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PAWTUCKET DOWNTOWN DESIGN PLAN

Pawtucket, Rhode Island, is a city of roughly 73,000 situated just a few miles north of Providence on the Blackstone River. Like many small New England cities, Pawtucket’s fortunes have ebbed and flowed with history. It expanded with the industrial revolution in the 1800s, suffered an outflow of manufacturing in the 1930s, lost residents and density to suburbanization and urban renewal in the 1950s and ‘60s, and resurged with real estate growth in the early 2000s. Many of these eras introduced plans to redesign Pawtucket’s physical environment, and the city today reflects these layered efforts. Its unused train station deteriorates slowly above a closed rail stop. Interstate 95 coarsely cuts off the downtown from its neighborhoods. The core of the city, once a meeting point of historic routes, is now a confusing set of one-way streets and inescapable loops. In 2010, the City of Pawtucket’s Planning Department and the Pawtucket Foundation initiated a project to a project to study traffic, public space, and zoning. Called the Pawtucket Downtown Design Plan, the project’s goal is to improve the city’s infrastructure and, as a result, foster sustainable economic and residential development. The resulting set of projects is summarized here and the full report can be viewed online at: www.downtownpawtucket.us. PDDP Consultant Team Thurlow Small Architecture Urban Design / Lead Office L + A Landscape Architecture Landscape Architecture McMahon Associates Traffic Engineering Horsley Witten Group Regulatory Consultant Highchair designhaus Website and Signage Design

BOSTON

BLACKSTONE RIVER INTERSTATE 95

RAIL CORRIDOR

PAWTUCKET PROVIDENCE


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AERIAL OF DOWNTOWN PAWTUCKET


PAWTUCKET DOWNTOWN DESIGN PLAN

THE TURNPIKES THE EXCHANGE “P”ARKING THE RIVERWAY DOWNTOWN GUIDANCE

Before solving Pawtucket’s problems, the Pawtucket Downtown Design team had to better understand their roots. In 1790 Pawtucket presented a vision of America as an urban industrial nation to a receptive Alexander Hamilton, then Secretary of Treasury, as he crossed the Main Street Bridge and visited Slater Mill. The city soon emerged as a dense urban hub connected to commercial corridor spokes. That clear pattern, though still evident today, was later interrupted by major projects intended to benefit the city, like the interstate and the northeast rail corridor as well as a succession of planning decisions that altered the function of short segments of roadway and intersections. While presumably made with good intentions, these choices inevitably undid established connections. The design team found that linking existing routes, instead of reconfiguring them, could allow people to use their natural instincts to get around. The Pawtucket Downtown Design Plan proposes five concepts in response to specific problems that look backward to move forward — not through nostalgia but common sense.

EXISTING River

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PROPOSED Turnpike one way conversion

Gateway

Buildings

Turnpike street improvement

Green space

Public parking

Shared space

Riverway viewpoints

Green space

Pedestrian connections

Infrastructure investments Temporary Bike Strip Future BV Bikeway

Tolman bike circulator Shea bike circulator

Tolman bike hub Shea bike hub

PAWTUCKET DOWNTOWN DESIGN PLAN


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MBTA Commuter Rail Station

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PROJECT 1 : TURNPIKE SYSTEM

PROBLEM

Pawtucket is confusing– it is really hard to get to and from downtown.

CONCEPT

The first PDDP project reconnects the historic turnpike system, a regional roadway system from the early 1800s and the original urban logic, so that travelers see clearly how to get to and from Main Street. This Turnpike System concept would first be implemented on Main Street and East Avenue Extension by opening them to two-way traffic, decreasing wide intersections, increasing on street parking, and enhancing both pedestrian and bicycle access. Supportive details of this system include wayfinding and street signage that work from prior downtown signage programs, environmentally and business-friendly street furnishing options for Main Street, and the recommendation of a lighting replacement program. This project also encourages the use of newly available public space in key locations to be developed into special gateways to downtown. Like well known historic sites, this project would celebrate and use historic routes, including the former Boston Post Road, as a fundamental part of navigating the city.

Turnpike project goals Make finding Downtown easy Normalize streets & intersections Bring people to Main Street naturally Link people to Pawtucket’s past

Turnpike project components Re-establishing two-way traffic Adding on-Street parking Encouraging bicycles and pedestrians Adding historic route signage Creating special paving and striping

Main Street improvements goals Make it open to two-way traffic Make it active, functional, & beautiful Add traffic calming

Main Street components Two-way traffic lanes On-street parking alternating both sides Add bike accommodations

EXISTING River

PROPOSED

Buildings Public parking

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Turnpike one way conversion Non-Turnpike one way conversion

Green space

Turnpike street improvement

Infrastructure investments

Gateway

FOLLOW THE TURNPIKE, ALL ROADS LEAD TO MAIN STREET


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PROJECT 1 : TURNPIKE SYSTEM Original Turnpike Routes Pawtucket was an important regional crossing point for long distance roadways in the 1800s, including the oldest one in North America, the Boston Post Road. While the city still uses the majority of these routes, many segments have been made one way disconnecting them. These one-way segments are shown dashed below. Valley Falls Turnpike Central Falls & Cumberland

Norfolk Bristol Turnpike South Attleboro & Boston

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Mineral Spring Turnpike North Providence & Connecticut

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Providence Pawtucket Turnpike North Main in Providence Boston Post Road New York City to Boston One Way Segments 8

Providence East Turnpike Hope Street & East side of Providence


One way to Two way segments to reconnect Turnpike Routes

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The downtown plan proposes re-establishing two way operation on all of these routes so that it is easy to go to and come from downtown on the same path. As well, the crossing point of these important historic roadways is the commercial and social center of downtown– Main Street.

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Short-term Medium-term 9 Long-term


PROJECT 1 : TURNPIKE SYSTEM East Avenue Extension Plan Two Way Conversion This proposal opens East Avenue Extension to two way service and reprioritizes Pleasant Street as the major route. Allowing this change connects Hope Street on the east side of Providence directly to East Avenue and Pleasant Street into downtown Pawtucket. The new gateway space can artistically announce this entry.

CONNECTION TO RE-ALIGNED PARK PLACE

ENHANCED ON STREET PARKING

NEW PRIORITY OF PLEASANT STREET OVER EAST AVENUE EXTENSION

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NEW PUBLIC SPACE GATEWAY LOCATION

ADDED SHARROWS FOR BICYCLES


Removing the “Circulator” By opening up Main Street to two way traffic and reconnecting Pleasant and High Streets, Summer Street can return to safer, accessible, and special use as a local street for car and pedestrian traffic coming to the Pawtucket library, YMCA, and local businesses. This also increases the number of on street parking spaces.

NEW PUBLIC SPACE GATEWAY LOCATION

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PROJECT 1 : TURNPIKE SYSTEM Main Street Plan Two Way Conversion NEW BICYCLE PATHS

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RENAME MAIN STREET SEGMENT “BAYLEY STREET”

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MCDEVITT 3” RAISED CROSSING AREA NORTH UNION

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RENAME PARK PLACE SEGMENT “MAIN STREET”

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3” RAISED CROSSING AREA

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NEW PARKING - ALTERNATING SIDES

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3” RAISED CROSSING WITH PLANTING AREAS PLACES & SPACES REALTY

IMPROVED PARKING

NEW SHARROWS AREA FOR PLANTINGS

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Main Street Views

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PROJECT 1 : TURNPIKE SYSTEM Turnpike Signage The turnpike system includes new signage to help people find their way to and from Main Street. One type would replace existing signs while the other could be added to existing signs that have been recently replaced.

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Turnpike System Components The Turnpike System would add bicycle paths, buffers to protect people from traffic, trees, better lighting and signage. Cycle tracks are elevated bike lanes that would be used in places of heavy traffic congestion.

BRANDED SIGNAGE

TREES

BUFFER SPACE

BIKE LANE COLOR CODING

CYCLE TRACK AT ON STREET PARKING LOCATIONS

LIGHTING

SIDEWALK BIKE LANE TRAVEL LANE

TRAVEL LANE

PARKING

CYCLE TRACK

SIDEWALK

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PROJECT 2 : THE EXCHANGE

PROBLEM

The rail, the river, the highway, public transit and future bikeway all come through, but not together, in downtown.

CONCEPT

The Exchange upgrades Exchange Street into a boulevard providing clear places for and links between bus, bicycle, traffic, and pedestrian systems. The design of the Exchange shows a buffer space between pedestrians and traffic to locate public amenities, utilities, trees, and cycle tracks for bicycle use in high traffic volume areas. It also proposes two new bicycle loops, or bike “circulators”– a play on Pawtucket’s infamous 1960’s traffic pattern– that would use striping, signage, and bicycle shelters and parking to safely link the Blackstone Valley Bikeway and downtown to important historic sites, local schools, and McCoy stadium. These loops would be useful for residents and visitors alike. This concept would first be implemented between Broadway and the Nathanson Bridge in the Armory District and near Tolman High School as part of a street improvement project underway. This concept also encourages the integration of future RIPTA rapid bus and MBTA commuter rail stops into the downtown area as those projects move forward.

GOALS

COMPONENTS

Find alternative transportation easily Encourage walking, biking,and taking the bus Make it safe to ride a bike Help kids get to school Encourage tourists to explore by bike Add trees and beauty to Downtown

Intersection diets Bicycle lanes Sustainable plantings & trees RIPTA bus focus Specific RIPTA bus shelters Improved crossing at Tolman HS Normalize intersections

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Buildings RIPTA bus shelters Infrastructure investments Temporary Bike Strip Future BV Bikeway

Street improvement Tolman bike hub Shea bike hub Tolman bike stop Shea bike stop Tolman bike circulator Shea bike circulator

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TRYING TO CONNECT IN DOWNTOWN? TAKE THE EXCHANGE


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Future Commuter Rail Station

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Broad Street Gateway

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PROJECT 2 : THE EXCHANGE Exchange Segments

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The Exchange develops an important existing street into a unique tree-lined boulevard where many forms of transit can share public space. Here buses, people, bikes and cars have separate systems that are connected so that people can easily access and switch between them.

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Bike Circulators The Exchange includes two bike ‘circulators’ or loops that help kids get to school safely in a healthy way, people commute to downtown jobs, tourists visit shopping and historic sites, and cyclists of all kinds link to the future Blackstone Valley bikeway. The loops would include signage, parking, shelters and historic markers.

BIKE HUB bicycle shelter & parking, air pump, lane signage, general bike system information and map BIKE STOP open-air bike parking, historic or key location marker signage, and lane signage 19


PROJECT 2 : THE EXCHANGE BIKE CROSSING

Exchange Street Plan

PROPOSED LOCATION OF BLACKSTONE VALLEY BIKEWAY

CYCLE TRACK

NEW PLAZA

EXCHANGE COURT

TOLMAN HIGH SCHOOL DESIGN CENTER

NEW 3” RAISED CROSSWALK

EXCHANGE STREET

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BIKE PATHS

GATEWAY SPACE REMOVED ISLAND AND REVISED CROSSWALK

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Exchange Street Views

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PROJECT 3 : ”P”ARKING

PROBLEM

Parking is downtown is perceived as a problem even though there is too much surface parking.

CONCEPT

The “P”arking concept includes a set of components, including signage, enforcement, and design, that will help people better use existing parking, decrease its environmental impact, and encourage surface lot transition to development. Surface parking encompasses 25% of all of the area of downtown and on street spots are plentiful, yet it is difficult for drivers to understand where they can park in lots or find an available space on the street. To improve how parking works and reduce its negative impact, this concept proposes: signage to improve wayfinding; on street parking limit enforcement; the addition of on street spaces; the addition of trees at lot edges to better define urban street corridors; two-wheeled vehicle parking; replacing impervious parking surfaces with permeable options to decrease the heat island effect and lessen water runoff; and lighting replacement to decrease energy use and light pollution. These components are intended to encourage drivers to park on the street for short term visits and off the street for long term stays. Proposed zoning changes (see “Downtown Guidance” on page 32) also discourage the creation of new surface parking and open existing lots for higher density development.

GOALS

COMPONENTS

Make finding parking easy Encourage development Encourage two-wheeled vehicle use Reduce precipitation run-off

Enforce on-street parking Add on-street spaces Create “P” signage at parking lots Increase permeable surfaces Add trees to define edges Renovate City Garage Change parking requirements

EXISTING River

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Buildings Parking lots Infrastructure investments Temporary Bike Strip Future BV Bikeway 22

Public “P”arking lots Event program lots

Tree or green edges On street parking

STAYING IN DOWNTOWN? LOOK FOR “P”ARKING


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PROJECT 3 : ”P”ARKING “P”arking System The “P”arking system will make better use of the existing parking in downtown by adding on street spaces while encouraging the decrease of private surface parking lots. It will also improve site design standards to reduce precipitation run-off, further develop the tree canopy, and increase ground water recharging.

PROPOSED CHANGES

CURRENT CONDITIONS

Add and enforce on street parking Add 30 to 40 on street parking spaces through the turnpike system street improvement projects - a 20% increase Enforce two hour limits to encourage short-term on street parking and long-term off-street parking

10% of spaces are on the street

& 30% of spaces are public

Not enforced; employees consume on street spots

Improve existing off street parking Use standard blue “P” signs to help people find off-street parking

Inconsistent or missing signage

Renovate the Main Street Garage to improve existing parking

Interior unappealing and poorly lit

Encourage low-impact vehicles Add two-wheeled motorize vehicle spaces to on and off street parking

No spaces designated

Improve Site Design Replace asphalt surfaces with permeable paving to slow precipitation run off, reduce heat island effect, and recharge ground water Replace lighting with energy efficient, pedestrian-oriented fixtures to reduce

25% of downtown area is impervious surface parking Parking is generally over lit

light pollution and energy use Add trees to edges of parking lots to better define lot edges

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Well below desired 30% canopy


“P”arking Project Components

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PROJECT 4 : THE RIVERWAY

PROBLEM

The river is a vital resource, but hard to access.

CONCEPT

The Riverway concept supports and connects public and natural areas along the mostly undeveloped river and better links them to local neighborhoods and downtown. The Riverway concept proposes that specific existing areas of public land be developed into public parks with viewpoints to frame the river for residents and visitors and connected to each other and the coming Blackstone Valley Bikeway. Two parks have already been designated adjacent to the new Bridge 550 project as part of their precipitation management requirements, Bridge Park West and East (a design proposal for the latter is included in the following pages). A new pedestrian and bicycle bridge is proposed below the Division Street bridge that would be part of a larger river walk network. As well, this project encourages the incorporation of sustainable practices in downtown, including the adoption of a tree ordinance and a green street network initiative to increase the tree canopy. The Park Place re-alignment proposal would create a shared space connection to the existing Wilkinson Park making it more accessible and improving traffic patterns.

GOALS

COMPONENTS

Help people get to the river Offer a beautiful place to get exercise Protect the river’s natural resources Encourage appropriate development Prioritize river importance in downtown

Links existing public green spaces Create view spots and corridors Adds to tree canopy Links city to planned BV Bikeway Defines BV Bikeway parking areas

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River

Green space

Buildings

Shared space

Green space

Pedestrian connections

Infrastructure investments

Bridge overlooks

Undeveloped green space

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Riverway viewpoints

ACCESS THE RIVER AND ENJOY THE RIVERWAY


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PROJECT 4 : THE RIVERWAY Park Place Re-alignment

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Re-aligning Park Place highlights Wilkinson Park by turning the east side of Park Place into a shared space zone and the west side into two-way traffic. By shifting north-bound traffic, George and Dexter Streets would function as a continuous route that clearly crosses Main Street (Mineral Spring Turnpike).

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Riverway views

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To highlight the Riverway, this concept includes view corridors through selective removal of riverside vegetation, highlighting the bridges and falls with innovative and creative lighting or design solutions, and establishing different materials at the bridges to distinguish them from the adjacent streets.

EXCHANGE

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PROJECT 4 : THE RIVERWAY Bridge Park as a Rain Water Garden This concept proposes the restricted land intended for stormwater management instead be redesigned as a public park. The project includes a pedestrian bridge over the wetland retention basin, a grassy hill, trees, native plant species, a future connection to the riverway, and a viewpoint to see the river and new Bridge 550.

BLACKSTONE RIVER

INTERSTATE 95

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INTERSTATE 95

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TREE ROW GABION WALL VIEWPOINT

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PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE MEANDERING LOW FLOW CHANNEL WITH RAIN GARDEN VEGETATION CONSTRUCTED WETLAND RETENTION BASIN

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Bridge Park East Views

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PROJECT 5 : DOWNTOWN GUIDANCE

PROBLEM

The current regulatory process relies on special use permits and variances.

CONCEPT

Downtown Guidance cleans up zoning and land use issues and to encourage the pedestrian-oriented, mixeduse development the city wants and discourage the cardominated, low density it doesn’t. While often not an overt element of physical infrastructure, a City’s regulatory framework sets a community’s goals into action through the process of private development. With the increase of residential and commercial development in the early 2000s, Pawtucket’s existing regulatory system was tested by new types of development. Many of these projects did not fit in the original zoning goals and thus the process developed a history of special use permits and variances to accomplish what are now standard practices in other successful communities of the same size. This pattern of allowing special exceptions as a matter of course has left the regulatory bodies without a clear path and development with extra hurdles. Downtown Guidance is intended to do some regulatory housekeeping that includes changing the city’s current regulations to offer mixed use and multi-tenant commercial by right, remove parking requirements for the Commercial Downtown District, reduce allowable maximum height restrictions in downtown and offer development guidelines to support appropriate and compatible urban design and architecture. It also hopes to foster supportive projects that benefit the city’s downtown and to leverage positive density and activity. GOALS

COMPONENTS

Variance Free Environment Support other Downtown efforts Provide development information

Fixing what is broken Strengthening good ideas Lay the foundation Encourage local efforts Make development guidelines available

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Commercial Downtown

Residential Elevator

Commercial Local

Residential Multifamily

Commercial General

Riverfront Public Open

Industrial Built-up

Riverfront Mixed-Use

Industrial Open

Cemetery

DEVELOPING PROPERTY? LET DOWNTOWN GUIDANCE HELP


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PROJECT 5 : DOWNTOWN GUIDANCE

FIXING WHAT IS BROKEN This work will take care of zoning and land-use regulatory housekeeping that will allow mixed-use and multitenant commercial use projects by right, reduce special use permits, and change residential density limits.

STRENGTHENING GOOD IDEAS This initiative will shift parts of the Development Plan Review from the Ordinance to the Regulations, and employ the power of zero to eliminate parking requirements for commercial development, setback requirements in the commercial downtown and make adjustments that can bring variances to zero as well.

LAY THE FOUNDATION This will help future regulatory projects by looking in a more sophisticated way at design in the design guidelines for development, take a look at form-based codes, and investigate incentive zoning logics that can involve the transfer of development rights, boost green development and look forward towards how downtown’s changes can affect the city as a whole.

ENCOURAGE LOCAL EFFORTS A set of local citizens that have organized into a neighborhood association that is the precursor to a downtown business improvement district are hoping to improve the quality of how Main Street looks. The PDDP encourages these local grown efforts to raise money and incrementally improve the streetscape.

MAKE DEVELOPMENT GUIDELINES AVAILABLE ONLINE When the new design guidelines and incentives are available, the PDDP wants to support the Pawtucket Foundation’s goals to market the downtown and make the information freely available. The PDDP website will be transformed into this public space for people, entrepreneurs and developers to find good information.

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PROJECT 5 : DOWNTOWN GUIDANCE Regulatory Changes Below is an abbreviated list of proposed amendments to the zoning ordinance and planning commission regulations.

PROPOSED CHANGES

CURRENT REGULATIONS

Commercial Downtown Multi-family residential (5 units or over) use allowed by right Mixed Residential and Commercial use allowed by right Multi-tenant use allowed by right Bed and Breakfast home use allowed by right Drive-throughs are not permitted

By special use permit only By special use permit only By special use permit only Bed and Breakfast not allowed Allowed

Riverfront District Multi-tenant use allowed by right Gardening and farming (not including raising of animals) allowed by right Site and Building requirements Minimum lot size is 2,500 sf Minimum lot frontage is 40 feet Maximum height of structures is 65 feet No minimum front yard setback Maximum front yard setback is 40 feet, but precludes parking spaces and travel lanes-- must be for people and bikes. Parking Off-street parking is not required for non-residential uses in the Commercial Downtown District Residential parking requirements are 1 space per unit City-wide If two uses share parking, they may petition to reduce the minimum number of required parking spaces Revised minimum parking standards City-wide Maximum parking requirements in place for restaurants and retail 50% of required parking can be allowed off-site Design Standards Landscape Standards are proposed City-wide to improve public space, buffer zones, soil restoration, and tree health, as well as increase shade, reduce irrigation needs and dust pollution, improve air quality, and generally encourage best practices of landscape design. Design Standards for the Commercial Downtown District are proposed, not to create a place where buildings look the same, but rather where they are high quality in design and compliment each other in massing, materials, size, and accessibility to public spaces. This encourages the use of best practices in site design and architecture, regardless of style.

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By special use permit only Not allowed

5,000 sf 50 feet 100 feet Not specified Not specified

1 parking space for every 300 sf leasable floor space 2 parking spaces per unit Not allowed Generally twice the amount Not specified By special use permit only

Not specified


Design Standards

MAX SETBACK

PARKING

SMALL SETBACK

MINIMUM SETBACK

Proposed design standards include setback opportunities for greenspace and pedestrian use instead of automobile parking or roadway. This encourages buildings to form clear urban edges and private development to offer public amenities connected to the sidewalk, such as benches, trees, restaurant seating or plazas.

LOADING ADJACENT LOT

BUILDING

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BUILDING

BUILDING

STREET

Downtown Pawtucket is a historic New England commercial district that includes buildings from different eras. The design guidelines allows for architecture that promotes windows at street level, appropriately scaled signage, the use of natural materials, material articulations, and clear entries to avoid long unbroken facades. ARTICULATE CHANGES IN FLOORS OR OTHER SPATIAL FEATURES ROOF TOP SHOULD SHIELD VIEW OF MECHANICAL SYSTEMS NATURAL MATERIALS SHOULD BE USED OVER INDUSTRIAL

60% MIN REQUIRED CLEAR GLASS ON STREET LEVEL WINDOWS SHOULD BE ACCESSIBLE TO SIDEWALK TRAFFIC UNBROKEN FACADES BEYOND 50 FEET ARE NOT ALLOWED MAIN ENTRY SHOULD BE PRONOUNCED

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PAWTUCKET DOWNTOWN DESIGN PLAN Project List The PDDP concepts are broad in ambition, but organized into a list of specific projects that address short, medium and long-term phase implementation. While each project can be completed individually, they also add up to a more productive overall vision.

Project

Location specifics

Timeline

Phase

Cost Range

Turnpike System East Avenue Extension George to Summer Medium-term Conceptual plan $ 806,000 Main Street Broad to High Medium-term Conceptual plan 1,175,000 Pawtucket Avenue East Ave to Division Street Medium-term Planning funding 200,000 - 500,000 Main Street Mineral Spring to Church Medium-term Vision level 60,000 - 200,000 Broadway One ways Long-term Vision level 300,000 - 800,000 Turnpike improvements Existing two-way Segments Long-term Vision level 500,000 - 2,000,000 The Exchange Exchange Street Improvements Nathanson Bridge to Broadway Short-term Conceptual plan 702,300 Exchange Street Dexter to Tolman HS Medium-term Planning funding 1,000,000 - 2,000,000 Bicycle circulators & shelters To Tolman & Shea HS Medium-term Vision level 80,000 - 150,000 RIPTA rapid bus planning & stops Exchange St & Roosevelt Ave Medium-term RIPTA planning 150,000 “P�arking P new signage public lots Short-term Graphics complete 3,000 Bus zone to two-hour parking Roosevelt Avenue Short-term Recommendation 200 Zoning requirement changes downtown area Short-term Language written 0 Lighting audit & improvements downtown area Short-term Recommendation 10,000 - 100,000 Tree edges at lots public lots Short-term Recommendation 15,000 - 50,000 Enforcement of two-hour limits downtown area Short-term Recommendation 0 On street & 2-wheel vehicle parking downtown area Medium-term Vision level 0 City Garage renovation Main Street Medium-term Recommendation 200,000 - 1,000,000 Permeable paving public lots Attrition Recommendation 0 Riverway Riverway Master Plan East bank of Blackstone River Short-term Recommendation 50,000 Bridge Park East East side of Bridge 550 Short-term Conceptual plan 900,000 Bridge Park West West side of Bridge 550 Short-term Recommendation 1,000,000 Tree Ordinance downtown Medium-term Recommendation 0 Green Street network downtown Medium-term Recommendation 0 Park Place Re-alignment Park Place Long-term Vision level 1,000,000 - 1,200,000 Riverway links, viewpoints, bridge Extent Long-term Vision level 5,000,000 - 8,000,000 Downtown Guidance Zoning changes downtown area Short-term Language written 0 Design guidelines downtown area Short-term Language written 0 Website transition downtownpawtucket.us Short-term Site 5,000 - 30,000 Wayfinding signage I-95 Exits & downtown spots Short-term Graphics complete 8,000 Banners Main Street Short-term Graphics complete 2,000 Landscape & street furniture Main Street Short-term Plan locations 50,000 - 100,000 Commuter rail station connections Dexter & Barton Streets Medium-term Recommendation 200,000 - 500,000 Expanding downtown provisions Pawtucket boundary Long-term Recommendation 30,000

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PAWTUCKET DOWNTOWN DESIGN PLAN


Cost ranges are for general planning purposes only. Cost estimates shown in purple.

Responsible Agency Partner Agency

Funding Sources

Next Steps

City of Pawtucket RIDOT TIP TIP process City of Pawtucket RIDOT TIP TIP process City of Pawtucket RIDOT TIP / Bridge 550 PDDP team design City of Pawtucket RIDOT TIP / Statewide Planning Challenge Grant Application RIDOT RIDOT TIP / Statewide Planning Challenge Grant Application City of Pawtucket RIDOT TIP Long-term planning RIDOT VHB Engineering Secured City monitoring City of Pawtucket RIDOT TIP / Bridge 550 PDDP team design City of Pawtucket Statewide Planning Statewide Planning Challenge Grant Application RIPTA City of Pawtucket RIPTA Meeting RIPTA & City of Pawtucket City of Pawtucket - City of Pawtucket DPW detailing & fabrication City of Pawtucket RIPTA not required DPW coordination City of Pawtucket - not required Planning Commission & City Council approval City of Pawtucket Dept of Energy Dept of Energy Workshop participation & grant application City of Pawtucket Paw Foundation Paw Foundation DPW coordination City of Pawtucket - City of Pawtucket System design City of Pawtucket - TIP Develop TIP projects City of Pawtucket - City of Pawtucket Source funding City of Pawtucket - City of Pawtucket Wait for necessary improvement project City of Pawtucket RI DEM / CRMC / BVNHC Statewide Planning Challenge Grant Application RIDOT CRMC / BVNHC Bridge 550 CRMC & Commonwealth coordination RIDOT CRMC / BVNHC Bridge 550 RIDOT coordination City of Pawtucket RI DEM not required City of Pawtucket RI DEM City of Pawtucket City of Pawtucket RIDOT TIP 10% Plan City of Pawtucket RI DEM / CRMC / BVNHC RIDOT Master Plan City of Pawtucket not required Planning Commission & City Council approval City of Pawtucket not required Planning Department review Pawtucket Foundation City of Pawtucket private funds PDDP team coordination with PF team City of Pawtucket City of Pawtucket Sign drafting Paw Foundation PADS City of Pawtucket CDBG Project management & Implementation Paw Foundation PADS City of Pawtucket CDBG Project management & Implementation RIDOT City of Pawtucket FTA RIDOT meeting City of Pawtucket Statewide Planning Challenge Grant Application

FINAL REPORT

9 3


PAWTUCKET DOWNTOWN DESIGN PLAN

0 4

PAWTUCKET DOWNTOWN DESIGN PLAN


10% and Concept Plan

FINAL REPORT

1 4


PAWTUCKET DOWNTOWN DESIGN PLAN

THE TURNPIKES THE EXCHANGE “P”ARKING THE RIVERWAY DOWNTOWN GUIDANCE

Inevitably, the Pawtucket Downtown Design Plan is not a single “plan” so much as a set of ongoing projects. These efforts may not fix everything about downtown, but they will give the city a solid infrastructural base that provides healthy and clear ways to get around by allowing the city to leverage its many strengths. Pawtucket is what so many places are not — a small, walkable urban center, bisected by a beautiful river, filled with new and old buildings, neighborhoods of people from all over the world, hardy entrepreneurs, and accessible city government. At just one corner, Fountain and Exchange streets, you can find a world-class theater, a silkscreen company, a high school, a renovated mill full of design companies, a historic armory, and, just across the adjacent waterway full of wildlife, you reach City Hall, a post office, a public library, and a historic site soon to be the center of a new National Park. It is rich both in history and promise. In developing the downtown plan, the PDDP team found that the best design direction was simply to make a place evident to itself and others.

To find out more information or to view the Existing Conditions and Final Reports visit

WWW.DOWNTOWNPAWTUCKET.US


PDDP Summary report  

PDDP Summary Report

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