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JULY 2015

PAPER HEROES CELEBRATES 30YEARS July 2015

ARE YOU A MOSQUITO MAGNET?

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Rehabilitation Hospital

of Jennings

DIAgNOSeS THAT we TReAT

• Brain Injury

• Hip Fractures

• Strokes

• Osteoarthritis/DJD

• Amputations

• Neurological Disorders

• Burns

• Spinal Cord Injury

• Major Multiple Trauma

• Congenital Deformities

• Rheumatoid Arthritis

• Systemic Vasculidities

• Joint Replacements

Others who can benefit from inpatient rehabilitation are postoperative patients, accident victims and cancer patients. 24 Hour Nursing Care • Physical Therapy • Occupational Therapy Speech Therapy • Nutritional Counseling and Monitoring Case Management Call for a free assessment today. One Hospital Drive, Ste. 101 • Jennings, LA 70546 • Phone: (337) 821-5353 • Fax: (337) 821-5355 or 5366 jenningsrehab@yahoo.com • www.jenningsrehab.com 2 www.thriveswla.com

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July 2015


July 2015

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Contents

48

7

36

Regular Features

In This Issue Wining & Dining 6 Milk 4-1-1 7 Give Goat Cheese a Go 8 4 Tips for Food Pics laces & Faces P 10 Paper Heroes Celebrates 30 Years 16 Local Sailor Serves on one of the World’s Largest Warships 24 Louisiana Celebrates Young Local Heroes

20 First Person with Taja V. Simpson 25 By the Numbers 26 Who’s News 44 The New Family Tree 57 Business Buzz 68 McNeese Corral 70 Solutions for Life 71 Happenings

Money & Career 32 Overcome Overspending

20 ARE YOU READY FOR SOME FOOTBALL?

34 Building and Maintaining Confidence

Home & Family 36-38 Cover Story: BATTLE of the In-Laws United Way Breaks Ground Hurricane Preparedness Checklist

42 46

Style & Beauty 48 Style Choices That Could Age You 52 A Guy’s Guide to Socks

Check out our Football Gold issue, with updates from the Saints, Tigers and Cowboys.

Mind & Body

CATCH IT, IN AUGUST!

52 Battling Boomeritis 60 Feeling Fatigued 62 Tighten and Brighten, Without the Knife DON’T JUST LIVE, THRIVE!

Thrive is designed for people focused on living a happy, healthy life, one that is balanced, full of energy and contentment. Thrive readers want to make the most of every day and be successful in all areas of their lives – family, health, home and career. 4 www.thriveswla.com

Editors and Publishers

Kristy Armand Christine Fisher

Creative Director

Barbara VanGossen

Assistant Editor

Katie Harrington

Business Manager

Katie McDaniel

Assistant Designers

Keri Cannon Shonda Manuel Kris Roy Mandy Gilmore

Advertising Sales Michelle Phelps ads@thriveswla.com 337.310.2099 Submissions edit@thriveswla.com

Submitted articles and photos are welcome. Thrive assumes no responsibility for unsolicited materials and does not guarantee any submissions.

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July 2015


All our wonderful dogs are available for adoption through 4Paws Society. Call 287-3552 for more information and to learn about other programs that are available.

RICO

s TCH! LET’S PLAY-oFEld miniature pinscherdlos ve a This 2-year is little boy just nee is Th e to play ball. row the ball to him! H partner to th d a fun playmate. n adorable a

COCO GREAT SNUGGLE BUDDY! is about This chocolate chihuahua boy

ll. 2 years old. He is shy and very sma re whe old seh hou lt adu an ds Coco nee he he can find the love and security needs. Will you take me home?

July 2015

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Wining & Dining

Milk 4-1-1

Different kinds, which are best by Beth Winslett Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

There was a time when milk was just milk and came from a cow. We poured it on cereal, dipped our cookies in it, and mom made us drink it with supper. And that was that. Today there are many milks to choose from that aren’t even milk at all. They are made from plants like soybeans, almonds, and rice. Non-dairy milks are perceived to be healthier than cow’s milk, but that’s not necessarily the case. Here are some popular milk alternatives and their nutritional pros and cons. Because they are plant-based, none contain saturated fat or cholesterol, and as you read labels among products in stores you will find that many are enriched with nutrients. Soy milk is the only non-dairy milk that is comparable to cow’s milk in protein content. However, flavoring reduces the protein content so unflavored soy milk is best. It’s not a good source of calcium but does provide ample amounts of vitamins A, B12, D, and the mineral, potassium. For someone who is lactose intolerant or allergic to milk, it is a good alternative. Almond milk has the lowest calories. Like cow’s milk, it contains a wide variety of vitamins and minerals. Its calcium content is the best among the plant-based milks. However, this nutty drink has very little protein and is lacking in B vitamins. While it may be a suitable alternative for those who can’t 6 www.thriveswla.com

drink cow’s milk, it should be avoided by people with nut allergies. Rice milk is low in fat, but it is higher in carbohydrate than cow’s milk or soy milk making it the least desirable choice for people with diabetes. It has practically no calcium or protein, and it offers little in the way of vitamins and minerals. It comes in a variety of flavors and is an alternative for those who can’t drink soy, almond, or cow’s milk. Don’t depend on it for any real nutrition unless it has added nutrients. Nutritionally speaking, you can’t beat cow’s milk. It is an excellent source of calcium, provides eight grams of protein per cup, and is a good source of vitamins D, B12, and the B vitamin, riboflavin as well as phosphorus, magnesium, potassium, and

zinc. It is available as whole, 2%, 1%, referring to the fat content, or nonfat (skim). Adults and teens should drink 1% or nonfat milk to reduce their intake of saturated fat. Non-dairy milk products were created for people who are lactose intolerant, allergic to milk, or have vegan dietary restrictions. Some brands are fortified with nutrients to make them comparable to cow’s milk, but not all. Always read labels to see exactly what you are getting. As to which non-dairy milk tastes best, it’s really a matter of personal preference. Almond milk is a favorite because of its nutty taste, but soy is preferred by some for its creaminess. And just because they’re not “real milk” doesn’t mean cow’smilk lovers can’t enjoy them, too.

NUTRITION INFORMATION PER 1 CUP

CALORIES FAT (GRAMS) PROTEIN (GRAMS) CALCIUM (% DAILY VALUE) Cow, whole 146 8 7.9 28 Cow, 2% 122 5 8 29 Cow, 1% 102 2.4 8.2 29 Cow, nonfat 86 .4 8.4 30 Soy 132 4.3 8 6 Almond 60 2.5 1 20 Rice 120 2 .4 2

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July 2015


Give Goat Cheese a Go Although Americans have long celebrated cow’s milk and made it part of standard fare, goat milk remains popular in other parts of the world. And for many, the cheese made from goat’s milk is more flavorful, with a more desirable texture and taste. Fat content is the biggest difference between goat cheese and cheeses made from cow’s milk. The fat in goat cheese is naturally distributed, making it creamier and naturally homogenized. “Among cheese enthusiasts, some believe goat cheese should take the award for best overall. It’s creamy, spreadable, and full of dense flavor,” says Fran Avery, co-owner of Crave, a food boutique and gift store in Lake Charles. Crave stocks a variety of goat cheeses, including Tres Belle Chevre, a regional artisan goat cheese hand-crafted in the “oldworld style” at Belle ‘Ecorce Farms in St. Martinville, Louisiana. Tres Belle Chevre is a micro-dairy and cheese plant with small herds of Lamancha and Nubian dairy goats, which are known for their flavorful milk and high butterfat. No preservatives or additives of any kind are used. Each cheese is individually packaged and seasoned with herbs and flowers. The Tres Belle Chevre varieties sold at Crave is marinated in Crave’s extra virgin olive oils, which adds to the unique, fresh flavor. “Goat cheese is distinct, and that’s what most people love about it,” Avery explains. “It’s distinct in color, texture and taste. Like any other cheese, it comes in several varieties, from sharp and crumbly to creamy and spreadable.” According to Avery, goat cheese is lower in fat, calories and cholesterol and higher in calcium, giving it an added bonus. “In this case, you don’t have to sacrifice flavor for better nutrition,” she adds. Organic goat milk—the basis for goat cheese—has been linked to an increased ability to metabolize iron and copper, according to researchers from the USDA and Prairie View A&M University. Goat milk has also been shown to cause fewer digestive problems that cow’s milk. In addition to Tres Belle Chevre, Crave also carries goat cheeses from Carr Valley and Cypress Grove. For more information, stop by the store at 2801 Ryan Street or call (337) 421-0040.

July 2015

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Wining & Dining

Four Tips for Food Pics by Erin Kelly

You’ve just been served a delicious plate of food from a Zagat-rated restaurant in the Caribbean. You’re ready to take an enormous bite—but wait! First you want to share this moment with friends, family, and anyone else who may follow you on Instagram. You take a shot with your smartphone, ready to make less-fortunate diners green with envy. But for some reason, your perfectly delightful bowl of soup looks like slop from a mess hall. Your juicy steak looks like something pulled from a TV dinner. And those steamed vegetables are totally devoid of color. Taking appetizing pictures of food has been one of the most difficult challenges faced by professional photographers since cameras were invented. So it’s no wonder that you haven’t been able to capture the scrumptious moments that you’re aiming for.

Next time, try these tips from Bon Appetit and the Digital Photography School. Pay attention to what’s around. Too often, amateur photographers get caught up in the object they intend the photograph. But the surroundings matter, too. That’s why you don’t take portraits in your disorganized closet or family photos in the master bathroom. Don’t just look at the food. Look at the table your plate is on. Look at the plate itself. Is there a dirty napkin in a ball in the upper corner? Get rid of it. Look at the “bigger picture.” 8 www.thriveswla.com

Try shooting down, directly at the food. This usually gives off the best angle.

Don’t use flash. The majority of the time, it doesn’t come off well. Especially not with food.

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Lighting can make or break a food photo. If you’re in a restaurant with friends, you won’t have much control over the lighting, but you can give it your best shot. Lighting from behind is your best bet, but that won’t always be possible.

July 2015


So You Think You Don’t Like Fish by Beth Winslett Fontenot, MS, RD, LDN

“You live in South Louisiana, and you don’t like fish? What’s wrong with you?” If you’re not a fan of fish, you’ve probably heard that a time or two. If you aren’t fond of fish, I’m here to help. You probably already know that you’re supposed to eat fish twice a week for good health. Not only are they a lean source of protein, but the oily kind supply healthy omega-3 fats that are good for your heart and brain. First of all, what is it about fish you don’t like? If it’s the smell, try killing it with lemon juice. Squeeze a whole lemon over raw fish. This will neutralize the odor without leaving much lemon flavor behind since most of the juice will evaporate with cooking. Do you think fish taste too—well, fishy? Some do, but catfish, flounder, haddock, and rainbow trout are very mild. If you really don’t want to taste fish when eating fish, try tilapia. It has been called the “boneless, skinless chicken breast of the sea.” Did your mother make you eat salmon loaf as a kid, thus killing your desire for fish forever? Forgive her and move on. Salmon is a great, mild-tasting fish with a meaty texture. And it’s one of the healthiest fish you can eat because it’s a rich source of those omega-3 fats. Alaskan wild-caught salmon is the best bet for both taste and health. Fire up your outdoor grill, spray the filets with a vegetable spray, add Cajun seasoning, and grill on each side for six to seven minutes. I can almost guarantee you’ll love it. If you’re afraid of swallowing a bone, buy fish filets rather than fish steaks. You are much less likely to find a bone in a filet. Maybe you just don’t know how to cook fish. There is a solution to that: Google. A quick Internet search will lead you to instructions for

July 2015

various ways of cooking fish (though I don’t think poaching or microwaving will go over well in this culture), and the only way to learn is to do it. For starters, I’d recommend cooking fish on your outdoor grill. Your fish will have a wonderful smoky flavor and your house won’t smell like fish for days. Deep-fried fish are a favorite, but should probably be reserved for special occasions. Are you afraid of getting bad fish? Food poisoning is no fun, and fish does spoil quickly. Cook fish the day you buy or catch them.

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Otherwise, freeze immediately in a way that does not allow air to touch them. Placing them in water in a plastic bag is the easiest way if you aren’t going to keep them in the freezer for long. If you just don’t like fish, may I suggest shrimp, oysters, crawfish, crab, or scallops? They have many of the same health benefits as fish, and like fish, can be cooked in a variety of ways.

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Places & Faces

Paper Heroes Celebrates 30 Years Spreading Geekdom One Year at a Time by Felicite Toney; photos by Shonda Manuel

Kevin Cinquemano has been helping the Lake Area increase its knowledge and love of all things geek for more than 15 years. Cinquemano, former owner of Final Frontier Trading Cards, took ownership of Paper Heroes in 1998. On its website, Paper Heroes is described as a hobby

shop. In reality, it’s much more. Paper Heroes is a place where you can thumb through comics, local art, action figures, sports cards, collectibles, and more. The shop, located at 3941 Ryan Street, caters to all fandoms; if ever a customer wants something, Cinquemano is willing to order it. Paper Heroes, which celebrates its 30th anniversary this year, is one of the area’s best-kept

secrets. According to Cinquemano, the secret is getting out. “A lot has changed over the past few years,” Cinquemano says. “There’s definitely an increase of female presence as well as kids who come into the store with their parents. People are more willing to walk in from off the street and take a look around the shop. I’ve heard things like ‘Wow! This reminds

“A lot has changed over the past few years,” says Kevin Cinquemano, owner of paper heroes. 10 www.thriveswla.com

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July 2015


me of The Big Bang Theory!’” This wasn’t always the case. What was once labeled geeky or nerdy has becomes quite popular and mainstream. What gives? According to Cinquemano, there are many contributing factors to the increased popularity of genres such as science fiction, fantasy, horror, and of course, all things comics. One huge contributing factor is movies. The Avengers, created by Stan Lee back in 1963, blew up in 2012 with the release of the movie of the same name. By then, audiences were familiar with many of the heroes who made up The Avengers team due to previous blockbusters such as Iron Man (2008), The Hulk (2008), and Thor (2011). In addition to the heroes, the villains have claimed a bit of the spotlight. When Tom Hiddleston brought Loki to life on the big screen, fan girls everywhere heard the call. Television series and cartoons also aid in the mainstream acceptance of what was once thought of as nerdy. The Walking Dead series on AMC brought to life the comics that many had loved since their debut in 2003. The TV series has helped expand graphic novels and comics to those who may not have thought twice about them. Cinquemano has two more words to add: Star Wars. Premiering in December 2015, people of all ages are anxiously awaiting its arrival. “The anticipation is huge,” Cinquemano says. Many are skeptical and worry that the movie will be a let-down. A good response to those worrywarts comes from Darth Vader: “I find your lack of faith disturbing.” In regards to helping out the Lake Area’s art scene, Cinquemano is always willing to help. Local artist Johnny Segura says that Cinquemano “allows local artists to sell their work. He also allows us to have book releases when we have new comics come out. He’ll go above and beyond to help if we need anything for the release.” In addition to local artists, Cinquemano is a big supporter of the local conventions. CyPhaCon and BayouCon are two annual conventions that cater to all fandoms in the Lake Area. Justin Toney, director of BayouCon, is glad to have the support of Paper Heroes behind the conventions. “He has been there since day one. He has opened his shop to help us out in any way possible, from meetings to special events,” Toney says. Cinquemano believes that these conventions have helped with the overall acceptance of all things geek from a local standpoint. “The conventions help foster the community and the growing scene in our area. They offer avenues for people to explore a communal event in their own town,” he says. Continued on Page 12 July 2015

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Places & Faces What would a convention be without cosplay? Cosplay (costume play) is the act of dressing up as your favorite character from any fandom. In addition to dressing the part, many people act the part and take on the persona of the character. Don’t let this scare you away, though. Think of the Disney princesses at Disney World. It’s the same concept. Cinquemano doesn’t think cosplaying is as widely accepted as other components of fandoms, but it’s getting there. “I see more females dressing up and getting into character at conventions. It’s becoming more popular,” he says. When asked if he thinks the current popularity of all things geek is here to stay or just a passing trend, he believes that it’s here to stay, but adds: “Everything has peaks and valleys.” In regards to the hype of fandoms, Cinquemano has this to say: “This is the golden age of fandoms. I think we’re at the best time for it. People don’t realize it, but the time is now.” Whatever it is you follow, whatever fandom you belong to, now is the time to embrace your inner geek.

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July 2015


Each day, an abused or neglected child is removed from an unsafe home and placed in Louisiana’s foster care system. They remain in the system until their home environment is safe—but for many, that never happens. Of the 4,000 children currently cycling in state foster care, about 350 are ready to be adopted today. More than 60 of them are in Southwest Louisiana, right here in our community.

KPLC reporter Britney Glaser, in partnership with the Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS), highlights one child each month who is legally ready to be adopted. Thrive is supporting “The New Family Tree” by featuring each month’s story.

Little Boy Gets Special Forever Home

Quick Facts on Adopting a Foster Child • Minimum age is 21. • Single people can adopt. • Many of the children in state custody are considered “special needs,” which is defined as the following: older child, race/ethnic background, sibling group, medical conditions, physical/mental/ emotional handicaps. • Children in foster care are there as a result of abuse, neglect or abandonment. • The certification process typically takes 90 days to complete. Once matched with a child, the process to legally adopt a child takes about one year.

July 2015

One year has passed since KPLC-TV launched “The New Family Tree,” featuring children in Southwest Louisiana hoping to be adopted. The adoption process can take several months, but we are thrilled to report one of the first children featured is now in a forever home. In July 2014 KPLC-TV shared four-year-old Darrell’s story. The little boy had special needs and needed a special home to help him thrive. Ashley Andrews of Baton Rouge came across Darrell’s profile and video online, and knew that he was meant to be her son. She is adopted, herself, and knows how much that selfless act changed her life. “I’m adopted, so I do know what it feels like,” she said, “I wanted to do something for another child.” Andrews works in the medical field and felt that she could handle Darrell’s special medical needs that might discourage someone else. The next step for Andrews was to get in touch with the child’s case worker with the Department of Children and Family Services. From there, her foster-to-adopt certification was reviewed and Darrell was placed in her home for six months before the adoption could move forward. She had to make some changes as a single, working mom to a special needs child, but she said she was happy to do it. “It’s all about priorities. Once I organized the things in my life, I have a family support system and I have all the time I need,” she said. “I can take him to his appointments, to therapy, so that’s not a problem.” Andrews chose a new name for her son – Ayden. Since being in her home, Ayden has moved from baby food to solids, learned ten new language signs, and has made tremendous progress in his mobility. Andrews has been patient through the long process to adopt her son and could not have smiled any bigger when his adoption case came to a close. There are still 69 children in Southwest Louisiana ready to be adopted today. Call the Department of Children and Family Services at 337-491-2470 for information on the foster-to-adopt process. Follow Britney Glaser’s “The New Family Tree” series at kplctv.com.

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Places & Faces

‘An incredible job’ Local sailor serves on one of the world’s largest warships by Lt. J.G. Christopher Hanson

A 2000 Washington Marion High School graduate and Lake Charles, Louisiana, native is serving on one of the world’s largest warships, the U.S. Navy aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan. Petty Officer 3rd Class Byron Gradney is an aviation ordnanceman aboard the San Diegobased ship, a Nimitz-class nuclear-powered aircraft carrier and one of only ten operational aircraft carriers in the Navy today. “It’s an incredible job. We work on the weapons and ammunition for our fighter aircraft on the USS Reagan,” said Gradney. Named in honor of former President Ronald Reagan, the carrier is longer than 3 football fields, at nearly 1,100 feet long. The ship is 252 feet wide and weighs more than 100,000 tons. Two nuclear reactors can push the ship through the water at nearly 35 mph. As a sailor with numerous responsibilities, Gradney said he is proud to serve his country aboard an aircraft carrier. “I love the camaraderie and teamwork we 14 www.thriveswla.com

experience ship-wide. From the top down, they make sure the sailors have the knowledge and training to do the job,” said Gradney. Gradney also said he is very proud of the work he is doing as part of USS Ronald Reagan’s nearly 3,000-member crew, helping protect America on the world’s oceans. Sailors’ jobs are highly varied aboard USS Ronald Reagan. Nearly 3,000 men and women make up the ship’s company, which keeps all parts of the aircraft carrier running smoothly — this includes everything from washing dishes and preparing meals to handling weaponry and maintaining the nuclear reactors. Another 2,000 or so form the air wing, the people who actually fly and maintain the aircraft. “I never cease to be impressed with the type and quality of work that goes on aboard the carrier each day,” said Capt. Christopher E. Bolt, the carrier’s commanding officer. “Our team is filled with highly qualified young adults – in many cases, 19 and 20 years old – and they’re out Thrive Magazine for Better Living

here launching and recovering aircraft, running a complex propulsion system safely, serving as air traffic controllers, operating sophisticated electronics, and keeping this floating city alive and functioning. Their work ethic, enthusiasm, and esprit de corps are second to none. If you pick up a newspaper in any city and examine what other 19and 20-year-olds are doing, there is no comparison to the level of responsibility our Sailors hold. That caliber of Sailor is what has earned us the title of America’s Flagship.” The USS Ronald Reagan is also a self-sustaining, mobile airport and, like each of the Navy’s aircraft carriers, is designed for a 50-year service life. While underway, the ship carries more than 70 jets, helicopters and other aircraft, all of which take off from and land on the carrier’s 4.5-acre flight deck. Four powerful catapults launch aircraft off the bow of the ship. After lowering a tail hook that protrudes from the rear of the aircraft, jets and aircraft land by snagging a steel cable called an arresting wire. July 2015


Petty Officer 3rd Class Byron Gradney

After an extended maintenance period spent pier side in San Diego, USS Ronald Reagan is preparing for its move to Japan, as part of the first ever three-hull aircraft carrier crew and hull swap. It will replace USS George Washington in Japan and become part of the U.S. 7th Fleet forwarddeployed naval forces (FDNF) in Yokosuka, Japan. As part of this rebalance strategy to increase the Navy’s presence in the Pacific Fleet, USS Theodore Roosevelt will move from Norfolk, Va., to San Diego. In 2008, George Washington was the first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier sent to Japan as part of the FDNF. Maintaining a FDNF capability supports the United States’ commitment to the defense of Japan and the security and stability of the vital Indo-Asia-Pacific. As a member of one of the U.S. Navy’s most relied upon assets, Gradney and other USS Ronald Reagan sailors know they are part of an agile and skilled team standing ready to defend America. The Navy is uniquely positioned to be there, on the world’s oceans, patrolling what is essentially the world’s interstate ocean highway system. The U.S. Navy ensures the free flow of global trade, which, in turn, preserves America’s economic prosperity. When it comes to protecting and defending America, being there matters. And America’s Navy is already there. “I enjoy the things I’ve learned while being the Navy, the leadership, discipline and work ethic because they will help me shape my life after the Navy,” said Gradney. July 2015

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Places & Faces

EXPLORATION VESSEL NAUTILUS

Opens to Louisiana and Texas Schools

Mary Fuqua, teacher with Maplewood Middle, along with Missy Amidon of CITGO Lake Charles, Kim Holmes, teacher from W.W. Lewis, and students from W.W. Lewis and Maplewood Middle School, in Sulphur monitor activities aboard the Nautilus.

Educators Amanda Boudreaux and Katie Nichols of Sulphur recently joined an esteemed crew of scientists and engineers aboard the Exploration Vessel (E/V) Nautilus for six days at sea as part of the Ocean Exploration Trust’s (OET) 2015 Nautilus Ambassador Program. Boudreaux teaches sixth grade physical science and coaches robotics at W.W. Lewis Middle School. Nichols is a sixth grade physical science teacher at Maplewood Middle School. They joined fellow educators Erin Boyd from Lemont, Illinois, and Jonathan Gain of Corpus Christi, Texas. The Nautilus Ambassador Program is made possible by CITGO Petroleum Corporation and its partnership with OET to support science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education and environmental stewardship. “As a proud partner of OET and advocate of STEM programs, CITGO (was) honored to receive 16 www.thriveswla.com

the 2015 Nautilus Ambassadors in Galveston. We thank them for their commitment as educators and for working daily to encourage young minds to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and math,” said CITGO President and CEO Nelson P. Martinez. While aboard the Nautilus, the Ambassadors participated in education and outreach efforts from ship to shore, connecting with live audiences. Streamed through an interactive web portal, the Ambassadors fielded questions from their classrooms at home, in addition to CITGO refinery employees. Venues for the live interactions were located in Corpus Christi, Lake Charles and Lemont, utilizing Nautilus’ state-of-the-art telepresence system. The 2015 CITGO-sponsored Ambassadors traveled aboard E/V Nautilus to explore an underwater brine. They also helped map the Thrive Magazine for Better Living

seafloor, shadowed onboard scientists and engineers and collected oceanographic data. “The Nautilus Ambassador Program strives to inspire curiosity for discovery and drive achievement in STEM education, a mission that the Ocean Exploration Trust shares with CITGO,” said Dr. Robert Ballard, founder of the Ocean Exploration Trust (OET). “We are dedicated to providing our 2015 Nautilus Ambassadors with valuable tools and experiences in ocean exploration for their classrooms, so that they can help us inspire the next generation of scientists, engineers and explorers.” CITGO partnered with OET in 2014 as part of the company’s Caring for our Coast initiative, a year-long series of programs designed to extend the company’s ongoing commitment to environmental protection and restoration leading into the 10th anniversary of Hurricanes Katrina July 2015


and Rita in August and September of this year. As a result of the storms, a significant portion of beaches, dunes and wetlands surrounding the Gulf of Mexico were damaged by erosion - areas where CITGO employees and refineries are largely based. “A decade ago we were united by the tragedy of the devastating storms, yet today we are united by hope. From the beginning, CITGO was there helping our communities rebuild, and in the decade since we’ve heighted our social responsibility efforts through programs like the OET, which serves to advance environmental education and the protection of our oceans and marine life,” added Martínez. Local students and teachers get ready to board the Exploration Vessel Nautilus.

July 2015

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Places & Faces

first person

with

Taja V. Simpson

by Erin Kelly

First Person is a monthly Q&A that features compelling people who excel in their chosen endeavors. Ideas for future Q&As? Email edit@thriveswla.com.

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July 2015


As a little girl in Lake Charles, Taja V. Simpson would watch her favorite movies again and again. She’d memorize and recite the lines. She portrayed each character, just for fun. A seed had been planted, although she was barely aware of it. By the time she graduated from McNeese State University, the seed had grown to a full-fledged dream—one that led away from Southwest Louisiana and straight to Hollywood, where she could pursue acting and climb the uphill battle to stage and screen. In the years since, Simpson has acted and directed television, theater, and film. She landed a regular role on “The Bold and the Beautiful”, appeared on “Grey’s Anatomy”, and was most recently seen on TV Land’s “The Soul Man” with Cedric the Entertainer. Other roles have included “The Young and the Restless”, “Real Husbands of Hollywood”, “Mystery Girls”, “NCIS-LA”, and “Benched.” Simpson has also hosted programs like the NAACP Theatre Festival and served as a presenter at the NAACP Theatre Awards. This year, she’ll appear in five feature films—”The Preacher’s Son”, opening in theaters to limited release; “The Baker’s Man” on DVD; Alton & “Kenya’s Outrageous Wedding”, also on DVD; and two films on the film festival circuit. Simpson admits that it’s not a business for the faint of heart, but when you’re following a dream, giving up is not an option. She recently shared her continuing journey in an interview with Thrive. When and how did you discover your love of acting? I discovered my love for acting when I was in elementary school. I would watch movies, learn all the lines, and recite them over and over and over again. I didn’t realize at the time I was ‘acting,’ I just really enjoyed movies. I could literally watch a movie one time and the next time I would see it, I found myself reciting the dialogue as if I was each of the characters. At that time I didn’t realize this was a profession I could actually pursue and there weren’t any acting classes for kids that I could get into to cultivate that skill, so it was more like a hobby. It wasn’t until I graduated college that I began pursuing the craft. Then I fell in love with all facets of it. I learned all the different styles—Stanislavski, Adler, Meisner—and quickly realized the type of things I did since I was a kid were actually different ‘techniques.’ I believe my diligence and persistence then still influences my work ethic. Just as much as I was in love with acting as a kid, I’m even more in love with it now. When was the first time you saw yourself on screen? The first time I saw myself on screen was when I booked my first short film, ‘The Greater Ambition.’ It was also my very first audition! After wrapping the movie, the producers held a screening and seeing myself was hard, actually. I critiqued everything I did. I remember sitting in my chair with my hand up over my face. When the credits began to roll, I was like, ‘Whew, so glad that’s over.” But then I had to face the many people who came out to see it. I put my brave face on and held my head up high and awaited the feedback. People were coming over to me saying how much they enjoyed my performance. I was floored! Sometimes as an actor you constantly strive to be better and can be very hard on yourself. However, I learned so much from that experience and now I don’t worry about it. I do the work, give my all, and leave it all ‘in the can.’ When I walk away from a production, I know it will be great because I’ve literally done my best. You’ve mentioned previously that your appearance on Grey’s Anatomy was a turning point for you, personally and professionally. In what way? I started watching Grey’s Anatomy from the very first episode. I can remember sitting my apartment in Glendale, California, and thinking, this is going to be an amazing show. Over the years and being an avid watcher, I’d dream of walking down the halls of Grey-Sloan Memorial and talking to Meredith and Christina. So when I booked the show it was literally a dream come true! Simpson behind the camera.

July 2015

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Places & Faces

Onset Mystery: On set with Tori Spelling and Jennie Garth

The Soul Man 3: Simpson with Cedric the Entertainer

On set at Grey’s Anatomy

When you attain a goal or feel as if a ‘dream has come true’ it can be a turning point in your life. You realize all the hard work, time, effort, energy and dedication it has taken to get you that place. You deserve to sit back, enjoy the moment and the fruits of your labor. This industry comes with a great deal of rejection and I’d labored for quite a while to get to that point. It certified I was doing what I was born to do and that was a huge turning point for me.

How has being an actor changed the way you view films and TV as a consumer? As a consumer, when I watch movies or television, I watch as any audience or moviegoer would. I’ve paid money to enjoy a great piece of cinema so I go into it hoping to be satisfied. However, if something stands out while watching—good or bad—the actor or director side of me definitely takes note.

You became a regular guest on The Bold and the Beautiful. What was that experience like? I used to always hear, “…working on a soap is a fantastic training ground.” Now that I’ve been on “The Bold & The Beautiful”, I definitely see what people were referring too. I like to call it a fine-oiled tune machine. You get your script and the rundown for the day prior to arrival. The rundown shows you the scene order they will be filming that day. Blocking rehearsal is at 9 a.m. and ‘On Camera’ starts promptly at ten, and is typically done at 6 p.m. It’s the perfect 9-to-5 job doing what you love! A soap opera set is different because all scenes are shot one time—that’s right, only once. Being on this set has given me even more respect for these actors as they nail it the first time, every time. I believe greatness begets greatness and working on a soap opera has made me an even better actor.

What are your hopes for the road ahead? The road ahead looks pretty darn good. I’m currently working on an on-line network to bring quality family fun television back to the world—TVS-TV.

What are some of your favorite films? This is actually the hardest question! I have so many, but here are a few: A Beautiful Mind, The Notebook, Remember The Titans, Rudy, Mrs. Doubtfire, The Shawshank Redemption, Heat, E.T., Titanic, Troy and of course my childhood favorite, The Last Dragon. To name a few! How do you stay motivated in such a tough and competitive business? My faith is what keeps me motivated. I’m passionate about what I do and I believe I’m working in my calling so it makes it easy to deal with the rejection. I just say, ‘That one wasn’t for me’ or ‘on to the next,’ and keep it moving. What’s meant for me is for me and that keeps a smile on my face. Ecclesiastes 9:11 says, “The race is not given to the swift nor the strong but he who endures until the end.” I’m in it for the long haul, so giving up is not an option.

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What advice would you give to young people who have big dreams? Steve Jobs says, “Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking and don’t settle! As with all matters of the heart, you’ll know when you find it.” I love this quote because before I knew this was something Steve Jobs has said, it’s something I’ve always given as advice. However, the quote is perfect. Be limitless. Change your mindset and believe you can do anything. Philippians 4:13 says, “I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.”

A selfie on set with Jennie Garth of “Mystery Girls”

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Simpson’s script and headshot for Grey’s Anatomy

July 2015


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21


Places & Faces

Architect Presents Draft of Lakefront Development

Design includes hotel, retail, and living accomodations Steven Oubre of Architects Southwest presented a draft of its lakefront development design plan to the Downtown Development Authority last month. The preliminary plan lays out a design concept and illustrates the development potential of the property along the north side of the Lake Charles lakefront including the land donated by Pinnacle to the City. The plan’s concept is based on the design standards that originated from a series of public hearings on the lakefront property held between 2006 and 2007. At that time, a plan for development was created and approved by the City Council and then by voters in a public referendum with more than 80 percent voting to approve the plan. Pending approval by the Downtown Development Authority and the City Council, the City intends to solicit offers from developers later this month and be prepared to recommend the best proposal or combination of proposals to the Council for approval in October. “We are trying to expedite the process to capitalize on current market conditions,” said Lake Charles Mayor Randy Roach. “The final master plan will include details that will help guide developers, such as the property’s infrastructure needs and preferred uses, architectural styles, and design specifications including building height and street and sidewalk width.” The suggested master plan calls for a hotel, retail, restaurants, living accommodations, boat docks, and public piers, which allow for commercial development along the lakefront while maintaining public access. The plan incorporates Lake Charles historic architecture into its design standards and also uses existing features including Bilbo Cemetery and the parking deck. For more information, to watch the presentation, or to download the presentation materials, visit www.cityoflakecharles.com. 22 www.thriveswla.com

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2015


Places & Faces

Southwest Louisiana Tourism: $384.48 By the Numbers million:

By Paul Oswell

The economic impact of tourism in Calcasieu Parish for 2013

: 4,u3m0be0 r of

N jobs related h m is r u to is sieu Par in Calca

1 out of 10: Number of Louisiana jobs dependent on travel and tourism

46:

Age of the average Louisiana visitor

: ed 1 0 4 , 6 8 6 visitors reach

l s/ Potentia e Lake Charle h t h iana throug est Louis Bureau w h t u o S isitors tion & V ts in 2013 n e v n o C g effor marketin

4.6 nights:

Average overn ight trip duration for visi tors to Louisiana

4:ount n 8 4 $rage amitors o

s Ave t by vi ht trip ig n spe overn an

300,000:

47%:

Number of ann ual visitors to the Creole N ature Trail All-American R oad

Percentage of visitors traveling to Louisiana to visit friends/relatives Source: Lake Charles/Southwest Louisiana Convention & Visitors Bureau, Louisiana Office of Tourism July 2015

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Places & Faces

Movers and Shakers in Southwest News? You tell us! Send press releases to Louisiana... Who’s edit@thriveswla.com with the subject line “Who’s News.”

IBERIABANK Names Public Relations Coordinator IBERIABANK, the 128-year-old subsidiary of IBERIABANK Corporation, has announced the naming of Jennifer Istre as Public Relations Coordinator for Jennifer Istre Southwest Louisiana. She most recently served as Senior Sales Manager for the Lake Charles/Southwest Louisiana Convention and Visitors Bureau. Her office is located at 4440 Nelson Road in Lake Charles. She can be reached by phone at (337) 312-7730 or by email at Jennifer.istre@iberiabank.com.

WCCH Names Safety Award Recipient West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital (WCCH) recently named Ronda Dickerson, food service aide in WCCH’s nutrition services department, as the recipient of its Safety Award. The award, which Rhonda Dickerson honors employees for their promotion of safety and safety awareness in and around the hospital, is distributed to those employees that demonstrate extraordinary awareness and action in minimizing potential safety risks.

West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital Announces Nurses Week Award Recipients West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital (WCCH) celebrated the skill and dedication of the hospital’s registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, nursing assistants, and support personnel throughout National Nurses Week. As part of its celebration, nursing excellence awards were presented. Brenda Quesnel, chief nursing officer, presented awards to the following individuals: WCCH RN of the Year – Libbie Croxdale, RN, Medical/Surgical Unit WCCH LPN of the Year – Lucy Daigle, LPN, Resource Pool; WCCH Nurse Aide of the Year – Diane Watkins, CNA, Medical/Surgical Unit; WCCH Support Person of the Year – Robin Bushnell, OR Technician in Surgical Services; WCCH Home Health Agency Professional of the Year – Evelyn Smith, RN WCCH Healing Touch Award – Katherine Swain, RN, Medical/Surgical Unit

Libbie Croxdale, RN

Lucy Daigle, LPN

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Merchant & Farmers Bank has announced that Amy Dowden has been promoted to Vice President of Consumer/ Commercial Lending for the Vernon Parish Area Amy Dowden Market. With over 16 years of banking experience, Dowden has worked as a teller, vault teller, teller trainer, note teller, loan processor and has been lending with MFB since 2008.

Former State Representative Receives CHRISTUS Health Eagle Award Retired Louisiana State Representative Herbert Dixon has been named the recipient of the 2015 CHRISTUS Health Eagle Award Herbert Dixon for his commitment to upholding the dignity of citizens in Louisiana and his tireless efforts to protect and provide access to quality health care for the poor and vulnerable of our society. The annual award, now in its sixteenth year, is presented by CHRISTUS Health to one or more lawmakers who share the health system’s mission to extend the healing ministry of Jesus Christ.

Memorial Welcomes William Gabbard, MD

Lakeside Bank Welcomes New Assistant Vice President Misti Trosclair Young has joined the staff of Lakeside Bank as a Banking Officer/ Assistant Vice President. Young brings 20 years of Misti Trosclair Young experience in the financial industry to her new position. She has an extensive background in branch staffing and operations, customer relations and operations. At Lakeside, Young will be working in the bank’s main office on Nelson Road in Lake Charles.

Merchant & Farmers Bank Promotes Amy Dowden To VP

Diane Watkins, CNA

Robin Bushnell, OR Tech

Evelyn Smith, RN

Katherine Swain, RN

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Memorial Medical Group welcomes William Gabbard, MD, a fellowship-trained nephrologist, to its staff. He will see patients at 2770 3rd Avenue, Suite 345 in Lake Charles. Dr. William Gabbard, MD In 2010, Dr. Gabbard received interventional nephrology training from Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia. Press Ganey has ranked him in the top 15th percentile for national patient satisfaction. Dr. Gabbard is a member of the American Board of Internal Medicine, through which he is also board certified in nephrology. He treats patients for a variety of

July 2015


conditions affecting the kidneys, including chronic kidney disease, renal failure and dialysis, kidney stones, and vascular and tubular disorders of the kidney. For more information, call (337) 494-6747.

Memorial Names Employee of the Year Myrtle Brown has been named the 2015 Rosie Thompson Employee of the Year for the Lake Charles Memorial Health System. She is a 16-year veteran of Memorial, working in the Myrtle Brown environmental services department. Brown was recognized through fellow employee nominations. She continues to receive compliments because of her commitment to doing a good job and her caring and compassionate attitude.

Kade Trahan Joins Trahan Construction’s Management Team Trahan Construction, a leading construction management firm in the Gulf Coast Region, proudly welcomes Kade Trahan, the third generation of the Trahan Kade Trahan family, to the company’s management team. Kade is a recent McNeese State University graduate with a bachelor’s degree in business management, as well as, a bachelor’s degree in finance. As part of the management team, Kade will focus his efforts on business development and market expansion along the I-10 corridor. For more information, call (337) 774-3600.

Southwest Louisiana Charter Academy Hires New Principal Southwest Louisiana Charter Academy has hired a veteran educator, LaTonia Harris, to lead the school for the next school year. Most recently serving as the founding principal Latonia Harris of Lafayette Renaissance Charter Academy in Lafayette, Harris has served in a variety of leadership and educational roles. She has

July 2015

extensive experience leading schools with diverse student populations including those in special education, gifted, Head Start and English Language Learners (ELL) programs. Jacqueline Smith, who has been acting principal at the school, is moving into a community/parent liaison position in Lake Charles. For more information, visit www.swlouisianacharter.org.

Century 21 Bessette Realty, Inc. Welcomes New Agents

Eric Blanchard

Matt Redd Selected for Counselor of Real Estate Designation Matt Redd, Business Director for NAI Latter & Blum, has been accepted into The Counselor of Real Estate organization and awarded the prestigious CRE designation. Matt Redd Membership in the CRE is extended on an invitation-only basis and Redd is one of only 13 CRE members in the state, and just one of 1100 worldwide. To be invited, prospective members must be recognized by their peers, clients and employers, for their outstanding professional achievement, impeccable judgment, and commitment to integrity in the field of real estate counseling. He will represent clients for multi-family, office space and industrial properties throughout Southwest Louisiana.

Keisha LaFosse

Century 21 Bessette Realty, Inc., a premier real estate agency in Southwest Louisiana, has added two real estate agents, Eric Blanchard and Keisha LaFosse, to its awardwinning staff. Eric Blanchard, originally from Sulphur now resides in Lake Charles. He received his real estate license in September 2014 and is looking forward to serving the real estate needs of Southwest Louisiana. Keisha LaFosse, originally from Jennings now resides in Elton. She received her real estate license in April 2015, and will represent real estate in all of Southwest Louisiana, including areas near Lake Arthur and as far north as Allen Parish. For more information, call (337) 474-2185.

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25


Money & Career

Get a Handle on Your Handshake

by Beth Winslett Fontenot

It’s such a simple act, but it can be the best—or worst—first impression you ever make. Whether you’re meeting people for the first time or trying to seal a business deal, your handshake sends a message. If it’s limp, it may suggest insecurity. If you pull away too quickly, you may be deemed arrogant. Clammy palms could communicate nervousness and make others suspect you have something to hide. And while the two-handed shake—grasping the other person’s hand with both of your hands—can be seen as warm and affectionate in some situations, it may seem insincere or overly personal in a business environment. A study conducted by William Chaplin, a psychologist at St. John’s University, found that a person’s handshake style says a lot about their personality. A person who offers a firm handshake tends to be an extrovert; introverts usually have a less firm handshake. Despite it being such an important element of a good first impression, 70 percent of people don’t feel confident about their ability to execute a proper handshake, according to Business Insider. Fortunately, it’s a learned skill.

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July 2015


The rules of handshaking vary from culture to culture, but in the United States the expectations are pretty consistent, and the end result should always be to make the other person feel comfortable. How do you make your handshake great? It’s all in the technique. Check out these tips from Etiquette International, Monster, and Business Insider.

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• With your fingers together and your thumb up, slide your right hand into the other person’s hand until the webs of your hands (the area between the thumb and forefinger) meet. A good handshake is firm and lasts about three seconds. Longer contact may make the other person feel uncomfortable. • Your grasp should not be forceful or a show of your physical strength. Use about the same grip you would use in opening a door handle. Two or three “pumps” from the elbow, not the shoulder, are all that’s needed. Keep in mind that you are trying to connect with the other person, not be overbearing. Gauge when the other person wants to end the handshake, and do so promptly. • Avoid the dreaded “dead fish grip” or limp handshake. It may make others wonder if you are uncertain or uninterested.

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• Avoid “lady fingers”—i.e., offering only your fingers. While it may be appropriate in some social situations, it’s not good for business. • Also, take care that your hands feel pleasant: smooth, dry, and warm. The fewer rings you wear, the less chance of pinching or scratching someone’s hand. For obvious reasons, avoid Band-Aids on your hands or fingers. • If you tend to have clammy palms, spray them with an antiperspirant once a day after you wash and dry your hands. When you know you are about to greet someone, discreetly place your hand behind your back or on our side, and swipe your palm on your clothing as you reach for the handshake. • In a social situation where drinks are being served, hold your beverage in your left hand. Otherwise you may end up giving someone a cold, wet handshake. In this age of global business, it’s important to remember that not all business cultures use the same handshake techniques. If the other person gives you a weak handshake, that may be their custom. Show your manners and social intelligence by matching your handshake with equal pressure. Knowing how to properly shake hands is a skill that requires practice. To sharpen your skill, shake hands whenever you have the opportunity. A great handshake makes others want to shake your hand again, and that’s just what you want whether you are trying to make a new friend or seal a business deal.

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Money & Career

Show Me the Future: Interviewing Tips by Davy DeGreeff

Where would you rather eat dinner in a new city – a respectably rated Italian restaurant chosen from a search online? Or a place a friend told you about, a family-owned restaurant with cozy ambiance (since you hate a busy meal), baskets of table-side garlic bread (you’ll probably go through two), and an alfredo sauce (which is your favorite on farfalle noodles) you’ll wish you could bottle and take home? Doesn’t that second restaurant sound just a bit more appetizing? Can’t you already sort of imagine what it would be like to eat there? Sure, the place you found online might have a higher overall rating, but how sure can you be that it would be the best restaurant for you? Just like finding a good restaurant, a company

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looking to bring on a new employee needs to know not only why a candidate would make a good hire, but why that candidate would make a good hire for them, and their specific job – as with Italian restaurants, not all candidates are successful for the same reasons. In a sense, a company looking to hire needs to be able to see the future. And if you’re the candidate who wants to be that hire, it’s your job to show them the future. Effectively interviewing for a job is a practice in spinning, or taking a piece of information and presenting it in a way that draws attention to its most positive and relevant characteristics. If that sounds like sales rep jargon to you, congrats, you’ve cracked the code – interviewing is a sales

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presentation, and you’re the product. And so, just as in any sales opportunity, you need to make sure your pitch doesn’t only reflect your overall strengths as a candidate, but that it concentrates on the specific strengths that make you a great candidate for this particular role. As they interview you, hiring managers are attempting to imagine a future with you as their new hire. The clearer the picture they can imagine, the more comfortable they are in making a decision. And the more specific and relevant information you can give them, the clearer their picture will be. Sometimes the method of painting that picture is obvious – if you’re a sales rep who’s sold in this same industry and can present five straight years of

July 2015


successful sales numbers, then that’s your lede. But what if the connection is less obvious, or your experience isn’t as direct? What if you’re interviewing to be an event planning team manager, and you’ve worked in event planning for five years, but have no management experience? Properly presenting your success in previous planning roles is a must, but you’ll also need to make sure you’re emphasizing the right aspects of that success in order to make the best pitch. Discussing examples of organization, time management, and customer service will demonstrate your abilities as a capable team member. But emphasizing examples of leadership, new employee training, and conflict resolution will make it clear that though you haven’t held a Manager title in the past,

you possess the skill set and relative experience to exceed expectations with one in the future. In the end, hiring managers want their job to be easy – they want to walk out of their first interview with a feeling of confidence that they could hire that first candidate without seeing any others and not worry that they were missing out on something better. They want to find a candidate who could not only fit the role they’re looking to fill, but who can spell out exactly why they’d be a great hire, and back up those claims with specific reasons. They want to see a future with you as their next hire, and if you aren’t going to be the one showing it to them, then who is? Davy DeGreeff is a sales recruiter for Epicor Software based in Minneapolis, Minn.

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Money & Career

Overcome Overspending

by Erin Kelly

HOW TO SAY NO TO SPENDING MORE THAN YOU HAVE

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July 2015


Life can be fraught with many woes, money among them. Financial woes carry a unique kind of weight. When you’re in debt, broke, or behind on paying bills, the stress permeates every area of your life—especially when there’s no clear way out. For overspenders, this anxiety is further compounded with feelings of guilt and remorse. “Most people have experienced some form of buyer’s remorse in their lives, and most of us have spent more than we should have at one time or another. But for some people, overspending is a habit, and it can become a dangerous one with big consequences,” says Misti Young, Assistant Vice President with Lakeside Bank. According to Young, overspending can quickly spiral out of control. She says there are people who struggle financially because they work at lower income jobs, “but when I reference overspenders, I’m talking about people who are in financial distress because they’re spending money they don’t have, usually on things they don’t need. It doesn’t matter how much money you have—the habit doesn’t offer immunity to the wealthy.” She says a lot of people with money overspend because they assume, “Well, I have money; I can afford it.” But when you develop a habit of overspending, having more money doesn’t solve the problem, Young explains. “It just allows you to overspend even more. Very often, you hear overspenders say they just ‘need to make more money’ and they won’t be in debt anymore. Unfortunately, that’s usually not the way it works out. They’ll just be in more debt.” If you’ve watched your money slip away or feel you’re losing your grasp on your financial willpower, the first step is to find out why you’re compelled to spend, according to Young. “Get to the heart of the matter. People develop unhealthy habits for a number of reasons. Find out why you overspend. Are you trying to fill an emotional void? Are you trying to keep up with friends, families or neighbors who seem to be better off? Do you rush to sales, afraid you might miss something? Is it because you don’t have a solid understanding of your financial situation? Maybe you’re just not paying attention to the prices and find yourself at the register with a $500 price tag when you intended to spend $75. Whatever the reason, find out what it is. When you know the source of the problem, you can better tackle it head-on,” says Young. As you pull at the emotional and mental threads of your unhealthy financial habit, you’ll need help learning to control it. Young advises calling in reinforcements. “Meet with a trusted financial advisor or banking professional, or sit with someone you know and trust who is financially responsible,” she suggests. “Have them help you develop a realistic budget and share strategies to help you stick with that budget. It will be helpful to have an objective perspective and it you’ll be more accountable if you’re reporting back to someone on your progress.” Young also advises patience as you work to become more financially responsible. “You didn’t develop your overspending habits overnight, so don’t expect to eliminate the urge to spend more than you have that quickly either. As you’re shopping, force yourself to be more aware of your choices. Ask yourself: ‘Why do I want this? Do I July 2015

really need it? What will happen if I don’t get it?’ If it’s something you don’t truly need, leave it behind and see if you feel as strongly about it in a few days. Be disciplined and track your progress so that you can see the overall improvement in your financial picture. That will give you added incentive to stay on the right track.” For more information about personal finances and banking services, call Lakeside Bank at (337) 474-3766 or visit www.lakesidebanking.com.

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Money & Career

Building and Maintaining CONFIDENCE by Jen Breen

Confidence is like a woman’s make-up ritual or a man’s daily shave—if you don’t want it to fade or expose the blemishes of self-doubt, you need to reapply. A single decision or action will not maintain the foundation. Adding another set of daily rituals to your routine may sound daunting at first, but if you commit to learning and practicing the language of confidence you’ll soon find that it not only makes most areas of your life easier, but you will have built one of life’s most rewarding habits. Most people have been faced with the challenge of gaining and acting with a true sense of confidence. It is not uncommon to experience the frustration of thriving in some areas, while not feeling self-assured in other parts of your life. If you are confident in one space, why doesn’t it carry over? We all know that confidence is the key to success, so how can apply throughout every area in our lives? The secret to gaining and retaining confidence is eliminating negative self-talk and thoughts, which can be a significant challenge as it may have taken years of reinforcement to build these doubts. If you commit to learning and practicing the language of confidence you’ll soon find that it not only makes most areas of your life easier, but you will have built one of life’s most rewarding habits. While each person’s struggle with confidence is unique, the most powerful weapons to breaking the internal cycle of negativity are the same.

Here’s how to become fluent in the language of confidence: Evaluate your self-talk. Negative talk is often so ingrained in our psyche that it may be difficult to identify. Do you often find yourself thinking phrases such as “must,”“have to,”“should have” or “missed out on”? These expressions sabotage confidence. It’s time to throw out these types of expressions and replace them with positive, affirming phrases, such as ,“I can do this,”“I’m proud of myself,”“I will succeed,” and “This is an opportunity,” so that you can do the things that you have always wanted to do.

Embrace Failure. Don’t be afraid to fail and do not let it define your selftalk. Sometimes failure is inevitable and it can be a success, as it is often the source of our greatest lessons and inspiration.

Perfection is a myth. The term “perfect” is subjective. If you’re trying to be perfect for someone else or on a project you’re facing an impossible, self-defeating task. Accept and embrace what you see as imperfections and shape them in a way that is perfect for you. Drop the comparisons. While competition can be healthy, it is not the same as comparison. Every person is unique. If you try to be like or compare yourself with someone else it will only lessen your confidence. Instead, focus on your strengths and the lessons you may be able to learn from engaging with this person. While these steps may seem simple it will take time to integrate them into your daily life, but as you continue to change your self-talk and habits you’ll see your confidence expand and grow.

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July 2015


6

tips

for a Skim-Ready Resume by Fred Sebren

l

et’s say you come across a job that matches your qualifications. You think: I’m a perfect candidate. I’m going to apply and show them all my credentials. As soon as they review my resume, they’ll see what a perfect fit I am. Maybe so. But chances are, there’s at least a dozen other applicants thinking the exact same thing. Recruiters and employers get inundated with resumes, especially for highly coveted or competitive jobs. In many cases, they don’t have time to review each one with a fine-toothed comb. They skim it and make a first impression, even before they’ve gotten lost in the details. For your resume to stand out, you need to make it easy to skim—and you need to make sure they’re skimming your best qualities.

Here’s how:

1 July 2015

Use bullet points. At the top of your resume, add a header that says “Qualifications,” and list three bullet points that highlight your most

desirable traits as a candidate. Keep the bullets short—one sentence, if possible—and don’t go overboard. Limit yourself to three. Make every words count and show results, not vague allusions. For example: Instead of “strong sales leader,” say “Increased sales by 25% in first quarter.”

2 3

Never center your text. That includes headers. Keep everything to the left. And don’t justify the copy, either. Stick with traditional left alignment, with a “ragged right” margin. It’s easier on the eyes and easier to skim.

Don’t play with fonts. Now is not the time to get font-crazy or overly creative. Select a traditional, conventional font—Arial or Times New Roman, for example—and keep all fonts the same size. You may want

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to make your name a little bigger, but everything else should remain consistent. It makes for better readability.

4 5 6

Don’t go crazy with boldface, either. Choose what you want to bold. Do you want to draw more attention to your previous employers, or your previous roles? Pick one or the other to put in boldface, but not both. Too many bolds and fonts confuse the eye.

Avoid all-caps. You might be tempted to capitalize something to draw attention. Don’t.

When using numbers, choose numerals rather than words. For example: “25 percent,” not “twentyfive percent.” This Improves readability and saves much-needed space.

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33


Money & Career

Hank Aaron Donates $10,000 to Eddie G. Robinson Museum by Angelita Faller

A reception honoring baseball great Henry “Hank” Aaron and former members of the Atlanta Braves to raise money for the Eddie G. Robinson Museum ended with a surprise donation of $10,000 from Aaron. Due to the $1.6 billion deficit in the state budget, funding for the museum was cut forcing the museum to only be open one day a week beginning in April. The Friends of the Eddie G. Robinson Museum (EGRM) do not believe that is nearly enough time for visitors to experience the historic significance of Coach Robinson’s impact on college football. “The museum is named after one of American’s greatest, Eddie G. Robinson, who coached at Grambling for 57 years and is in every Hall of Fame you can name,” said Wilbert Ellis, president of the Friends of EGRM. “He’s touched the lives of so many individuals, including myself. We want young people to see this great American and his contributions and what he has done for Grambling State University and the whole country.” Coach Robinson has the second-highest wins in NCAA football history with 408 wins. The Friends of EGRM have pledged to keep the museum open four days a week, and are raising funds to cover the cost of operating the museum the additional three days a week no longer covered by state funds. “This museum does not need to be open one day a week. It needs to be open all the time so people traveling on I-20 can appreciate what Eddie Robinson meant to the world of football, what he meant to the state of Louisiana,” said Lt. Gov. Jay Dardenne. An auction was held featuring autographed sports memorabilia, including baseballs and bats signed by Aaron and basketballs signed by Willis

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Reed, a Grambling alumnus and former New York Knicks player. One mysterious benefactor anonymously matched the donations of the last Hank Aaron baseball and bat purchased during the auction, which brought in a total of $6,000 for the last bat auctioned at the fundraiser. Aaron played 21 seasons for the Milwaukee/ Atlanta Braves in the National League and two seasons for the Milwaukee Brewers in the American League. When he retired at the end of the 1976 season, he held more Major League batting records than any other player in the game’s history. His most famous home run came in Atlanta on April 8, 1974, when he hit his 715 home run, breaking Babe Ruth’s seemingly untouchable record. Four former Atlanta Braves players, who are all Louisiana natives, were honored at the reception: Wayne Causey, Gary Eaves, Ralph “Roadrunner” Garr and George Stone. Stone, a graduate of Ruston High School and Louisiana Tech University, who was a pitcher for the Atlanta Braves, described how Aaron’s accomplishments inspired African Americans. “He’s the most respected baseball player ever in the history of the game. Not necessarily for what he did on the field, but it’s how he did it, with grace, with character, with dignity, with integrity,” Stone said. “I think one of the reasons he was really focused, he was playing for a whole race of people that desperately needed something to cling to at that particular time.” “We are life-long Louisianans, and this museum is more than a little important to our way of life,” said Mark Neal, an attorney from Monroe who purchased an autographed baseball for his family for $1,500. “I have been

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a fan of Hank Aaron for many years. There is no greater baseball player ever to live.” Aaron, who was awarded a Doctor of Humane Letters degree at Grambling’s 2015 Spring Commencement earlier in the day, surprised museum officials by announcing a personal donation of $10,000 from him and his wife, Billye Aaron. The total amount of money raised from the fundraiser is still being tabulated. The event was sponsored by Toyota, First National Bank and Squire Creek Country Club.

July 2015


All you need to know to stay in the know! Crave Introduces New Gift Registry Service Crave Gourmet Baskets and Gifts has introduced their “My CRAVEorite Things” Gift Registry. This is a unique registry for all occasions, including wedding, anniversary, house warming, birthday, graduation, retirement or any occasion. Co-owners, Fran Avery and Melanie McMullen are excited to launch the new service for their customers. To schedule a “My CRAVEorite Things” gift registry appointment, call (337) 421-0040, or email info@crave-foods.com.

CHRISTUS Health Louisiana and Ochsner Health System Create Future Vision for Health Care CHRISTUS Health Louisiana (“CH”) and Ochsner Health System (“Ochsner”) celebrated the formation of a strategic partnership focused on increasing local access to care, improving quality and reducing the cost of health care for patients throughout Louisiana. Together, as part of the Ochsner Health Network, the two organizations will build upon their unique strengths and effectively collaborate as partners to improve the health of the Louisiana communities they both serve today and to meet the needs of new communities across the state.

Big Day for Southwest Louisiana Youth Sports

Cheniere Partners with Bechtel and Technical Community Colleges to Close Construction Skills Gap

In a unanimous vote, the Louisiana High School Athletic Association (LHSAA) agreed to award the Louisiana High School State Baseball Championships to the Sulphur area for another two years. This will be the third time that all seven classes will be competing in one location to earn championship titles. Additionally, LHSAA voted to continue the Top 28 Boys Basketball State Championship at the Burton Complex in Lake Charles for two more years. For more information, call (337) 436-9588.

Cheniere Energy is partnering with Bechtel, SOWELA Technical Community College and Lamar Institute of Technology to implement their new Craft Development Program. Initially focused on welding technology, the program will provide full tuition reimbursement, potential job placement, and advanced training for qualified students at partner colleges. The program’s first participants will begin training this fall.

Lacassine RV Park Under Construction

WCCH Announces Tobacco-Free Campus Policy West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital (WCCH) adopted a tobacco-free campus policy effective June 1, 2015. Tobacco and tobacco related products are not allowed on any part of the hospital campus or hospital-owned properties. The policy applies to patients, staff and visitors. For more information and resources on smoking cessation, visit www. quitwithusla.org or call 1-800-QUIT-NOW.

The Lacassine RVP Park is under construction on I-10 halfway between Exit 44 and Exit 48 on the North Frontage Road. The Lacassine RV Park will A Tspaces T H Eon E45Yacres E Cand L I will N I have C a feature 532 laundry facility and a convenience store with food. There is also a fishing park on the property. The park is scheduled to open between February and March of 2016 and will provide recreational vehicle spaces for leisure travelers and long-term rentals. For more information, call (337) 802-3141.

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July 2015

FREE LASIK Screenings available on Wednesdays & Saturdays by appointment. Call 1-877-95-FOCUS.

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35


Home & Family

Battle of the In-laws

HOLIDAYS, BIRTHDAYS, AND MILESTONE EVENTS LIKE FAMILY WEDDINGS, OR EVEN FUNERALS, ARE STRESSFUL ENOUGH WITHOUT THE ADDED PRESSURE OF THAT ONE RELATIVE. YOU KNOW THE ONE. SHE CREEPS UP BEHIND YOU TO CRITICIZE YOUR COLESLAW ON THE FOURTH OF JULY, OR MAYBE HE DRINKS TOO MUCH ON CHRISTMAS EVE AND DECIDES TO MAKE A LIST OF YOUR MOST UNAPPEALING TRAITS. by Emily Alford Having a sibling or close relative who’s a family nuisance is no picnic, but when the offending party is an in-law, the situation gets even more complicated. It’s hard to confront in-laws about bad behavior or even small disagreements for fear that confrontation will damage a spouse’s relationship with a close family member, or even worse, put a spouse in the horrible position of choosing between a partner and a loved one. Problems between spouses and in-laws usually stem from what Nicol Stolar-Peterson, a licensed clinical social worker in Riverside, California, calls “enmeshment.” According to Stolar-Peterson, “Enmeshment refers to the blurry and often blended roles of the spouse and in-laws. This often looks like an in-law ‘butting in,’ but the actual disagreement between the spouses is the lack of healthy and appropriate boundaries as well as the expectations of the current marriage requiring its own roles and respect.”

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For example, if a mother-in-law is constantly criticizing the cleanliness of a new bride’s house, and the husband does nothing, or, even worse, agrees with his mother that the house could be tidier, the problem is first and foremost with boundaries: both the right of the new couple to keep their house any way they chose, and the expectations within the marriage for dealing with outside criticism as a unit. “While butting in is the trigger, it is the reaction or the response of the spouse that actually hurts the relationship,” says Stolar-Peterson. “Often a spouse’s unwillingness to set boundaries with their own parents undermines and severs vital connections that their own marriage requires to survive so they do not find themselves in a pool of resentment.” For these types of disagreements, StolarPeterson says that communication between spouses is often more important than confronting

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the offending family member. “One of the best ways to deal with enmeshments is for the couple to discuss the importance of their own marriage and relationship,” says Stolar-Peterson. “What are the expectations for respect, communication, and values? Then look at how the butting in is actually affecting their marriage. If they can look at what the actual issues are, such as being undermined or pushed over by their spouse’s parent, then they can start talking about how to be a team.” But enmeshment isn’t the only problem spouses face with their in-laws. Another common problem Stolar-Peterson sees is grandparents who overstep their bounds with grandchildren, seeing their own style of parenting as superior to that of their child and his or her spouse. Perhaps the grandparents stuff the children with off-limits sweets on overnight visits and then brush off concerns with, “It’s just one night.” when confronted about the child’s diet. Or perhaps

July 2015


Tessina recommends the following list of Dos and Don’ts for dealing with problem in-laws.

DO: • Get a clear agreement with your spouse about the boundaries you’re going to set with his or her parents. • Learn to give “adult time-outs” to the in-laws if they behave badly or pressure you. This means to politely disengage from a tense situation without personal interchanges or rudeness. • If in-laws are difficult, learn to treat them as members of someone else’s family with whom you’d not react to obnoxious things. Sometimes it’s best to politely ignore what they’re doing or saying and maintain a pleasant demeanor. • Be a grownup, whether they are or not. Don’t let them drag you into bad behavior of your own.

grandparents believe in spanking and see nothing wrong with taking a switch to a misbehaving child, which threatens the authority of parents who believe in alternate form of discipline. No matter the problem, the answer, once again, is boundaries. “Any time a child parents differently than their own parents, they are often met with questions, second guessing and unwanted advice,” Stolar-Peterson says. “Again, setting healthy boundaries with in-laws and being on the same page as the spouse in regards to discipline and everything that follows is critical. If there is a certain parenting theory they are working off of, it can be helpful to include the in-laws in the discussion so that everyone is on the same page.” But one thing is clear, unless the parents are abusing their children, there should be no “co-parenting” with grandparents, and spouses should be firm on that front, even if it means setting ground rules with their own parents. Grandparents should not be parenting grandchildren they do not have guardianship

of, they should be grandparenting StolarPeterson says. “This looks like nurturance, guidance, healthy boundaries and unconditional love. The parents should be the disciplinarians, allowing the grandparents to retain their position of huggable, unconditional love. This is often a great way to remind the in-laws that the actual parents are calling the shots, not them.” The most difficult things about confronting in-laws, according, according to Dr. Tina B. Tessina, licensed psychotherapist and author of Money, Sex and Kids: Stop Fighting About the Three Things That Can Ruin Your Marriage, are staying firm, but loving, and remembering that you are an adult with valid opinions, rather than a child seeking approval. “The way you deal with in-laws and parents now lets them know how much influence they can have on your married life,” says Tessina. “Be respectful and listen to what they say, but make your own decisions.”

• Take the time to get to know your in-laws. If you’re separated by distance, write or e-mail to get to know each other. • Check with your spouse about family customs. Ask if you should bring a gift when invited over, what they like to eat, what kind of humor they use, if they play sports together or discuss politics. • Be polite and friendly. Use your most charming ways around your in-laws!

continued on page 38 July 2015

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Home & Family |

Battle of the In-Laws

DON’T: • Assume that your spouse’s family relationship will resemble the one you have with your family. • Take offense easily. You may just not understand the family dynamic. • Criticize your spouse’s family. Rather, ask for explanations of the things you don’t understand. • Assume they understand how you feel. They may not have a clue. • Don’t take their comments or reactions personally. You may not understand them as they were meant.

It’s important to remember that even if you momentarily disagree with your in-laws, they will be a part of your life forever. While boundaries and communication are important, so is maintaining a positive relationship with the people who knew your spouse long before you came along. In the end, no one wants to chose between a spouse and a parent, so it is imperative not to let disagreements come to such a dire conclusion. Try to maintain a united front with your spouse, but don’t remain so rigid that it becomes impossible to work out your differences. The goal of “In-Law Battles,” after all, is not to win, but to create a stable, loving family who cares for and supports one another no matter what differences may arise.

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July 2015


get focused on

Summer Fun Optics Unlimited at The Eye Clinic has the styles kids want, and the quality parents are looking for in children’s eyewear. Beat the back-to-school rush and schedule your child’s eye exam this summer at one of The Eye Clinic’s five convenient locations. We’re making it easy with these special offers:

routine eye exams 65 Kid’s eyewear packages $ starting at just 49

$

for kids

This offer is available on routine vision exams* for school-aged children at all locations of The Eye Clinic through August 31, 2015 *Contact lens exams and fittings require additional fees.

Lake Charles • DeRidder • Sulphur • Jennings • Moss Bluff | (800) 826-5223 • www.theeyeclinic.net

July 2015

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39


Home & Family

Are You a Mosquito Magnet? by Christine Fisher

IT OFTEN SEEMS AS THOUGH MOSQUITOES MAKE A BEELINE FOR ONE PERSON IN A GROUP, LEAVING THEM FULL OF BITES WHEN OTHERS AREN’T NEARLY AS BOTHERED. The itchy bites can be enough of a nuisance, but for those who are allergic to mosquitoes, the bites can swell and become painful. Can anything be done to lessen one’s attraction to mosquitoes? Apparently mosquito evasion calls for blending into the crowd. “Mosquitoes are attracted to contrasts,” said Robert Soileau, manager of the Lake Charles location of J&J Exterminating, a Louisiana-based pest control company. “It can be movement, colors or smells; if it calls attention, it will attract the female mosquito, and that’s the one who bites.” Because contrast attracts them, a person with red or blonde hair in a group of mostly

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dark-headed people will tend to get the lion’s share of mosquito attention. Someone wearing brightly colored clothes will stand out more than someone wearing earth tones or muted colors. Blending in with the surroundings has been proven to detract mosquitoes. Limiting the amount of movement also helps. “Even though it’s natural to swat at mosquitoes, swinging your arms to swat at them only draws attention,” explained Soileau. “And, if it’s hot, just the effort of waving your arms might make you sweat little more, and sweat draws mosquitoes in, too. The movement, combined with additional sweat is like a magnet for them.”

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Mosquitoes are attracted to carbon dioxide, the chemical element exhaled by humans. People who have a higher metabolism, those who are overweight, and also women who are pregnant expel more carbon dioxide, thus inviting the potential for more mosquito bites. Outdoor parties often feature a backyard volleyball, badminton or tether ball game. Because mosquitoes are attracted to sweat, Soileau said it’s like an open invitation for them. “If you want to have games in your back yard or at an outdoor event, plan them for early afternoon,” he advised. “Mosquitoes are most active in the late evening and early morning hours.”

July 2015


The most effective way to repel mosquitoes is to utilize the services of a qualified pest control service. “Our treatments are effective; homeowners and business owners say they’ve seen a dramatic reduction in mosquitoes on their property with our mosquito control systems and treatments,” Soileau said. “It’s peace of mind, especially for families with young children who want to play outside.” Knowing what attracts mosquitoes can help people know how to hopefully avoid them.

July 2015

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41


Home & Family

UNITED WAY OF SOUTHWEST LOUISIANA Breaks Ground on New Community Headquarters

A groundbreaking ceremony took place today at the future home of the United Way of Southwest Louisiana, located at 815 Ryan Street, in downtown Lake Charles. The event marks a milestone in United Way history for the region, as the organization, which celebrates its 75th anniversary this year, takes the

necessary steps to ensure its longevity and ability to meet the growing needs of the community. “As board members, it’s our responsibility to assess both current and future needs, and after a great deal of research and consideration, we agreed that we needed to make this move now to make sure our United Way will be here for another 75 years, serving future generations as well as – or better – than we do now,” said United Way board member and building committee chairman Dr. Raymond Steiner. “This is the right move to make and now is definitely the right time, with all the growth that is taking place in our region.” The new site is just a block down from the United Way’s current offices at 715 Ryan Street. Although the move will be short in distance, it will be huge in terms of both long-term cost savings and expanded community resources, according to Dr. Steiner. “This was not a decision the board made lightly. Our current building, which was donated to United Way over 40 years ago, is 78 years old, and it has become very expensive to maintain due to its age. In 2012, when the operating costs of the building were over budget by 20%, we formed a building committee. Over the course of two years, we looked at the situation from every angle; considering numerous options, including selling and renting; tearing down and rebuilding; selling and building a new building. In the end, we determined that a new building designed to house the services United Way provides would be the most cost effective solution, when considering ongoing and anticipated repair costs to our current location. For example, we’ve spent nearly $200,000 on repairs over the past two years alone, with an estimated

Pictured left – right: Mayor Carol Ponthieux, Town of Iowa; Senator Ronnie Johns; Mayor Randy Roach, City of Lake Charles; Denise Durel, executive director, United Way of Southwest Louisiana; Robyn Elias, United Way of Southwest Louisiana Board Chair; Mike Solari, project architect; Dr. Raymond Steiner, United Way of Southwest Louisiana Building

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July 2015


$950,000 in additional repairs and renovation needed in the near future to keep the building and its mechanical systems in safe, working order. We, as a board, are confident our decision is a sound financial one, and that our new building will allow us to better meet the needs of the organization and the community we serve.” Denise Durel, President and CEO of United Way of Southwest Louisiana, adds that the current building, which is 28,000 square feet, is much larger than the organization needs, but Denise Durel, President and CEO of United Way of Southwest because it is an older building, Louisiana a large amount of that space was unfinished and unusable. “However, we have still had the responsibility of maintaining all of the space over the years, which has been an additional expense.” She says another ongoing problem has been limited parking and access for those with disabilities since the building is not ADA-compatible. “Considering the various populations we serve, this has been a major concern. Our new building will address all of these issues as well as being much less expensive to maintain.” United Way’s new, two-story building will encompass 10,181 square feet, which includes staff offices, a large conference room, several smaller meeting

rooms and ample space for future growth. A large parking lot will be located behind the building, with handicapped accessible entrances. Architect Mike Solari designed the building with historically accurate features, to blend in seamlessly with historic downtown architecture. The cost of the new $1.6 million building will result in significant cost savings over time compared with upkeep and maintenance costs at the current location. In addition to these cost savings, a capital campaign, “Building a United Legacy,” is being launched to generate additional funding for the new building. This campaign includes naming opportunities for donors, and Durel says these funds will be applied directly to the principle on the construction loan. The current building at 715 Ryan Street was purchased in December 2014 by the Lake Charles American Press, LLC, dba Shearman Real Estate. The new owner is allowing United Way to remain in their current location until the new building is complete. Durel says they expect to move into their new offices in early 2016. For more information about the “Building a United Legacy” campaign, call Denise Durel at (337) 433-1088. Mayor Randy Roach, City of Lake Charles

July 2015

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43


Home & Family

Hurricane Preparedness Checklist Residents Encouraged to Create a Plan and Emergency Kit The Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness (OHSEP) encourages residents to develop a hurricane plan and emergency disaster kit to prepare for hurricane season, which began June 1. “We need to be constantly prepared and ready for hurricanes and other disasters. We live in an area with a variety of potential hazards so we recommend getting plans in place,” said Dick Gremillion, director of OHSEP. Calcasieu Parish residents can get local Southwest Louisiana emergency alerts via phone or email through CalcaShout, www.cppj.net/calcashout. The service is free and allows residents to designate an alternate email address or phone number where an email, voice or text message can be sent during an emergency. The information is never displayed in a public directory or used for other purposes. The Governor’s Office suggests the following preparations in case you and your family needs to evacuate or shelter in place:

• A three to five day supply of water (one gallon per person per day) and food that won’t spoil • One change of clothing and footwear per person, and one blanket or sleeping bag per person

• Sanitation supplies • Special items for infant, elderly or disabled family members • An extra pair of glasses • Important family documents in a portable, waterproof container • Mess kits, paper cups, plates and plastic utensils, paper towels • Paper and pencil • Books, games, puzzles or other activities for children • Infant formula and diapers • Pet food and extra water

• A first aid kit that includes your family’s prescription medications • Emergency tools including a battery-powered radio, flashlight and plenty of extra batteries

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• An extra set of car keys and a credit card, cash or traveler’s checks

Learn more about the state’s program “Get a Game Plan” at www.getagameplan.org and more about different alert systems available in Calcasieu Parish at www.cppj.net/hurricaneseason. For more information on signing up for CalcaShout, call the Office of Emergency Preparedness at 337-721-3800.

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July 2015

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45


Style & Beauty

Style Choices That Could Be Aging You by Emily Alford

Everyone should have the right to dress him or herself in a way that feels comfortable, but sometimes, our everyday style choices age us in ways we might not notice. There’s nothing wrong with aging, and there’s nothing wrong with looking your age. However, there are a few common fashion missteps that could actually be moving the clock forward, rather than showcasing timeless style.

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July 2015


TOO MUCH BLACK

DRESSING TOO YOUNG

Black is quick fix for many fashion problems: it looks cooler and more expensive than lighter colors and it goes with everything. The problem is, as most people age, their skin gets paler. Putting black too close to the face can bring out dark under eye circles and little wrinkles in the neck and face. No need to banish black from the closet though, just remember to brighten up with lighter accessories around the face, like a bright scarf or some bold statement jewelry.

Most people like trying out new trends, and fashion is certainly not reserved for the young, but clothes designed with teenagers in mind are often not flattering on a fully-grown woman. There’s no need to resign yourself to twinsets and sensible walking shoes just because you’ve reached a certain age, but it is important to try trends in a way that’s flattering. For example, rather than reaching for that skin-tight, sequined mini-dress, try a plunging neckline with sequined accents and a longer hem. You’re not going to trick anyone into believing you’re twenty if you’re not twenty, and worse still, according to StyleCaster, “You could run the risk of looking dated or like you’re trying too hard to be young, which automatically translates to, well, not young.”

SKIPPING THE TAILOR It seems to make sense that loose clothes will hide body parts we’re not too happy with. Oddly enough, the opposite is true. Baggy tops and roomy, overlong pants can actually make you look wider and smaller, like a “little old lady,” lost in a sea of clothes. According to top fashion blog, StyleCaster, there’s, “no need to prance around in skin-tight numbers and stilettos, but a well-fitting dress with a nipped waist and a flattering hemline, a blazer that skims your body, or pair of well-fitting jeans will show your figure in a way that’s stylish without being overt.”

OVERPLUCKING EYEBROWS Don’t go haywire with the tweezers. Pencil thin brows can give the face a harsh appearance and bring out lines around the eyes. It’s best to pluck sparingly and let eyebrows keep their natural shape. So if you’ve overplucked, grow them out and fill in sparse areas with a matching pencil. You’ll be surprised at how much younger you instantly look!

Did you know that 90 PERCENT of the signs of AGING are from the damaging effects of the SUN?

RELYING ON THE SAME OLD STAPLES Basic tees and a go-to pair of jeans are a must in every woman’s wardrobe, but make sure you’re updating those pieces as you go. The sweater that was super stylish during the Clinton years might be cozy, but it’s also broadcasting the fact that you haven’t updated your wardrobe since Hilary was First Lady. Also, over time, even well-made clothes lose their shape. Things that fit perfectly five years ago might be sagging or pulling now, which ages you along with the outfit. So try these tips to keep from aging yourself, but remember, personal style and feeling confident in your clothes look great at any age!

PROTECT & REVERSE THE DAMAGE

Rejuvenating treatments and products from the Aesthetic Center can help restore and protect healthier, younger looking skin. We offer: 3Chemical Peels 3Microdermabrasion 3Cosmetic Injections 3Dermapen

3Targeted Skin Care Treatments 3PCA Home Care Products 3Jane Iredale Mineral Make-up 3Facial Cosmetic Surgery

Enjoy summer without sun damage, with help from the Aesthetic Center. Call 310-1070 for more information or to schedule your appointment. Treatments are provided under the medical direction of facial cosmetic specialist, Mark Crawford, MD.

facehealth.net • 310-1070 • 1717 Oak Park Blvd. July 2015

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Style & Beauty

Tired of the same oldponytail? Check out these casual up-dos for summer from Kacie Guilbeaux, senior stylist and network educator with Signatures Salon.

THE BRAIDED CROWN

THE HALF TOP KNOT Step 1

Step 1 Begin by sectioning your hair in half. Start braiding one side of your hair into a ponytail. Then secure that end with a tie.

With day two curly hair, being by sprinkling Bumble and Bumble Prêt-à-powder to bring your roots back to life.

Step 2 Start your second braid on the other side and secure the end with a tie.

Step 2 Starting right above your ears, section out half of your hair to pull up using your fingers instead of a comb. This is so the lines separating the sections are a little unfinished and natural.

Step 3

Step 3 Pull one braid over to the other and secure to your head with a bobby pin.

Now, while holding the section of hair on top of your head, twist it around to great a messy top knot and either secure with a couple of bobby pins or an elastic, depending on the thickness of your hair.

Step 4 Grab and pin the other braid just like the last.

Step 5

Tuck the ends of the ponytails behind the braids and secure with a bobby pin then gently loosen the braid to give more of a messy look. 48 www.thriveswla.com

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Step 4 Spritz remaining hair using Bumble and Bumble Surf Spray or Bumble and Bumble Surf Infusion then twist and “scrunch” into place.

July 2015


THE DOUBLE BUNS

Step 1

Step 2

Step 3

Use your fingers to section out the top part of your hair for the first bun.

Twist the top section around into a bun and secure using a couple of bobby pins.

Loosely gather the remaining hair and twist into a bun. Place it right below the previous and secure with a couple of pins.

Step 4 Secure the two buns together by loosening slightly and pulling together using a pin. Loosen hair around your face for more of a messy soft touch.

July 2015

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49


Style & Beauty

A Guy’s Guide

to Socks

by Emily Alford

Hey guys, how often do you think about your socks? If the answer is “never” then you could be unintentionally committing some major sock faux pas. Maybe your’re wondering why anyone would care what you’re wearing on your feet; after all, the most folks normally see of your socks is about two inches between your pant cuff and the tip of your Well, turns out that two inches is more noticeable than you think if you’re wearing the wrong socks. Don’t believe us? Then try wearing white athletic socks with a tux the next time you’re invited to a wedding. Trust us, people will stare. Like it or not, socks are a little piece of an outfit that can mean the difference between looking completely pulled together or pretty hopeless. Luckily, sock rules are easy to master. Here are some guidelines:

Wear Appropriate Socks for the Occasion According to men’s lifestyle guide The Art of Manliness, black tie events call for a dark, thin, knee-high sock with “a sheen appearance.” You can probably pick them up the same place you get your suit or tux. With a blazer and slacks, “heavy wool argyle socks work perfectly.” And if you’re just in jeans and loafers, dark cotton socks should be just fine. The only time you should be busting out those white tube socks is at the gym. 50 www.thriveswla.com

Match Socks to Pants It seems intuitive that socks would match shoes; they’re a set, right? Not so, says The Art of Manliness. It’s better to match socks to pants, for example, brown socks with khaki pants, because “it serves to create a streamlined look with no unnecessary color contrast until the eyes meet the shoes.”

Pay Attention to Length No one wants a flash of bare, hairy calf when you sit down. It’s best to keep those gams covered until you break out the shorts, says personalized shopping site Black Lapel. That gives you two choices: over-the-calf, which means you’ll never be seen stooping to adjust your socks again, or mid-calf, which Black Lapel describes as “a great choice for men who want to rock wool socks year round because they keep you cooler than their over the calf brethren.” When should you be wearing ankle socks? Only with shorts. Thrive Magazine for Better Living

Don’t Wear Socks When They’re Not Necessary Wearing sandals is a personal choice that every man must make for himself, but should you buy that pair of Tevas, you have to commit. That means showing foot and leg. No socks! And if you’re wearing shorts, keep it bare clean down to the ankle. That four inches of sock sticking out of a shoe actually breaks up the visual line of the leg and makes you look shorter. Following a few simple rules can make socks a no brainer. Investing in about ten pairs of well-made cotton and wool socks for various occasions will ensure that you never find yourself in the awkward position of only looking snazzy from the ankle up.

July 2015


Four Tips 4 Summer Moisturizing The weather changes with the season, and so should your moisturizer. Just as the texture of your skin dries with the cold or sweats with the sun, your moisturizer should adjust accordingly. Here are a few tips on how to pick the best skin care regimen during the brutal Louisiana summer months:

Choose oil-free products. You probably feel a light sheen on your face during the summer, thanks to the hot weather. No need to add to that oily sensation. You might need oil when it’s dry, but if not, go for something without it.

Consider the SPF. In addition to keeping your face moisturized, you want to keep it protected from UV rays. Select a product with built-in SPF protect.

Don’t skimp. You might think you don’t need to continue moisturizing in the summer, but you’d be wrong. Your skin needs to stay on a consistent routine to avoid break-outs, blemishes, and other nuisances. Now might be the time to pick the best seasonal product, but it’s not the time to abandon skin care completely.

Look at the ingredients and consider lactic or glycolic, which can be too harsh for winter, but just right for summer. These ingredients are known for being great hydrators and exfoliators.

July 2015

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Mind & Body

Battling

BOOMERITIS by Erin Kelly

BY 2030, AN ESTIMATED 25 MILLION ADULTS WILL BE LIMITED BY SOME FORM OF ARTHRITIS, ACCORDING TO THE CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION. AND THIS NUMBER, WHICH ACCOUNTS FOR MORE THAN 9 PERCENT OF ALL U.S. ADULTS, IS CONSIDERED CONSERVATIVE. The prevalence of doctor-diagnosed arthritis is expected to increase in the coming decades, for several reasons. The sheer size of the Baby Boomer population has already played a role in burgeoning arthritis cases. But it’s not just the number of Baby Boomers that’s affected the numbers; it’s also the characteristics of the generation itself. Researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, an affiliate of Harvard Medical School, found that Baby Boomers have substantially higher rates of arthritis than their parents. “There have been several studies on this, and there are various theories,” says orthopaedic specialist George Trappey IV, MD, with Center for Orthopaedics. “It’s believed that one primary reason for increased rates is the higher rate of obesity among Baby Boomers. This is true for the population in general, and Baby Boomers are no exception.” Studies show that Baby Boomers—those born between 1946 and 1965—will spend more of their adult life obese than their parents’ generation. “There are many underlying causes and irritants

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for arthritis, and obesity is certainly one of them. The more we stress our joints, the more that joint can become damaged or compromised. And one way to place stress on a joint is to put a lot of weight on it for a long period of time,” says Dr. Trappey. “What’s interesting is that Baby Boomers are generally better educated about nutrition and the negative effects of obesity than their parents, simply because there’s more research, information and access than in years past. Yet they experience higher rates, for longer periods of time.” According to the BIDMC study, obesity-related arthritis cases rose from 3 percent to 18 percent from 1971 to 2002. Researchers noted that there could be several reasons for the hike that aren’t necessarily related directly to increased rates of obesity—better tools for diagnosing arthritis, for example. It’s also possible that Baby Boomers’ lifestyles— outside of nutrition and obesity—can be linked to increased arthritis risk, explains Dr. Trappey. Baby Boomers are more likely to have played competitive sports, for example.

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“More and more Baby Boomers are reaching the age when arthritis becomes a real problem and there’s an increase in diagnosis,” Dr. Trappey says. According to Dr. Trappey, it’s critical to take steps to prevent the onset or progression of arthritis, because it can be “a debilitating condition that impacts a person’s quality of life.” The CDC notes that functional limitations in activities of daily living are common among adults with arthritis. Forty percent report that it is “very difficult” or impossible to complete at least one of nine important daily functions, such as the ability to stoop, bend or kneel. Six million suffers cannot walk even onefourth of a mile, according to the CDC. At times, the lack of ability to move freely further contributes to obesity, which only worsens the problem, Dr. Trappey says. He offers these suggestions for Baby Boomers that may help prevent the development or progression of an arthritis condition:

Maintain a healthy weight. This is a critical component to healthy living for a number of

July 2015


conditions, including arthritis. Being overweight stresses and strains the joints, which further compounds the everyday wear-and-tear that most people experience as they age.

Eat arthritis-fighting foods. Certain foods fight inflammation and strengthen bones. Try to add them to your diet. These include fish; low-fat dairy products, like milk, yogurt and cheese; grains; beans; and nuts. Also, don’t forget your leafy greens. Exercise. Keep your bones and joints healthy and moving. Find out which exercise works best for you. It doesn’t have to be an hour of high-energy movement, like aerobics or cycling. It can be lowkey, or you can build to a more active routine. If you have aches and pains, consider water exercises, which are effective yet forgiving on joints. See your doctor for regular check-ups. Don’t wait until something’s wrong to see your primary care physician. Follow-through with all your annual checkups—go twice a year if needed—and have all the necessary screenings and blood tests based on your doctor’s recommendations.

See your doctor when something’s wrong. Have you been having regular aches and pains? Call your doctor. Don’t swallow aspirin every day and wait for it to pass. If the pain has lingered for too long, worsened, or affected your ability to perform common tasks—like tie your shoes or brush your teeth—you need to see your doctor. Arthritis is a progressive condition and requires intervention to delay or halt its progress. For more information on the non-surgical and surgical treatment options for arthritis, call the Center for Orthopaedics, an affiliate of Imperial Health, at (337) 721-7236 or visit www.centerforortho.com.

July 2015

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Mind & Body

Realizing Your Smile’s Potential Smiling is a deeply human method of communication that comes as easy as breathing and is often taken for granted, but a simple grin can be uncomfortable or embarrassing for those with damaged or missing teeth. The dentists at Robinson Dental Group Family Dentistry believe that a wide smile in a family portrait or an infectious laugh should never be luxuries that are just out of reach. With the help of medical advances, dental implants can be incredibly effective at reviving the confidence lost from injury or disease. With dental implants, you can regain a stronger, healthier bite without the need for dentures or a bridge, and the procedure can be completed from start to finish in a minimal number of visits, which helps to eliminate the inefficiencies of having to go to other doctor offices to do just a part of the procedure. “Dental implants can be a comfortable and stable option for tooth replacement,” said Dr. Steven Park, a dentist at Robinson Dental Group. “Additionally, implants are self-supporting and 54 www.thriveswla.com

typically do not put stress on surrounding teeth.” A dental implant is composed of three parts— an anchoring root, an abutment and a crown. During the procedure, an anchoring root is secured directly to the jawbone to serve as a solid base for the final crown, and the anchor is given time to fuse naturally with the bone. After an abutment is placed into the anchor, impressions of the bite are made so that a crown can be custom fabricated. Finally, the crown is fitted as the new tooth. The process of creating a dental implant is a medical marvel in itself, but the procedure is propelled even further with the advancement of 3-D dental imaging technology. Robinson Dental Group uses a digital CT scanner to produce highresolution and real-time scans of bone, teeth, tooth orientation, tooth and nerve relation, airways and sinuses, which make the dental implant procedure a highly-individualized experience. “If you are in good health, have healthy gums and adequate bone to support the implant, you are probably a good candidate for a dental implant,” said Dr. Park. “Your dentist will conduct a thorough Thrive Magazine for Better Living

dental examination to determine if you are a good candidate.” Being a good candidate is a two-way street— with dental implants, you must be committed to practicing strong oral hygiene to keep your mouth healthy and schedule regular dental appointments. For more information on dental implants, call Robinson Dental Group Family Dentistry at 337-4743636 in Lake Charles or 337-429-5057 in Moss Bluff or visit www.robinsondentalgroup.com.

July 2015


July 2015

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Mind & Body

Beat Bedtime

Procrastination

by Katie Harrington

After staying up way too late streaming just one more episode of your favorite television series or reading just one more chapter in the latest best-selling novel, you swore you’d go to bed on time tonight. It’s easy to think that procrastination applies only to work and academics, but researchers are now studying a new kind of procrastination, one that takes place in the bedroom. Researchers from Utrecht University in the Netherlands published a study in the journal Frontiers in Psychology that defined the idea of bedtime procrastination, something that may be keeping many of us from getting sufficient sleep. “This group of scientists defined bedtime procrastination as failing to go to bed at the intended time, while no external circumstances prevent a person from doing so,” says Michelle Zimmerman, nurse practitioner with the Sleep Disorder Center of Louisiana. “The flu or loud music from an upstairs neighbor count as external

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circumstances, but little chores that don’t need to be addressed before turning in for the night don’t count.” Unlike other forms of procrastination which may have academic or career consequences, bedtime procrastination can lead to fatigue during the day and can even affect your overall health. “When it comes to your overall health picture, sleep deprivation leads to more than just bags under your eyes,” Zimmerman says. “It can contribute to conditions like diabetes, cardiovascular disease, obesity and depression. People who sleep for less than six hours a night are also more likely to have a higher body mass index.” In addition to the conditions listed above,

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Zimmerman says sleep deprivation can also lead to hypertension, poor mood and poor immune function. “It can also lower your life expectancy. A Harvard study revealed that sleeping five hours or less per night increased mortality risk from all causes by about 15 percent.” The answer to why people procrastinate on going to bed is still being studied, but the Dutch scientists did offer up a couple of theories. While some may view it as a lack of self-control, these scientists say it’s more about an inability to effectively regulate negative moods. “If you’re having a bad day, putting off sleep can be a way of avoiding have to lie there with negative thoughts running through your head over and over,” Zimmerman explains. “If you’re

July 2015


mentally fatigued, around the time you should be going to sleep, you’re likely to be tired and have little mental energy, diminishing your capacity for self-regulation.” Basically, one more episode of “Game of Thrones” doesn’t seem like such a bad idea after all. One way to combat bedtime procrastination involves a little visualization, according to Zimmerman. “Just picture yourself in a tired, cranky state in the morning when the alarm goes off. It’s easier to beat bedtime procrastination if you have established heathy sleep hygiene practices and have a solid bedtime routine in place.” Zimmerman suggests doing vigorous exercises in the morning or afternoon and relaxing exercises like yoga before bed. “It’s also important to make sure your bed is comfortable and that your bedroom is not too hot, cold or bright. Create an environment built for sleep.” For more information, call the Sleep Disorder Center of Louisiana at (337) 310-REST or visit www.sleepdisordercenterofla.com.

July 2015

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Mind & Body

Understanding Asthma:

It’s Complicated by Erin Kelly

Rates steadily increasing. Now affects more than 25 million people. For millions of Americans, breathing doesn’t always come easy. Asthma rates have increased by as much as 12 percent in recent years, affecting more than 25 million people in the US, including 7 million children, according to the National Heart, Blood and Lung Institute (NHLBI). Despite its prevalence, asthma remains a largely mysterious condition that can be difficult to unravel. “One of the things that makes asthma so interesting and complicated is its relationship between a person’s physiology, their genetic background, the environment in which they live, and the state of the environment in general,” says Dr. Luke Williams, pulmonologist with Imperial Health. “When clinicians study asthma, they have to consider not just the individual with the condition, but their history of hygiene, industrialization, and lifestyle choices—not to mention the challenges of delivering appropriate dosages of medication directly into the lungs.” According to the NHBLI, asthma is a chronic lung disease that inflames and narrows the airways. This chronic condition causes recurring periods of wheezing, chest tightness, shortness of breath and coughing. It’s typical for asthma to worsen at night or in the early morning. Asthma can be hereditary, but studies have shown that there are several other mitigating factors that can contribute to its development. According to research published in Biologics, there is an “expanding list of environmental factors thought to be involved in the development of asthma,” primarily inhaled airborne particles, which trigger a cascade of events leading to inflammation of the lungs. The types of airborne particles in the air have changed in the years since the Industrial Revolution and now include an increased number of pollutants. According to the National Resources Defense Council, studies have shown that air pollution from cars, factories and power plants is a major cause of 58 www.thriveswla.com

asthma attacks. But increased air pollution and decreased air quality aren’t the only factors that may contribute to rising asthma diagnoses. The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology cites the “hygiene hypothesis” as a leading theory. “This theory basically says that because of increased sanitation— specifically in American culture—children are no longer exposed to germs that would have set off their immune systems in the past. This makes it difficult for the body to distinguish between germs that help us and those that harm us,” Dr. Williams said. “Asthma and allergy-related symptoms are triggered when the body wrongly identifies a safe irritant as harmful. When the body believes its immune system is in danger, it immediately takes preventive steps. That manifests through the symptoms.” According to the Academy, research has shown that people living on farms develop fewer allergic diseases; the belief is that farm animals increase exposure to germs and germ components, and when this exposure happens early and often, the body is better equipped to identify them properly. “There is also a belief that poor diet and nutrition has increasingly contributed to higher asthma rates,” says Dr. Williams. “There is a correlation between being overweight and suffering from asthma, and obesity rates have risen by dramatic measure in the past few decades.” Other theories: Increased use of antibiotics and decreased time outdoors. Some studies illustrate a parallel between the rise in antibiotic use and the rise in allergy and asthma rates. Some experts also suspect vitamin D deficiency caused by less time outside. Research released by the American Thoracic Society found that vitamin D deficiency has been shown to alter lung structure and function. The current generation spends more time indoors than previous generations, which limits exposure to sunlight—and,

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July 2015


consequently, vitamin D. “There’s robust research underway to understand the complex dynamics of asthma and allergies and treatments that can be developed to manage them,” says Dr. Williams. Because there is no known cure and the causes of asthma are varied, it’s difficult to provide a checklist for prevention; however, there are steps people can take to reduce their progression risk, Dr. Williams says. Here are a few: Reduce exposure to allergens. Keep your environment clean. Get rid of dust mites. Wipe down surfaces regularly. Don’t keep animals in the house. Protect sleeping surfaces with allergen-impermeable covers.

Don’t smoke and limit exposure to secondhand smoke. “Cigarette smoke isn’t good for anyone, but it’s truly harmful and dangerous for people with asthma,” Dr. Williams says. “Tobacco smoke causes the lungs to produce more mucus than normal. Considering this is already a problem for people with asthma, the result can be dangerous. Smoke also damages finite structures in the airways that are responsible for reducing exposure to dust and mucus. Everyone needs these structures. Especially people who have asthma and need all the protection they can get.”

See your doctor and schedule all the appropriate tests or screenings. Asthma can be treated with medication. Make sure you have the medication you need and keep them filled regularly so they’re available in an emergency. For more information about asthma, prevention and treatment options, call (337) 312-8328 to make an appointment with Dr. Williams.

July 2015

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Mind & Body

Feeling

Fatigued? by Christine Fisher

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July 2015


Mid-afternoon slump. Lack of energy. That blah feeling. It has many symptoms but overall tiredness affects all areas of life. Performance at work can suffer, home life is strained, and learning something new can feel nearly impossible. “This goes beyond the normal ebb and flow of a person’s day,” explained Maureen Lannan, MD, family medicine physician with The Cypress Clinic and medical staff member of West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital. “We all have days when we’re more tired than others, but when it becomes a chronic problem or begins to affect our quality of life over a period of time, that’s when it’s time to take a closer look.” Lack of sleep is the obvious culprit. Obtaining six to eight hours of continuous sleep each night is ideal. Keeping the lights low, avoiding caffeine, keeping the bedroom cool and turning off the television before bedtime are techniques to promote good sleep. But, there are other fatigue-inducing culprits that aren’t as obvious: THYROID TROUBLES. The tiny thyroid at the front of the throat is a powerful gland that, in part, helps regulate energy. “If the thyroid isn’t functioning properly, it can cause you to feel fatigued,” said Dr. Lannan. Women are more likely than men to have thyroid problems. Other symptoms of a possible thyroid disorder include unexpected weight gain or weight loss, menstrual irregularity, and cold intolerance. “An out-of-balance thyroid can cause the body to become imbalanced and it can affect one’s energy level,” Dr. Lannan said. EXTRA SLEEP ON WEEKENDS. Dr. Lannan says that you don’t have to rise with the chickens on the weekend, but sleeping until noon will affect your body’s natural rhythm, causing you to feel more fatigued later in the day. Late risers on Saturday and Sunday report feeling more fatigued on Monday morning than those who get up at a reasonable hour on the weekends. Aim to get about the same number of hours of sleep every night, whether it’s a weekday or the weekend.

CLUTTER. Too many things piled in a workspace can sap energy. Imagine a clean desk with only the essentials: phone, computer and keyboard, notebook and pen and perhaps a file or two. Now consider a typical workspace. Chances are, papers are haphazardly stacked, and there are piles of receipts, brochures, charts, and countless other things. They’re all competing for attention in the subconscious mind. While a sparse work area might not be practical, Dr. Lannan says the brain works best when

July 2015

things are grouped together; such as, tools in one area, papers in another. In short, chaos tends to cause fatigue, orderliness promotes a sense of relaxation.

DEHYDRATION. Even mild dehydration can make you feel mentally sluggish. “Lack of fluids can cause a drop in energy,” said Dr. Lannan. “If you’re thirsty, you’re already dehydrated. Keep a bottle of water nearby and drink often throughout the day.” ELECTRONIC OVERLOAD. If reading before bedtime helps with relaxation, choose an old fashioned book instead of an e-reader. Studies show the blue shortwavelength light emitted from e-readers tends to suppress melatonin, the natural sleep hormone. Even smartphone use has been shown to have this same affect. IRON DEFICIENCY. Low iron levels can cause fatigue. “In this case, the body isn’t producing enough hemoglobin in red blood cells, which is responsible for carrying oxygen to working muscles and organs,” said Dr. Lannan. Check with a healthcare provider for a simple blood test to determine iron levels. If it shows a deficiency, he or she will likely recommend iron-rich foods, such as lean red meats, poultry, seafood, leafy greens and beans. Addressing these not-so-obvious sleep-stealers can help in the quest for a good night’s sleep.

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Mind & Body

Tighten and Brighten

Without The Knife! by Katie Harrington

Perform a web-search on skin tightening and chances are you will be bombarded with information ranging from topical miracle creams to surgical facelifts; and everything in between. With the many choices available, a good place to begin is with an appointment to see an experienced, board certified skin expert. “Skin Tightening: Ulthera® is a non-surgical option that stands above the rest when it comes to tightening the skin on the face, neck and décolleté,” says Dr. Christopher Hubbell, a board certified dermatologist and medical director/ founder of a Jeuné Advanced Medical Spa. “It is the only non-surgical treatment that delivers ultra-sound energy, safely into the deep layers of the skin to firm, tighten and lift loose or sagging skin. Ulthera® is unique because it ‘banks’

You r

S m i l e i s O u r S p e c ia

lty

Summer is the perfect time to begin orthodontic treatment, and we offer a variety of advanced techniques that create great smiles. At Crawford, we accept most insurance and flexible benefit plans, and offer affordable, convenient payment options to fit any budget. We’ll give you - and your kids something to smile about.

(337) 478-7590 | 701 West College Street, Lake Charles www.drcrawfordorthodontics.com Call Crawford Orthodontics today to schedule a free consultation. 62 www.thriveswla.com

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July 2015


your collagen by jumpstarting a repair process. It relies on the body’s own regenerative process to create new collagen resulting in an actual lift of skin over a short time.” There is much talk about rebuilding collagen to improve our appearance, but why is this important? “Collagen is the protein latticework that provides structure to the skin and to the deep supportive connective tissue below the skin,” explains Dr. Hubbell. “As we age, the collagen in our body becomes prone to the effects of gravity and weakens causing fine lines and wrinkles on the top layers of the skin; and sagging in the deeper layers.” Because Ulthera® delivers the right amount of energy at the right level, it stimulates the body’s healing and restorative properties with results typically seen after three months. It continues this collagen-building process with further improvements appearing up to six months following a procedure. “Uthera® allows us to target specific treatment areas and is safe for most skin types,” Dr. Hubbell adds. “There’s no downtime and treatment results are long lasting. Typically patients only need one treatment and it can be performed at any time during the year.” Skin brightening involves combining therapies that address the surface level of the skin with skin tightening and will provide the “one-two punch” needed for overall rejuvenation. “Photorejuvenation is one of the most effective treatments to address imperfections such as: uneven pigmentation, poor skin texture, sun damage, redness, broken capillaries, enlarged pores and fine lines,” Dr. Hubbell says. “This treatment delivers

light based therapies to the surface level of the skin with little to no downtime. Although a series of three treatments is generally recommended for most individuals with overt sun damage, personalized modifications are always made based on your skin’s unique qualities.” Dr. Hubbell adds that in aesthetic medicine, combination technologies, along with physician grade skin care products to maintain results, typically yield the best and most natural outcomes. “Creating a customized treatment plan that is tailored to your specific needs requires experience and in-depth knowledge of the skin and facial anatomy and of the many tools available for treatment. An experienced, board certified and aesthetically active skin care expert is my recommendation for the greatest safety, the most advanced non-surgical techniques and the best results” For more information, call aJeuné Advanced Medical Spa at (337) 989-7272 or visit online at www.skinexpert.com.

Meet the Newest Specialist on our Medical Staff,

Juan C. Teran, MD, MS, FACP, FACG Gastroenterologist

Board certified gastroenterologist Dr. Juan C. Teran has joined the Imperial Health physician team. He has 20 years of experience in his field, including positions as staff gastroenterologist at Verde Valley Medical Center in Arizona, Medical College of Virginia and the Cleveland Clinic Florida. Dr. Teran earned his medical degree from the Universidad Anahuac and Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico. He completed an internal medicine residency, a gastroenterology fellowship, and earned a Master’s of Science in nutrition at MetroHealth Medical Center, which is affiliated with Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio. In addition, Dr. Teran completed a fellowship in hepatology at Cleveland Clinic Foundation. Dr. Teran is certified by the American Board of Gastroenterology and the American Board of Nutrition. He is a Fellow of the American College of Physicians and a Fellow of the American College of Gastroenterology. For more information or to schedule an appointment with Dr. Teran, call (337) 312-8462.

www.imperialhealth.com

501 Dr. Michael DeBakey Dr. • 1st Floor | Lake Charles July 2015

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McNeese Student Wins College Division of SEED Business Pitch Contest Lance Sefcik, a management major from Georgetown, Texas, at McNeese State University, has won the college division of the 3rd annual SEED Center Business Pitch Competition at McNeese. As the college division winner, Sefcik was awarded $2,500 in start-up money from the Angels of SWLA. He also has the option of six months free rent and office space at the SEED Center and access to resources to help his business grow and succeed. Other McNeese finalists in the college division included: Jesse Morton, Houston, Texas; Hunter Romero, Lafayette; and Anna Salvador, Clear Lake, Texas.

tumbling and modeling. The camp will also include daily crafts and games for campers. For more information, call (337) 480-4234.

McNeese Program Ranked in Top 10 McNeese State University’s graduate training program in Applied Behavior Analysis has been ranked nationally in the top 10 ABA programs on research productivity and the professors who work in those academic programs. The ABA program is offered as a concentration through McNeese’s Master of Arts in Psychology degree program. For more information about the ABA program at McNeese, visit http://www.mcneese.edu/psychology/ applied_behavior_analysis.

McNeese Receives Donations from Alumni Association The McNeese State University Alumni Association has donated $80,000 to establish the McNeese Alumni Association Scholarship #8 and the McNeese Alumni Association Athletic Scholarship #3 through the McNeese Foundation.

McNeese Offers Summer Engineering Academy

From left, back row, Lance Sefcik, Dr. Jeffery Stevens, assistant professor of management, Hunter Romero, Dr. Mitchell Adrian, professor of management, and Jesse Morton, and front row, Anna Salvador.

Revised Kicker Kutie Dance Camp The annual Kicker Kutie Summer Dance Camp will be held from 9am-4pm on July 20-24 at McNeese State University by the Cowgirl Kickers Dance Team. This summer camp is open for students entering grades K-6 and offers instruction in dance, cheer,

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A summer engineering academy for students entering grades 9-12 will be offered July 1331 by the McNeese State University College of Engineering. The two-week summer program offers a broad exposure of engineering disciplines to high school students interested in pursuing science and engineering careers. Cost is $1,550 per student and includes on-campus housing, meals, transportation and lab supplies. For more information, call (337) 475-5875.

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L TO R: Mike Wittler, past alumni association president, McNeese President Dr. Philip C. Williams and Stephanie Clark, McNeese assistant director for alumni affairs.

July 2015


THE CITY OF LAKE CHARLES WATER DIVISION P.O. Box 1727, Lake Charles, LA 70602 | 337-491-1307 • June 2015

ANNUAL DRINKING WATER QUALITY REPORT e are pleased to present to you the Annual Water Quality W Report for the reporting/monitoring period from January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2014. This report is designed to inform

• Inorganic Contaminants - such as salts and metals, which can Our water system is required to test a minimum of 80 bacteriological be naturally-occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff, samples per month in accordance with the Total Coliform Rule. industrial, or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas Coliforms are bacteria that are naturally present in the environment production, mining, or farming. and are used as an indicator that other, potentially harmful, bacteria • Pesticides and Herbicides – may come from a variety of sources may be present. During the monitoring period covered by this such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses. report, we had no noted violations of drinking water regulations. • Organic Chemical Contaminants – Including synthetic In addition, the State of Louisiana also performs routine chemical and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of analysis for regulated contaminants. Chemical sampling for industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come regulated contaminants may not be required on an annual basis. from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems. The results furnished for testing are from the most recent sampling • Radioactive Contaminants – can be naturally-occurring or be of our source water performed in Jan/Feb of 2013. the result of oil and gas production and mining activities. Certain minerals are radioactive and may emit forms of radiation In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the EPA prescribes known as photons and beta radiation. Some people who drink regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water water containing beta particle and photon radioactivity in excess provided by public water systems. Food and Drug Administration of the MCL over many years may have an increased risk of getting regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water, which cancer. must provide the same protection for public health. Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking PROTECT OUR RESOURCES, USE WATER WISELY !!! water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons SOURCE WATER ASSESSMENT such as persons with cancer undergoing A Source Water Assessment was chemotherapy, persons who have performed on our water supply in April undergone organ transplants, people GOT A QUESTION? 2003. The program emphasizes pollution with HIV / AIDS or other immune system NEED SOME ANSWERS prevention to ensure safe drinking water, disorders, some elderly and infants can be The numbers below are provided if you have focusing on the protection of the water particularly at risk from infections. These sources. Personnel with the State of questions or problems with your water service. people should seek advice about drinking Louisiana performed this assessment. water from their health care providers. The source water assessment consists of Billing/New Service 491-1307 EPA / CDC guidelines on appropriate three steps: 1) Delineation or outline of means to lessen the risk of infection by Meter Problems 491-1522 the source water protection areas – in our Cryptosporidium and other microbial Main Breaks 491-1487 case a one mile radius around each well contaminants are available from the Safe Rusty Water/Odor 491-1554 field; 2) Inventory of significant potential Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791). sources of contamination within these Distribution Department 491-1494 areas; and 3) Analysis of the system’s If present, elevated levels of lead can Production/Plant Info 491-1479 susceptibility to contamination from the cause serious health problems, especially 24 Hour Number 491-1483 potential sources identified. This plan is for pregnant women and young children. For Plant Tours 491-1487 now available in our office. According to Lead in drinking water is primarily from the Source Water Assessment Plan, our materials and components associated water system had a susceptibility rating with service lines and home plumbing. of ‘MEDIUM”. If you would like to review the plan, please feel free The City Water Division seeks to provide high quality drinking to contact our office. Information can be obtained by contacting water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing Russell Buckels, Water Division Superintendent at 491-1479. components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals - Office of Public you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your Health, routinely monitors for constituents in your drinking water. tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or Results of sampling by the State and contracted laboratories are cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your drinking water, shown in the tables below. Drinking water, including bottled water, information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps to may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline some contaminants. The presence of these contaminants does not or at http://www.epa.gov.safewater/lead. necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk.

you about the quality of your water and the services we deliver to you every day. Our constant goal is to provide you with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your drinking water and its’ compliance with government standards. In this report you will find information such as the quality of the local drinking water; likely sources of drinking water contamination; and information about your local services. We want to thank all of our customers for their patience during the chlorine burnout we performed in the Spring of 2014. The citywide initiative and flushing was performed in order to improve long term overall water quality. You can learn more about the Water Division and its’ facilities and services by visiting the City web site at www. cityoflakecharles.com. Under the Public Works department listing, click on the water tab. If you have any questions about this report, or simply want to learn more about your drinking water, please contact Russell Buckels at 337-491-1479. *All information in this report has been collected and reported to you in accordance with water quality standards established by the USEPA. We are pleased to report our drinking water meets all Federal and State regulatory requirements. CITY OF LAKE CHARLES WATER SOURCES The City of Lake Charles obtains water from wells that are drilled in the 500-foot and 700-foot sands of the Chicot Aquifer. Groundwater or well water is found in saturated zones beneath the land’s surface. It fills the pores and fractures in underground material such as sand, gravel, or other rock. If the water can be removed from this material in useful amounts, these areas are called aquifers. At the present time the City of Lake Charles has 17 wells that provide a clean, sufficient water supply for all of our customers. HEALTH INFORMATION The sources of drinking water (both tap and bottled) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals, and in some cases radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity. Contaminants that may be present in untreated source water include: • Microbial Contaminants - such as viruses and bacteria, may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife.

TEST RESULTS In the tables below are shown results of sampling on our source and treated water. The last chemical sampling of our source water was performed in Jan/Feb of 2013. This sampling was performed by a private laboratory certified by the State of Louisiana. Chemical sampling may not be required on an annual basis, therefore, information provided refers back to the most recent chemical sampling results. You will note that all of these contaminants were not detected or were well below the MCL. Terms and abbreviations you might not be familiar with are furnished with the following definitions: Not-Detected (ND) - laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present. Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) - The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL’s are set at very stringent levels. Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG) - The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLG’s allow for a margin of safety Action Level - The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow. Treatment Technique (TT) - A treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water. (ppm) = parts per million (ppb) = parts per billion (ppt) or (nanograms/l) = parts per trillion (ppq) or (picograms/l) =parts per quadrillion Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – measure of radioactivity in water In the table below, we have shown the deficiencies that were identified during our latest survey done by the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals. These are deficiencies we are currently working to resolve. Below, are listed the regulated contaminants that were detected during sampling. While these DATE IDENTIFIED 05/29/2014 05/29/2014

FACILITY Distribution Well M2 (V)

CATEGORY CODE

ACTIVITY NAME

DUE DATE

LEAD AND COPPER

COMMENTS

CC17

GWR-App Corrective 07/01/2015 Action Plan (Fed)

LAC 51:XII.344 - LSPC Protection of Wtr Sply Containment Practices

SO18

GWR-App Corrective 03/31/2015 Action Plan (Fed)

SRC WL – LAC 51:XII.327.A.12 GW Well Vent Construction

COLLECTION DATE

HIGHEST VALUE

RANGE

UNIT

Di(2-ethylhexyl) Phthalate

4/30/2012

1.71

0.47-1.71

ppb

6

0

Discharge from rubber and chemical factories

Fluoride

12/14/2012

0.2

0.1-0.2

ppm

4

4

Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth. Discharge form fertilizer and aluminum factories

REGULATED CONTAMINANT

contaminants were detected you will note that all were BELOW their maximum contaminant level. All samples except for Lead and Copper, were collected at the raw water source and represent water before any treatment, blending or distribution. As such, the consumer tap levels could be less.

MCL MCLG

TYPICAL SOURCE

DATE

90TH PERCENTILE

RANGE

UNIT

MCL

MCLG

TYPICAL SOURCE

Copper, Free

2011-2013

0.2

0.1-0.3

ppm

1.3

0

Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives

Lead

2011-2013

2

1-7

ppb

15

0

Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits

DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS

SAMPLE POINT

PERIOD

RANGE

UNIT

MCL

MCLG

Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5)

209 Helen Street

2014

12

1.1-8.1

ppb

60

0

By-product of drinking water disinfection

Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5)

2437 Ory Road

2014

8

0-21.4

ppb

60

0

By-product of drinking water disinfection

Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5)

4260 Indigo Pl.

2014

3

0-6.1

ppb

60

0

By-product of drinking water disinfection

Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5)

4908 Desoto St.

2014

5

1.3-10.7

ppb

60

0

By-product of drinking water disinfection

TTHM

209 Helen Street

2014

9

2.4-17.9

ppb

80

0

By-product of drinking water disinfection

TTHM

2437 Ory Road

2014

30

5.3-52.4

ppb

80

0

By-product of drinking water disinfection

TTHM

4260 Indigo Pl.

2014

13

5.1-22.5

ppb

80

0

By-product of drinking water disinfection

TTHM

4908 Desoto St.

2014

23

15.8-30.8 ppb

80

0

By-product of drinking water disinfection

HIGHEST LRAA

TYPICAL SOURCE

THE FOLLOWING CONTAMINANTS WERE SAMPLED FOR, AND WERE NOT DETECTED IN OUR WELLS OR FINISHED WATER Arsenic Barium Beryllium Cyanide Cadmium Chromium Mercury Nitrate Nitrite Selenium Thallium 2,4,-D 2,4,5, -TP (Silvex)

July 2015

10 ppb 2 ppm 4 ppb 200 ppb 5 ppb 100 2 ppb 10 ppm 1 ppm 50 ppb 2 ppb 70 ppb 50 ppb

ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND

Alachlor Atrazine Benzo (a) pyrene PAHs Carbofuran Chlordane Dalapon Di(2-ethylhexyl)adipate Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate 1,2-Dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP) Dinoseb Diquat Dioxin [2,3,7,8-TCDD] Endothall

2 ppb ppb 200nanograms 40 ppb 2 ppb 200 ppb 400 ppb 6 ppb 200 nanograms 7 ppb 20 ppb 30 picograms 100 ppb

ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND

Endrin Epichlorohydrin Ethylene dibromide EDB Glyphosphate Heptachlor Heptachlor epoxide Hexachloro-cyclopentadiene Lindane Hexachlorabenzene Methoxychlor Oxamyl [Vydate] PCB’s Pentachlorophenol

2 ppb ---50 nanograms 700 ppb 400 nanograms 200 nanograms 50 ppb 200 nanograms 1 ppb 40 ppb 200 ppb 500 nanograms 1 ppb

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND

Picloram Simazine Toxaphene Benzene Carbon tetrachloride Chlorobenzene o-Dichlorobenzene p-Dichlorobenzene 1,2, - Dichloroethane 1,1 – Dichloroethylene cis -1,2-Dichloroethylene trans – 1,2-Dichloroethylene Dichloromethane

500ppb 4 ppb 3 ppb 5 ppb 5 ppb 100 ppb 600 ppb 75 ppb 5 ppb 7 ppb 70 ppb 100 ppb 5 ppb

ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND

1,2-Dichloropropane 5 ppb Ethylbenzene 700 ppb Styrene 100 ppb Tetrachloroethylene 5 ppb 1,2,4 – Trichlorobenzene 70 ppb 1,1,1 – Trichloroethane 200 ppb 1,1,2 – Trichloroethane 5 ppb Trichloroethylene 5 ppb Toluene 1 ppm Vinyl Chloride 2 ppb Xylenes 10 ppm

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ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND

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!

Solutions for Life

from Solutions Counseling & EAP by Keri Forbess-McCorquodale, MS, LPC, LMFT, CEAP

Getting Ready for the Future I’ve got that itch again. The itch to organize. I have friends who are moving to new homes, and I feel the urge to ask “can I set up your kitchen?” Or, I want to blurt out, “I can help you unpack!” All I can think about is the great opportunity for my friends to purge and clean out all their belongings. Ooh, aah…I know, it’s kind of creepy, isn’t it? I think if I weren’t a therapist, I would be a professional organizer. All the closets and junk drawers in the world would be under my spell! In my role as a therapist, I have been able to work with a few people on organization skills and what might be the underlying cause of their messiness. Fascinating! So what do you do if you tend not to be so organized? Fortunately, there is no “organization gene” that you either have or don’t have. It’s a skill, which means it can be learned and implemented to whatever degree you would like. People who are more organized think differently than those who are less organized. We’re always thinking in future terms. Everything we do is about making our lives easier tomorrow. If we struggle with something, we automatically begin to think of what we could do differently so it wouldn’t be such a struggle next time.

Pick up for the future. I know you don’t want to do the dishes right now. But if you do them now, you won’t have to keep seeing them in the sink every time you walk by. Which makes you feel bad. Which impacts your day negatively. Why not just get it done so you can enjoy the rest of your day with nothing hanging over your head? Along these lines, one of my big things is unpacking after a trip. I don’t care how late it is, I will unpack everything and get the dirty clothes into their respective piles to be washed before I fall into bed. Honestly, I sleep better if I don’t have a big, dirty task to face in the morning.

If you want to become more organized, you need to start thinking in future terms too. Here are some suggestions:

It’s always a great time to declutter your life. Start small, reward yourself for progress, and watch yourself become lighter. Free up your mind so you can plan for the future!

Buy for the future. No, I don’t mean you should stock up for the future (that’s called “hoarding,” and that’s another article). What I mean is every time you purchase something, you need to ask yourself a few questions: • Do I really need this? • What is the true likelihood I will wear/use this? • Where is this going to live? Organized people tend to purchase only what they truly need and will use repeatedly. And we are already thinking about where we will keep the object as we are pulling out the credit card to pay for it. As I’ve become a better organizer, I have fewer “why did I buy this? I’ve had it for 2 years and have never worn it” experiences.

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Cull for the future. Organized people tend to put things where they go the first time they touch the item. Mail is gone through over the trash can. Emails are dealt with as they arrive and then deleted so the inbox does not get overwhelming. There are very few piles of things – you know, the piles that keep getting moved from place to place as you need the current space the pile is occupying? I even do it with my contact list. Whenever I am on hold, I cull through all the contacts I have that begin with the same letter of the person I am calling. All of this is in an effort to cut down on the brain clutter that can so easily accumulate.

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2015


Mark Your Calendar! Safe Sitter Babysitting Classes Scheduled at WCCH West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital (WCCH) has announced a Safe Sitter babysitting class for girls and boys age 11 to 13 on July 14 at Dynamic Dimensions Fitness Center in Sulphur. The Safe Sitter program is a national, medically accurate program that teaches young adolescents, including babysitters, how to handle emergencies when caring for younger children. The cost to attend is $35. To register, call (337) 527-4361.

will be held from 6-7:30pm on June 18, July 9 and August 13. All are welcome and grade school aged children are welcome with an adult participant. For more information, call David Booth at (337) 526-0837.

The Children’s Theatre Company The Children’s Theatre Company presents “Acting for the Camera” for children ages 8-18. This workshop covers auditioning for commercials, reading commercial scripts, exploring different commercial techniques, and beginning improvisional skills. The workshop cost is $85 and is held July 8-10 from 12-1:30pm. For more information, visit www.childrenstheatre.cc.

Sax and the City Premiere Join Grammy-nominated saxophonist Mickey Huber Smith, Jr. at Sax in the City, a dinner/concert series that will take place the last Sunday of every of every month from July through November at Chateau du Calcasieu in Lake Charles. A catered dinner will be served at 5:30pm followed by the concert at 7pm. Tickets are $30, or a $15 concert ticket can be purchased at the door. For more information, call (337) 625-5397.

Travis Tritt to Perform at the Golden Nugget Travis Tritt will perform at the Golden Nugget Lake Charles on July 10 at 8:30pm in the Grand Ballroom. Tritt, an American Country music singer, has received four awards from the Country Music Association and has been a member of the Grand Ole Opry since 1992. Tickets are available online at www.ticketmaster.com and/or by calling 1-800-7453000.

Matt Sandbank’s Shadow Factory to Close Out Summer Reading Program The public is invited to come and experience the wonderment of Matt Sandbank’s Shadow Factory. Sandbank will be closing out the 2015 Summer Reading Program with parish wide performances at the following Calcasieu library branches.

July 13

10am – Sulphur Regional Library 2pm – DeQuincy Library

Pat Benatar and Neil Giraldo to Perform at The Golden Nugget Pat Benatar and Neil Giraldo will perform at Golden Nugget Lake Charles on July 18 at 8pm in the Grand Ballroom as part of their 35th Anniversary Tour. Pat Benatar and Neil “Spyder” Giraldo have forged one of the most successful partnerships in rock and roll history. Tickets are available online at www. ticketmaster.com and/or by calling 1-800-745-3000.

Gulf Coast Bird Club Announces Basic Birding Workshop The Gulf Coast Bird Club announces a free summertime Basic Birding Workshop to be held at Tuten Park in Lake Charles. Participants will explore the fascinating hobby of Birding. Three sessions July 2015

July 14 10am – Central Library 2pm – Carnegie Memorial Library

July 15 10am – Moss Bluff Library 2pm – Iowa Library 5pm – Hayes Library

July 16 10am - Fontenot Memorial Library 2pm – Starks Library

L to R: Samantha Lanhan and Hope McDaniel “dress it up” CTC’s Acting for the Camera workshop.

Bayou BBQ Bash comes to Morgan City The 4th Annual Bayou BBQ Bash will take place July 24-25 under the U.S. 90 Bridge in downtown Morgan City. The event, held at the corner of Second and Greenwood streets, is a BCA Sanctioned State Championship BBQ Competition. In addition to the competitive teams, locals can get in on the action. The cost to enter is $150 for competitive and local teams and $250 for corporate teams. For more information, visit www.cajuncoast.com/bbqbash.

Gridiron 43 Set Go Big or Go Home is the theme of the 43rd Annual Gridiron Show presented by the Ad & Press Club of Southwest Louisiana. Gridiron, the annual night of skits, songs and laughter, is the show that has been called the Saturday Night Live of SWLA. This year’s show is set for July 18 at the Lake Charles Civic Center Rosa Hart Theatre. Doors will open at 6pm and the show will begin at 7:30pm. For more information or tickets, visit www.adpressclub.com.

July 17 10:30am – Westlake Library 2pm – Epps Memorial Library For more information, visit www.sandbankshadowfactory.com. Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

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Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2015

Thrive July 2015 Issue  

July 2015 Issue of Thrive Magazine

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