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July 2018

BACK TO SCHOOL July 2018

ON THE CASE: LEGAL CORNER Thrive Magazine for Better Living

first person

with Mayor Nic Hunter www.thriveswla.com

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Rehabilitation Hospital

of Jennings

DIAgNOSeS THAT we TReAT

• Brain Injury

• Hip Fractures

• Strokes

• Osteoarthritis/DJD

• Amputations

• Neurological Disorders

• Burns

• Spinal Cord Injury

• Major Multiple Trauma

• Congenital Deformities

• Rheumatoid Arthritis

• Systemic Vasculidities

• Joint Replacements

Others who can benefit from inpatient rehabilitation are postoperative patients, accident victims and cancer patients. 24 Hour Nursing Care • Physical Therapy • Occupational Therapy Speech Therapy • Nutritional Counseling and Monitoring Case Management Call for a free assessment today. One Hospital Drive, Ste. 101 • Jennings, LA 70546 • Phone: (337) 821-5353 • Fax: (337) 821-5355 or 5366 jenningsrehab@yahoo.com • www.jenningsrehab.com 2 www.thriveswla.com

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July 2018


July 2018

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Contents In This Issue

tyle &Beauty S 6 Iron Shop Provisions 8 The Parlor House 10 Shimmer Makeup at Any Age 12 Boho Style

Wining &Dining

Regular Features 20 40 52 65 74 75

First Person Who’s News Happenings Business Buzz Solutions for Life McNeese Corral

6

14 Pure Press Juicery 16 What’s New at Blue Dog Café 18 Summer Treats SOUTHWEST LOUISIANA Places &Faces 22 – 39 Cover Story:

WOMEN BUSINESS WHO MEAN

66 68 70 72

LE

Mind &Body

G

TH E CAS

14

R

54 – 64 Special Section:

N

E

Money &Career

O

Home &Family 42 – 51 Special Feature:

AL

CO TAVR Valve Replacement Managing Pain without Medication Beyond Braces Getting a Jump on Physical Literacy

RN

E

70 Managing Editor

DON’T JUST LIVE, THRIVE!

Thrive is designed for people focused on living a happy, healthy life, one that is balanced, full of energy and contentment. Thrive readers want to make the most of every day and to be successful in all areas of their lives – family, health, home and career. 4 www.thriveswla.com

Angie Kay Dilmore

Editors and Publishers Kristy Como Armand Christine Fisher Creative Director

Barbara VanGossen

Design and Layout

Mandy Gilmore

Business Manager Katie McDaniel Stevenson Advertising Sales katie@thriveswla.com 337.310.2099 Submissions edit@thriveswla.com

Submitted articles and photos are welcome. Thrive assumes no responsibility for unsolicited materials and does not guarantee any submissions.

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Style & Beauty

IRON SHOP

PROVISIONS by Stefanie Powers | photos by Chris Brennan

A lot of new businesses are popping up around the Lake Area. One of the most unique is Iron Shop Provisions, which Josh and Erin Guillory recently opened on Broad St. in downtown Lake Charles. The storefront is filled with men’s clothing, boots, and accessories – along with a really sharp sports car and the aroma of freshly brewed coffee. What makes this business so distinctive is that there’s a huge workshop behind the retail space where Josh Guillory now does his iron work. “Josh has been working with iron since his high school years,” Erin explains. “He’s been running his own welding shop (Custom Iron by Josh) for the past 14 years. The studio is now located in the back of the retail and showroom. Customers can observe the metal work while sampling our new store’s locally roasted coffee.” What prompted the couple

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NOT YOUR TYPICAL MEN’S STORE to open this unique business? “Josh always had trouble finding clothing he loved in Lake Charles, and while we were shopping at a favorite boutique out of town, the idea came to mind,” she says. “We discussed it and realized that if he had that problem, then other men must, too.” Erin has a marketing degree and had a job in sales before she began to work with Josh and their company in February 2016. The new business is something that is right up her alley. “We offer curated products, items that are well made with an intent and purpose,” she says. “Our clothing ranges from seasonal swimming trunks to raw denim and button-ups. Our accessories include handcrafted leather wallets, leather boots, waxed canvas utility rolls, backpacks, and totes, as well as sunglasses. At Iron Shop Provisions, you’ll also find apothecary items such

July 2018


as rosemary beard oil and hand-poured soy candles in the scent of Louisiana Moss.” They are also excited to work with another local business, Acadian Coffee Roasters. “They came up with three different coffee blends exclusive to our shop,” Erin says. So what are their long-range plans? “Overall, we want to be successful and enjoy our new business!” Erin says. “We will have events like cook-offs, bike nights, and music nights, creating a casual atmosphere for customers to shop. As this brings us new people, we’ll form relationships with the customers and make sure we provide clothing and accessories they are proud to wear.” Iron Shop Provisions is located at 625 Broad St. and is open Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. For more information, go to their Facebook page or give them a call at (337) 794-4122.

2018 Keynote Speaker

Tamron Hall THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18 LAKE CHARLES CIVIC CENTER

8:00am - 4:00pm Featuring Various DIY Workshops Vendor Registration for MarketPlace Now Open!

WomensCommissionSWLA.com July 2018

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Style

& Beauty

The Parlor House Another New Addition to the Downtown Business Community by Stefanie Powers | photos by Chris Brennan

Downtown sure is bustling, and another cool new business has burst upon the scene. The Parlor House, a high end, full-service hair salon, opened its doors this past April. Adrien Lyles is the proud owner of this beautiful space. She was born and raised in New Orleans and moved here at the age of 21 after marrying her husband Ira, a Lake Charles native. “We worked with local businesses to create a unique environment,” she says. “Chelsea Brennan with Brennan Interiors did a gorgeous job on the interior design and Chris Brennan captured all the photography that hangs in the salon. In addition, Josh Guillory did the iron work and Chad Whited did our branding. I love that people know these amazingly hard-working and talented individuals and get to see their work when they come in.” Lyles has been doing hair for almost 16 years, and this is the first salon that she’s owned. “But, my mom and dad were both hairdressers, so I grew up around the business. I was the little girl playing with perm rods on the floor of their salon.” It took a year and a half to make her vision a reality. “It started with a very simple drawing on a piece of paper and a grand idea to do something different,” Lyles says. “My husband was a vital part in planning and building. He was so invested in finding and creating our vision for the salon.” 8 www.thriveswla.com

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July 2018


It was important to Lyles for The Parlor House to have a downtown location. “I worked in the downtown area for almost 10 years,” she says. “In that time, we were able to watch the downtown community grow. Being a part of so many events in the heart of the city made me want to be able to have that experience again.” The salon has eight talented stylists. “I thought it was very important to select a team that has the same visions and desires for their careers as I did,” Lyles says. “It’s more meaningful to have the right people than just finding stylists to fill the chairs. I think our staff is the thing that sets us apart. We truly love what we do and we work as a team. Everyone feels welcomed and relaxed when they come in.” Lyles says that effortless, lived-in hair color and styles are a huge request. “We do a lot of balayage, which is a hand-painted lightening method that is very natural and grows out easily. But we also have a lot of fashion colors and straight razor shaves.” Along with cuts and color, the salon offers esthetics services such as facials, full body waxing, skin-tightening treatments, and aromatherapy. “We also have a barber, who focuses on men’s grooming and straight razor shaves,” Lyles says. “In addition to beauty services, we offer unique gifts and beauty products.” Now that her dream is a reality, Lyles’s mission is to have the community be a part of it. “When you walk through our doors we want you to feel welcomed, excited, and ready to be taken care of. The people of Lake Charles make The Parlor House a home!” The Parlor House is located at 825 Ryan St. in downtown Lake Charles. Their hours are Monday: noon – 7 p.m., Tuesday: 9 a.m.- 5 p.m., Wednesday: 11 a.m.- 6 p.m., Friday: 9 a.m.- 3 p.m. and Saturday, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Closed Thursday and Sunday. For more information, go to their Facebook page or call (337) 429-5483. July 2018

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Style

& Beauty

Summertime Shine

SHIMMER MAKEUP AT ANY AGE by Emily Alford For the past few years, matte makeup has been one of the biggest trends in beauty. Matte makeup doesn’t reflect light and sometimes provides fuller coverage, so while it’s plenty dramatic, it can look pretty. But this summer, it’s time to shine. Bold shimmery colors are back on the shelves just in time to create mermaid-inspired summer looks. However, many makeup lovers think shimmer is just for teenage girls. And while it’s true that some shimmery products have a nasty habit of settling into creases around eyes and lips, a bit of shimmer can also reflect light and take years off your look.

Eyes

Shimmery eye makeup can still look super professional, according to Kacie Moss, makeup artist for Signatures Salon in Lake Charles. “Shimmer eye shadows are always fun, especially in the summer,” Moss says. “Bronze and gold neutrals are always my goto, especially to add a little pop under your bottom lash line instead of a harsh liner.” Shimmer shadow does have a tendency to settle into fine lines, making them appear

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deeper. To avoid this, define your crease with a matte shade and then use gold or bronze shimmer in the center of the lid and at the inner corner of the eye for a shine that doesn’t settle.

Lips

Bold, matte lips in brownish or purple hues are still a huge beauty trend, and won’t be going away anytime soon, but this year is also seeing a revival of nude, glossy lips. To update your makeup bag without throwing out your mainstays, invest in an iridescent gloss to transform your matte favorites. And if you’re worried about gloss bleeding into fine lines around your mouth, just dab a bit gloss at the center of the top and bottom lips, avoiding the corners, which creates the illusion of a fuller pout.

Highlighter

Highlighter has been a mainstay of the Instagram beauty scene for years, but now it’s becoming mainstream and more widely available at drug stores. Moss recommends NYX Duo Chromatic Illuminating Powder,

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which comes in a variety of colors and only costs about $8. To use highlighter, dust a thin layer at the top of the cheekbone after applying blush for a dewy glow.

Foundation

Foundation is pretty costly, so replacing it just to keep up with the shimmer makeup trend probably isn’t an option for most of us. Luckily, according to Moss, shimmery primer and moisturizer in combination with matte foundation makes for a glowy look that works for just about everyone. “If you want to lighten up your matte foundation a little for summer, I would recommend Intelligent Nutrients Revitalizing Moisture Crèam and Becca First Light Priming Filter to add radiance and smoothness,” Moss says. “Some people even like to mix their foundation with their moisturizer or primer to lighten up their foundation and use less product.” Summer is the season for letting loose and having fun. When the temperatures drop, we can all go back to our serious matte makeup, but for now, shine on!

July 2018


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Style

& Beauty

Breathe New Life into your

Boho Style by Emily Alford

If you’re a fan of all things fringe, full-skirted, and floral, and believe that more is more when building your look, then you’re probably a lover of Bohemian (or boho) style. And the past few years have been great for flower children, since fringe jackets, bell sleeves, and even bell-bottoms have made a huge comeback. The next big trend is adding boho touches to your wardrobe in the form of accessories. Here are some of the season’s hottest boho accessories, according to Marlee Henry, co-owner of ThumbPrint boutique.

Sunglasses

For the past few years, boho sunglasses have been large and in charge, from big, round rimless shades to huge mirror lenses. And while mirror lenses are still all the rage, this year’s shades have shrunk,

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and no boho look is complete without this little accessory. “When I hear boho, I instantly think tiny sunglasses,” Henry says. Tiny, round John Lennonstyle sunglasses are definitely a vibe this summer, as are teardrop-shaped shades just big enough to cover your eyes.

Hats

No beach trip is complete without a cute hat. Luckily, boho hats are a big deal in 2018. A round, widebrimmed hat worn pushed to the back of the head is a classic way to bring a bit of free-spirited style to your summer rompers, or you can go even more classic with a smallbrimmed brown straw hat. For the past few years, giant floppy hats have been the go-to boho toppers, but this year, hats, like sunglasses, have been paired down.

July 2018


Email or Text Notification when your RX is ready!

Head Scarves

When it comes to summer boho fashion, nothing has Henry more excited than headscarves. “Headscarves are the thing to do right now,” Henry says. “I would definitely say this is how you could add subtle boho vibe to your outfit. Either tie it in your ponytail, add it in a braid, or a full head wrap is in also. There are multiple ways to add them to your outfit for that day!” Look for bright patterns, bold floral statement scarves, or even fringe.

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Kimonos

A great kimono adds a bit of free-spirited flair to any summer outfit. Just throw a sheer, floral kimono or cardigan over a white tee shirt tucked into blue jean shorts with a pair of ankle booties and you’re pretty much Instagram-ready. Bonus: kimonos also make perfect beach cover-ups. It seems like Bohemian style has been having a mighty long moment, at least for the generally fast-paced fashion world, so if you’re reluctant to buy too much more 70s-inspired clothing, adding just a few boho touches to your summer wardrobe will keep you stylish without adding any clutter to your closet.

601 S. Pine Street • DeRidder, LA 70634 • (337) 463-7442 www.thriftyway.com • thriftyway2@thriftyway.com

IndustryInsider Q: A:

Straight Answers to Your Questions on Industry and the Environment Is anyone monitoring the air quality in our community? If so, how does it rank?

Industries and regulatory agencies continuously monitor air quality and we are within recommended guidelines.

Air quality in Calcasieu Parish is monitored regularly and meets EPA standards. Part of our air quality ranking is based on ground level ozone. It is created when emissions from cars, lawnmowers, industries, and fuel are exposed to sunlight. Residents and industries contribute to ground level ozone. Industries follow stringent EPA guidelines to remain within recommended standards. Residents in our community can help combat ground level ozone by following these tips: during midday when the sun is the brightest, avoid refueling your vehicle or mowing your lawn; also, combine errands whenever possible to avoid driving during the brightest part of the day. You’d be surprised at the high number of tests and monitoring industry does to comply with our air permits. We do it because it’s good for business but also because we live here, too. With industry and residents working together, ground level ozone in Calcasieu Parish can continue to remain within the recommended guidelines.

Brooke Roncancio

environmental engineer at area industry

Visit www.laia.com to learn more and submit your question about local industry and the environment. July 2018

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Wining & Dining

PURE PRESS JUICERY

Fresh, Delicious, & Healthy by John O’Donnell

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Cold pressed juices have been all the rage in natural foods since the early 2000’s. Cold pressing means that the juice is extracted from fruits and vegetables using a hydraulic press that produces no heat during the juicing process; hence, the produce being juiced is cold pressed. Cold-pressing takes longer than other juicing methods, and typically produces less juice, but the juice that is produced is theoretically higher in nutritional content because heat can destroy certain enzymes and nutrients. Jason Holder founded Pure Press Juicery in 2013 in Lake Charles and started selling juices at The Cash and Carry Farmers Market every Tuesday. Pure Press Juices quickly gained popularity and became a farmer’s market staple. The local demand for Pure Press was great, and for good reason. Their commitment to locally sourcing as many of their ingredients as possible, and to ensure that all Thrive Magazine for Better Living

of their ingredients are 100 percent organic, lends incredible freshness and flavor to Pure Press juices that are unrivaled by store bought juices. The increased demand for Pure Press recently spawned a brick and mortar location on Ryan Street, directly across from the Historic Calcasieu Marine Bank. The rustic brick building is a beautiful addition to downtown Lake Charles. A permanent location gave Holder the means to expand his menu. Included with the same great juices and juice blends that they have always offered, Pure Press now offers some great healthy dishes for breakfast, lunch, and even coffee. “Our cold brew latte is made with Reve Coffee Roasters coffee from Lafayette and organic almond milk. No added sugar,” Holder said. “Cold brewing it adds no heat to the coffee, so it makes it less acidic than drip coffee.”

July 2018


Presented by First Federal Bank of Louisiana

SHAKEN

not STIRRED THE MUSIC OF

JAMES BOND

SATURDAY JULY 14, 2018

LAKE CHARLES CIVIC CENTER

6PM: DOORS OPEN 7PM: CONCERT BEGINS

Guest Artist: Jeans ‘n Classics Tickets Start at $35

Tickets: 433-1611 or LCsymphony.com/Pops2018

For an antioxidant-packed breakfast or lunch, try one of Pure Press’s smoothie bowls. Smoothie bowls are thicker than a regular smoothie. Made with a granola base and topped with fresh fruit, you eat them with a spoon. “Our Acai Bowl is the most popular,” Holder said with pride. Expanding from selling one day a week at the local farmers’ market to opening a thriving new downtown restaurant open six days a week required an obsessive focus on quality and detail, and you can taste that obsession in the flavor at Pure Press Juicery. In a region and a state where that dedication to craft is usually reserved for heavy fare not typically associated with wellness, Pure Press offers a refreshing and delicious alternative that will make your taste buds as happy as it makes your body.

6th Annual FILL THE

BACKPACK July 21

Access of Louisiana is teaming up with Maplewood Middle School to support Pick-A-Kid’s 6th Annual Fill The Backpack Event on July 21st to provide school supplies for Calcasieu Parish students in need. Donations accepted year round at all our credit union offices.

Pure Press Juicery is located at 825 Ryan St. For more information, see their Facebook page, @PurePressJuicery.

Sulphur  Westlake  Lake Charles 337-533-1808  www.access.coop Federally Insured by NCUA

Hours: Mon-Fri 7am-3pm; Sat 8am-2pm July 2018

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Wining & Dining

What’s New at the

Blue Dog Café by Lauren Attebery Cesar | photos by Denny Culbert

Nothing says Louisiana quite like delicious food or the iconic Blue Dog that artist George Rodrigue made famous during his lifetime. One can go into the Blue Dog Café, Lake Charles, and experience the joie de vivre that Rodrigue captured in his paintings communicated through a beautifully prepared dish. And while Southwest Louisiana has been able to enjoy the delicacies that can be found at the heart of Cajun country for a while, the Blue Dog Café is changing things up. Blue Dog Café now features Ryan Trahan as their new Executive Chef. Trahan is most recently known from the restaurant Dark Roux, an acclaimed and regionally inspired, sustainable Southern concept in Lafayette. In 2017, he was named a Chef to Watch by Louisiana Cookin’ magazine. Trahan was raised in Crowley, with roots firmly established in Louisiana home cooking. He will focus on fresh, regionallyinspired, sustainably-sourced cuisine with a side of southern hospitality and Cajun culture. “We have been watching Ryan make an impact on the Louisiana culinary scene for a while now and could not be more excited to have him join the Blue Dog Café,” said Jacques Rodrigue, co-operator of Blue Dog Café and son of artist George Rodrigue. “Ryan is the perfect chef to continue the Blue Dog Café’s tradition of serving as a destination and cultural hub that pays tribute to Dad, his artwork, and Cajun culture.” Last month, Chef Ryan won the annual Louisiana Seafood CookOff and was named the 2018 King

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of Louisiana Seafood. To earn the crown, Trahan reigned over 11 other Louisiana chefs and prepared a crackling-crusted red snapper with pickled crawfish tails, buttermilk chili consommé, spring vegetables, burnt leek oil, fermented cream, and bowfin caviar. On August 4, he’ll represent our state and compete against the best seafood chefs in the country at the Great American Seafood Cook-Off in New Orleans. Trahan brings inventive cuisine and reimagined classics to this landmark establishment. Rodrigue says, “Inspired by the elevated hospitality that defines Blue Dog Café, Chef Ryan’s menu features new dishes like a Crawfish Cake, Cajun Macaroni Gratin, Charbroiled Oysters, Pork Fried Catfish Chips, Pompano En Papillote, Half Roasted Chicken, and Buttermilk Pie.” If you’re a faithful patron and lover of the Crawfish Enchiladas, there is no need to panic. The Crawfish Enchiladas, the Seafood Wontons, the Corn and Crab Bisque, and the Louisiana Purchase are still on the menu. However, the new menu also features modernized Cajun classics as well as several healthier options through Blue Dog Café’s partnership with EatFit of Southwest Louisiana. The Blue Dog Café is open for lunch and dinner Wednesday through Saturday and Sunday for brunch. Brunch will feature their new menu offerings in the same buffet-style, and when you come in, be sure to enjoy a cocktail from their seasonal craft cocktail menu. Bon Appetit! To see their full menu, visit their website. http://lakecharles. bluedogcafe.com/full-menu/ Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2018


Live Music | SWLA Restaurants Local Artists

$40

Tickets on sale July 7 www.artscouncilswla.org 337-439-ARTS Must be 21 to enter. Proceeds benefit the arts!

Saturday, August 18 5-8 p.m. | Burton Coliseum

OF LAKE CHARLES

Nick Reina 337-478-7052

www.nickreina.com

July 2018

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Wining & Dining

Beat the Heat with

Summer Treats by Isabel Jones

POPS AND ROCKETS

104 W Pujo St. Lake Charles, LA Ever want to take a time machine back to the good old days? Pops and Rockets has you covered with their 80’s throwback decor. Even the handcrafted pops and ice cream are named after 80’s songs like Karma Chamelon (watermelon / mint), Blister in The Sun (pineapple / ginger), and Enola Grey (earl grey / lemon curd / shortbread). From the crafty treats to the free arcade games, it’s easy to get lost in an afternoon of ice cream and all you can play Mrs. Pacman.

CAJUN GYPSY CORNER MARKET

729 Ryan St, Lake Charles, LA Inspired by the old Corner Stores of Downtown Lake Charles, Cajun Gypsy celebrates the classics. They keep it simple with traditional ice cream flavors like chocolate, vanilla, and strawberry, and old fashioned, in-the-glass sodas. Their specialty is a refreshing coke float served up in a tall glass. You can beat the heat with one of their delicious floats as you browse their unique collection of local goods.

PIZZA ARTISTA

420 A W Prien Lake Rd, Lake Charles, LA Surrounded by the smell of fresh-made pizza sits Pizza Artista’s Italian gelato. From the gelato maker to

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Happy National Ice Cream Month! Summer is here and the heat is real, so what better way to celebrate than with a cold cup of ice cream goodness? We’ve rounded up a list of places to get ice cream and beat the heat this summer!

the ingredients, everything about this gelato is straight from Italy. With their homemade flavors ranging from Birthday Cake to Strawberry Cheesecake, you can’t go wrong! They also offer dairy-free flavors, including Lemon, Watermelon, and Green Apple. If you can’t get enough of their gelato, ask for a pint to take home.

MODERN PANTRY at L’AUBERGE

777 Avenue L’Auberge, Lake Charles, LA Tucked away in the L’Auberge Casino Resort you’ll find delighful Modern Pantry gelato. Each flavor is crafted by their gelato specialist. With flavors ranging from Watermelon to JD’s Honey Gelato by Chef Lyle (made special for adults) it may be hard to choose just one. They’re open 24/7. Go mid-week for Waffle Cone Wednesday. With the purchase of two scoops of gelato, you’ll get a free waffle cone to go with it!

LOUISIANA REAUXL

2040 W Gauthier Rd, Lake Charles, LA From the streets of Thailand (where rolled ice cream originated) to your very own town, Louisiana Reauxl puts a Cajun twist on this new treat. Rolled ice cream starts as a liquid base which is then frozen, flavored, and rolled right before your eyes. You can create your own recipe or choose from their list of flavors including Louisiana Sunrise (vanilla ice cream, decaf coffee, caramel, wafer stick) and Birthday Cake (colorful birthday cake ice cream, sprinkles, syrup). They’re rolling ice cream to a whole new level!

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GIGGLES ICE CREAM & GOURMET COFFEE

10077 Gulf Hwy, Grand Lake, LA Like a diner out of the 50’s, you’re greeted with friendly faces and that small town, everyone’s welcome feel. Giggles is a one stop shop with every treat you can imagine. Along with homemade baked goods, they have an impressive list of ice cream flavors, including frozen yogurt and sugar free options. With flavors like Superman (red, yellow, and blue vanilla) for the kids and Dulce de Leche Cheesecake for the adults, they have something for everyone.

WINKYDOO’S

2701 Ruth St, Sulphur, LA Right off I-10 in Sulphur sits an old-fashioned ice cream shop known for its shakes and malts. With over 20 of your favorite Blue Bell flavors to choose from, they promise to make your ice cream dreams come true. They specialize in malts, shakes, sundaes and banana splits. Winkydoo’s also offers smoothies and sugar free ice cream so anyone can come along for the ride!

Did YOu Know?

Americans consume around 22 pounds of ice cream per person every year, according to the International Dairy Association.

July 2018


Serving. Strengthening. Sustaining Southwest Louisiana for 85 years. July 2018

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Places & Faces

In April of last year, Nic Hunter was elected Mayor of Lake Charles and was sworn in on July 1. This month, we celebrate his first year in office. Hunter’s history in Lake Charles goes back to his childhood, when at a very young age, he bussed tables and washed dishes at his grandparents’ restaurant, Harlequin Steaks & Seafood. At age 17, he managed the restaurant full-time. Hunter graduated from St. Louis High

School in 2002 and earned a BA in History from McNeese State University in 2007. He was elected to the Calcasieu Parish Police Jury in 2011 and was in his second term of service when he won the mayoral election. In 2015, Hunter married Becky Jacobs, a local attorney. They welcomed their son, Harrison Edward, into the world last August. In each of his roles – entrepreneur, police juror, and now mayor – Hunter’s career has been defined by philanthropy and a love of this community. Thrive recently visited with the mayor, where he talked about his firstyear accomplishments, his goals for Lake Charles’s future, and the importance of his own personal priorities.

first person by Angie Kay Dilmore

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with

Mayor Nic Hunter

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As you grew up in your grandparents’ restaurant and learned the business, was there anything in those early experiences that helped prepare you for your current role as mayor? My grandmother grew up in the Great Depression, and her stories about her childhood and what they went through still resonate with me today. She had me start at entry level positions in the restaurant. I washed dishes, swept floors, and cleaned tables for years. I cannot stress the importance of work ethic enough. Hard work is essential for success. This sounds basic, but I don’t think everyone really gets that. I also worked with a diverse group of people from every spectrum of society, and we were a team. When you’re trying to work with five other people to feed two hundred, you’d better be working as a team. It was like being in a family. This taught me that diversity can be celebrated and can bring people together rather than apart, if used the right way.

You majored in history at McNeese. What fostered this interest? Originally, I just took history classes as electives, but I fell in love. I realized this was a field that could help me in whatever path I chose for myself. I credit my history classes with sparking my interest in public service and politics. I wrote my senior thesis on Earl K. Long. The more I studied Louisiana political history, the more inspired I became to get involved. I thought, ‘Here is how I can really make a positive impact on my community.’

What have been your primary accomplishments in your first year as mayor? I am happy with what we have accomplished. My biggest accomplishment is the

July 2018

increased funding for enhanced drainage improvements for the City. We increased our drainage investment by 78% and we did this without raising taxes. We accomplished this through good fiscal policy and budget prioritization. We’ve launched several partnerships with the Community Foundation, raising hundreds of thousands of dollars in private funds, not tax payer dollars, to enhance our parks and support veterans’ initiatives. The City Council recently approved the first step in creating economic incentive corridors for underserved areas of Lake Charles. We believe this will result in increased economic activity in these areas. We drastically reduced the amount of time property owners can allow their properties to remain eyesores. We have reenergized our recreation centers. Via a partnership with Second Harvest Food Bank, we now offer food to kids at our recreation centers after school. Teen Connections, Midnight Basketball, Mayor’s Youth Partnership, and the Mayor’s High School Roundtable have all allowed us to connect more with the youth. I am happy with our track record and our aggressive pace. We have accomplished much, and we have much still to accomplish. The most exciting things are yet to come.

What has been your greatest joy in your role as mayor thus far? Your deepest disappointment? My greatest joy is visiting kids at elementary schools. I love reading to them or talking to them about being mayor. They have the most interesting and sometimes funniest questions. My deepest disappointment was attending the funeral of a young boy who was shot by a home intruder. That was a very sad day and hard to get through as a father myself. I can’t imagine the pain of that family, and I pray for them daily.

What has been your greatest challenge? Finding enough time to do everything. I desperately want to meet with everyone who calls my office and attend every function I’m invited to. There just aren’t enough hours in the day sometimes and I don’t have a clone, so I can only be in one place at a time.

What has it been like, being a new dad and a new mayor, almost simultaneously? What have been the challenges of trying to excel in both roles? Politics is not the most important thing in life. After God, family comes next. Really, they are almost one in the same, because when I look at my son, I see the work of God. Being a dad and a husband are the most rewarding jobs I’ve ever had in my life, hands down. Being a mayor is definitely harder than being a husband or dad. My wife and I have a pretty good system. When I get home from the office or events, she feeds Harrison and bathes him. I get him ready for bed and read him a new story every night. The greatest feeling in the world is reading my son a bedtime story.

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What are your goals for your second year as mayor of Lake Charles? Now that the Council has taken steps to create economic incentive corridors, we can get aggressive about development in the underserved areas of our city. Success will not happen overnight, but I believe we will see progress, specifically on the lakefront, I-10 corridor, and Enterprise Boulevard. My goals are the same as they have always been. We will focus on better drainage, enhanced public spaces, police and fire protection, crime reduction, traffic. My office dry erase board has over 60 current projects or new initiatives.

Is there anything else you’d like to add? Thank you to this City. Thank you for trusting me. I take this job so seriously and, second to being a dad and husband, being mayor has been the greatest honor of my life. I also ask those who prayed for me during the election to continue those prayers. I’m filled with optimism and excitement. We are on the brink of historic progress and there is much more on the horizon for Lake Charles.

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Places & Faces

SOUTHWEST LOUISIANA

WOMEN BUSINESS WHO MEAN

Since the early days of the Suffragettes and the passing of Women’s Right to Vote in 1920, women have slowly been striving towards equality, especially in the workforce. While the proverbial glass ceiling is hardly shattered, there are certainly several cracks in it. As a testament to that triumph, in this month’s cover story, we feature eight local women working in high-level management positions traditionally held by men in the past. As most working women know, there are challenges to overcome while simultaneously juggling several roles. They are often torn between the responsibilities of family life and their career. Read about these high-achieving women, how they find balance in their lives, and their best advice for young women who want to succeed in the business world.

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July 2018


FIND A NEW HOME FOR YOUR FINANCES. For over 17 years, Denise Rau, CFP®, and the staff of Rau Financial Group have been fully invested in helping clients pursue their financial dreams. Whether its getting started with investing, saving for college, defending your family from financial uncertainty, preparing for retirement, arranging your estate, supporting an aging parent, or all of these, we’ll listen to your goals and dreams first. Then we’ll develop a sound strategy and customized financial plan to help you pursue them. There’s no time like the present to plan for your future. Give us a call today.

raufinancialgroup.com (l-r) Denise Wilkinson, Denise Rau, Debora Alexander and Latrana White

(337) 480-3835 | 1634 RYAN ST., LAKE CHARLES

Securities offered through LPL Financial. Member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advice offered through Goss Advisors, a registered investment advisor. Goss Advisors and Rau Financial Group are separate entities from LPL Financial.

July 2018

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Places & Faces

WOMEN WHO MEAN BUSINESS

JANIE FRUGÉ

CEO | WEST CALCASIEU CAMERON HOSPITAL With her career firmly in the nursing field, Janie Fruge’ says being CEO of a hospital was not on her radar; but like many leaders, she carefully considered the opportunity and embraced the challenge. A graduate of McNeese State University in nursing, Fruge’ also holds a master of science in business administration and nursing from the University of Phoenix. She progressed at West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital (WCCH), from runner to unit secretary and nurse aide during her college years, to becoming a registered nurse. She traveled across the Southeast lecturing and educating other nurses on emergency cardiac treatments. Fruge’ left WCCH for five years to assume a position as Emergency Room director at CHRISTUS St. Patrick Hospital. She returned to WCCH as patient care supervisor, then chief nursing officer. Fruge’ was named CEO in 2013. “My comfort zone was in the clinical world, giving and directing patient care. The thought of changing to CEO was new and intriguing,” she explains, “so I gave it careful consideration. I had prepared through education and years of experience. I’m grateful for the

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support and mentorship I received from colleagues, physicians, and co-workers.” Fruge’ says seeing people working together to take care of the needs of others brings satisfaction. “Every member of our hospital team contributes to a portion of care. It can be challenging to navigate the rapidly changing healthcare environment to keep that promise of our vision and mission in our community, but we stay focused and never stop thinking about where we are going and how we will get there,” she says. “I feel we all do a better job when we encourage creativity; this helps us generate new ideas to meet challenges. It is critical to delegate and allow people to do their jobs; you must trust your team.”

On finding balance

“I am fortunate to have a very supportive husband. It’s difficult to balance our careers and personal lives but we make time for date nights every week. I feel it’s important to set aside time for self-care; we give to others and we need to make sure we’re refreshed and rejuvenated ourselves.”

Best advice

“Be your best self and don’t compare yourself to others. Don’t believe everything people say in regards to a glass ceiling; don’t operate under other peoples’ assumptions. Don’t underestimate yourself or be overconfident. Prepare yourself and don’t set limits; keep your options open. When preparation meets opportunity, then success happens.”

July 2018


Devan Temple, 2018 MDA Goodwill Ambassador with CITGO Lake Charles Vice President & General Manager Jerry Dunn. CITGO Lake Charles partnered with the Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA) Southwest Louisiana (SWLA) to host the 34th Annual CITGO MDA Golf Classic on May 7 at the Lake Charles Country Club. This collaborative effort raised more than $440,000 dollars for the MDA SWLA and the proceeds will be used by the organization to support research and services for more than 700 children and adults affected by muscular dystrophy in Southwest Louisiana. A portion of the proceeds also sent more than 100 children to a barrier free MDA summer camp, Camp Starlite. Thank you to all of the contributors, participants, and volunteers who made the 34th Annual CITGO MDA Golf Classic a resounding success. Also, we appreciate MDA SWLA for serving Southwest Louisiana residents who are impacted by muscular dystrophy.

www.CITGO.com

July 2018

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Places & Faces

WOMEN WHO MEAN BUSINESS

AVON KNOWLTON

DIRECTOR OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, DERIDDER/BEAUREGARD PARISH POLICE JURY

As a native and life-long resident of Beauregard Parish, Avon Knowlton is fully invested in the in the economic development of SWLA. Her professional work is focused on ushering prosperity and opportunity into the region. She currently serves as the Director of Economic Development for the City of DeRidder and the Beauregard Parish Police Jury. Through a cooperative endeavor agreement, the city, chamber, and parish pooled their resources into a creative relationship with Knowlton. Her optimism and hopeful outlook produce positive changes which result in successful outcomes within Beauregard Parish. Her duties include recruiting new businesses and industry to Beauregard Parish, retaining

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existing businesses, workforce development, and quality of life projects and programs. She was instrumental in working to develop and market the first Louisiana Economic Development Certified site in Beauregard Parish. Formerly the Executive Vice President of the SWLA Economic Development Alliance, Chamber SWLA, and Foundation Operations, she helped broaden the Chamber SWLA’s regional efforts and drove member and investor participation in the Chamber SWLA and Alliance programs, projects, and Economic Development Foundation. In 2008, she was named Louisiana Chamber of Commerce Director of the Year.

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July 2018


Knowlton, along with others, was instrumental in the formation of Fort Polk Progress, dedicated to the growth of Fort Polk and a better quality of life for our military and their families. She consults and mentors community leaders and many Chambers across Louisiana and the United States, working as a facilitator for boards, policy procedures, economic and community development, leadership programs, strategic planning, workforce development and project management. She is dedicated to working for a better quality of life for our military and their families, advocating in Washington and raising awareness for Fort Polk Progress. Knowlton received her Certified Chamber Executive Certification (CCE) from the Association of Chamber of Commerce Executives in 2012, making her one of only two certified Chamber of Commerce executives in Louisiana. She recently received her Economic Development certification from Southeastern Louisiana University. Avon has been married to Edward Knowlton for 28 years and is the mother of Garrett and Dylan and grandmother of Bowen and Boone.

On finding balance

“For me, it’s all about family time and doing things with them. It is important for me to set a flexible schedule to have down time to avoid burnout.“

Best advice

“Never let someone tell you that you cannot do something or you are not good enough. Prove them wrong. Believe and invest in yourself.”

July 2018

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Places & Faces

WOMEN WHO MEAN BUSINESS

CLAIR HEBERT MARCEAUX, PCED DIRECTOR OF CAMERON PARISH PORT, HARBOR & TERMINAL DISTRICT A proud Cameron Parish native, Clair serves as Director of Cameron Parish Port, Harbor & Terminal District, which is the parish’s public port authority. Her role allows her to interact with people from all over the world to promote Cameron Parish. Her work days are filled with developing relationships with land owners, project managers, site selectors, and local, state, regional, federal and international partners. Her previous work experience includes Director of Economic Development for the Cameron Parish Police Jury,

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Southwest Region Economic Development Project Manager for Entergy Louisiana, Calcasieu Parish Police Jury as Senior Grants Administrator, and Regional Lead with the Federal Emergency Management Agency overseeing more than 11,000 temporary housing units for FEMA. Clair began her career as an English teacher in Lafayette. She is a graduate of the University of Louisiana at Lafayette where she graduated Magna Cum Laude and was a member of Sigma Tau Delta, the International English Honor Society. She is currently

July 2018


CONGRATS CLAIR!

on being featured as one of Thrive’s “Leading Ladies in Business”

enrolled in the Lamar University Port Management Master’s program. Clair is a nationally Certified Community and Economic Developer and serves or has served on the boards of Fusion Five, the Arts and Humanities Council of Southwest Louisiana, the SWLA Literacy Council, the Women’s Business Network, the Acadiana Economic Development Council, the Southwest Louisiana Economic Development Alliance, IMCAL, the Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana, the Cameron Lions Club, Cameron Preservation Alliance, and United Way SWLA. She is active in several professional organizations such as the Louisiana Industrial Development Executives Association, the Southern Economic Development Council, the Louisiana Energy Export Association, and the Louisiana Tourism and Promotion Association. Clair is an avid runner, participating annually in the LA Fur & Wildlife Festival 5K, Gibbstown Bridge 5K, and the Beach Run 10K to benefit the preservation of the Sabine Pass Lighthouse in Cameron Parish. She and her family make their home in Cameron.

(337) 739-1098 | www.cameronparishport.com

On finding balance

“If you have vacation, take it. If your family needs you, be there. No excuses. I have found that as long as I didn’t abuse my work relationships, my supervisors almost always supported me. If they didn’t, I created a better opportunity for myself.”

Best advice

“Make the most of your situation, whether it’s a natural disaster, a chance meeting with someone you admire, participating in a leadership program, or jumping at opportunities to travel. If you want to succeed in anything, just grow yourself!”

July 2018

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Places & Faces

WOMEN WHO MEAN BUSINESS

DANA WILLIAMS

CEO | JENNINGS AMERICAN LEGION HOSPITAL

As Chief Executive Officer of Jennings American Legion Hospital (JALH), Dana Williams is responsible for the overall direction and management of the facility and is accountable for implementation of strategic and operational goals. She began her 34-year career at JALH in 1984 as Assistant Director of Medical Records. Over the years, she worked up the managerial ranks, serving as Director of Medical Records, Director of Administrative Services, Chief Operating Officer, and now CEO.

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“I have been fortunate enough to work at JALH my entire career,” says Williams. “My background was in Health Information, and I rose in responsibility and authority over the years due to opportunities afforded to me by the prior CEO, Terry Terrebonne, and my board. When Mr. Terrebonne retired in 2009, I was offered the role of CEO and it’s been my privilege to serve in that capacity since.” Williams earned a BS degree in Medical Record Science from University of Louisiana at Lafayette in 1984. She earned a Master’s Degree in Healthcare Administration from the University of Minnesota in 2007. In her free time, Williams likes to travel and read. “I have always been an avid reader, and I really enjoy weekend down time at our camp in Lake Arthur with a good book and a glass of wine.”

July 2018


On finding balance

“Finding the right work/life balance is a challenge for all of us, regardless of gender. Over the lifespan of a career, those competing priorities change. Earlier, it was at times a struggle to ensure that I was as attentive and engaged with the activities of my children as I wanted to be. Later, there were concerns regarding care of aging parents and in-laws. However, I found that living in a smaller community has made it easier to participate and develop a good support network. I am fortunate to have an employer and work culture that fosters balance, and I have a good partnership with my husband. But, I have to remain attentive to keep it all in check.”

Best advice

“I encourage women to pursue whatever career path they desire without hesitation; there should be no limits. I work alongside many competent, professional and strong women in the healthcare and business community and see more and more of them assuming leadership roles than ever before. I believe women contribute unique and valuable perspectives in problem solving and strategic decision-making and should be confident in their career pursuits.”

July 2018

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Places & Faces

WOMEN WHO MEAN BUSINESS

ELAINE ACORD

UNIT MANAGER – EO/EG SASOL, NORTH AMERICAN OPERATIONS Elaine Acord leads one of the new production units under construction at Sasol’s world-scale petrochemical complex near Westlake. A chemical engineer by training, she says family brought her home to a job she loves. Raised in Lake Charles, industry and technical expertise is in her DNA. Her father and brother work in the chemical industry and she attributes her traditional upbringing to her somewhat untraditional career choice. While pursuing a chemical engineering degree at Purdue University, an extended internship at an international specialty chemicals company in

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Chicago solidified her chosen vocation. After graduation she moved to Houston and spent seven years in operations and production with LyondellBasell before returning to Lake Charles where her arrival aligned perfectly with Sasol’s announcement of their Louisiana growth plans. She got in on the ground floor of construction and has spent the past five years working on Sasol’s new ethylene oxide and ethylene glycol production unit. Today, she leads that unit and works daily with her team to bring the state-of-the-art facility to fruition.

July 2018


On finding balance

“As the wife of a college sports coach, mother to two young daughters, and an active community volunteer, I’ve learned that balance is key. I do my best to find the right balance and give myself a break. Break time means time with my inquisitive girls and my husband doing fun activities together. One of our current favorite activities is visiting Sasol’s Chem Corner exhibit at the Lake Charles Children’s Museum. The interactive STEM activities are so much fun and they help the girls understand what mommy does at work and how Sasol’s work contributes to our community. “

Best advice

“Find yourself a great support system, then lift up and help one another. There aren’t many women who do what I do and I’m incredibly grateful to have found my niche in a career and in an industry that’s so supportive of my success and advancement. I want to take every opportunity to pay it forward. Lake Charles is full of talented girls and women and I’m honored to meet and work with many of them through Junior League and Sasol for Good activities. I try to encourage girls, especially my own, to dream big, work hard to overcome challenges, and see by example that its possible to do anything they set their minds to.”

July 2018

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Places & Faces

WOMEN WHO MEAN BUSINESS

LYNDEE BRASSIEUR MANAGER OF CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT, WESTLAKE CHEMICAL CORPORATION For nearly 20 years, Lake Charles native Lyndee Brassieur has excelled in a variety of production and manufacturing roles at Westlake Chemical’s south plant facility (formerly PPG Industries) and in management at multiple facilities throughout the organization. As Region One’s manager of continuous improvement, Lyndee leads with an innovative style, forging a distinguished path of excellence while simultaneously motivating those around her. Lyndee began her career as a student through McNeese State University’s engineering co-op program. After earning her Bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering, she started working full-time at the south plant site, a facility that produces commodity chemicals for customers throughout the world. “As a result of working in a diverse facility, I was exposed to many aspects of manufacturing including production, shipping, and business,” she said. “Seeing operations from different angles helped me to grow and shaped my career path significantly.” Throughout her career, Lyndee has shown dedication and a passion for industry. Early on, she developed a fondness for teamwork, which led her into management and leadership. 34 www.thriveswla.com

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“I have always enjoyed working on teams to achieve a shared goal,” she said. “When I can help others succeed while influencing the bottom line -- I love that.” Lyndee is manager of continuous improvement at four Westlake Chemical Lake Charles sites and a facility in Longview, Texas. Her job involves managing structured problem-solving initiatives through LEAN 6Sigma -- a process designed to drive results. As a LEAN 6Sigma Black Belt, Lyndee has spearheaded the implementation process of LEAN 6Sigma methodologies at the plant sites. Lyndee is active in the community, serving alongside Westlake Chemical’s volunteer groups and the company’s Partners-in-Education program.

On finding balance

Married for 21 years, Lyndee and her husband have three daughters, Dhara, 14, Aila, 11, and Lola, 5. As a mother, Lyndee is a strong advocate for individual empowerment, believing each person should have freedom to choose their own life path. Her approach to balancing career with motherhood is connected to her worldview: “Know yourself, identify your goals, and stay focused.” “Ask yourself: How do I want my career to grow and what do I want for my family. Define what you want and go for it.”

Best advice

“Embrace opportunities and don’t hold back. When you’ve earned a seat at the table, take it. Work hard, push yourself, and advocate for what you want in your career.” July 2018


INTRODUCING THE MOST

comfortable MAMMOGRAM

West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital offers Smart Curve, a revolutionary mammography design. Hologic 3D Smart Curve Technology is designed to provide a more comfortable mammogram screening without compromising image quality for an exceptional patient experience. The curved, unique design mirrors the shape of a woman’s breast to reduce pinching and apply uniform compression. To schedule an appointment, please call (337) 527-4256.

Rhonda Ryker, WCCH Breast Health Navigator

701 Cypress Street, Sulphur

wcch.com

July 2018

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Places & Faces

WOMEN WHO MEAN BUSINESS

MARION “BUTCH” FOX DIRECTOR | JEFF DAVIS PARISH ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT & TOURIST COMMISSION Marion “Butch” Fox has been involved in the state’s tourism and economic development industry for more than 30 years, serving stints in Lake Charles and New Orleans, the Louisiana Office of Tourism, and the Louisiana Office of Economic Development. Fox has directed the Jeff Davis Parish Economic Development & Tourist Commission since 2007. In April 2015, she added Chamber duties to her list. She divides her time overseeing economic development, tourism, film commission, and the Chamber of Commerce for the parish and manages the Oil & Gas Park and the Gator Chateau through a contract with the City. Fox says her most important job is to create a business-friendly atmosphere and to “sell” her parish to potential businesses and visitors. Because Jeff Davis Parish is rural and agriculturebased, she looks for ways to add value to the products grown or produced in the area, such as the locally-grown sugar cane by the Bayou Rum distillery in Lacassine. As past-president of both the Louisiana Association of Convention & Visitors Bureaus and the Louisiana Travel Association, Fox strongly believes in creating partnerships. “By working together, especially promoting the rural parishes, you get so much

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more accomplished,” she says. The recipient of the 2015 Will Mangham Lifetime Achievement award from the Louisiana Travel Association, she has served the association in numerous roles over the years and has long been a champion of the association’s advocacy efforts. An avid hunter and fly fisher, Fox spends her free time outdoors. She also enjoys speaking to groups about her career and what she’s learned in life.

On finding balance

“Women have an easier time in the workplace now, but we are still defined by the choices we make every day. Putting your family first is a choice, then balancing your work life becomes easier. Women can have it all, a family, a career, friends, and as your family grows different choices can be made based on that life stage. Growing, adapting and being flexible are traits which working women with families should strive for.”

Best advice

“Young women starting out today have a world of opportunities, so find a job that you are passionate about. Also, do something every day that scares you; you will learn and grow daily by doing little things that get you out of your comfort zone.”

July 2018


IMAGEmatters. Make yours a Healthy one. advertising public relations graphic design media relations social media copywriting photography strategic planning video production website development event planning corporate communication

4845 Ihles Road, Lake Charles (337) 312-0972 | ehealthyimage.com

OWNERS: BARBARA VANGOSSEN, CHRISTINE FISHER AND KRISTY ARMAND

July 2018

U. S. CHAMBER TOP 100 SMALL BUSINESS • SWLA CHAMBER SMALL BUSINESS OF THE YEAR • LA DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT • REGIONAL SMALL BUSINESS OF THE YEAR

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Places & Faces

WOMEN WHO MEAN BUSINESS

JENNIFER FARQUE OPERATIONS MANAGER | PHILLIPS 66

Jennifer Farque started her career within industry 20 years ago after graduating from the University of Michigan, relocating to New Orleans, and accepting an off-shore mechanical engineering position. In 2000, Farque moved to Lake Charles where she took a position with Phillips 66 Lake Charles

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Manufacturing Complex. Now Farque is the Area B operations manager where she oversees nearly 100 employees who are responsible for the safe operation and maintenance of the area, as well as the engineers performing the day to day monitoring, troubleshooting, and optimization of process units. Her years as a manager have taught Farque that adapting your managing style to the individual motivates and generates the best results. “I press for results,” says Farque. “I think every manager has to. But over the years, I’ve reflected on good and bad traits within supervisors and peers and tried to mold and adapt my leadership style in a way that produces quality results and builds a solid relationship with my staff.” When not at work, Farque keeps busy with her husband and children. To de-stress, she takes time during her lunch break to get in a quick run. She is currently training for a triathlon. “For years I worked through lunch, but now I take that time to recharge. Sometimes that might be the only time I have for myself, so I force myself to take it.”

July 2018


On finding balance

“Like many working women, I admit I still search for balance between work and family life. I accept that some days the scales will be uneven. I couldn’t do it without my support system. I lean on my husband, Lane, a lot. He helps with all sorts of things for our family. Hopefully folks can find a partner, somebody to help them out. You can’t do it all yourself. Consider hiring someone to help you if needed.”

Best advice

“Connect with a strong mentor and learn from them. Don’t be afraid to talk to leadership within the company. Looking back, I wish I had done more of this when I was younger. As a leader, I wish more people would take it upon themselves to do that now. Don’t be afraid to tell folks what you want for your career. Ask for their advice. You’re more apt to get something if you ask for it.”

July 2018

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Places & Faces

Movers and Shakers in Southwest Louisiana...

Who’s News? You tell us! Send press releases to edit@thriveswla.com with the subject line “Who’s News.” Courtney White, Senior Credit Coordinator in Business Banking, has been promoted to Bank Officer. Crystal Harrison, Executive Assistant to the Chief Lending Officer, has been promoted to Bank Officer. Kenny Miller, IT Department Manager, has been promoted to Vice President.

Heidi Bloomer

John Paul Timpa

Mallie Bowers, Director of Human Resources, has been promoted to Assistant Vice President. Catherine Furs, Private Banker, has been promoted to Assistant Vice President. Shana Maxfield, Mortgage Loan Officer, has been promoted to Assistant Vice President. For more information, call First Federal Bank at 337-433-3611 or visit www.ffbla.com.

Courtney White

Kenny Miller

Crystal Harrison

Mallie Bowers

Fontenot joins O’Carroll Group Emily Fontenot has joined the staff of the O’Carroll Group as a communication specialist, providing public relations and marketing services to the firm’s clients. Emily Fontenot Fontenot was an award-winning news writer with the American Press, covering business, city government and community news, and a member of the newspaper’s editorial board. She is a native of Lake Charles and a graduate of Northwestern State University of Louisiana.

Local Veterinary Clinic Welcomes New Veterinarian Catherine Furs

Shana Maxfield

First Federal Bank Announces Promotions

Charles V. Timpa, President and CEO of First Federal Bank of Louisiana, has announced four recent promotions. Heidi Bloomer, Manager of the Records Management Department, has been promoted to Bank Officer. John Paul Timpa, HR Generalist, has been promoted to Bank Officer.

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Local Veterinary Clinic, Gill Bright Animal Hospital is welcoming a new veterinarian to their practice. Dr. Kevin Shrewsberry will join their clinic in June. Dr. Kevin Shrewsberry Dr. Shrewsberry was born and raised in Lake Charles, Louisiana. At 14, he began volunteering at Gill Animal Hospital and, shortly after, began working with them. In May of 2018, Dr. Shrewsberry was granted his Doctorate of Veterinary Medicine by the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine.

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

As Dr. Shrewsberry returns home to Lake Charles and to Gill Bright Animal Hospital he is thankful to be back in Southwest Louisiana where it all started. As a veterinarian his mission is to provide his patients with the best care possible while developing lasting connections with their owners. He looks forward to becoming the family veterinarian for many families for years to come.

Imperial Health Welcomes Neurosurgeon Dr. Brian Kelley Brian Kelley, DO, board certified neurosurgeon, has joined the medical staff of Imperial Health. Originally from Kansas, Dr. Kelley Dr. Brian Kelley has been in practice in Lake Charles for five years. He earned his undergraduate degree at the University of Kansas in Genetics and Biochemistry and his Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine at Oklahoma State University. He completed an internship in General Surgery and residency in Neurosurgery at the University of Kansas Medical Center. Dr. Kelley is certified by the American Board of Neurological Surgery and is an active member of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons, the American Association of Neurological Surgeons and the Louisiana Association of Neurological Surgeons. Dr. Kelley will be practicing in the Lake Charles office of Center for Orthopaedics, located at 1747 Imperial Blvd. For more information or to schedule an appointment, call (337) 721-7236.

Robinson Dental Group Family Dentistry Welcomes Dr. Mark Whatcott Mark Whatcott, DDS, recently joined the staff of Robinson Dental Group Family Dentistry in Lake Charles. Dr. Mark Whatcott Dr. Whatcott received his bachelor’s degree from the University of Arkansas and his doctorate in dental surgery from Louisiana State

July 2018


University School of Dentistry in New Orleans. He is a member of the Louisiana Dental Association, the American Dental Association and the Academy of General Dentistry. Robinson Dental Group Family Dentistry provides all areas of general dental care, including cosmetic, implant and sedation dentistry. For more information, visit www. robinsondentalgroup.net or call (337) 474-3636.

Dr. Moukarzel is accepting new patients at his clinic located on the 3rd Floor of 1717 Oak Park Boulevard in the Lake Charles Memorial Hospital complex. For more information or to schedule an appointment with Dr. Moukarzel, call (337)494-4900 or visit to www.lcmmg.com.

The Eye Clinic Welcomes Retina Specialist Dr. Jonathan Perkins Jonathan Perkins, MD, ophthalmologist and retina specialist, has joined the physician staff of The Eye Clinic. A retina specialist is a Dr. Jonathan Perkins medical doctor who has specialized in ophthalmology and completed an additional two-year vitreoretinal surgical fellowship focusing on diseases of the retina, macula, and vitreous. Retina specialists diagnose and treat a wide variety of conditions such as macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and retinal tears or detachment among others. They also treat patients who have experienced severe eye trauma or infections, and consult on cases where there are hereditary diseases of the eye. Dr. Perkins will be seeing patients at The Eye Clinic’s new Retina Center, which will be opening in August at 2800 1st Ave., Suite C, in Lake Charles. To schedule an appointment with Dr. Perkins, call (337) 310-0762 or visit www.theeyeclinic.net.

Orthopedic Surgeon Robert Moukarzel, MD joins Memorial Medical Group Memorial Medical Group welcomes Robert Moukarzel, MD, a board-certified orthopedic surgeon to Dr. Robert Moukarzel its staff. Dr. Moukarzel joins fellow orthopedic surgeons Drs. Thomas Axelrad, Brett Cascio, Nathan Cohen, Robert Duarte and William Hubbard with Memorial Medical Group Orthopaedic Specialists. Before coming to the Memorial Medical Group, Dr. Moukarzel practiced at Baton Rouge General Medical Center and Ochsner Health Center. He is board-certified by the American Board of Orthopedic Surgery. He is a member of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons and is a diplomat with the National Board of Medical Examiners. July 2018

First SOWELA Professorship Awarded The SOWELA Foundation awarded The Oliver G. “Rick” and Donna G. Richard III Endowed Professorship to Graphic Art Instructor Erik Jessen at a recent employee appreciation luncheon. This is the first professorship awarded at the College. To be considered for the professorship, faculty must apply or be nominated by students, peers, staff, administrators, external organizations, or community members and submit a proposal detailing how the award would be used to further the mission of the College. The professorship was made possible through the generosity of a donation made by Oliver G. “Rick” and Donna G. Richard III and with matching funds provided by the Louisiana Board of Regents Support Fund. SOWELA Foundation promotes community stewardship and empowers students of SOWELA Technical Community College to launch their careers through scholarships, professorships, staff development, technological advancements, program improvements, and capital expansion. Donations go directly to the College to help provide students with a world class education in Southwest Louisiana.

Matthew Abraham, MD, Joins Lake Charles Memorial Sleep Health Lake Charles Memorial welcomes Matthew Abraham, MD, as the new director of Lake Charles Memorial Sleep Health. Dr. Abraham Dr. Matthew Abraham is board-certified and fellowship-trained in sleep medicine and is board-certified in family medicine. Dr. Abraham has more than 15 years of experience in sleep medicine. Prior to coming to Memorial he worked at Our Lady of Lourdes Comprehensive Sleep Disorder Center in Lafayette and Premiere Sleep Medicine Center in Baton Rouge. Dr. Abraham is an active member of the American Academy of Family Physicians, Louisiana Association of Sleep Medicine and American Academy of Sleep Medicine. For more information, contact Lake Charles Memorial Sleep Health at (337)494-2393 or go to www.lcmh.com/sleep.

Bertha Duhon

Rosemary Ashworth

Judy Woodson

Christa O’Neal

Four employees receive honors from West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital recognized four employees over the course of January, February, March, and April with Employee of the Month honors. Bertha Duhon, environmental services team member; Rosemary Ashworth, patient accounts representative; Judy Woodson, nutrition services team member; and Christa O’Neal, RN, maternal child educator/Shots for Tots coordinator, were those selected to receive the honor during this time. Thrive Magazine for Better Living

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Home & Family

! r e v E . r a e Y . t s Be

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Care That Makes You SMILE ven though schoolaged children and their families go through the process each year, back-to-school time can nonetheless be a challenging transition for both the students and their parents. This year, our Back-to-School Guide includes school-ready health considerations, summer tutoring and suggestions to keep kids’ academic skills sharp, tips on getting back into a schoolyear sleep routine, and how to plan for college financing. Your smile is your trademark; it lights up your face and expresses your joy and friendliness. Put your smile in safe, experienced hands:

the hands of the team at Lake Area Dentistry. We offer all aspects of General Dentistry including:

Family | Preventive | Restorative | Sedation Implant | Emergency | Minor Orthodontics Same Day Procedures

Back to School Tutoring

LAKE AREA DENTISTRY

Immunizations

Ashley Moffett Azevedo, DDS Peter T. Bayles, DDS Nathan Bray, DDS Jeffery Hennigan, DDS

College Financing Sleep Tips Hearing & Vision Screenings

LAKE CHARLES 700 W. McNeese St. (337) 478-8470

DEQUINCY 824 W. 4th St. (337) 786-6221

lakeareadentistry.com July 2018

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Home & Family Back to school

to Combat Summer Learning Loss by Lauren Atterbery Cesar

he word “summer” conjures up images of sleeping late and lazy days spent at the pool or on the back porch sipping lemonade as children laugh and run around the sprinkler. While those things make summer so enjoyable, it is important for students to continue to practice the skills they learned the previous year so that their minds will be as back-to-school ready as their new school uniforms and their monogrammed backpacks. Helping students retain and reinforce skills they learned during the previous school year is crucial to combat summer learning loss, and there are many ways that parents and guardians can do just that. Renee Reina, Director of Sylvan Learning of Lake Charles says, “Although the school year can be very stressful, it is important that we do not let our children go all summer without practicing their reading, writing, and math skills.” She suggests that fifteen minutes of reading daily, five minutes of practicing math facts, and even a weekly letter, not a text, to a relative can make all the difference for the next school year. Of course, if your student struggles in a particular subject, Reina urges parents to enroll them in some sort of tutoring program or remedial class over the summer. “The new school year will include more challenging work,” says Reina. “Academic problems can escalate rapidly and make it difficult to get caught up.”

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July 2018


Some of the biggest issues that Reina sees students struggle with is the new pace of schools. “If a student gets behind, there is no time for them to get caught up.” She reiterates that even students who are not behind but want to enroll in advanced classes need to do the extra work in the summer to prepare for them. Patrick Fontenot is the principal at Iowa High School. He says, “While waiting in line grocery shopping this weekend I became involved in a conversation with a member of our community who asked me ‘How are you enjoying your time off?’ My response was ‘I don’t take much time off, because you will not get better at what you do by not doing it.’ To retain and improve their skills, students should read something every day. The ability to read is a must in today’s workforce at varying degrees of difficulty depending

on what occupation they choose.” Leisure Learning courses at McNeese State University offer extra learning opportunities for students, as well as wonderful tutoring programs through Sylvan Learning, the Literacy Council of Lake Charles Day Camps, and Mathnasium, among other various local day camps. If checking out one of these opportunities does not fit your schedule, remember the advice of the experts: encourage your children to read every day, work on math problems, and continue to challenge them in the subjects in which they struggle so their minds will be ready for the beginning of a new school year.

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FAITH-CENTERED FAITH-CENTERED LIFE LIFE

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Now EnrollingTwo Two Years 8th Now Enrolling YearsThrough Through 8 Now Enrolling Two Through 8thGrade Grade Now Enrolling Two Years Through 8thGrade Grade STEWARD OF THE ENVIRONMENT

803 803 North North Division Division Street Street 803 North Division Street Lake Charles, LA 70601 Lake Lake Charles, Charles, LA LA 70601 70601 Lake Charles, LA 70601

803 North Division Street 803 North Division Street Now Enrolling Two Years Through 8th Grade Lake Charles, LA 70601 803 North Division Street 337-433-5246 337-433-5246 337-433-5246 Lake Charles, LA 70601

337-433-5246 337-433-5246 www.episcopaldayschool.org www.episcopaldayschool.org 337-433-5246 www.episcopaldayschool.org www.episcopaldayschool.org www.episcopaldayschool.org

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EDS not the basis color, national and ethnic origin, gender initsgender admission its educational EDS does notthe discriminate onof basis race, color, national and ethnic origin, or gender inorigin, admission of educational policies, scholarship and loan programs and athletic andor other school administered programs. EDS policies, EDS doesdoes does notadmissions discriminate notdiscriminate discriminate onon on basis the basis oftherace, race, of ofrace, color, color, national national and and ethnic ethnic origin, or school gender or in admission in of admission of itsofeducational its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs and athletic and other administered programs. admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs and athletic and other school administered policies, admissionspolicies, policies, scholarship and loan programs and athletic and other schoolprograms. administered programs. policies, policies, admissions admissions policies, policies, scholarship scholarship and and loanloan programs programs and and athletic athletic and and otherother school school administered administered programs. programs.

July 2018

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Home & Family Back to school

Back to School

Protecting our Children from Diseases by Angie Kay Dilmore

Back-to-school is only a month away. In addition to shopping for uniforms and school supplies, you may also want to verify your child is up to date on immunizations. Children entering pre-school and 6th grade require proof of current immunizations to be admitted to school. Immunization is the process by which a person becomes immune to a disease. When your body’s immune system develops antibodies against a disease, you develop immunity. To do that, you can either contract the disease, or get vaccinated for that disease. A vaccination stimulates your body’s natural immune system to create antibodies against the disease. “Vaccines are safe and they save lives,” says Dr. Albert W. Richert, pediatrician with The Pediatric Center of Southwest Louisiana.

For children entering pre-school, Louisiana law requires two doses of MMR, three doses of Hepatitis B, two of Varicella, and booster doses of DTaP and Polio vaccines on or after the 4th birthday and prior to school entry. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Louisiana had a 97.1% vaccination rate for kindergarten children in 2017, one of the highest rates in the country. (Way to go, Louisiana!) Dr. Richert says most children get their immunizations as part of their routine well child visits starting at age two months. “Immunizations are usually given at the two, four, six, twelve, and eighteen months visits. The next set of immunizations is given at four years of age. So people who follow the recommended schedule have everything they need for school by that four year visit.” Sixth graders (11-12 years of age) are required one Tdap, two VAR, two MMR, three HBV, and one MCV. Dr. Richert says a child who is up to date will have already had all but meningitis (MCV) and a tetanus booster (Tdap). Usually, children need proof of a tetanus shot in order to play sports and other activities.

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July 2018


Pediatricians rarely see children with illnesses such as polio, diphtheria, and measles these days. “Serious infectious diseases in children are dramatically less common than any other time in history, and it is because of vaccines,” says Dr. Richert. “Now pediatricians are able to focus on things like preventive care, developmental problems, and chronic conditions such as asthma and allergies.” Immunization is one of the best ways parents can protect their children from potentially harmful, even life-threatening diseases. Though not required, Dr. Richert also recommends yearly flu shots for school age children.

Vaccination Glossary MMR

measles, mumps, and rubella

DTaP

diphtheria, tetanus, and whooping cough (pertussis)

Tdap

a booster of the above vaccine

VAR

varicella, aka chickenpox

HBV

hepatitis B

MCV

meningococcal diseases

July 2018

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Home & Family Back to school

for College by Andrea Mongler

College is not cheap. And in recent years, the cost of a college education has increased substantially, far outpacing the rate of inflation. Of course, how much a student actually has to pay depends in part on which college he or she attends. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, in the 2016-2017 academic year, the average total cost of college attendance (including tuition, fees, books, supplies, and room and board) for students living on campus ranged from $14,700 at public two-year institutions to $48,900 at private nonprofit four-year schools. Figuring out how to pay those prices can be stressful, frustrating, and confusing. The good news is that many options are available to help you pay for college. And with a little research and planning, you can take advantage of those that make the most sense for you.

Save as much as you can. Though this one might seem obvious, it’s not always easy. A great option is to open a 529 plan, an investment account

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that is specifically designed to help people save money for college — for themselves or their children. Louisiana’s 529 plan is called the Student Tuition Assistance and Revenue Trust, or START, Saving Program, and it is administered by the Louisiana Office of Student Financial Assistance. There are no fees to participate in the program, and earnings are exempt from state and federal taxes. The earlier you can start saving the better. If you have a new baby at home, consider opening a 529 plan now. But even if your child is a teenager, it’s not too late to start saving.

part of the U.S. Department of Education, helps millions of students pay for college. But in order to have access to these grants and loans, you must start by filling out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, more commonly known as FAFSA, available at fafsa.ed.gov. You may also want to consider applying for a private loan through a bank or other financial institution.

Apply for grants and loans. Start with the federal government. Each year, Federal Student Aid,

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July 2018


Apply for scholarships. Many scholarships are available; the key is knowing how to find them. College financial aid offices and high school guidance counselors are great places to start. Louisiana offers the Taylor Opportunity Program for Students, or TOPS, which provides scholarships to students attending colleges within the state. Many local groups — think civic organizations, businesses, and religious organizations — offer scholarships to local students, and some professional associations and other national groups offer scholarships, as well. To help you see what’s out there, check out the U.S. Department of Labor’s scholarship search tool.

Apply to more than one school. One college might offer you a much better financial aid package than another. Don’t limit your options. Finally, keep in mind that college — and paying for college — is different for everyone. Maybe that means living at home and attending a local school to eliminate the cost of room and board. Or perhaps it means taking longer to graduate because you have to work to afford tuition. If you know your options, you can make the most of them.

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“Nurturing All Children and Achieving Academic Success in the Spirit of Christ”

Special Education Services

2510 Enterprise Boulevard | Lake Charles, La. 70601 (337) 436-7959 | stmcs.com St. Margaret Catholic School welcomes all children regardless of race, creed, or nationality. July 2018

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Home & Family Back to school

Getting to Make A’s by Christine Fisher

The lazy, relaxed days of summer will soon be replaced with schedules, classes, and homework. It can be a shock to children to have to wake up early once school begins. As parents are busy buying new notebooks, new uniforms, and new lunch boxes, they should also take time to implement new sleep schedules for back-to-school. “Do everyone in the household a favor and plan to transition the sleeping patterns a few weeks before school,” advises Phillip Conner, MD, board certified sleep specialist and medical director of the Sleep Disorder Center of Louisiana. “A little preplanning makes it easier on everyone.” Parents and teachers alike will attest to the fact that a good night’s sleep can make a world of difference in a child’s performance at school. Lack of quality sleep can increase the likelihood of anxiety, low grades, and poor ability in classes. Fidgety and unruly behavior can often be traced back to not getting enough sleep the night before. There are two general types of sleep: rapid eye movement, or REM, and nonREM sleep. Both types are necessary for optimal learning. REM sleep is vital for consolidating memories so they can be retrieved later, a key cognitive function for learning. It’s also important for growing bodies and proper development. Non-REM sleep is more restorative; it helps keep the mind and body awake during the day. A consistent schedule is a crucial component to getting quality rest. Going to sleep and waking up at generally the same time each day is good for both the mind and body. “Even though children are usually woken by a parent or an alarm

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clock, being consistent with bedtime and wake up time, helps them wake up fully in a short time frame,” explains Dr. Conner. Weekends are typically not as scheduled as weekdays but it’s best if the sleep patterns don’t vary more than one or two hours on weekends. Here are a few helpful hints to get your children enough zzzzz’s to function well:

Spend time together before bed. Either snuggle in their bed or just talk together in a quiet space if the child is older. Let them talk about whatever is on their mind. Guide the conversation to soothing remedies for their troubles. Now is not the time for a long discussion about what frightens them; you want to gently help them put the day to rest and get ready for sleep.

Avoid screen time before bed.

story are done nightly, their minds and bodies settle into the routine and they become comfortable with it; as they get older, they’ll tend to continue the pattern with minor adjustments as they age.

Decrease fluids. Limit what they drink throughout the evening so they can use the restroom before bed and not have to wake up repeatedly during the night to do so. Dr. Conner recommends setting a reasonable sleep schedule about two weeks prior to school starting. “Everyone’s sleep needs are unique; some children require more sleep than what’s recommended and some need less, but start with this guide (see below) and tweak their schedule as needed,” he advises. The Sleep Disorder Center provides sleep testing and treatment for all ages. For more information, call (337) 310-REST (7378)

About an hour before bedtime, have your child set aside the tablet, phone, and video games. The blue light emitted from screens can inhibit the body’s natural melatonin release.

Embrace the routine. A consistent schedule helps children know what to expect. When bath time, brushing teeth, and a

Recommended sleep for school-age children

Ages 5 – 8 Ages 9 – 12 Ages 13 – 18

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10 – 11 hours 9 – 10 hours 8 – 9 hours July 2018


Hearing & Vision by Andrea Mongler

According to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, about one-fourth of school-aged children have a significant vision problem. Similarly, the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery says three million children younger than 18 years have some form of hearing loss. It’s no surprise, then, that newborns typically undergo vision and hearing screenings shortly after birth to catch some issues as early as possible. But many children develop problems with their eyes and ears later, sometimes well beyond early infancy. So, what can parents do to ensure that any hearing or vision problems their children might experience are caught early? And now that the back-toschool period is approaching, is it time to have your child screened by a health care provider? The answer depends in part on your child’s age and whether you’ve noticed any problems. A good place to begin is with advice from your pediatrician. If a problem is suspected, he or she can perform a hearing or vision screening and refer you to the appropriate specialist for further evaluation if needed. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, babies who do not startle at loud noises, do not turn to the source of sounds by age six months, or do not say single words like “mama” or “dada” by one year may have a hearing problem. “Older children with hearing problems may have delayed or unclear speech, turn electronic devices up high, and have trouble following directions,” says Dr. Heidi Sorrells with Acadian Hearing. “Babies older than six months who cannot track an object that moves across their field of vision or cannot make steady eye contact may have trouble seeing,” says ophthalmologist Virgil Murray

July 2018

III, MD, with The Eye Clinic. “Similarly, older children who have misalignment, pain, or itchiness in the eyes; keep books or electronic devices very close to their faces; or are having trouble with schoolwork should have their vision screened.” In addition, it is recommended that even children with no obvious signs of vision or hearing loss undergo screenings that vary by age. “These screenings often allow us to catch problems early, before children begin to have problems in school or elsewhere,” Dr. Sorrells says. The American Academy of Ophthalmology and the American Academy of Pediatrics recommend that children have a pediatrician screen their eyes as newborns and then as part of well-child visits starting by age six months. As your child ages, the type of screening performed will change too. In addition, the American Optometric Association recommends that children receive separate, more comprehensive exams by optometrists around age six months, at three years of age, before entering first grade and then every two years thereafter. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says children should have their hearing screened before they start school regardless of whether you suspect a problem. “You know your child better than anyone,” says Dr. Murray. “Trust you instinct and let your health care provider know if you have any questions or concerns.”

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For more information about children and vision screenings or vision concerns, call The Eye Clinic nearest you or 1-800-826-5223. For more information about children and hearing screenings or concerns, call Acadian Hearing at (337) 436-3277.

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Home & Family

HAPPENINGS MARK YOUR CALENDAR!

Fit For Life Class Announced Snap Fitness has announced a Senior Strength and Balance Program on Tuesday and Thursdays at 9:30am with a focus of “Fit for Life.” Strength decline, fall risks, decline in balance and mobility and postural deficits do not have to come with age. Our aging population can ward off these aging myths with the right program. This program is geared to increase total body strength, flexibility, balance, core strength and ensure muscles are activated and firing with our unique isometric exercise program. In addition to the classes, every senior has access to a 24/7 gym with a

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custom made program catered to meet each individual’s goals, fitness needs and fitness level. For more information, contact (337) 478-4525.

9th Annual Arts & Crabs event Set The Arts Council of SWLA has announced the 9th annual Arts & Crabs fundraiser event will take place on August 18, 5pm-8pm, at the Burton Coliseum. Arts & Crabs celebrates the ties between our seafood and culture – the region’s greatest national assets. Attendees sample from an extensive tasting featuring the best local chefs, each preparing a unique seafood dish representative

of their cuisine’s styles. Louisiana craft brew samples are offered as complementary pairings to all dishes. Chefs battle for votes in the annual “Best Crab Dish” award, which is determined by the number of tips each chef receives. Funds raised at Arts & Crabs are reinvested back into the SWLA community through the Arts Council’s year-round services and events. Sponsorships are now available, and the Arts Council invites area businesses to reach attendees during this unique culinary event through our various sponsorship packages. For details, call (337) 439-2787, or visit www.artscouncilswla.org.

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Ainsley’s Angels 5K Set On July 14, the Southwest Louisiana chapter of Ainsley’s Angels will hold its 5th Annual Sunset 5K and Finisher’s Festival. This event will include music, games, food and lots of fun. The organization is named after Ainsley Rossiter who had a progressive, fatal neurological disease. Although Ainsley passed away 2 years ago her legacy lives on. People come from around the country to celebrate inclusion and educate the community in Ainsley’s family’s hometown of Lake Charles. For more information, call (337) 802-4181 or visit www.ainsleysangels.org.

July 2018


THE CITY OF LAKE CHARLES WATER DIVISION P.O. Box 1727, Lake Charles, LA 70602 | 337-491-1307 • June 2018

ANNUAL DRINKING WATER QUALITY REPORT We are pleased to present to you the Annual Water Quality Report for the reporting/monitoring period from January 1, 2017 to December 31, 2017. This report is designed to inform you about the quality of your water and the services we deliver to you every day. Our constant goal is to provide you with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your drinking water and its’ compliance with government standards. In this report you will find information such as the quality of the local drinking water; likely sources of drinking water contamination; and information about your local services. The City of Lake Charles is going through some exciting times and unprecedented growth. The Water Division is dedicated to meeting that growth and continues to plan for the future needs of the water system and our customers. You can learn more about the Water Division and its’ facilities and services by visiting the City web site at www.cityoflakecharles.com. Under the Public Works department listing, click on the water tab. If you have any questions about this report, or simply want to learn more about your drinking water, please contact Russell Buckels at 337-491-1479 *All information in this report has been collected and reported to you in accordance with water quality standards established by the USEPA. We are pleased to report our drinking water meets all Federal and State regulatory requirements.

can be naturally-occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial, or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming. • Pesticides and Herbicides – may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses. • Organic Chemical Contaminants – Including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems. • Radioactive Contaminants – can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.

Our water system is required to test a minimum of 80 bacteriological samples per month in accordance with the Total Coliform Rule. Coliforms are bacteria that are naturally present in the environment and are used as an indicator that other, potentially harmful, bacteria may be present. During the monitoring period covered by this report, we had no noted violations of drinking water regulations. In addition, the State of Louisiana also performs routine chemical analysis for regulated contaminants. Chemical sampling for regulated contaminants may not be required on an annual basis. The results furnished for testing are from the most recent sampling of our source water performed in December 2017 – April of 2018.

In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the EPA prescribes regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water, which must provide the same protection for public health. PROTECT OUR RESOURCES, USE WATER WISELY !!!

Certain minerals are radioactive and may emit forms of radiation known as photons and beta radiation. Some people who drink water containing beta particle and photon radioactivity in excess of the MCL over many years may have an increased risk of getting cancer.

Some people may be more vulnerable SOURCE WATER ASSESSMENT to contaminants in drinking water A Source Water Assessment was than the general population. ImmunoGOT A QUESTION? performed on our water supply in April compromised persons such as persons NEED SOME ANSWERS 2003. The program emphasizes pollution with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, The numbers below are provided if you have prevention to ensure safe drinking water, persons who have undergone organ focusing on the protection of the water questions or problems with your water service. transplants, people with HIV / AIDS or sources. Personnel with the State of other immune system disorders, some Billing/New Service 491-1307 Louisiana performed this assessment. elderly and infants can be particularly Meter Problems 491-1522 The source water assessment consists at risk from infections. These people of three steps: 1) Delineation or outline should seek advice about drinking Main Breaks 491-1487 of the source water protection areas – in water from their health care providers. Rusty Water/Odor 491-1554 our case a one mile radius around each EPA / CDC guidelines on appropriate Distribution Department 491-1494 well field; 2) Inventory of significant means to lessen the risk of infection by Production/Plant Info 491-1479 potential sources of contamination Cryptosporidium and other microbial 24 Hour Number 491-1483 within these areas; and 3) Analysis of the contaminants are available from the Safe system’s susceptibility to contamination Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791). For Plant Tours 491-1487 from the potential sources identified. If present, elevated levels of lead can This plan is now available in our office. cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women According to the Source Water Assessment Plan, our water system and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from had a susceptibility rating of ‘MEDIUM”. If you would like to materials and components associated with service lines and home review the plan, please feel free to contact our office. Information plumbing. The City Water Division seeks to provide high quality can be obtained by contacting Russell Buckels, Water Division drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used Superintendent at 491-1479. in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals - Office of Public several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure Health, routinely monitors for constituents in your drinking water. by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using Results of sampling by the State and contracted laboratories are water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead shown in the tables below. Drinking water, including bottled water, in your drinking water, information on lead in drinking water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of testing methods, and steps to minimize exposure is available some contaminants. The presence of these contaminants does not from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov. necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. safewater/lead.

CITY OF LAKE CHARLES WATER SOURCES The City of Lake Charles obtains water from wells that are drilled in the 500-foot and 700-foot sands of the Chicot Aquifer. Groundwater or well water is found in saturated zones beneath the land’s surface. It fills the pores and fractures in underground material such as sand, gravel, or other rock. If the water can be removed from this material in useful amounts, these areas are called aquifers. At the present time the City of Lake Charles has 17 wells that provide a clean, sufficient water supply for all of our customers. HEALTH INFORMATION The sources of drinking water (both tap and bottled) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals, and in some cases radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity. Contaminants that may be present in untreated source water include: • Microbial Contaminants - such as viruses and bacteria, may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife. • Inorganic Contaminants - such as salts and metals, which

TEST RESULTS In the tables below are shown results of sampling on our source and treated water. The last chemical sampling of our source water was performed in Jan. – Dec. of 2015. This sampling was performed by a private laboratory certified by the State of Louisiana. Chemical sampling may not be required on an annual basis, therefore, information provided refers back to the most recent chemical sampling results. You will note that all of these contaminants were not detected or were well below the MCL. Terms and abbreviations you might not be familiar with are furnished with the following definitions: Not-Detected (ND) - laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present. Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) - The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL’s are set at very stringent levels. Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG) - The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLG’s allow for a margin of safety Action Level - The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow. Treatment Technique (TT) - A treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water. (ppm) = parts per million (ppb) = parts per billion (ppt) or (nanograms/l) = parts per trillion (ppq) or (picograms/l) =parts per quadrillion Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – measure of radioactivity in water In the table below, we have shown the deficiencies that were identified during our latest survey done by the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals. These are deficiencies we are currently working to resolve. DATE IDENTIFIED

FACILITY

05/29/2014

Distribution

CATEGORY CODE

ACTIVITY NAME

DUE DATE

COMMENTS

GWR-App Corrective 09/30/2015 Action Plan

CC17

COLLECTION DATE

HIGHEST VALUE

RANGE

UNIT

Nitrate-Nitrite

12/18/2017

1

1

ppm

10

10

Discharge of drilling wastes; discharge from metal refineries; erosion of natural deposits

Fluoride

12/182017

0.2

0.2

ppm

4

4

Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth. Discharge form fertilizer and aluminum factories

Lead and Copper Copper, Free

MCL MCLG

TYPICAL SOURCE

Date

90th Percentile

Range

Unit

AL

Sites Over AL

Typical Source

2014-2016

0.1

0.1-0.4

ppm

1.3

0

Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives

2014-2016

Lead

1

1-16

ppb

15

0

SAMPLE POINT

209 Helen Street 2437 Ory Road 4260 Indigo Pl. 4908 Desoto St. 209 Helen Street 2437 Ory Road 4260 Indigo Pl. 4908 Desoto St.

TTHM TTHM TTHM TTHM CONTAMINANT Chlorine

LAC 51:XII.344 - LSPC Protection of Water Supply Containment Practices`

Below, are listed the regulated contaminants that were detected during sampling. While these contaminants were detected, you will note that all were BELOW their maximum contaminant level. Required sampling was performed at sites within the distribution system, and at each of our well sites. All sampling was performed either by the State of Louisiana or by private laboratories certified by the State of Louisiana. REGULATED CONTAMINANT

DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS

Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5) Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5) Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5) Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5)

Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits

HIGHEST LRAA

PERIOD

RANGE

UNIT

MCL

MCLG

2017

5

1.6-4.7

ppb

60

0

By-product of drinking water disinfection

2017

4

0.73-5.8

ppb

60

0

By-product of drinking water disinfection

2017

5

2.2-4.4

ppb

60

0

By-product of drinking water disinfection

2017

7

1.8-6.2

ppb

60

0

By-product of drinking water disinfection

2017

15

12.6-17.4 ppb

80

0

By-product of drinking water chlorination

2017

24

20.3-28.3 ppb

80

0

By-product of drinking water chlorination

2017

17

15.1-18.2

ppb

80

0

By-product of drinking water chlorination

2017

20

13.4-24.1 ppb

80

0

By-product of drinking water chlorination

DATE 2017

RESULT

UNIT

RANGE MRDL MRDLG

1.55

ppm

0.7 – 2.7

4

4

TYPICAL SOURCE

TYPICAL SOURCE Water additive used to control microbes

COLLECTION DATE

HIGHEST VALUE

RANGE

UNIT

Chloride

12/18/2017

43

26.1 - 43

ppm

Iron

12/18/2017

1.78

1.5 – 1.78

ppm

0.3

Manganese

12/18/2017

0.46

0.4 – 0.46

ppm

0.05

PH

12/18/2017

6.75

6.52 – 6.75

SU

8.5

Sulphate

12/18/2017

4.0

3.0 – 4.0

ppm

250

SECONDARY CONTAMINANT

RADIONUCLIDES

COLLECTION DATE

HIGHEST VALUE

RANGE

UNIT

COM. RADIUM (-226 & -228)

6/13/2017

0.888

0.888

pCi/l

GROSS ALPHA

3/23/2015

4

2.96-4

pCi/l

GROSS BETA PARTICLE ACTIVITY

12/18/2017

5.2

2.45-5.2

pCi/l

MCL MCLG

SMCL 250

TYPICAL SOURCE

5

0

Erosion of natural deposits

50

0

Decay of natural and man-made deposits. Note: The gross beta particle activity MCL is 4 millirems/ year annual dose equivalent to the total body or any internal organ. 50 pCi/L is used as a screening level.

The City of Lake Charles fully complies with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Americans with Disabilities Act, and related statutes, executive orders, and regulations in all programs and activities. The City operates without regard to race, color, national origin, income, gender, age, and disability. Any person who believes him/herself or any specific class of persons, to be subjected to discrimination prohibited by Title VI/Americans with Disabilities Act may by him/herself or by representative file a written complaint with the City of Lake Charles. The City's Title VI Coordinator/ July 2018 Thrive Magazine for Better Living www.thriveswla.com 53 ADA Coordinator may be reached by phone at (337) 491-1440, the Mayor's Action Line at (337) 491-1346, or contact the appropriate Department Head.


TH E CAS N

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Money & Career

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N R CO

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ccording to the American Bar Association, there are currently 18,918 lawyers in the state of Louisiana. Choosing a lawyer can be a daunting task! In this special law section, you’ll find tips for choosing a lawyer that’s right for you. On a different legal note, Louisiana ranks 4th in the nation for number of divorces. Sadly, the divorce rate in the U.S. continues to be 40-50%. If you happen to be among these numbers, you’ll also read valuable information on lowering stress and discord during divorce proceedings.

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July 2018


Janet D. Madison

Todd S. Clemons

Justice is Priceless. Criminal Defense Personal Injury Civil Litigation Family Law

ToddClemons.com (337) 477-0000 | 1740 Ryan St Lake Charles July 2018

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Money & Career Legal Corner

Your Guide to Choosing a Lawyer by Angie Kay Dilmore

Determine what type of lawyer you need. The Heiros Gamos Law Center cites over 70 core areas of law which are then broken down into 260 sub areas of practice. You want to find a lawyer that specializes in your specific law need and has a proven track record. You will also want to consider a local attorney, as he/ she will be familiar with the courts and specific laws your area. “Always, always, always hire a local attorney,” says Mark Judson, a practicing attorney for over

56 www.thriveswla.com

Much like physicians or engineers, attorneys tend to be highly specialized. Just as you wouldn’t go to a cardiologist to have gallbladder surgery or want a chemical engineer to build the next I-10 bridge, you wouldn’t require the services of a criminal court lawyer to write up your will. It’s important to find a lawyer who is right for you, and that often depends on several factors. Follow these steps for your best legal outcome.

25 years and the Executive Director of the SWLA Law Center. “All courts have local rules, customs, and procedures that vary slightly from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. Judges are the same way. Every judge is different. A local attorney who is familiar with the local rules of court, and who is also familiar with the tendencies of a local judge, has a distinct advantage over an out-of-towner.”

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Contact your local bar association for a list of qualified attorneys. State bar associations keep public records about complaints and disciplinary actions taken against attorneys licensed to practice in the state. Most local bar associations also have free referral services that can help you find an attorney to suit your case’s needs. The Southwest Louisiana Bar Association includes the five-parish region. http://swlba.org.

July 2018


Find online listings of attorneys and read the reviews. Many websites offer free reviews of businesses. Find lawyer reviews at Martindale.com, LegalZoom, Rocketlawyer, LawTrades, and Avvo.com. Cross reference reviews from more than one website to counter biased reviews.

Obtain referrals and recommendations from friends, family, even other attorneys. Ask who they hired and for what type of service. Were they satisfied with the services and would they recommend the attorney?

Consider the size of the law firm. Law firms vary in size ranging from singleattorney offices to firms with dozens of lawyers. Choose a firm you think will be best suited to your situation. Large businesses may want to hire a large law firm with a notable reputation to handle complicated legal matters. But if you are simply looking for someone to manage your divorce or to help you write a will, a smaller firm with more personalized attention could be your best option. “Depending on the case you are seeking assistance for, depends upon which fit is best for your situation,” says James Sudduth, Sudduth and Associates. For example, if you are a million-dollar local business, your company’s needs carry a substantial amount of responsibility. Such responsibility may be too overwhelming for a single-attorney operation; therefore, it is best to consider a mid-size to larger firm, staffed with a support team that will be there to ensure that your businesses needs are met to your satisfaction. Furthermore, clients might choose a bigger law firm because they offer a “buffet style” of practice areas. They are essentially your one-stopshop, or your general practitioners. When clients go to a smaller firm or mid-size firm, like our firm at Sudduth and Associates, as opposed to a larger firm, they expect personalized treatment, and often have more of an input in their cases due to the fact that smaller firms tend to specialize in practice areas.”

Criminal Defense Family Law Employment Litigation Personal Injury/Auto Accidents General Civil Litigation Estate Planning

Continued July 2018

1109 Pithon Street* Lake Charles, LA 70601 t: (337) 480-0101 f: (337) 419-0507 www.saa.legal *New office location

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Money & Career Legal Corner

13,670 Number of Law Library patrons since 1998

50 Years in business

145

91,100 Number of family members affected since 1967

270,000

Number of man hours documented since 1967

23,187 20,425 Number of cases opened since 1967

Number of cases closed since 1967

Number of KPLC “Legal Corner� broadcasts since 2015

$19,324,770

$57,975,000

Cost @ Law Center for all cases since 1967 at current market value

Number of interns and volunteers since 1967

Cost @ private attorney for all cases since 1967 at current market value

1011 Lakeshore Dr #402 | Lake Charles | 70601 (337) 436-3308 | swla-law-center.com 58 www.thriveswla.com

520 320

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Number ofvolunteer attorneys since 1967

July 2018


Review each attorney’s website after you’ve made a list of possible lawyers who could meet your needs. Verify that each lawyer specializes in the type of law expertise you need. Look for other information about the attorney. Did he/she attend a reputable law school? What is his/her work history? Has he/ she won awards or been granted other distinctions or merits? Also consider researching potential lawyers on social media. How an attorney represents him- or herself to the public may give you an idea if you and the lawyer would work well together.

Make appointments with attorneys on your short list. Once you’ve narrowed your search down to a manageable few, it’s time to meet them in person. Most attorneys do consultation appointments for free, though some charge a small consultation fee. Determine this fee upfront; attorneys should be transparent about these details.

Make a list of questions to ask potential attorneys. An initial consultation with an attorney is an important meeting for both the attorney and the client. “It gives both sides the opportunity to get to know each other, as well as obtain more information about the case,” says Tina Wilson, attorney with Cox, Cox, Filo, Camel, and Wilson. Many times, the initial consultation is the first time the client has ever met with an attorney, so he or she may have many questions regarding the process, such as: • What can I expect? • What is the experience of the attorney or firm in handling similar cases? • How much is the attorney’s fee? In personal injury cases, clients may want to know things such as: • How will my medical expenses be paid? • How can I obtain necessary medical treatment? • What happens if I am unable to return to work right away? “The best thing an injured victim can do is look for a local experienced attorney who specializes in the area of litigation represented in the case,” Wilson says. “Overall experience and resources can make a major difference when it comes to your case. Remember that attorneys are accustomed to receiving questions of all types, so do not hesitate to ask whatever is on your mind. The attorney will also have a few questions for you to get a feel of your case. While most questions can be answered at the initial consultation, more questions may arise as the case progresses. Most attorneys are available by phone, email, or other means to consult clients throughout the case.” Continued July 2018

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59


Money & Career Legal Corner

Be a part of the legal team. Once your lawyer has started work on your case, Zita Andrus, attorney with Baggett McCall, encourages clients to cooperate with the lawyer and be an integral part of the legal team for the best possible outcome. Andrus offers the following tips to be an active participant in your case. • Keep a journal. If you are part of a personal injury lawsuit, you will be asked to explain your injury and how it has affected your life. This is often difficult to remember months later. Making a journal of the pain and issues you are having will be helpful to you and your attorney as the case progresses. • Follow the doctor’s orders. Following your doctor’s advice is paramount to a successful case and hopefully resolving your injuries. • Communicate with your lawyer. It is imperative that your lawyer knows about any changes in your life; whether you have moved, changed jobs, changed telephone numbers, or been referred to another doctor for treatment. Constant communication with your lawyer is key. • Keep your case confidential. Be mindful of what you tell others about your case, whether in person or on social media. • Honesty is the best policy. Being honest with your lawyers and medical providers throughout the case is crucial to a successful resolution.

Butch Ferdinandsen

CFP®, CLU®, ChFC®, CRPS, CRPC Investment Advisor Representative Ferdinandsen Financial Group is a marketing name. Securities and Investment Advisory services offered throughout Woodbury Financial Services, Inc., member FINRA/SPIC.

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When you need legal services, choose a lawyer whom you feel will be your best advocate and makes you feel the most comfortable. “After sifting through the seemingly never-ending lists of local attorneys and firms, choose the attorney or firm that works within your wheelhouse of need,” says James Sudduth. “Ultimately, it all boils down to one thing: trust. Do you trust this attorney, or this firm, to successfully navigate you – the client – through the inevitable rough waters ahead?”

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July 2018


DOCUMENT SOLUTIONS FOR BUSINESS

copiers • scanners • printers • fax • shredders

Once you’ve made a final decision, your attorney may provide you with an engagement letter. This is a contract between you and your attorney that defines the nature of the legal engagement you are involved in, and the conditions and terms of your agreement with your attorney. Read the engagement agreement closely and take time to understand it since it will guide your relationship with the attorney.

Locally owned and operated for over 30 years

So, what is typically included in this engagement agreement? Susan Gay Viccellio, partner at Stockwell Sievert Law Firm, breaks down the information you can expect to find in this important document.

600 W McNeese Street, Lake Charles | (337) 474-9913 asiofficesystems.com

The agreement will tell you what issues the attorney is resolving or not resolving for you and names the adverse party. “For example, if you hire a lawyer to help you with clearing the title of your house, that does not mean the lawyer is your attorney when someone hits your car as you drive home,” says Viccellio. “You and your attorney must decide if the attorney will help you resolve your car wreck in addition to clearing the title of your home.” The agreement will state how much the attorney charges for her services and how she will bill you for those services (e.g., an hourly rate, flat fee, contingency fee). “Many, if not most, attorneys will require you to pay a sum of money up front called a retainer. This is not the attorney’s money though until she earns it by providing you her services.”

Stockwell Sievert is a name that has earned a well-deserved reputation for excellence in the legal field for over 80 years.

The procedure for billing will be set out in the agreement. If the entire retainer is not used in resolving your legal questions, then the remainder will be returned to you. Also, if your legal issues require more work than can be covered by the initial retainer, the agreement will tell you how you will be billed for those services.

At Stockwell Sievert Title, LLC, we provide our clients with a comprehensive range of real estate services including the closing of residential and commercial sales and mortgages, title insurance, title searches and examinations, preparation and execution of residential and commercial leases, 1031 exchanges, and escrow services.

Many engagement agreements will also discuss miscellaneous items, such as how often you should expect to hear from your attorney or her office, how quickly to expect responses to phone calls or emails, and even mileage rates if your attorney must travel on your behalf. “Defining this information benefits you, as the client, so that you are aware of the scope of work needed to be done and the costs associated with it,” says Viccellio. “The agreement sets forth the duties of the law firm, the lawyer, and the client as they work together to resolve your legal needs.”

Choose the name you can trust for your real estate transactions.

Continued July 2018

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61


Money & Career Legal Corner Gather documents and pertinent information to take to the meeting. A lawyer may ask you to bring certain documents, but you should also bring any that you think are important to your case. “I always ask that my potential clients bring as much documentation as possible to the initial consultation,” says Jamie Gary, an attorney with Dwight & Gary, LLC and Safeguard Title, LLC. “It is an opportunity for me to sort out the facts and provide the most competent and cost-effective advice up front before I am retained.” Gary says the documents required depend on the type of case. “A litigated case, particularly a personal injury case, can be won or lost at the initial consultation if the client fails to bring a pertinent document or a piece of information that helps me evaluate the case. If the potential client had previously been injured or treated for similar complaints in the past, I need to know about those injuries and complaints. While most

Formerly

potential clients may not retain previous medical records that reflect prior treatment, informing me of the prior injuries and prior treating health care providers will allow me to obtain more information concerning prior injuries and treatment.”

for the involved parties to initially provide my office with a copy of a buy or sell agreement or any other document reflecting the terms of the sale. Additionally, I need full legal names, marital history, and an address of the property to be sold.”

If a potential client seeks to open a succession to handle the assets and debts of an estate, Gary says the most pertinent documents are the last will and testament, certified copy of death certificate, bank statements covering the date of death, credit card statements covering the date of death, vehicle titles, and tax assessments in the name of the deceased.

Attend your consultations. Take notes during these meetings to help you remember later what each lawyer said and what your initial impressions were. If you are having a difficult time understanding your lawyer, request that he/ she speak in a manner you can understand.

If it is a non-litigated matter, such as a real estate closing, there is never too much information that the client, lender, or realtor can provide a lawyer, Gary adds. “Real estate closings are time sensitive. The more information I can give to my closing secretary up front, the more efficient the closing process. We have the resources to obtain legal descriptions, tax assessments, and title documents. However, it is pertinent

Dwight Law Firm

DEDICATION EXPERIENCE DILIGENCE • • • • • •

Business & Commercial Law Auto Accidents & Personal Injury Successions & Estate Planning Workers Compensation Property Damages & Insurance Claims Energy Law - Oil & Gas Pipelines as well as • Real Estate Closings & Property Law provided by our title company:

SAFEGUARD TITLE continuing the tradition of providing prompt and proficient closings for buyers, sellers, lenders and real estate agents.

D G 62 www.thriveswla.com

DWIGHT & GARY, LLC 337.439.3138 • Fax 337.439.3395 ATTORNEYS AT LAW

1400 Ryan Street • Lake Charles, LA 70601 dwightlaw.com • info@dwightlaw.com

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July 2018


Five Ways to Minimize Stress in Divorce and Custody Cases Regardless of the circumstances which may take someone to a family law attorney, divorce and child custody cases almost always start in a negative place. “Divorce is emotionally, spiritually, financially, and physically draining,” says attorney Sean Corcoran, with Corcoran Family Law. “It should never be taken lightly and should only be considered when all other options have been exhausted. I encourage each person who enters my office to participate in marriage counseling. I provide them with the names of counselors and encourage them to only move forward if marital counseling is unsuccessful and they truly see divorce as the only option.” When people are convinced they have reached that point, Corcoran counsels his clients in a way that helps to keep their emotions in check and their focus on what is truly important. He offers his clients these five tips to help minimize the inherent stress of divorce:

TABLES ON SALE NOW! TABLE PURCHASE OPPORTUNITIES Table of 8: $800.00 | Table of 10: $1,000.00

To purchase your table, call 337-602-6788 or email awards@apgrowth.org

Growing SWLA Strong Awards Banquet Historic Calcasieu Marine National Bank

Thursday, August 2, 2018 Doors open at 6pm, Event begins at 6:45pm

Care for your emotions Corcoran believes that everyone benefits from speaking to others about the important issues in their lives,

Guest Speaker:

337-602-6788 | APGrowth.org July 2018

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Gov. John Bel Edwards

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63


Money & Career Legal Corner

regardless of what is going on. This is particularly the case when going through a divorce, and it applies not only to the parties involved, but also to the children who face a completely new reality. There are many excellent local therapists who specialize in counseling couples. Simply having someone to talk to can make a significant difference.

Care for your body We’ve all been inundated with thousands of articles in magazines and on the internet about the stressrelieving benefits of proper diet, sleep, and exercise. Divorce can be the most stressful experience that most people have ever experienced, so taking care of yourself physically is even more important when dealing with such a life-changing event. Although it may not feel like it at the time, getting enough sleep, eating healthy foods, and getting fresh air ensures you are better able to handle the stress that you might not be able to control.

Care for your spirituality Corcoran believes there is nothing as powerful as what God can do to heal the damage of divorce. He advises couples to go to church or their place of worship, talk to their pastor or spiritual advisor about what they are going through and how it is affecting them, and pray to God that He heals everyone involved and helps carry them during this trying time. “He is always there and is always listening, and even in the darkest times, He will always help,” says Corcoran.

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Care for your finances Corcoran recommends clients create a budget, regardless of income. When that same income now must support two separate households, things get tight on both sides. There are great budgeting tools for computers and smart phones, and there is an abundance of information available on the internet on how to cut costs and plan spending and saving. Utilize these tools and it will make each month a little easier.

Focus on what is truly important If there are children involved in a divorce situation, Corcoran says they should be the most important focus for couples. “The arguments have already happened. The perceived point of no return has already been reached. The lines have already been drawn in the sand and have either been crossed or walked away from. The decision has been made to move forward in a different direction. It is a decision, and with it comes the responsibility to focus on what is important. If children are involved, nothing is more important. No words said are as important as what or how your children hear them. And no fight is as important as ensuring that when the smoke clears your children have two parents and know that each parent loves them. In five or ten or 20 years, you may not remember the specifics of the argument, but the impression upon your children will impact them for life.” Contact Corcoran Family Law for a list of marriage counselors in the Lake Area, or with any other questions you may have, at 337-602-6214.

July 2018


CITGO and Bess the Book Bus Deliver the Joy of Reading to Southwest Louisiana Children for Tenth Consecutive Year This May, with the help of CITGO Petroleum Corporation, mobile literacy program Bess the Book Bus delivered the joy of reading to young students as part of its 2018 nationwide tour. Four local schools including Brenda Hunter Head Start Wonderland of Play, E.K. Key Elementary School, Maplewood Elementary School and Vincent Settlement Elementary School, received a special visit from Bess the Book Bus. Annually, CITGO celebrates National Reading Month and these visits bring CITGO representatives and Miss America titleholders to more than 50 schools and children’s hospitals where they have opportunities for reading sessions and deliver more than 18,000 books. Laryssa Bonacquisti, Miss Louisiana 2017, and Gracie Reichman, Miss Louisiana’s Outstanding Teen, joined Bess the Book Bus for the Southwest Louisiana visits. For more information, visit www.CITGO.com.

July 2018

Home Instead Senior Care Celebrates 15th Anniversary George A. Cestia, owner of the Home Instead Senior Care office in Lake Charles is proud to commemorate 15 years of providing outstanding service to seniors and their families in the Southwest Louisiana area. The local company was founded in 2003, as part of a franchise network that has become the largest of its kind in the world. Home Instead Senior Care helps seniors who want to remain in their homes as they age by providing dependable, compassionate care at all levels, including specialty care for those with Parkinson’s disease, arthritis, Alzheimer’s or other dementias. The Lake Charles office has employed 2,216 CAREGivers, who are trained, bonded and insured, in the last 15 years. These CAREGivers provide a number of services including assistance with meal preparation, medication reminders, bathing, grooming and transportation for errands or appointments. For more information, contact us at (337) 480-0023 or visit www.homeinstead.com/480.

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CHRISTUS St. Patrick Foundation’s Children’s Miracle Network and CHRISTUS Health Donate 10 Life-Saving Defibrillators to Beauregard Parish Schools Continuing the goal of keeping our children safe and healthy, CHRISTUS St. Patrick Foundation’s Children’s Miracle Network (CMN) and CHRISTUS Health donated ten Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) to Beauregard Parish middle and high schools’ athletic programs. An AED is a portable device that checks heart rhythm and can send an electric shock to the heart to try to restore a normal rhythm. AEDs are used to treat sudden cardiac arrest (SCA), and can save an athlete’s life if used in response to a cardiac event occurring on the field or court. The donation was funded by a generous CHRISTUS Health grant as well as CMN funds raised locally by CMN Corporate Partners and individuals. Children’s Miracle Network funds are raised locally and used to create local miracles by funding advanced pediatric surgical and treatment equipment and programs benefitting children and their families throughout our region.

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Mind & Body

Parents: Sugar isn’t the Only Cavity Culprit by Kristy Como Armand

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For years sugar has been blamed for a large variety of frustrating behaviors— hyperactive children, expanding waistlines, headaches, three o’clock energy crashes, poor nutrition. When it comes to tooth decay, we looked to sugar once again, quick to blame it for all our tooth-decaying woes. But sugar does not stand alone when it comes to causing cavities, according to pediatric dentist Eric Sanders, DDS. Parents who are on the lookout for their children’s teeth shouldn’t just confiscate the candy and cake, Dr. Sanders said. They should also keep an eye on sports drinks, sodas and even potato chips and fruit. “You can brush twice a day and avoid the sweet treats and still get cavities,” Dr. Sanders said. Sugar isn’t off the hook, of course. The reason it’s a main cavitycausing culprit is because of its high acidity. “Acidity is the true perpetrator.” According to Dr. Sanders, everyone has natural bacteria in their mouth that forms plaque. When plaque interacts with food deposits it produces acids that damage, demineralize or dissolve tooth enamel over time. The resulting acids can attack teeth for 20 minutes or more after you’ve finished eating and if the attacks are continual, it will break down the hard enamel on the surface of your teeth and eventually lead to tooth decay. Because some foods are already high in acidity, it can further complicate or hasten the process, Dr. Sanders said. “The higher the pH level in your mouth, the more cavity-prone you become.” These cavity-causing foods and drinks include sugary snacks like cookies, lollipops, bubble gum and Kool-Aid, but also encompass things like coffees, teas, fresh fruit, potato chips, non-dairy creamer, beer and grain products and other carbohydrates and starches. “Obviously some of these foods, like fresh fruit, are very nutritious and shouldn’t be sacrificed for the sake of cavities. Instead, consider ways to counteract the negative effects that fruit acidity will have on you or your child’s teeth,” Dr. Sanders said. Dr. Sanders provided the following tips for parents who want to prevent cavities in their children and themselves:

July 2018


zz According to the American Academy of General Dentistry, a high level of saliva in the mouth is effective in slowing the progression of tooth decay because saliva helps to restore the natural balance of acid in the mouth. When the acidity is high on a regular basis, the saliva doesn’t have an opportunity to restore the balance. People who eat a high-carbohydrate, high-acid diet, should temper it with foods that are lower in sugar and starches. This gives the saliva an opportunity to do its work. zz Are you or your child fans of chewing gum? If so, choose sugar-free, xylitol gum to increase the amount of saliva in the mouth, which will also help restore the pH. zz Reduce consumption of sugary sodas, fruit juices and fruit drinks.

zz Prepare snacks that raise the mouth’s pH, such as yogurt, cheese, sesame seeds, celery, water, carrots, sweet potatoes and broccoli. zz If your child eats something sugary or cavity-causing, encourage them to follow it up with a handful of peanuts or some other food item that is friendly on the teeth. zz Brushing immediately after eating something sweet isn’t necessary. Instead, drink water to neutralize the pH balance in the mouth. zz Use fluoride toothpaste. Fluoride strengths tooth enamel, which raises its defense mechanisms against acid. zz Drink through a straw. It’s best if the straw is positioned toward the back of the mouth to limit the amount of time the beverage is in contact with the teeth.

zz It’s better to consume sweet, sugary treats with a meal, when the mouth is producing more saliva. The added saliva created by a meal, rather than a quick snack, will help neutralize the acid in the mouth and could help rinse some of the cavity-causing particles. zz Drink lots of water. Fluoridated water is ideal for preventing tooth decay. zz Brush teeth twice a day and floss at least once. zz Limit substances that rob the mouth of healthy saliva. This includes alcohol and even many medicines, such as antihistamines. zz If your child is involved in sports, have them drink water rather than energy or sports drinks whenever possible.

For more information about dental care for children, call Dr. Sanders at 433-5437 or visit www.sanderspediatricdentistry.com

There’s strength in our numbers. We’re proud to be the region’s largest, independent musculoskeletal group. Our experienced specialists work together to provide our patients with the type of care they expect and deserve—personalized, attentive, respectful, and of the highest quality. And when it comes to technology, we’re bringing the latest advances to Southwest Louisiana so you won’t have to leave home to get the care you need. Our team of doctors includes these specialties: orthopaedic surgery physical medicine and rehabilitation foot and ankle care/surgery

interventional pain management hand surgery neurosurgery

Whatever your musculoskeletal concern, we’ve got you covered from head to toe.

Lake Charles | Sulphur

CenterforOrtho.com July 2018

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Mind

& Body

Take control of your pain and improve your life with

Managing Pain without Medication

AcuPlus.

by Haley Armand Tarasiewicz

Five Ways

Chronic Pain Can Affect Your Life:

1. Takes enjoyment out of life 2. Leads to depression 3. Affects concentration 4. Impacts ability to work 5. Poor sleep

If you’ve tried different pain creams, ointments and medications with little success, AcuPlus offers real relief for muscle and joint pain. Developed locally, AcuPlus delivers cool, soothing, targeted pain relief. Its fast-acting formula also reduces swelling and inflammation. AcuPlus is made from proven, all-natural ingredients. Its high quality, proprietary blend is FDA-registered. Just apply to the skin and it will penetrate deeply to promote healing and recovery.

Learn more about AcuPlus at AcuPlus.com. You can order there, or Amazon.com. It’s also available at Center for Orthopaedics, 1747 Imperial Blvd., Lake Charles.

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In the United States, pain is the most common complaint that leads patients to seek medical care. While over-thecounter pain relievers and other conservative measures are usually adequate to make a mild headache or muscle ache feel better, chronic headaches, back pain, surgery recovery, sports injuries, and accidents usually require physician care for pain management. To help alleviate and manage pain, patients often receive prescription medications — many of them powerful opioids. While opioids are appropriate for the management of acute pain in the short term, their role in the management of chronic pain is very problematic. An opioid is a type of pain medication that can have serious side effects if used correctly, incorrectly or for prolonged periods of time. Typical side effects include drowsiness, nausea, vomiting, constipation, endocrine abnormalities, psychological issues, and actually can lead to increased pain. Prolonged use increases the risk of tolerance, dependence, and addiction. Although opioid use for acute/postsurgical pain and palliative care is accepted,

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the controversy continues concerning their long-term use for the treatment of chronic pain. Dr. Joseph Crookshank III, MD, board certified Interventional Pain Management Specialist and Anesthesiologist with the Center for Orthopedics, an affiliate of Imperial Health, seeks to provide other options. These options include non-opioid based multimodal treatment as an alternative, and in most cases, preferred, option to treat chronic pain while avoiding the unfavorable side effect profile of opioids. “The primary goal of chronic pain treatment is to maximize function while providing true, long-term pain relief,” says Dr. Crookshank. “Ideally, this is accomplished by treating the multiple causes of chronic pain directly, which decreases a person’s reliance, or chance of reliance, on powerful opioids. The non-opioid multimodal therapy model uses a combination of non-narcotic pain medicines, physical therapy, psychology and procedures to treat the whole person and the pathology. I practice these methods with a focus on improving and restoring functionality, quality July 2018


of life and ability to perform activities of daily living as quickly as possible without the reliance on medications.” Dr. Crookshank says these goals are achieved through the use of minimally invasive, outpatient interventions. The spectrum of potential interventions includes everything from injections to the implantation of spinal cord stimulators. “These treatments are tailored for each patient to help optimize chronic conditions in an effort to help restore a patient’s quality of life.” He describes the building blocks of multimodal methods and how they work with your body:

• Interventional pain management uses minimally invasive “interventions” to block the formation, production, propagation, and transmission of pain signals to the brain through methods including injections, nerve blocks, spinal cord stimulation and kyphoplasty. These treatment strategies allow for selective targeting of injured and painful body areas, while minimizing complications such as infection, bleeding, recovery time, and further injury.

July 2018

• Behavioral and psychological approaches for addressing pain focus on the mind-body relationship and consist of techniques including relaxation and stress reduction training, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), communication skills and flare management.

• Complementary therapies

include passive modalities such as acupuncture/accupressure, hypnosis, occupational and physical therapy, massage, and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation; and active modalities such as relaxation, biofeedback, deep breathing, guided imagery, distraction and visualization.

The bottom-line is non-opioid pain treatment should be a firstline approach whenever possible after the initial injury or trauma is addressed, adds Dr. Crookshank. “We’ve had great success using multimodal methods to help people return to a productive life.”

SLEEP like a baby

AGAIN. Over time, some of us lose our natural ability to sleep well. Sleep disorders such as sleep apnea, restless leg syndrome, insomnia and narcolepsy interfere with getting quality sleep. Our sleep specialists at the Sleep Disorder Center of Louisiana can diagnose and treat over 80 types of sleep disorders. If you’re having difficulty getting a good night’s sleep, call us for an appointment and sleep like a baby again.

For more information about pain management using these treatments, call Dr. Crookshank at Center for Orthopaedics, (337) 721-7236.

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Sleep Specialists

Phillip Conner, MD Michelle Zimmerman, NP

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Mind

& Body

BEYOND BRACES by Taylor Trahan Henry

At the first mention of the word orthodontist or orthodontics, people’s minds automatically turn to the thought of braces. But did you know that orthodontists do much more than that? While braces tend to be their main practice, they actually perform many services that aim to properly align teeth and reposition the jaw. Dr. Robert Lamb, orthodontist with Oak Park Dental in Lake Charles, provides some insight on the variety of conditions orthodontics can remedy as well as the many tools of the trade. Space Maintainers It’s not uncommon for baby teeth to be lost earlier than normal. When this happens, space fillers may need to be put in to ensure that other teeth do not grow into the space meant for the missing tooth. “These space maintainers allow for more teeth to fall out and adult teeth to grow in without disruption,” said Dr. Lamb. A band, which is attached to one tooth, and a wire, which is extended to the tooth on the other side of the gap, work together to stretch and keep the space open.

Aligners Much like braces, aligners help to straighten and align teeth. They are common in

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remedying underbites, overbites, open bites, cross bites, or crowding. In the industry today, most aligners are clear trays that allow for the gradual alignment of teeth while remaining virtually invisible to others. Dr. Lamb explains that these trays are tailor made to your teeth to mold your perfect smile.

Jaw Repositioning Appliances Oftentimes called splints, jaw repositioning appliances are used to manipulate either the upper or lower jaw, or the jaw as a whole, to close more naturally. “This course of treatment is common in those with temporomandibular joint disorder, or TMJ,” says Dr. Lamb. Splints can often be used to treat injuries to the jaw as a result of car accidents, sports injuries, or other head trauma. Depending on the severity of the issue and the decidedupon course of treatment, splints may be worn around the clock or only at night. Palatal Expander Palatal expanders create more space in a child’s mouth by gradually widening the upper jaw. While it sounds scary, it’s actually relatively easy to do and for the patient to tolerate. One of the benefits of receiving orthodontic treatment in childhood is

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that it allows for the orthodontist to take advantage of pre-pubescent bone structure. “Prior to puberty, the two separate halves that make up the upper jaw have not fused together,” says Dr. Lamb. “Before that happens, the two bones can be separated and stabilized gradually and gently.” Removable Retainers Another course of treatment that you may be more familiar with, a retainer, is made to keep your orthodontist’s hard work from going to waste. After braces or aligning trays, a custom-fit retainer can be worn to keep teeth from shifting back to their original position. Depending on your needs, there are two options: a plate worn on the palate with a metal wire fitting against the front teeth, or a clear tray that fits around your teeth. More often than not, these retainers are worn at night only. As you can see, orthodontists have many ways of achieving a more beautiful smile. Oak Park Dental offers a variety of services to correct the alignment of teeth and positioning of the jaw. For more information, visit www.oakparkdental.com or call (337) 478-3232.

July 2018


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Meet the Newest Member of our Physician Team,

Brian Kelley, DO, Neurosurgeon

Imperial Health proudly welcomes Dr. Brian Kelley, board certified neurosurgeon, to our medical staff. He joins the Center for Orthopaedics’ group of musculoskeletal specialists. Dr. Kelley has been in practice in Lake Charles for five years. He is originally from Kansas and earned his undergraduate degree at the University of Kansas in Genetics and Biochemistry and his Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine at Oklahoma State University. He completed an internship in General Surgery and residency in Neurosurgery at the University of Kansas Medical Center. Dr. Kelley is certified by the American Board of Neurological Surgery. Beginning July 1, Dr. Kelley will be practicing in the Lake Charles office of Center for Orthopaedics, located at 1747 Imperial Blvd.

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Mind

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Getting a Jump on

PHYSICAL LITERACY by Christine Fisher

Physical literacy is a relatively new buzzword in the fitness industry. Because of the decline nationwide in children engaging in physical exercise, many children aren’t getting the opportunity to develop confidence and coordination in physical activities. Physical literacy addresses this growing need with targeted programs designed to motivate young people, encourage a desire for fitness, and enhance a child’s ability when it comes to movement skills. Years ago, P.E. classes and recess at school included time on monkey bars, playing chase, and other childhood games along with structured physical activities. For a variety of reasons, this organized playtime that was a gateway for children to learn and develop movement skills, has diminished and

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more sedentary activity has been embraced, especially at home. In many homes, children are indoors playing on a tablet or video game, rather than being active outdoors. “We’ve noticed a decline in activity in children,” explains Suzy Trahan, ACSM Certified Exercise Physiologist, ACE Certified Personal Trainer and Director of Dynamic Dimensions Fitness Centers of West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital. “Many times, children don’t want to participate in physical activities. They see it as a punishment. Health and fitness experts are looking closely at this behavior; research is showing that because children aren’t as active anymore, there is a decline in their movement ability or physical literacy. Just as we teach children to read and write, we’re finding

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that they benefit from fundamental movement skills. This, in turn, gives them confidence to participate in various physical activities and sports, which benefits their overall development physically, socially, and mentally.” Parents can look for basic movements to see if their child is on track with physical achievements or if they need a little help in that area. Here is a list of basic physical movements that should be reached in early school-aged children. This is not a comprehensive list of physical literacy achievements, but a good start in checking a child’s abilities. Forward roll. This is just a simple roll on the floor but it shows a reasonable degree of flexibility and coordination.

July 2018


Flat-footed squat. This movement consists of standing upright, squatting down, then standing up again. It indicates a blend of flexibility, coordination, balance, and strength. Some children have difficulty keeping their feet flat on the ground, which points to the need to work on balance and strength in key leg muscle groups. Swimming. The ability to swim and be comfortable and confident in water is important not only for physical achievement but also for safety. Strike an object. Hitting a ball with a bat, or a birdie with a racquet is a good indication of hand-eye coordination and balance. Land solidly from jumping. Watch as a child jumps down from an elevated position. Do they land with their knees aligned squarely above their feet or do their knees collapse inwards? Landing solidly helps children be able to hop, a fundamental movement skill.

Confidence to try sports. Children who have a reasonable degree of physical literacy feel confident trying a sports activity. Being able to run, jump, and throw gives them the skills they need to try their hand at any number of sports. “It may seem like these skills are naturally learned by children as they grow up, and in some cases, they are. But because our society has changed away from consistent movement throughout the day to a more sedentary lifestyle, many children aren’t given opportunities to learn basic movement skills,” Trahan says. “Activities and games are to physical literacy what nursery rhymes are to language: it’s a fun and simple way for a child to develop the skills they need. Children who are physically literate will be more confident to play games and participate in activities.” Under Trahan’s direction, Dynamic Dimensions in Moss Bluff is launching Dynamic Kids, a new training program designed to encourage physical literacy in children ages three to 12. “The activities are centered around

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the elements of physical literacy, so that all of the children develop basic movement skills and have the tools they need to enjoy an active lifestyle. When children are encouraged to be more active and enjoy it, they have a strong foundation for continuing these good behaviors as they grow into adulthood.” The benefits of being physically active are numerous and include increased selfesteem, as well as better performance in school and reduced risk of heart disease, stroke, cancer, and diabetes. Dynamic Kids will focus on movement development such as balance, strength, and agility; social skills such as teamwork and cooperation; and character building such as kindness, respect, and responsibility. “The coaches for this program are all professionally trained in exercise and movement and they truly have a love for teaching and coaching kids,” Trahan explains. “Their passion for moving is contagious!”

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!

Solutions for Life

from Solutions Counseling & EAP by Keri Forbess-McCorquodale, MS, LPC, LMFT, CEAP

That’s Curious! I recently came across something that I am trying to adopt as my new life mantra: Be curious, not judgmental. Read that again: Be curious, not judgmental. Now, you may be saying to yourself, isn’t she a therapist? Shouldn’t she always be nonjudgmental? Oh, that it were so! In the therapy room I am pretty good at remaining curious. But outside of that space, I find myself jumping to conclusions sometimes, assuming things, and generally being “judgy” more often than I would like. Don’t get me wrong – I can justify anyone’s behavior, good or bad. I can suppose the bad behavior is due to childhood issues, or being treated unfairly, or any number of reasons. In therapy, I truly “seek first to understand” before jumping in to solutions and changes. Also, I’ve written in this column how helpful it is to make up an excuse for people who are doing things you find irritating. That man is driving so slowly because he is having car trouble. The lady at the restaurant counter was so rude because she has problems at home. And I really do use this tool . . . AFTER I’ve been judgmental for a brief period.

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My goal is to be curious instead of judgmental as a first response. To skip over the initial irritated, “REALLY?!” and move straight into, “There is a reason this person is doing this, and I’m curious about what that reason might be.” How often have you jumped to conclusions, or been frustrated with someone, only to find out there was actually a good reason for their behavior? Yeah, me too. Sigh. I read a story recently that I think illustrates this point beautifully: There was a young man who got angry so often, and caused so much conflict, that he was mandated to counseling. One day, after several sessions, where he was taught anger management and mindfulness techniques, he stopped by the grocery store. It was crowded, the checkout lines were long, and he was tired. To make matters worse, there was no express lane open, and he had only a few items. His irritation really started to bubble up when the cashier stopped checking out the person in front of him to coo over the baby the customer held. Then, the cashier actually took the baby from the customer and held him! The nerve! We’re

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all trying to get home! What is this crazy cashier doing??? He could feel the anger rising, and because he had been training in mindfulness, he also felt the stress and tension that came along with the anger. So, as he’d learned to do, he took some breaths, acknowledged what he was feeling, and let it subside. By the time it was his turn, he was calmer, so he said to the clerk, “That was a cute kid you were holding.” And she said, “Oh, he’s my boy. You see, my husband was in the military. He was killed in combat last year, so now I have to work full-time. My mom brings my son in once a day so I can see him.” Whoa. I can see me having the same response as him, can’t you? And wouldn’t we feel put in our places?! As well we should, too. Won’t you join me in the “curious zone?” Let’s stop making assumptions, let’s stop looking down our noses at people who are not acting as WE think they should. Let’s remember there are generally pretty good reasons to explain the behavior of others. And, if we are curious instead of judgmental, we just might achieve a greater level of understanding along with some serenity.

July 2018


will include gamma-ray flashes detection, flight software, telemetry (measurements) and a ground station (a facility linked to a communications satellite). Pride of McNeese Band Members Selected for Elite Drum Corps International

McNeese Student Selected for NASA Internship McNeese State University engineering junior Anthony Miller, of Sulphur, is one of 13 undergraduates from Louisiana institutions to receive a NASA-funded summer internship focused on what happens inside thunderstorm cells at high altitudes. This 10-week internship looks into the correlation of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes, electric fields and lightning strikes in storms. This project revolves around a ballooning project sponsored by the Louisiana SPACE program located on the Louisiana State University campus and funded by NASA’s Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research. The interns are working with LSU staff members on research and development that

Seven members of the McNeese State University Pride of McNeese Marching Band are participating this summer in the elite Drum Corps International (DCI), which consists of 47 corps from the United States, Canada and Europe. The students will perform and compete head-to-head with their corps units during a national tour that ends with the DCI World Championships August 6-11 in Indianapolis, Indiana. Following a vigorous audition process, only the top performers on instruments and in marching are chosen, according to Dr. Lonny Benoit, interim head of the W.A. and Dorothy Hanna Department of Performing Arts. Those selected for the DCI tour are: Jonathan Moore, Houma, a health and human performance major, on euphonium and David Billodeau, Sulphur, music education major, as drum major/rehearsal assistant, both with the Blue Stars in La Crosse, Wisconsin; Dawson Wallace, Merryville, music

education and music performance major, on mellophone, with the Phantom Regiment in Rockford, Illinois; Ty Ellender, Lake Charles, music education major, on percussion, with the Cadets in Allentown, Pennsylvania; Hayley Bourgeois, Lake Charles, music education major, on percussion and Ashlyn Dufren, Prairieville, engineering major, in the Color Guard, both with the Louisiana Stars in Lafayette; and Joshua Rigby, Lumberton, Texas, music education major, on euphonium with the Corpsmen in San Antonio, Texas. McNeese Awards Emeritus Titles McNeese State University has honored seven past faculty members and administrators with emeritus status for their exemplary service to students, the university and the community. Emeritus titles are awarded to retired faculty and administrators in recognition of distinguished academic careers and professional contributions and those who have served significant portions of their careers at McNeese. Receiving awards were: Dr. Anita Fields-Gold, nursing, and Edward Khoury, enrollment management, Dean Emeritus; and Dr. Robert Cooper, English, Dr. Michael Kurth, economics, Michele Martin, music, Dr. Jay Uppot, engineering, and Dr. Thomas Watson, history, Professor Emeritus.

THIS SPACE COULD BE YOURS! Contact Katie@thriveswla.com for more information on sponsoring McNeese’s news page. July 2018

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