 - Buddy Wasisname and the Other Fellers June 8 – 13 - The Full Monty

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Madoc Performing Arts Centre, Centre Hastings Park, Madoc. April 23 – 8pm – Ian Tamblyn, Music & Pictures. Tickets in advance $15.00 Contact: Ellen Wilson 613 473-2368 Quinte Symphony, concerts at Bridge Street United Church, Belleville. Tickets: Symphony Boutique, 217 Front St., Bellville or Bruinix Jewellers, 73-B Dundas St. W., Trenton. Info/tickets 613-962-0050 www.quintesymphony.com. April 11 - 2:30 pm - Viennese Treats. Quinte Symphony Pops concert with three soloists. Tickets $30./$5. May 14 - Musical Chairs, a FUNdraiser for Quinte Symphony, Location: Occcasions by the Bay, Bayside. Twenty one-of-a-kind Muskoka chairs hand-painted by area artists will be auctioned. Tickets $25. May 29 – 7:30pm - William Maddox at the Organ, with Quinte Symphony. Tickets $25./$5. The Regent Theatre, 224 Main St., Picton, Ontario, 613-476-8416, ext. 28 or 877-411-4761 www.theregenttheatre.org April 9 – 8 pm - Canada’s Premier Beatles Show starring The Caverners. It’s an amazing tribute to the biggest band of all time! his performance shows the lads just as they were as they progressed through time. It’s one FAB show! Tickets: $26.00 RTF Members $24.00 April 24 – 8 pm - The Relevant Deborah Kimmett is one Funny Lady. Bring your waterproof mascara because this county favourite is just back from the CBC TV’s Winnipeg Comedy Festival with great new material and characters. Tickets: $25.00 May 8 – 8 pm - Texas Blues Legend Andrew “Junior Boy” Jones presented by Zap Productions. A Bluesman with a talent as big as his home state of Texas. Fresh from a jaw dropping performance at this year’s Chicago Blues Festival, “Junior Boy” has been knocking out audiences and critics alike. Tickets: $26.50 The Stirling Festival Theatre, West Front St., Stirling 613-395-2100 or 1-877-1162 www.stirlingfestivaltheatre.com March 15-19 - The Brothers Grimm Spectaculathon Tickets- $10 April 14, 2pm & 8pm/ April 15, 2pm - Buble to ­Bocelli Tickets- $27.50 April 24, 8pm - Endless Summer Beach Band Barbecue & Concert Tickets- $47.50 Concert Tickets $27.50 April 30 & May 1, 6pm - Murder at the Okey Doke Corrall Dinner Theatre. Tickets- $135 couple/ $520 table of 8 April 25- May 5, 2010 - Stirling Festival of Sacred Praise 60th Anniversary. For more information ­contact Helen Cofell at 613-395-4110 or helencofell@sympatico.ca. May 8 - 8pm - Baby Boomers, The Show. Tickets- $27.50 May 26, 2pm/ May 27, 2pm & 8pm - The Judy ­Garland Story -Tickets- $25

EVENTS March 21- 11am – 5 pm - 8th Annual Madoc Total Life Expo. A one-day show hosting an integrated mix of excellent exhibitors from Madoc and the surrounding area. Kiwanis Centre, St. Lawrence St. East in Madoc. James Reid, Senior Trager Practitioner, RR#1 Stirling ON K0K 3E0, 613 395-3257, 2james@kos.net March 23 – 7 pm – Not Evil Just Wrong Documentary presented by Community Action Belleville. The first film to expose the True Cost of Global Warming Hysteria it takes viewers on a poignant journey that connects the first victory of the environmental movement - the worldwide ban of DDT, the pesticide that could have saved millions of Africans - with the current Global Warming campaign. Organic Underground, 255 Front Street, Belleville. Admission free. Information: Gary 613 477 1264 or Organic Underground 613 967 3647 March 25 - 7 – 9 pm. -Arts Quinte West First General Meeting and Membership Drive. Hear about the events we’re planning for 2010 as well as a presentation on “Putting Your Art Online”. Knights of Columbus Hall, 57 Stella Crescent, Trenton. Suzanne, Quinte West Chamber of Commerce, 613-392-7635, or Carryl Postma at 613-392-0957.

March 31 – April 3 - Kiwanis Easter Flower Sale in the Tweed Motor Car Sale Showroom, Tweed. April 4 – 7 pm – The Age of Stupid documentary. A wave-making feature film about a man living alone in the devastated world of 2055, watching archival film footage from 2008 and asking why we didn’t slow down or stop climate change when we had the chance. Organic Underground, 255 Front Street, Belleville. Admission free. Information: Gary 613 477 1264 or Organic Underground 613 967 3647 April 11 - 1 – 5 pm - Marmora Crowe Valley Lions Country Jam. Marmora Community Centre, 613-472-2377 April 17 & 18 -MACK Fest, Marmora & Area Canoe & Kayak Festival, Marmora & area. www.mackfest.ca April 17 & 18 – Treats On The Black River, Queensborough. Come out and watch the kayakers while enjoying locally prepared treats. April 18 – 7 pm -Waterlife Documentary presented by Community Action Belleville. The film follows the epic cascade of the Great Lakes to the Atlantic Ocean. Under assault by toxins, sewage, invasive species and dropping water levels, many scientists believe the Great Lakes are on the verge of ecological collapse. Organic Underground, 255 Front Street, Belleville. Admission free. Gary 613-477-1264 or Organic Underground 613-967-3647 April 18th - 2 – 5 - Marmora Legion Music Jam, Marmora 613-472-2218 April 30- May 2 - Antique Car Show & Flea Market, Stirling Fairgrounds, Stirling. Admission- $5/ Children 12- under free. www.stirling-rawdon.com May 2 – Queensborough Community Pancake Breakfast – 8:00 a.m. – Noon., Queensborough Community Centre. May 16 – 2 – 4 pm- A VICTORIAN TEA presented by Victorian Order of Nurses Hastings Northumberland Prince Edward , Ramada Inn, Bay Bridge Road, Belleville. $50 pp. - $25 charitable receipt available. Tickets: 1-888-279-4866 (Master Card or Visa) from 8:30 to 5pm Mon to Fri or 80 Division Street 2nd floor to pay in person. White gloved servers will serve a selection of tea sandwiches, Devon cream and cakes on bona china. Period music performed by The Living Music Ensemble, a division of TL Vocal Arts Studio. Silent auction, door prizes and a 50/50 draw. May 22 - Tweed and District Horticultural Society Annual Plant Sale. Tweed Memorial Park, Tweed. May 29 & 30 - Apple Blossom Tyme. Victoria Square, Colborne. A family friendly old fashioned event with live entertainment, Soap Box Derby, Irish Road Bowling, Garden Shed Market Place (vendor inquiries welcome), plant sale ,Classic Cars ,Tractors, and Antiques. Free. www.AppleBlossomTyme.com or 905-344.7845 Period Costume Encouraged

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May 29 - Stirling-Rawdon Farmers’ Market Kick-off! Street Dance featuring classic rock band Groundspeed! 8pm- 1am, Covered bridge in downtown Stirling!

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May 29 – Spring Fling Dance for Young Teens. Queensborough Community Centre, Queensborough.

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May 30 – 11 am – 4pm – Lilac Tea Art Show. Featuring ten artists & artisans at Tyendinaga Township Public Library Heritage site, 852 Melrose Road (Hwy.401 exit 556, Shannonville Rd north to Melrose Rd. east) • Free Admission • Presented By Friends Of Tyendinaga discovering has Twp. Public Library www.ttpl.ca 613.967.0606 www.tyendinagatownship.com 613.396.1944

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If you would like to include your community event in our discovering has free COUNTRY CALENDAR listing please email details to info@countryroadshastings.ca April 29, 2010 is the deadline for events occurring early June thru mid August.

CR Coun

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discovering has


Country Roads

discovering hastings county

CR Country Roads

discovering hastings county

To book your markeTplace adverTisemenT please call 613-395-0499

marketplace

> ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES

> DEVOTIONAL

> hEALTh AND wELLNESS

Elm Tree Collectibles

Mill Creek Spa a natural choice

Manicures Pedicures Facials Therapeutic Massage Reflexology Treatments Bridal Packages

Old, New & Unusual Items 27 West Front Street, Stirling, ON Email: etc@live.ca > ARTS & CULTURE

28 West Front St., Stirling, Ontario 613.395.7727 For full list of spa services visit www.millcreekspa.ca

> fINE fOODS

> hOmE fURNIShINgS

savour the taste of international foods? Why drive to toronto? More than 2000 International Food Products in Stock - Indian, Thai, Latin American, Asian, Greek ...

Step into the Past Tom Deline’s Family Business

Quinte Global Foods 117 Mineral Rd., Belleville 613-771-9805 Check us out at www.quinteglobalfoods.com

We transfer money to over 100 different countries With our reliable and affordable money transfer service

> BUILDINg SUPPLIES & SERVICES

> fLOwERS & gARDEN CENTRES

Kelly’s Flowers & Gifts Wedding Consultations, Wedding Rentals, Bridal & Attendant Bouquets, Sympathy, Tribute & All Occassion Designs 43 Durham Street S. Madoc, ON Tel: 613-473-1891 • Fax: 613-473-2712 www.kellysflowers.net

www.sears.ca 1-800-267-3277

Step into the Future P.O. BOx 430, 26A St. LAwrence St. w., MAdOc, On 613-473-3052

> RESTAURANTS

Country Roads

Wed.-Sun.

11-9

d i s c o v e r i n g h a s t i n g s c o un t y

• Casual Dining • Reasonably Priced •

Country 227 West Front St., Stirling, Ontario Roads 613-395-9444

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Menu online at www.stirlingblackdog.com

Country Roads Nutritious, Delicious, & Satisfying

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CR Country Roads

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Specializing in oven roasted meats No processed sandwich meats or cheeses #7 - 400 West Front St. Stirling, Ontario 613-395-9350 By the new Post Office 7-4 Mon-Fri • 7-3 Sat


Back Roads

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Country Road d i s c o v er i n g h a s t i n g s c o un t y

A Novel Railway Feat

Country Roads The above building, a coal shute situated in the G.T.R. yards at Belleville, Ontario, was recently lifted from

discovering hastings county its site, placed on two trains of flat cars and move three-quarters of a mile to another site on the Company’s property. The job was a very ticklish one, but it was accomplished without an accident of any kind in the remarkable space of six hours. After the building was lifted by means of screw-jacks to the height of a flat car, two trains of flat cars were run beneath it. It was then lowered until it rested on the cars. Engines then hauled it to its new site, the trains running parallel on the two tracks of the G.T.R. main line. discovering hastings county The above picture shows the building resting on the trains of flat cars.

Country Roads

CR Country

The above photograph and text are reprinted from the Montreal Standard, 1906. Photo courtesy Gerry Boyce

30 I

Country Roads • Spring 2010

Roads

discovering hastings county


LILAC TEA ART SHOW

Why not live where you love to visit? $569,000 MLS 2091241

SUNDAY MAY 30, 2010 11 am – 4 pm Featuring ten artists & artisans at Tyendinaga Township Public Library Heritage site - 852 Melrose Road (Hwy.401 exit 556, Shannonville Rd north to Melrose Rd. east)

• FREE ADMISSION •

PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY On a quiet country lane overlooking Long Reach and Hay Bay this totally private 2.5 acre property will invite you to stay. The waterfront is accessed by terraced steps and landings with 150 feet of shoreline. There is a main open concept home and carriage house with guest loft plus a bunkie.

This beautiful piece of the County is just waiting for you!

PRESENTED BY FRIENDS OF TYENDINAGA TWP. PUBLIC LIBRARY & TYENDINAGA TOWNSHIP Fine Art Raffled – Proceeds support library literacy programs

ProAlliance Realty, Brokerage Independently Owned and Operated

Elizabeth Crombie Sales Representative

Melrose Rd. Library

II NG

613-476-2700 or Toll Free 1-877-476-0096

Enjoy Everyday

SE SI

A LE H P

104 Main Street, Picton, Ontario K0K 2T0 www.pictonhomes.com E-Mail: elizabeth.crombie@sympatico.ca

P Weese Rd.

www.ttpl.ca Tel: 613.967.0606 www.tyendinagatownship.com Tel: 613.396.1944

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f there are concerns about you, a member of your family, or a friend, continuing to live alone, Quinte Gardens offers an attractive lifestyle alternative. It combines the comfort and privacy of independent living, without the burden of maintaining a private home. We also provide a stimulating environment for those who wish to participate in a variety of activities or meet new friends of similar age and with similar interests.

The Quinte Region’s Premier Retirement Residence 30 COLLEGE STREET WEST, BELLEVILLE, ONTARIO • www.quintegardens.com

For a free estimate and guaranteed price call: belleville 613.968.3461 6833 Hwy 62 north (1km north of 401) northland Centre

CALL TO BOOK YOUR PERSONAL TOUR • 613-966-5815

plumbing plus fully licensed plumbers & renovators

Kingston 613.389.5724 655 Arlington park place

Baths, Showers, Custom Glass

www.plumbingplus.com

connecting style & price with good advice


REOPENING SATURDAY0, 10 APRIL 10TH 2

We've Got You Covered!

613.967.1581 525 Frankford Rd. Foxboro (2km. west of Foxboro) www.farmgategardens.com


Country Roads 10-01  

Welcome to the Country Roads Website! Country Roads is a lifestyle magazine that celebrates the best of Hastings County, the second largest...

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