Page 1

JULY 2017

Special Sections:

BACK TO THE BOOKS! LEGAL ROUNDUP July 2017

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

1


Rehabilitation Hospital

of Jennings

DIAgNOSeS THAT we TReAT

• Brain Injury

• Hip Fractures

• Strokes

• Osteoarthritis/DJD

• Amputations

• Neurological Disorders

• Burns

• Spinal Cord Injury

• Major Multiple Trauma

• Congenital Deformities

• Rheumatoid Arthritis

• Systemic Vasculidities

• Joint Replacements

Others who can benefit from inpatient rehabilitation are postoperative patients, accident victims and cancer patients. 24 Hour Nursing Care • Physical Therapy • Occupational Therapy Speech Therapy • Nutritional Counseling and Monitoring Case Management Call for a free assessment today. One Hospital Drive, Ste. 101 • Jennings, LA 70546 • Phone: (337) 821-5353 • Fax: (337) 821-5355 or 5366 jenningsrehab@yahoo.com • www.jenningsrehab.com 2 www.thriveswla.com

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2017


July 2017

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

3


Contents In This Issue Wining &Dining

6

Yellowfin Vodka 8 Mama Shine’s Shaved Ice & More 10 Cottage Cheese Makes a Comeback Places &Faces

14

Regular Features 12 First Person with Maestro Bohuslav Rattay 18 Who’s News 66 Business Buzz 68 McNeese Corral 69 Happenings 74 Solutions for Life

8

Where are You Going? Mystery Travel 16 Ethel Precht: A Tribute 20 – 29 Cover Story:

BAYOU Rhythms

Mind &Body

30

Music Can Be a Major Key to Therapeutic Healing 32 Tap Into the Benefits of Water 33 Go Big and Stay Home. How to Build a Home Gym 34 Dealing with Summer Common Colds

33

Home &Family 36 – 48 Special Section: Back to the Books 50 Little Free Pantry

Money &Career

52 – 61 Special Feature: LEGAL ROUNDUP

73

62 Coupling your Finances: Tips for Talking Money in a Relationship 64 CITGO Provides Elementary Schools with Student Engineering Projects Style &Beauty

70 How to Achieve the “No Makeup” Makeup Look 72 What’s a Clothing Subscription Box, and Should You Try One? 73 Pack Your Bag for a Day at the Beach! 2017

UP NEXT!

SOUTHWEST LOUISIANA

Your Guide to Thriving Local Businesses in our Region

Later this month, watch for our annual Homegrown issue, where we’ll showcase local businesses, their cultural contributions, the services they offer, and their support of state and local economy. Shop local!

DON’T JUST LIVE, THRIVE!

Thrive is designed for people focused on living a happy, healthy life, one that is balanced, full of energy and contentment. Thrive readers want to make the most of every day and be successful in all areas of their lives – family, health, home and career. 4 www.thriveswla.com

Editors and Publishers

Kristy Como Armand Christine Fisher

Advertising Sales ads@thriveswla.com 337.310.2099

Creative Director

Barbara VanGossen

Submissions edit@thriveswla.com

Managing Editor

Angie Kay Dilmore

Business Manager

Katie McDaniel Stevenson

Design and Layout

Mandy Gilmore

Assistant Designers

Shonda Manuel Kris Roy

Submitted articles and photos are welcome. Thrive assumes no responsibility for unsolicited materials and does not guarantee any submissions.

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2017


July 2017

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

5


Wining & Dining

Yellowfin Vodka Locally-Made and Sippin’ Smooth by Angie Kay Dilmore

In 2007, when Jamison Trouth told his chemical engineering classmates at McNeese State University about his future plans to own and operate a vodka distillery, they voiced considerable skepticism. Chemical engineering majors move on to work in petro-chemical plants. Everyone knows that! But Trouth never gave up on his dream. Sure, he indeed had to work in the plants for seven years to save up enough money to make his dream become a reality. But in 2014, he decided it was time. “If I was going to do it, I needed to jump all in. I quit my job, sold my house, and started making it happen,” says Trouth. Trouth spent the next two years on brand development, design and procurement of equipment, extensive permitting, and label design. He bottled his first batch of artisan vodka on Christmas Day 2016. Since then, he has promoted his new product via word of mouth and social media. His marketing method seems to be effective, and he is already working to increase his monthly production because he can’t keep his popular spirits in stock. Trouth says his vodka is honestly the best vodka he’s ever tasted. What makes Yellowfin Vodka unique and special? It is fermented and distilled from pure crystallized Louisiana cane sugar and filtered in five stages over two days, which results in a “smooth, sippable vodka.” Yellowfin Distillery is essentially a one-man operation. Trouth carries out

6 www.thriveswla.com

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2017


every step of the vodka-making process himself, from schlepping the sugar to attaching the labels. However, he says that he is very grateful for the help and support of friends and family. And he’d like to extend a special thank you to Larry G. Huber, Sr. and David Haynes of Control Concepts in Sulphur, who donated materials and time from their busy schedules to help Trouth install the control system that powers and operates his distillation system. Trouth spent considerable time on both the name of his business and the design of his colorful label. He enjoys spearfishing and wanted the brand to reflect his passion. The background of the front label is a photo taken with his GoPro on a spearfishing trip in the Gulf. He also wanted the brand to highlight a local natural resource and he felt Yellowfin was perfect. And as Trouth explains, fresh yellowfin tuna can be enjoyed raw or slightly seared, just as his vodka can be appreciated either straight up at room temperature or on the rocks. Currently, Trouth sells his Yellowfin Vodka from the distillery, located at 1716 E. Burton St., Sulphur, La., and is open Wednesday – Friday, 11:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. and Saturday 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Follow @Yellowfin Distillery on Facebook and Instagram or at www.yellowfinvodka.com. Trouth can be reached via social media or at jamison@yellowfinvodka.com.

2017 Keynote Speaker

Genevieve Gorder THURSDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2017 LAKE CHARLES CIVIC CENTER

8:00 am - 4:00 pm Featuring Various DIY Workshops Vendor Registration for Marketplace Now Open!

womenscommissionswla.com (Registration Opening Soon!) July 2017

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

7


Wining & Dining

Mama Shine’s

Shaved Ice and More Raises Snow Cones to a New Level of COOL by Mitch Thomas

Imagine a cookie dough-flavored ice beach under a cocktail umbrella with Sour Belt beach towels, a Sour Patch gummy bear floating in a Gummy Life-Saver on an ocean of blue-Hawaiian ice. This quirky creativity can be found year-around at Mama Shine’s Shaved Ice and More, where patrons enjoy specialty shaved-ice snow cones, like the Beach Day described above, or craft their own custom masterpieces from 62 flavors and 16 toppings, including the popular cheesecake, whipped cream, fruits, and even pickles, for those so inclined. Mama Shine’s, located on Smith Rd. just off of La. 14 in Lake Charles, is the product

8 www.thriveswla.com

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

of a lifetime of dreaming and two years of research. Before opening her shop in 2015, owner Dana Bodin wanted to create a spot her local community could call their own, but the stand has garnered attention from people all over Southwest Louisiana. “I’ve been living in the neighborhood for 25 years,” Bodin said. “And I wanted to open a little neighborhood snow cone stand because I had a dream of a nice place for the neighbors to walk over to on a sunny day with the children. I never imagined it would become what it is.” For Bodin, the stand’s success comes from her and her team’s hard work to deliver

July 2017


satisfaction, in both friendly service and a level of quality typically found only in small momand-pop shops. Her close-knit staff are all snow cone enthusiasts; many are former customers. Her stand also boasts one of the few machines in Louisiana that produces genuine shaved ice, which holds the syrups much longer than other kinds of crushed ice. As the name suggests, there’s “more” to Mama Shine’s than shaved ice. Bodin also sells prepared foods like nachos and hot dogs. She makes several sandwiches, like the hot ham and cheese, chopped barbecue chicken, and a roast beef and ham club. Stop by during the cooler months and you might find red beans and rice or gumbo. New to the snow cone menu is the Snownado, a combination of shaved ice and ice cream blended together in a decadent treat. Special combinations include the Carrie Loves Cheesecake, with strawberry cheesecake-flavored syrup, sweet cream, ice cream, fresh strawberries, and real cheesecake; or the Somewhere on the Beach, made from strawberries, mandarin oranges, pineapple blended in pina colada-

July 2017

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

flavored syrup, whipped cream, and three pieces of fruit on top. Try the Death by Chocolate, with brownies and chocolate syrup. Or consider July’s flavor of the month, berry crazy, for something different. Bodin reminds patrons that “cheesecake goes well with just about anything.” Though customers sometimes get confused, Bodin is not Mama Shine. The name belonged to her grandmother, a woman who lived a good, simple life of 101 years in Delcambre, La. “I originally had a different name for this snow cone stand, but while Mama Shine was sick, I visited her a lot and one day I thought, ‘You know what? I’m going to name my snow cone stand Mama Shine’s to honor my grandmother, and her name will live on and on.’ And it worked out great because everyone loved the name,” Bodin said. She doesn’t mind if new patrons still want to call her Mama Shine though. “My grandmother was an amazing woman, so I’d be honored to be called Mama Shine the rest of my days. That’s perfectly fine with me.” Bodin is simply pleased her business has been a success. “I don’t know what it is — maybe it’s my grandmother blessing us from above.”

www.thriveswla.com

9


Wining & Dining

Cottage Cheese Makes a Comeback

by Emily Alford

F

or the past decade or

so, yogurt has reigned supreme in the dairy

aisles of grocery stores. Whether it’s Greek or goat, yogurt has become the healthy snack staple of health nuts, foodies, and dieters alike. But slightly older shoppers may remember a time when cottage cheese was all the rage.

10 www.thriveswla.com

In the early 1970s, the average American ate about five pounds of cottage cheese per year, according to NPR, but in the decades that followed, the food fell out of fashion as yogurt consumption rose sevenfold. The two are very similar: both contain milk and bacteria, though different kinds. But unlike yogurt, cottage cheese bacteria causes small curds to form, which are cut into cubes, washed, and sometimes blended with cream. And while that doesn’t sound incredibly appetizing, the results are just as delicious and versatile as yogurt or sour cream. Not to mention the fact that cottage cheese is rich in protein, calcium, B vitamins and vitamin

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

A, which can promote weight loss and decrease risk of osteoporosis. So if cottage cheese is this great, why aren’t more brands pushing it the same way they do yogurt? The answer could be cottage cheese’s reputation as a bland food usually paired with Jello molds and peach slices. However, several companies are looking to give cottage cheese a makeover. One of those is Good Culture, which packages its cottage cheese like single-serve containers of trendy yogurt and offers appetizing flavors, such as pineapple or

July 2017


strawberry chia, along with savory options like kalamata olive. Cottage cheese also seems to be making a comeback on the menus of foodie restaurants in cities like Portland and Los Angeles, where chefs are increasingly using it in place of ricotta cheese. Whipping cottage cheese by hand or with a mixer gives it a fluffy texture similar to ricotta or even cream cheese, making it ideal for lightening up dips and desserts. It seems that food bloggers have long been awaiting a cottage cheese revival as well, and a host of websites offer cottage cheese-based recipes. One foodie blog, The Kitchn, even advocates dipping salty potato chips into cottage cheese instead of reaching for the French onion dip. Martha Stewart is also excited about the trend, suggesting cottage cheese-stuffed enchiladas and cottage cheese-dill skillet bread on her blog. Whether you’re looking to top a fruit salad with cottage cheese for a proteinpacked snack or get more adventurous by whipping your curds with a packet of dry ranch dressing, it’s worth revisiting this delicious dairy-aisle darling.

July 2017

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

11


Places & Faces

Bohuslav Rattay serves as music director and conductor with the El Paso Symphony Orchestra, the Midland Symphony Orchestra in Michigan, and has filled that same role since 2011 with our own Lake Charles Symphony, now in their 60th season. Rattay has been the conductor for allstate and youth symphonies and was on the faculty at Ball State University and the College of William and Mary. He acts as guest conductor at symphonies across the country and around the world. Yes, Rattay travels extensively. He was born in the Czech Republic (then Czechoslovakia) and was raised in a musical family. He started learning piano at age five, sang in a prestigious boys’ choir from age six, and later studied bassoon at the Prague Conservatory. In 1993, he came to the United States to continue his mastery of bassoon. First stop – McNeese State University. Then later on to Rice University in Houston. While in Lake Charles, Rattay played bassoon in the Community Band and the Lake Charles Symphony under William Kushner. He currently lives with his wife, Kellie, and their young daughters, Felina Isabella and Ajla Sage, in Santa Teresa, N.M., a small town just outside of El Paso. Thrive magazine recently talked with Rattay about growing up in Bohemia, setting aside the bassoon, and picking up the maestro’s baton.

first person by Angie Kay Dilmore

12 www.thriveswla.com

with Maestro Bohuslav Rattay Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2017


Tell me one of your fondest memories of your childhood in Prague. My parents were free-thinkers. My brother and I could disappear for the day and go play in the woods at my grandparents’ country house. No one would worry about us. At that time, that was possible.

What did you love about the bassoon and do you still have opportunities to play it? I loved the sound of bassoon, the sonority of it. And I sold my bassoon because I wasn’t using it as often as an instrument needs to be used. I don’t have the time for it.

You made the transition from bassoon player to conductor in your 30s. What attracted you to that role? One day a friend of mine asked me if I’d conduct a small group for him to make a tape recording for a music festival. I agreed, and of course, it was a disaster. But that put the conducting bug

in me. And then I realized I’d need to go back to school, because conducting is like any other craft. You have to go to school to learn all that.

You have said part of your role as conductor is to create an emotional connection between the audience and the orchestra. During a performance, your back is to the audience. How do you know this connection is being achieved? It’s an energy that flies in the air. It’s like a sixth sense. And I can tell by the reaction of the orchestra, too. They can sense it, as well. If they are having a good time, you know something is going right.

Why are the arts, music in particular, vitally important to a community? Much has been written about the horrendous times in Europe in the 1930s and 40s. People, especially Jewish people, were locked in camps. The

survivors always said one thing; ‘They (the captors) could take everything from us, except art. It was the only thing we could do on our own without them stealing it. And that helped us survive.’ Those were drastic times, but the principle applies to today’s world, too. When going through tough times, the arts, especially music, employs senses in our brains, creating a special connection that is not really explainable.

I read that your favorite dish is goulash and dumplings, a native Czech specialty. What do you like to eat when you are in Lake Charles? Gumbo. I go to Seafood Palace for a bowl of gumbo.

How do you relax in your spare time? What are your hobbies? I ride a

with a group of friends on the weekends. And I started painting. That was a dream for a long time.

Name three things you learned from your most trusted mentor. My conducting teacher, Gustav Meier (Peabody Institute of the Johns Hopkins University), who has since passed, taught us to always be ourselves when conducting. Our personalities will come through. He taught us kindness – to be kind to the players in the orchestra. This job requires a lot of diplomacy so that was a good lesson for me to learn. And he recommended (jokingly) to never look at the trombone section in the orchestra because even a quick glance will encourage the trombone players to play louder.

BMW Adventurer motorcycle

2017 - 2018 Events Saturday, July 15 Saturday, February 24 7 pm 5 pm Summer Pops - The Rat Pack Wild Beast Feast James E. Sudduth Coliseum

Saturday, September 30 7:30 pm Evangeline Suite Rosa Hart Theatre

Historic Calcasieu Marine National Bank Courtyard

Saturday, April 8 3 pm Video Games Live Rosa Hart Theatre

Saturday, October 28 8 pm Shaken not Stirred The Music of James Bond Golden Nugget Casino Resort

Saturday, December 3 Holiday Home Tour Location to be announced

Saturday, April 28 11 am Beethoven, Bubbly & Bingo Lake Charles Country Club

Banners Series Black Violin Tentative

lcsymphony.com

July 2017

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

13


Places & Faces

by Angie Kay Dilmore

Imagine you’re packing your bags for your next big vacation. You have the weather forecast for your pending trip, a suggested packing list, and what time to arrive at which airport, but otherwise, you have no idea where you are going. Once at the airport, you open an envelope for the big reveal. Entrepreneur Lillian Rafson started her business, Pack Up + Go, in January 2016, and thus far has sent 2500 people on surprise long-weekend getaways to destinations around the U.S. She believes this travel trend has taken off for a couple reasons. One, travel planning can be stressful and can deter from the enjoyment of the vacation. Mystery travel companies do all the research, coordinating, and booking so you can relax and enjoy your getaway. She adds that the travel industry and travelers in general continue to evolve. “People want more and more unique experiences. They want to live spontaneously, and nothing is more spontaneous than finding out your destination the day you depart!” Visit packupgo.com for more information. Magical Mystery Tours is another online site that has been planning surprise trips for travelers to international and domestic destinations around the world since 2009. Visit magical-mystery-tours.com for more information.

Sonjia Mackey (in blue in photo on left) and her fellow travelers in Antarctica (L), Easter Island (top), and the Andes Mountains, Chile (bottom)

How it Works

The concept is simple. You fill out an online form indicating your budget, your likes and dislikes, the places you have already been to, and the dates you are interested in traveling. The travel agents do the rest. A week or so before your departure, you receive the all-important envelope in the mail. Some travelers simply can’t stand the suspense and immediately open the envelope to discover where they are going, but most agree, it is more fun to wait until they are at the airport. 14 www.thriveswla.com

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2017


Local Mystery Travel Planner

Lake Charles native Sonjia Mackey grew up watching the Discovery Channel and Animal Planet. She especially loved shows on African safaris. She imagined one day going on a safari of her own, and in 2005, she did just that. She spent three weeks in Kenya and Tanzania. “It was a dream come true,” she says. That trip was the beginning of Sonjia’s love of travel. She quit her job in the oil and gas industry and started her own life coaching business, part of which is to host people on lifechanging trips. “I want to help people get out there and see the world.” Her business, Bucket List Beasts, has over 9000 Facebook followers. They’re an adventurous group and tend to explore off the beaten path. Mackey has taken people (tours are open to everyone, but the majority of her clients are women) to Santiago, Chile and Easter Island to see the Moai statues, La Paz and the Salt Flats of Bolivia. She’s been to Antarctica (which included a polar plunge). She’s skydived over the Palm Islands of Dubai. And she’s been glamping in Yellowstone National Park. Sonjia plans the excursions and hosts her clients on these mystery trips. She asks them where they have already traveled to and chooses destinations where none of them, including herself, have been before. “It’s a total adventure for all of us.” Last month, Sonjia and 13 women embarked on an adventure to Sri Lanka. They bicycled through the countryside and explored ancient ruins, saw UNESCO sites and monuments, went on safari (Sri Lanka has the highest density of leopards in the world), visited a tea farm and tea processing factory, then drank fresh-made tea, enjoyed a farm-to-table meal with a local family in their home, and relaxed on the beach . . . all in ten days! Sonjia says mystery trips push you outside your comfort zone. “They force you to let go of the control a bit and just have a good time.” For more information on Bucket List Beasts, see Sonjia’s website, www.bucketlistbeasts. com, or find her on Facebook at www. facebook.com/groups/BucketListBeasts.

July 2017

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

15


Places & Faces

Ethel Precht

The Passing of a Breast Cancer Survivor Champion It is with deep sadness that the Board of Directors of the Ethel Precht HOPE Breast Cancer Foundation shared the news of the passing of a champion for breast cancer survivors in Southwest Louisiana. Mrs. Precht passed away the evening of June 6th from complications due to diabetes. In 2004, after attending a national walk, Ethel Precht thought it would be a good idea to host a walk event in Southwest Louisiana to benefit local residents who were under-going treatment for breast cancer. To date, the Ethel Precht HOPE Breast Cancer Walk has grown to one of the largest attended walks in the area, captivating the hearts of thousands of community residents. From day one, Ms. Ethel was committed to donating 100% of the walk proceeds directly to individuals in the Calcasieu and Cameron Parishes who are going through breast cancer treatment. Because of Precht’s vision 13 years ago, close to 700 survivors have had their quality of life enriched through the charity efforts of a true champion and humble servant. The Board of Directors of the Ethel Precht HOPE Breast Cancer Foundation, along with countless residents of Southwest Louisiana, extend their deepest sympathy to the Precht family in their loss. The 13th Annual HOPE Breast Cancer Walk/Fun Run will be held on Saturday, October 21, 2017 at the Lake Charles Civic Center in fond memory of Ethel Precht.

16 www.thriveswla.com

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

W th 3 o c o to w d th d in g W to Y se U If m 3 *A in W re C T th o It g in ti su H T la o n a o

C in

T sa ce p d fo N M se M kn A w Tr in (p (p In D

B d w o

July 2017


THE CITY OF LAKE CHARLES WATER DIVISION P.O. Box 1727, Lake Charles, LA 70602 | 337-491-1307 • June 2017

ANNUAL DRINKING WATER QUALITY REPORT We are pleased to present to you the Annual Water Quality Report for the reporting/monitoring period from January 1, 2016 to December 31, 2016. This report is designed to inform you about the quality of your water and the services we deliver to you every day. Our constant goal is to provide you with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your drinking water and its’ compliance with government standards. In this report you will find information such as the quality of the local drinking water; likely sources of drinking water contamination; and information about your local services. The City of Lake Charles is going through some exciting times and unprecedented growth. The Water Division is dedicated to meeting that growth and continues to plan for the future needs of the water system and our customers. You can learn more about the Water Division and its’ facilities and services by visiting the City web site at www.cityoflakecharles.com. Under the Public Works department listing, click on the water tab. If you have any questions about this report, or simply want to learn more about your drinking water, please contact Russell Buckels at 337-491-1479. *All information in this report has been collected and reported to you in accordance with water quality standards established by the USEPA. We are pleased to report our drinking water meets all Federal and State regulatory requirements. CITY OF LAKE CHARLES WATER SOURCES The City of Lake Charles obtains water from wells that are drilled in the 500-foot and 700-foot sands of the Chicot Aquifer. Groundwater or well water is found in saturated zones beneath the land’s surface. It fills the pores and fractures in underground material such as sand, gravel, or other rock. If the water can be removed from this material in useful amounts, these areas are called aquifers. At the present time the City of Lake Charles has 17 wells that provide a clean, sufficient water supply for all of our customers. HEALTH INFORMATION The sources of drinking water (both tap and bottled) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals, and in some cases radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.

industrial, or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming. • Pesticides and Herbicides – may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses. • Organic Chemical Contaminants – Including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems. • Radioactive Contaminants – can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities. In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the EPA prescribes regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water, which must provide the same protection for public health. PROTECT OUR RESOURCES, USE WATER WISELY !!!

TEST RESULTS In the tables below are shown results of sampling on our source and treated water. The last chemical sampling of our source water was performed in Jan. – Dec. of 2015. This sampling was performed by a private laboratory certified by the State of Louisiana. Chemical sampling may not be required on an annual basis, therefore, information provided refers back to the most recent chemical sampling results. You will note that all of these contaminants were not detected or were well below the MCL. Terms and abbreviations you might not be familiar with are furnished with the following definitions: Not-Detected (ND) - laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present. Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) - The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL’s are set at very stringent levels. Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG) - The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLG’s allow for a margin of safety Action Level - The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow. Treatment Technique (TT) - A treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water. (ppm) = parts per million (ppb) = parts per billion (ppt) or (nanograms/l) = parts per trillion (ppq) or (picograms/l) =parts per quadrillion Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – measure of radioactivity in water In the table below, we have shown the deficiencies that were identified during our latest survey done by the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals. These are deficiencies we are currently working to resolve.

05/29/2014

FACILITY Distribution

CATEGORY CODE

ACTIVITY NAME

DUE DATE

GWR-App Corrective 09/30/2015 Action Plan

CC17

Barium

HIGHEST VALUE

RANGE

UNIT

3/23/2015

0.49

0.21-0.49

ppm

8/10/2015

Fluoride

Lead and Copper

COLLECTION DATE

Date

90th Percentile

0.26

Range

0.18-0.26

Unit

AL

MCL MCLG 2

ppm

4

SAMPLE POINT

209 Helen Street 2437 Ory Road 4260 Indigo Pl. 4908 Desoto St. 209 Helen Street 2437 Ory Road 4260 Indigo Pl. 4908 Desoto St.

TTHM TTHM TTHM TTHM

COMMENTS

CONTAMINANT Chlorine

TYPICAL SOURCE

2

Discharge of drilling wastes; discharge from metal refineries; erosion of natural deposits

4

Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth. Discharge form fertilizer and aluminum factories

Sites Over AL

Typical Source

Copper, Free

2014-2016

0.1

0.1-0.4

ppm

1.3

0

Lead

2014-2016

1

1-16

ppb

15

0

Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits

HIGHEST LRAA

PERIOD

RANGE

UNIT

MCL

MCLG

2016

5

.94-8.9

ppb

60

0

By-product of drinking water disinfection

2016

5

1.4-6.4

ppb

60

0

By-product of drinking water disinfection

2016

5

2.4-6.2

ppb

60

0

By-product of drinking water disinfection

2016

7

2.6-11.6

ppb

60

0

By-product of drinking water disinfection

2016

13

8.3-12.3

ppb

80

0

By-product of drinking water chlorination

2016

26

16.3-36.1 ppb

80

0

By-product of drinking water chlorination

2016

17

15.4-17.0

ppb

80

0

By-product of drinking water chlorination

2016

22

14.5-27.4 ppb

80

0

By-product of drinking water chlorination

DATE 2016

RESULT

UNIT

RANGE MRDL MRDLG

1.7

ppm

0.5-2.7

4

4

TYPICAL SOURCE

TYPICAL SOURCE Water additive used to control microbes

COLLECTION DATE

HIGHEST VALUE

RANGE

UNIT

Chloride

3/23/2015

255

22.8-255

ppm

Iron

7/27/2015

1.9

0.21-1.9

ppm

0.3

Manganese

3/23/2015

0.45

0.22-0.45

ppm

0.05

PH

9/21/2015

7.8

7.1-7.8

SU

8.5

Sulphate

7/27/2015

4.5

2.6-4.5

ppm

250

SECONDARY CONTAMINANT

RADIONUCLIDES

Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives

July 2017

DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS

Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5) Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5) Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5) Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5)

LAC 51:XII.344 - LSPC Protection of Water Supply Containment Practices`

Below, are listed the regulated contaminants that were detected during sampling. While these contaminants were detected, you will note that all were BELOW their maximum contaminant level. Required sampling was performed at sites within the distribution system, and at each of our well sites. All sampling was performed either by the State of Louisiana or by private laboratories certified by the State of Louisiana. REGULATED CONTAMINANT

Certain minerals are radioactive and may emit forms of radiation known as photons and beta radiation. Some people who drink water containing beta particle and photon radioactivity in excess of the MCL over many years may have an increased risk of getting cancer.

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons SOURCE WATER ASSESSMENT such as persons with cancer undergoing A Source Water Assessment was chemotherapy, persons who have GOT A QUESTION? performed on our water supply in April undergone organ transplants, people 2003. The program emphasizes pollution NEED SOME ANSWERS with HIV / AIDS or other immune system prevention to ensure safe drinking water, The numbers below are provided if you have focusing on the protection of the water questions or problems with your water service. disorders, some elderly and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These sources. Personnel with the State of people should seek advice about drinking Louisiana performed this assessment. Billing/New Service 491-1307 water from their health care providers. The source water assessment consists of Meter Problems 491-1522 EPA / CDC guidelines on appropriate three steps: 1) Delineation or outline of means to lessen the risk of infection by Main Breaks 491-1487 the source water protection areas – in our Cryptosporidium and other microbial case a one mile radius around each well Rusty Water/Odor 491-1554 contaminants are available from the Safe field; 2) Inventory of significant potential Distribution Department 491-1494 Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791). sources of contamination within these Production/Plant Info 491-1479 areas; and 3) Analysis of the system’s If present, elevated levels of lead can 24 Hour Number 491-1483 susceptibility to contamination from the cause serious health problems, especially For Plant Tours 491-1487 potential sources identified. This plan is for pregnant women and young children. now available in our office. According Lead in drinking water is primarily from to the Source Water Assessment Plan, materials and components associated our water system had a susceptibility rating of ‘MEDIUM”. If you with service lines and home plumbing. The City Water Division would like to review the plan, please feel free to contact our office. seeks to provide high quality drinking water, but cannot control Information can be obtained by contacting Russell Buckels, Water the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your Division Superintendent at 491-1479. water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals - Office of Public 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are Health, routinely monitors for constituents in your drinking water. concerned about lead in your drinking water, information on lead Results of sampling by the State and contracted laboratories are in drinking water, testing methods, and steps to minimize exposure shown in the tables below. Drinking water, including bottled water, is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www. may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of epa.gov.safewater/lead. some contaminants. The presence of these contaminants does not

Contaminants that may be present in untreated source water include: • Microbial Contaminants - such as viruses and bacteria, may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife. • Inorganic Contaminants - such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff,

DATE IDENTIFIED

necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. Our water system is required to test a minimum of 80 bacteriological samples per month in accordance with the Total Coliform Rule. Coliforms are bacteria that are naturally present in the environment and are used as an indicator that other, potentially harmful, bacteria may be present. During the monitoring period covered by this report, we had no noted violations of drinking water regulations. In addition, the State of Louisiana also performs routine chemical analysis for regulated contaminants. Chemical sampling for regulated contaminants may not be required on an annual basis. The results furnished for testing are from the most recent sampling of our source water performed January – December 2015.

COM. RADIUM (-226 & -228) GROSS BETA PARTICLE ACTIVITY

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

SMCL 250

COLLECTION DATE

HIGHEST VALUE

RANGE

UNIT

11/15/2016

1.07

1.07

pCi/l

5

0

Erosion of natural deposits

10/3/2016

3.29

1.85-3.29

pCi/l

50

0

Decay of natural and man-made deposits. Note: The gross beta particle activity MCL is 4 millirems/ year annual dose equivalent to the total body or any internal organ. 50 pCi/L is used as a screening level.

MCL MCLG

TYPICAL SOURCE

www.thriveswla.com

17


Places & Faces

Movers and Shakers in Southwest Louisiana...

Who’s News? You tell us! Send press releases to edit@thriveswla.com with the subject line “Who’s News.”

Joseph E. Stough Appointed to First Federal Bank Board of Directors M.A. Pierson, III, Chairman of the Board of First Federal Bank of Louisiana, has announced the Joe Stough appointment of Joseph E. Stough as a member of the First Federal Bank of Louisiana Board of Directors. Stough is a software and analytics business entrepreneur who has resided in Lake Charles for the past 12 years. He was raised in SWLA, educated in California, and is experienced on a worldwide scale with software and analytics business strategy and operations leadership. He has served on the board of WAITR since its inception and now serves as WAITR’s Chief Strategy Officer.

Rau Financial Group Adds the Services of a Paraplanner Latrana White, RP®, has joined Rau Financial Group. Originally from Cypress Creek, Louisiana, White has over 25 years of experience in the banking and Latrana White, RP® financial industry. She holds credentials from several educational and professional organizations, including the American Institute of Banking, the Banking School of Supervisory Training, Oakdale Technical Institute and the College for Financial Planning in Centennial, Colorado, where she earned the designation of Registered ParaplannerSM. In her new position at Rau Financial Group, White will assist the firm’s founder, Denise Rau, CFP®, as she offers a “hands-on” approach to financial planning, estate planning, investing and multiple banking practices. For more information, call (337) 480-3835 or visit www.raufinancialgroup.com.

18 www.thriveswla.com

Tony Hulsey Promoted to JD Bank Vice President Business Development Office JD Bank has announced the promotion of Tony Hulsey to Vice President Business Tony Hulsey Development Officer. In his new position, Hulsey will have many key responsibilities, including identifying and building relationships with potential clients, and promoting JD Bank’s array of products and services to commercial businesses. Hulsey has served as Vice President and Office Manager of the JD Bank Jennings branches for over four years. He will continue to be based at the JD Bank branch office in Jennings but will travel throughout Southwest Louisiana and Acadiana as he focuses on commercial lending and business services.

Lara James Joins JD Bank as Mortgage Loan Originator

Lara James

JD Bank has announced Lara James as Mortgage Loan Originator. She is an established, well-known home lender in the Lake Charles area and she is located in the JD Bank MorganField

Branch Office. In this position, James will develop and maintain relationships with realtors, builders and area developers, and also provide individualized service to customers applying for mortgage loans. Her background includes servicing the financing for conventional, FHA, VA, USDA and Rural Development loans, as well as helping first-time homebuyers. Prior to joining JD Bank, James worked as a Mortgage Loan Officer and has over 10 years of experience working with mortgages and customers in Southwest Louisiana.

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

Susan Hyatt

Ashleigh Newsome

West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital Honors Two Employees West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital recently recognized its April and May employees of the month for 2017, Susan Hyatt and Ashleigh Newsome, RN. Susan Hyatt serves as secretary in the physical medicine department. She helps ensure the department runs smoothly for patients, physicians, therapists and techs. Susan has been with WCCH for nine years. Ashleigh Newsome, RN, serves as a registered nurse in the hospital’s emergency department where she provides exceptional care to patients and also assists in the training and mentoring of new nursing staff. Ashleigh has been with the organization since 2015.

Medical Oncologist & Hematologist Mohammad Khan, MD Joins Memorial Medical Group Memorial Medical Group welcomes Mohammad Khan, MD, a fellowshipDr. Mohammad Khan trained hematologist and medical oncologist to its staff. He will see patients at his office at 2770 3rd Avenue, Suite 210 on the Lake Charles Memorial Hospital main campus. Dr. Khan served as the director of the cancer program at CHRISTUS St. Patrick Hospital for the past seven years. Dr. Khan is board certified in medical oncology and will join the faculty of the Memorial/LSUHSC Family Medicine Residency Program to assist with clinical training in hematology and oncology. For more information or to schedule an appointment, call (337) 494-6768 or visit www.lcmmg.com July 2017


Obstetrician and Gynecologist Norman Stewart, MD Joins Memorial Medical Group Memorial Medical Group welcomes Norman Stewart, MD, a boardDr. Norman Stewart certified obstetrician and gynecologist to its staff. He will see patients at his office at 1890 W. Gauthier Road, Suite 135 at the Lake Charles Memorial for Women campus. Prior to joining Memorial, Dr. Stewart worked at the Woodhull Medical Center in Brooklyn, New York, home of the New York University School of Medicine. Dr. Stewart is a Fellow of American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology. He is also a member of American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists, American Association of Colposcopic and Cervical Pathology, American Medical Association and American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology. He holds certifications in Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support (ACLS), Basic Life Support (BLS) and Neonatal Resuscitation Protocol (NRP). For more information or to schedule an appointment, call (337)480-5510 or visit www.lcmmg.com.

Danny Allain & Erik Jessen

Local Artists Create Mural for New Lake Charles Kroger Store Local artists, Erik Jessen and Danny Allain, created a new mural for the Lake Charles Kroger store #394 at 2010 Country Club Road in Lake Charles. Erik Jessen is a graphic arts instructor at SOWELA Technical Community College. He has been immersed in the arts since a young age and continues to support and promote Southwest Louisiana’s artist culture and advocates for technology and art. July 2017

Danny Allain is an artist native to Southwest Louisiana, a graduate of McNeese State University, and former arts educator. He has created over a dozen murals in Southwest Louisiana. This mural represents the beautiful Lakefront below the I-10 bridge. The area’s rich outdoor culture is depicted through fishing, bird watching and water sports. The Ferris Wheel in the background represents Lake Charles being the festival capital of Louisiana. For details or information on the Arts Council’s year-round services and programming, visit www.artscouncilswla. org or call (337) 439-2787.

Ryan Hess With Lakeside Bank Completes Commercial Lending School Ryan Hess, an assistant vice president with Lakeside Bank and manager of their Ryan Hess Westlake Branch, recently graduated from the American Bankers Association (ABA) National Commercial Lending School at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas. This six-day commercial lending curriculum takes a leadership approach to examining the advanced issues lenders face. The curriculum is regularly updated to keep pace with changes within the lending field. The intensive and interactive coursework is designed to further develop students’ skills in lending strategies, credit risk management, improving return on investment, and much more. Originally from Westlake, Hess is a graduate of McNeese State University. He has 10 years of experience in the financial field, and joined Lakeside Bank in 2014. For more information, visit www.lakesidebanking.com.

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

Ben Bourgeois Qualified for Million Dollar Round Table Ben Bourgeois, a financial advisor of Northwestern Mutual, qualified for the Million Dollar Round Ben Bourgeois Table (MDRT), a highlyregarded honor in the financial industry. Ben has been associated with Northwestern Mutual since 2014. He was also awarded Northwestern Mutual’s New Rep of the Year for his network which covers all of Louisiana and Mississippi. This is a highly prestigious award and exemplifies the hard work and efficiency of Ben’s practice.

RMC: Resorts Mountains Cities Names New President RMC, an international Top 25 Destination Management Company with a presence in Lake Rhonda Brewer Charles, Louisiana, has announced the promotion of Rhonda Brewer to the position of President. Brewer joined RMC on November 1, 2016, as the Chief Sales and Operations Officer, and quickly demonstrated her extensive experience in sales and operations by making significant contributions to the company’s strategic growth. Brewer holds a bachelor’s degree from Southwest Missouri State University, and has more than 30 years of experience in travel and hospitality sales and operations. She previously served as Maritz Travel’s Vice President of Sales, where she focused on global companies and strategic planning. Brewer currently serves as the immediate Past-President for the SITE (Society for Incentive Travel Excellence) Board of Directors and is actively involved in this organization. As the result of her expertise and success, Brewer’s transition to her new position has been seamless and will continue to improve and broaden RMC within the industry. For more information, contact Kevin Funke at 407-496-8787 or kfunke@rmcdmc.com.

www.thriveswla.com

19


Places & Faces | Bayou Rhythms

Celebrating Louisiana Music 20 www.thriveswla.com

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2017


H

ere in Southwest Louisiana,

music is an integral part of our cultural definition. We hear it everywhere; indoors and outdoors, live and recorded, at festivals, events, and venues, over the airwaves, and emanating from neighborhood front porches. Whether the distinct sounds of fiddle, washboard, and accordion, a rowdy country band, blues, jazz, or rock, we know how to make and enjoy music. In this issue, we celebrate the art of SWLA music.

July 2017

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

21


Places & Faces | Bayou Rhythms

LOUISIANA MUSIC Cajun • Zydeco • Swamp Pop by Madelaine Brauner Landry

Dancing is an integral part of Louisiana’s culture. Toddlers learn steps by standing on the toes of their grandparents. Unfortunate souls whose DNA isn’t wired for two-stepping are advised to stand by the stage so the “rhythm method” can infect them. If your feet aren’t moving, check your pulse. Gerald Simon, drummer with Joe Harmon and the Harmonics, says Southwest Louisiana music survives because of its great grooves and hooks. “It’s the simplicity. Good entertainers get people up, dancing, and smiling. Think about it — there’s always a weekend festival crowded with happy dancers somewhere in the state. Everywhere else, a festival is just a concert. In Louisiana, it’s one giant, non-stop fais-do-do.” Fans of the three primary Southwest Louisiana musical genres, Cajun, Zydeco, and Swamp Pop, agree the rhythms are contagious. Mostly indigenous to the Acadiana region, each follows its own form, instrumentation, and traditions. Accordions, fiddles, and drums are basics, but musicians are not above borrowing from each other; their music overlaps cultural and social contexts. It cross-pollinates. For example, Colinda, a beloved Cajun classic, traces its origin to African dance rituals that entered

22 www.thriveswla.com

the Port of New Orleans before traveling west to Cajun dancehalls. Audiences sense the similarities in backbeats and lyrics. Dancers seamlessly make the switch from waltzing to six-beat stomping to belly-rubbing. Traditional Cajun music evolved from pre-World War II dance parties held in rural Louisiana’s homes. Neighbors gathered, young children in tow, to catch up on gossip and maintain communities through music, food, and dancing. Lyrics became more than stories set to music; they preserved the language rural Cajuns were forbidden to speak. Men returning from Europe were determined they’d never again be shamed for speaking a language they shared with French Allies. Cajun music exploded. Soon every bayou community had its own dancehall and local bands. Kegan Navarre, the great-grandson of musician Iry Lejeune, whose 1940 Cajun repertoire and style are still influential today, was hooked early. “There was always an accordion sitting out in my grandfather’s house. I was seven or eight when I really got interested.” For Navarre, it’s more than music. “Cajun musicians will do anything for each other. We’re all part of a bigger family.” Kegan Navarre and LA Traditions attract audiences

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

that tell them their traditional music works; they’re free to dance like they have for decades. As modern music evolved in the late 60s, many feared Cajun music’s extinction. Could indigenous music spread beyond state boundaries? Apparently so. When legendary musician Dewey Balfa appeared at the Newport Folk Festival, his music received universal acclaim. Younger musicians soon followed, adding variations to old standards. By the 80s, Cajun and Zydeco music had achieved worldwide popularity – and it’s never waned. South Louisiana teenagers in the 50s and 60s tuned in their transistor radios for a taste of rock-and-roll or New Orleans rhythm and blues. They didn’t set out to create something new, but what evolved was what that era’s music sounded like to them. Swamp Pop combined tinkling piano riffs, tear-jerking lyrics, and bellowing horns. It’s now embraced from Louisiana to Europe to Japan. Hard-core enthusiasts make an annual pilgrimage to Ville Platte’s Louisiana Swamp Pop museum for a reunion on Lundi Gras, the Monday prior to Mardi Gras. New dancers are forewarned by old-timers: “If you do this right, you might be engaged when the song ends.”

July 2017


Live Music. Happy Hour. Sunday Brunch. GOOD DOG.

609 Ryan Street | (337) 491-8880 bluedogcafe.com/lake-charles July 2017

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

23


Places & Faces | Bayou Rhythms

Madelaine B. Landry is co-host of the Tom & Maddy Rock ‘n Roll Gumbo show. Bringing back your yesterdays once more, the show features classic oldies of the 50s and 60s, Cajun, Zydeco and Swamp Pop music. It airs live every Saturday morning from 7:00 – 11:00 a.m. on 88.3 FM, KBYS, a noncommercial community/college radio station broadcasting from the McNeese State University campus in Lake Charles, Louisiana. Come pass a good time!

24 www.thriveswla.com

Gerald Simon recalls touring with “Lil’ Alfred” Babino, who gained fame when he replaced Huey “Cookie” Thierry as lead singer for Cookie and the Cupcakes. “Wherever the Swamp Pop classic Mathilda is playing, the dance floor is packed. It’s phenomenal,” says Simon. Zydeco music is also homegrown, rooted in the rural economic hardships of French-speaking African Americans in South Louisiana. The rhythmic rub-board backs up bluesy vocals with hints of R&B, jazz, gospel, and Cajun influences. Zydeco devotees trace its origins to le musique Creole, birthed in the recordings of Amédé Ardoin from the late 20s. His style heavily influenced pioneers like Clifton Chenier, The King of Zydeco. It quickly found its foothold in Louisiana’s cultural and musical landscape. According to Rusty Metoyer, a new generation musician, Zydeco grabs listeners with its high energy vibes. “Folks get a happy feeling when they hear the rhythm coming from the accordion.” Rusty fondly remembers Saturday morning family clean-up days. “There was always a pot of gumbo cooking and a jam session happening. Listening to my grandfathers and uncles play, I knew I would have to do my part to keep my heritage alive.”

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

Metoyer recalls his first public appearance, playing Amazing Grace at his grandmother’s funeral. “I hid behind the others. I had no confidence, so I put my accordion down to pursue sports in high school. When our parish priest asked me to play for a Family Day event, I had to pick it back up and put together a band using friends and family.” Every Zydeco band, like Metoyer’s Zydeco Krush, starts similarly, with community and a shared mission: keep Creole culture alive and its music kicking. John Dale Hebert has been playing Louisiana music for over forty years. “My mother and her brothers all played music. We’ve played with just about everyone in the state at some time. Aldus Roger, Nathan Abshire, Belton Richard — all the greats. Other musicians keep me going. You learn something new from each one of them. John Dale Hebert and Friends plays an up-tempo style, some Cajun, Swamp Pop and country. Folks like variety.” It’s impossible to offer a comprehensive overview of Louisiana music’s rich history in one article, giving credit to everyone who has created or interpreted the traditions. Here’s the takeaway: Louisiana bayous flow at various speeds, but they keep moving. Bayou music is no different with its flow of energy and rhythm. Staying still is not an option. C’est vrai!

July 2017


THE MUSIC MUSEUM OF SWLA

Preserving our Musical History

The Music Museum intends to explore several aspects of SWLA music history. They are determined these stories not be lost. For example:

Ball’s Auditorium Music is a key thread in the tapestry of our colorful Southwest Louisiana culture. Countless music-related memories have been made over the decades. Fortunately for posterity, there’s a group in Lake Charles with board members who are passionate about preserving those memories for generations to come. The Music Museum of SWLA was formed in 2003. Currently, there is no brick and mortar location for the museum, but rather it is an on-going collection of general memorabilia such as albums, posters, ticket stubs, newspaper clippings, musical instruments, studio and recording equipment. Over the years, these items have been kept in various storage units. But thanks to the energy and enthusiasm of new board members, these items are being culled through, cataloged, and prepared for public viewing. “We’re focused on collecting the stories and artifacts and are just recently getting our face out into the public and wanting to educate the people on all aspects of local music history,” says Jody Taylor, board member of the Music Museum of SWLA and Project Coordinator at the Arts and Humanities Council. “Lake Charles historically has not taken ownership of its musical roots. The Music Museum of SWLA wants to change that.”

Goldband Recording Studio

Taylor says Goldband Records was one of the Lake Area’s most significant musical claims to fame. It’s where Swamp Pop originated and Dolly Parton recorded her first record. Freddie Fender, Mickey Gilley, and other big names also got their start at Goldband. The old abandoned building was recently razed, but before the bulldozers and wrecking ball arrived, Taylor and other music history enthusiasts scoured the premises and salvaged whatever memorabilia they could find. Taylor says Eddie Shuler, owner of Goldband Records, was a “merchandising king.” The Goldband collection includes hats, stickers, aluminum ashtrays, license plate covers, and playing cards. Music Museum members plan to move the Goldband artifacts into a permanent exhibit at Sloppy’s Downtown.

Preserving the Past and Promoting the Future

The Music Museum also actively supports and promotes current local musicians. “It creates a pollinization, working with each other, being exposed to new things,” says Taylor. Artifacts from the Music Museum will be on display September 29 at Historic City Hall, as Lake Charles continues its 150th anniversary celebration with a history exhibit. Music memorabilia can also be seen on the museum’s Facebook page, @musicmuseumswla.

July 2017

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

Ball’s was a haven for what was known at the time as the Chitlin Circuit. Legendary musicians such as Ray Charles performed there, according to Taylor. “Even though I’ve been involved with local music since the late 1990s, I’d never heard of this until recently. I find it fascinating that we have this history, and so little is known about it. The building is gone now, but it is part of the Calcasieu Historical Preservation Society’s Lost Landmarks Series.”

Zypien’s Music Center

Located at 306 Iris St. in Lake Charles, Zypien’s was a gathering spot for musicians and music lovers alike from 1946 to 2001. It was owned by Bernard “Mr. Zyp” Zypien, and later by his grandson, local musician Bam Arceneaux, who spent countless hours in the shop as a child helping his grandfather with the day to day operations. They sold pianos, organs, guitars, and other musical instruments, records, phonographs, stereos, and sheet music. They would set up free concerts on the sidewalk outside the shop, drawing in the crowds.

Pourquois Pas

Taylor speaks of a vibrant DIY music community in the mid-90s. Pourquois Pas (a French phrase that means ‘Why not?’) was a live music club with a focus on punk rock, where members paid dues, no alcohol was served, and all ages were welcome. They gathered at 727 Ryan St. Many local musicians got their start there, including Lake Charles native Wendy Colonna, now a successful singer/ songwriter based in Austin. Taylor remembers attending Pourquois Pas on Friday nights as a teen. “It was a formative experience for a lot of people in this area. It’s a great story of young people coming together and making something happen.”

www.thriveswla.com

25


Places & Faces | Bayou Rhythms

Southwest Louisiana

CONCERT SCENE by Angie Kay Dilmore

Once upon a few decades ago, it didn’t take much for famous entertainers to grace the stages of small but popular venues in and around Lake Charles. Musicians such as Bonnie Raitt, Leon Russel, and Edgar Winter were regulars at joints like Scarlett O’s and Gandolf’s. In 1972, the Civic Center opened and national acts – Elvis, Bon Jovi, White Snake, to name a few – were brought in to the Coliseum. The greatest impact on the Lake Area concert scene came about with the arrival of casino gaming. The major casino resorts in Southwest Louisiana now serve as a perpetual source of live musical entertainment, showcasing both local talent and big name bands. Here’s a rundown of what local casinos are offering concert-goers this summer. After 11 years of wowing patrons with exciting musical performances, L’Auberge Casino Resort is taking a hiatus this summer from their popular Party by the Pool/Liquid Society series. Kerry Andersen, Director of Public Relations at Pinnacle Entertainment, says “We constantly strive to reinvent and offer new ways for our guests to experience memorable moments with us. We have a new team of leaders overseeing entertainment at L’Auberge and Pinnacle Entertainment, and they are getting to know our property while gearing up to bring us unforgettable future shows.” Meanwhile, there is no shortage of great entertainment at L’Auberge. • Live country bands in Jack Daniel’s Bar & Grill every Friday and Saturday night. Most shows free; a few are $10.

26 www.thriveswla.com

• DJs at the Adult Pool Thursday nights. $10 for guests. Must be 21. Saturdays and Sundays are for hotel guests only. • Nightly piano entertainment in Ember Grille & Wine Bar. • Live performances at The L Bar, Friday and Saturday nights. • Marquis events such as the Righteous Brothers, Sept. 2 at the Event Center. • Karaoke & Trivia at Jack Daniel’s Bar & Grill on Tuesday evenings. Golden Nugget Lake Charles also offers live entertainment seven days a week. In 2016, they hosted eighty headline shows in their Grand Event Center and are on track to do the same this year. “We bring in a variety of genres so there is something for everyone,” says Ron Richey, Director of Entertainment at Golden Nugget. New at the Golden Nugget is their H2O Pool + Bar concert venue, adjacent to the Lazy River. Richey says their summer concert series will kick off July 7 with I Love the 90’s Tour, followed by Hank Williams, Jr., Lee Brice, Pat Green, Jason Derulo, and FloRida. Other venues for live entertainment at Golden Nugget include the Rush Lounge (seven days a week) and Blue Martini (five days a week, plus acoustic night on Sundays.) You’ll also find an entertaining DJ and a party atmosphere at the H2O Pool on Saturdays and Sundays. “Live acts are part of the casino experience,” adds Richey. Delta Downs Racetrack Casino Hotel has two headliners this summer. Mark Chesnutt will perform a free concert

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

on Saturday, July 29. A “B Connected” membership is required to attend, but membership is free to anyone 21 years of age or older. And on Saturday, August 26, Rodney Carrington will perform. Tickets are currently on sale at Ticketmaster.com. Delta Downs also offers live musical entertainment in the Gator Lounge each Friday and Saturday night beginning at 9:00 p.m. July performers include George Dearborn & Branded (July 7-8), Bernie Alan (July 14-15), Louisiana Express (July 21-22), and BB & Company (July 28-29). Coushatta Casino Resort also offers several concert opportunities. They have two big July events scheduled at their Pavilion. The Crossroads Festival will take place July 15 with non-stop music all day on two stages. Performers include Geno Delafose & French Rockin’Boogie, Bernie Alan, Travis Matte & The Kingpins, Pine Leaf Boys, Leroy Thomas & the Zydeco Roadrunners, Wayne Toups & ZydeCajun, Richard LeBouef & Two Step, Jamie Bergeron & the Kickin’ Cajuns, and Keith Frank & the Soileau Zydeco Band. On July 29, Coushatta presents Elvolution, an “Elvis through the eras” impersonation show. Other concert opportunities at Coushatta include live entertainment at Mikko LIVE and concerts at their Dream Pool every Friday night through July 28 for their Advantage Club members. For more information about entertainment at any of the casinos, check out their websites.

July 2017


July 2017

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

27


Places & Faces | Bayou Rhythms

Live & Local!

The Lake Area’s Top 10 Music Venues by Jody Taylor

Music is life, especially in culture-rich Louisiana. These ten locally-owned entertainment venues offer eclectic, comfortable, and creative spaces for just about any musical taste or budget. Luna Live / Luna Bar & Grill (710 Ryan Street) One of the best places for live music in the Lake Area has been holding it down for a while now. Luna owner Dave Evans opened his first venue over a decade ago in Midtown, refining his focus towards this flagship location downtown. For several years, Luna was the only place to go in Lake Charles for diverse, original music from all over the country, hosting anything from Louisiana legends like George Porter Jr. and Tab Benoit, to iconic rock bands like Black Flag and the Reverend Horton Heat. With three stages across two buildings, it’s a versatile space that’s driven by Dave’s passion for good music and great eats.

Monday

Open Mic Night | 8-11pm

Tuesday

Trivia | 8-10pm

Wednesday – Saturday Acoustic Music | 7-10pm

Friday – Saturday

Regional Live Bands | 9-12midnight

Sunday Funday

Acoustic Pie | 3:30-6:30 Jay Ecker Jazz Quartet | 7-10pm 3716 Ryan Street • Lake Charles | 337.602.6635 • rikenjaks.com

Daily Specials | Late Night Food Menu 28 www.thriveswla.com

Sloppy’s Downtown (329 Broad Street) Sloppy D’s is the newest addition to an increasingly vibrant downtown. Husband and wife

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

photo by Emily Martindale

duo Amanda and Brett Stutes re-opened the venue space with an entirely fresh and welcoming atmosphere, complete with delicious street food and a nice selection of craft brews and creative cocktails. Sloppy’s hosts live music every Friday and Saturday night, and their Zydeco Brunch is not to be missed, both for the great food and for the best French music in Louisiana, live on stage every Saturday morning. The Listening Room (801 Enterprise Boulevard) This unique concert series occurs every month or so at the beautiful Historic Cash & Carry Building. The experience is worth every penny of the $20 ticket price, which includes some of the best Lake Area songwriters along with a fine plate of food. What makes these concerts so great is the intimacy and storytelling, providing a stronger connection between singer and

July 2017


audience. Buy your tickets early though, ‘cause this one sells out! Rikenjaks Brewing Company (3716 Ryan Street) After a major renovation in their brand new Midtown location, Rikenjaks triumphantly returned from its long hiatus in May of 2016. The patio and outdoor bar offers a lively setting for early-evening acoustic music and a few bar games. Though the indoor space (and parking) is a bit cramped, it’s a fun room for live cover bands on Friday and Saturday nights, and a tight jazz ensemble led by co-owner Jay Ecker on Sunday afternoons. Rikenjaks also serves delicious bar food and their own brand of tasty brews for craft beer lovers. Stellar Beans (319 Broad Street) This unique coffee bar, now under the new management of husband and wife team Carl and Chelsea Boudreaux, offers a relaxing alternative to wild bar-room gigs. Introspective singer-songwriters and culturally-significant folk musicians share this stage with local theatre companies like Itinerant, Children’s Theatre Co., or KC Productions, who often

show up to preview scenes from upcoming productions. Fresh sandwiches and soups too! My Place American Pub (630 W. Prien Lake Road) This 24-hour Midtown bar is a second home for late-night/ early-morning service industry folks, and regularly features live original music on the weekends. My Place, located close to Prien Lake Mall, also caters to beverage connoisseurs, with a weekly Louisiana Beer Night and special tasting events. Smoking is allowed, though a nice ventilation system keeps the room comfortable for non-smokers. Loggerheads (3748 Louisiana 3059) Scenery is everything at this bar and grill located right on the Calcasieu River near Moss Bluff. Kick back and enjoy the beautiful view, with live jazz music on Tuesdays, down-home Cajun jams on Wednesdays, and your favorite classic songs from area cover bands all through the weekend. The Round About (311 Broad Street) The Lake Area’s first locally-

owned vinyl store in many years also hosts semi-regular in-store performances from both local and touring musicians. These tend to be daytime shows, so it’s a great option for early bird music lovers. Bonus: record players and vinyl for sale! Crying Eagle Brewing (1165 E. McNeese Street) Live music at Crying Eagle’s taproom and beer garden tends toward the acoustic, though full bands like Rusty Metoyer sometimes play for special events. The facility is top notch, and the non-musical entertainment is eclectic, from comedy shows to costume contests and the massivelypopular “Food Trucks Invade”, held monthly. Crying Eagle is open 2:00 - 9:00 p.m., Wednesday through Saturday, making it another great stop for pregaming or post-work meet-ups. The Center Stage (3426 Ryan Street) Rounding out the list is The Center Stage, which hosts mostly heavier bands and fringe comedy shows, with the occasional country, rock, blues, or Cajun acts.

The music doesn’t stop at these ten stages, though. Check out acoustic acts at Blue Dog Café, Cajun bands at Putter’s Deli, small-town throw-downs at the Gillis Village, and of course, the last of the honky-tonks, Mary’s Lounge. Keep an eye out for Granger’s Gator Hog Saloon, set to open soon as a freshlyrenovated dancehall. Southwest Louisiana also boasts a crazy number of festivals, and several excellent (and free!) outdoor events in beautiful settings. The City of Lake Charles coordinates Downtown at Sundown for four Fridays in May; the Arts Council brings Live at the Lakefront each March; and the mighty Chuck Fest returns in October for its third year, while the scenic new development at Walnut Grove hosted its first “Groovin’ at the Grove” series this Spring, and looks to return for the Fall. Music is in the air, and music is everywhere. Soak it up, Lake Chuck.

TERRENCE SIMIEN Shares his Love of Louisiana Music In an effort to preserve our musical heritage, legendary two-time Grammy award-winning artist Terrence Simien and his band, The Zydeco Experience, educate young people on the history and cultural significance of Louisiana music through their program, Creole for Kidz. Since its beginnings in 2000, the program has reached over 500,000 children, young adults, parents, and teachers. They perform at art centers, festivals, and schools, both locally and across the globe. During the program, Simien shares the history of Creole culture and Zydeco music. Last month, as part of the Banners Engages series, Simien took his program to three Calcasieu Parish libraries where he both entertained and educated crowds of children and adults alike.

July 2017

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

29


Mind & Body

Music Can Be a Major Key to Therapeutic Healing Music plays a significant role in nearly everyone’s life, but for some people it represents much more than an invitation to dance or a soundtrack for the morning commute.

30 www.thriveswla.com

Researchers have found that music therapy provides a diversion from negative feelings and helps manage the pain of not only adults, but of children with developmental, physical, behavioral, and neurological disabilities. It also increases range of motion and motor skills, and in some cases is a replacement for medication. In short, its therapeutic uses are many. “Music is invaluable to people with special needs, allowing them to express themselves non-verbally,” says Travis Perry,

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

a music teacher for more than 35 years and inventor of ChordBuddy, a device that makes guitar-learning easier for anyone – including those with disabilities. “Veterans can use music to help cope with PTSD as well as other physical injuries. Senior citizens can learn to play the guitar, which helps build hand strength.” One recent study showed that music therapy can even help children cope with routine immunizations, making them less stressed – and their parents less stressed as well.

July 2017


While music therapy is known to be fruitful for the person needing therapy, the results also can be a gratifying for the teacher. Perry says he’s found it especially satisfying to teach the guitar to autistic children, who can be challenging but ultimately rewarding pupils. In fact, a small number of people with autism are musical savants, according to the American Music Therapy Association, but all benefit from music therapy interventions to enhance their social, communicative and motor skills, among other needs. Generally, children with autism aren’t able to make what would be considered a pleasing sound on the guitar without some assistance. Perry uses his invention to help them. Instead of positioning their hand into the correct chord positions – often tricky for even able-bodied learners – they can

just press a tab that results in a clear, strong chord sound. Perry, who has appeared on the popular TV show Shark Tank, didn’t actually have music therapy or people with special needs in mind when he invented ChordBuddy. He was trying to help his daughter learn to play and her frustration became his inspiration. “When learning an instrument, it’s important to have success right away, and that can be difficult to do with the guitar,” Perry says. “Most people give up within the first couple of months and the guitar ends up in a closet. That’s why I’m so excited when I know I’ve been able to help a special-needs child, a veteran with PTSD, or a senior citizen with arthritis make music. “You realize the odds they’ve had to overcome, both with the usual hurdles to learning and their personal difficulties, and that’s very fulfilling to me.”

Robotic Joint Replacement. Advanced Technology in Experienced Hands.

If you need knee or hip replacement, our surgeons offer an exclusive procedure completely customized for you, using the Mako® robotic -arm assisted surgery system at CHRISTUS St. Patrick Hospital. This innovative technology results in greater precision, less pain, significantly increased mobility and quicker recovery time.

(337) 721-7CFO www.centerforortho.com LAKE CHARLES • SULPHUR

Take a step toward pain-free movement today. Call us for more information.

July 2017

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

31


Mind

& Body

Tap into the

Benefits of Water by Felicite Toney

You may or may not love it, but you know you need it; even more so in these hot summer months when we lose a lot of water through perspiration. Water is essential for our bodies to function properly. Staying hydrated helps the human body regulate temperature, lubricate joints, protect sensitive tissue, and get rid of waste. In addition to functionality, there are many other health benefits that come with staying hydrated.

How much water does a healthy adult need to drink? It has long been thought that eight cups of water a day was enough for an adult to stay hydrated. However, the Center for Disease Control (CDC) doesn’t recommend a specific amount of water individuals should drink each day. That number is hard to pin down because our water needs vary depending on where we live, what we do during the day, if we are sick, etc. According to the CDC, dehydration can be avoided by simply drinking water when thirsty and drinking water with meals. Humans can get water through other beverages and foods, but the best way to stay hydrated is to drink plain water. The easiest way to achieve this is to make plain water your main choice of drink. Bottled or Tap? Many Americans turn to bottled water in order to stay hydrated. According to the Beverage Marketing Corporation (BMC), the total volume of bottled water consumption in 2015 was 11.7 billion gallons, which translates into an average of 36.3 gallons per person. But choosing water as

your main drink option doesn’t mean you need rely on bottled water. In fact, drinking tap water may be better and safer than bottled water. The EPA regulates tap water, whereas the FDA regulates bottled water. The difference here is that the EPA has the ability to oversee a mandatory testing program with public water suppliers. The FDA, on the other hand, only requires the identification of the source, Good Manufacturing Practice standards for boiling and bottling, and regulates labels and allowable levels of chemical, physical, microbial, and radiological contaminants. The FDA can issue a recall once a problem has been found, but doesn’t have the testing ability the EPA possesses. So that bottle of water you bought may not necessarily be safer than your own tap water. Buying a filter and attaching it to your sink is an option for those who are worried about the water in their homes. When it comes to water consumption, drink it when you’re thirsty and when you eat. Choosing between tap water and bottled water is a personal choice, but the important thing to remember is that water consumption is the first step towards a healthier lifestyle.

Healthy skin. Without adequate hydration, your skin may become dry, tight, and flaky. Properly hydrated skin will reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles. More energy. Beverages loaded with sugar will slow you down and leave you feeling sluggish. Water replenishes and energizes your muscles, which helps you stay active and alert. Weight loss. When you replace sugary beverages with water, you’ll consume fewer calories, which could lead to weight loss. It’s also good to eat waterrich foods such as fruits and vegetables, as they will fill you up sooner and leave your body feeling refreshed. Healthy kidneys. Ever had a kidney stone or a urinary tract infection? Staying hydrated with water will help reduce the risk of kidney stones and UTIs. Urine should be light yellow or colorless. Dark yellow urine with a stronger odor indicates dehydration.

32 www.thriveswla.com

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2017


Go Big and Stay Home. How to Build a Home Gym by John O’Donnell

Don’t have time to go to the gym? Hate waiting for the fitness bros to finish using the equipment you want to work out with? Don’t live near a gym? Have you ever considered building your own gym at home? There was a time when having your own home gym was only for millionaires and movie stars, but with a few affordable pieces of equipment anyone can get in a good workout in the privacy of their own home. Here’s how: The first thing you will need to build an awesome workout space is the space itself. If possible, build your home gym in an area that allows you to escape the craziness of your home. A space in the attic, your garage, or even a guest room with a door will work. It doesn’t have to be a huge space, but just a space that allows some privacy. Having a private space will allow you to focus on your workout and avoid all the distractions and interruptions we all have at home. Next you will need some equipment. Skip the expensive, complicated, heavy machines and get yourself a nice set of free weights, barbell plates, and dumbbells. Free weights will help emphasize compound lifts like squats, deadlifts and presses which will keep your workouts simple but also keep your home gym budget low. You might also consider a five to July 2017

thirty pound set of kettle bells. You can get away with having a nice home gym with just dumbbells and free weights, but if you want to take things to the next level consider also getting a power rack, also known as a power cage, squat cage, or squat rack. A power rack is a large stand that helps you do complex lifts safely by acting as a mechanical spotter for free weight and barbell exercises. Many power racks also have accessories like chin up bars, pulldown cable attachments, and weight storage capabilities, further increasing the utility of your home gym. Next you need a bench. A weight bench should be comfortable so that the only thing you have to focus on during a lift is your lift, not how much your back hurts. It needs to be sturdy. A rickety bench that might move around under you during a workout could cause injury. Lastly it needs to be adjustable, and not flat. An adjustable bench will give you a greater utility and range of the workouts that you’re able to do. From here you could add foam flooring, resistance bands, cardio equipment, and other fitness lagniappe. But with these few essentials you’re ready to start working out in your own space in the privacy of your own home. Train hard and have a great workout!

Email or Text Notification when your RX is ready!

ThriftyWay PHARMACY #2

Friendly service from your home town pharmacy. • Citywide Delivery Service • Drive-Thru Pick-Up Window • E-Mail and Call in RX Service

601 S. Pine Street • DeRidder, LA 70634 • (337) 463-7442 www.thriftyway.com • thriftyway2@thriftyway.com

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

33


Mind

& Body

Dealing with Summer Common Colds by Angie Kay Dilmore

Runny nose, persistent cough, scratchy throat . . . is it possible you have a common cold in the heat of summer? While it is true that most colds occur in cooler months, they can indeed show their nasty selves in the summer, as well. And why is it that summer colds seem to be worse in severity than colds in the winter? Possibly it is because we aren’t expecting a cold in the summer. We’re caught off guard, especially when we’re busy enjoying our vacation and the summer sunshine. Who has time in the summer to stay home in bed? Inconvenience aside, there are medical reasons why colds seem to be worse in the summer months. People can be infected with different viruses during the summer months than they are during the winter season. The “common cold” is actually an umbrella phrase including over 200 viruses, and each one has its season. Rhinoviruses are thought to be responsible for at least 50% of colds and are more common in winter. In the summer months, primary culprits include enteroviruses. Along with the usual coughing, stuffiness, and fever, enteroviruses can cause a host of other unpleasant symptoms such as diarrhea, sore throat, rashes, and body aches. Enteroviruses can last longer than other viruses – meaning it might take you a little longer to feel back to normal. Other factors related to summer can make your cold worse or last longer. For example, because you’d rather be outdoors than in bed, you may not get enough rest to recovery quickly.

How to Get Well Soon Contrary to popular belief, research does not support the vitamin C remedy. Sweating it out with exercise is also not a good idea, and may actually prolong the illness. Antibiotics are always contraindicated with viruses. And zinc likely isn’t as effective against enteroviruses as it is for rhinoviruses. So what can you do to help get over a summer cold? Basically, wait it out. Most viruses simply must run their course. Get plenty of rest and drink lots of fluids to stay hydrated. You can alleviate symptoms with over the counter pain relievers, cough drops and syrups, and nasal sprays. Warning: do not give children aspirin when they have a cold. The combination can cause Reye’s Syndrome, a rare but serious condition that causes confusion, swelling in the brain, and liver damage. If you do have a cold, keep your distance from others to prevent them from getting sick. Tips to Prevent Summer Colds • Avoid or decrease exposure to extreme air conditioning, which constricts the blood vessels in the nose and throat, making you more susceptible to viruses. • Stay away from people who you know have a cold. • Avoid touching your face, especially the nose, mouth, and eye areas, if you are around someone with a cold or have been touching surfaces in a public area. • Use disposable items if someone

in your family is infected. • Disinfect door knobs, drawer pulls, keyboards, light switches, toys, phones, remote controls, countertops, and sinks. • Don’t share eating utensils or drinking glasses. • Give each person in the family their own bathroom hand towel or use paper towels. • Dispose of used tissues immediately. • Wash your hands frequently and thoroughly. • Maintain an overall healthy lifestyle – eat well, exercise, and get enough sleep.

Is it a... Cold or Allergies? Symptom

Cold

Allergies

Cough

Usually

Sometimes

General aches and pains

Sometimes

Never

Fatigue and weakness

Sometimes

Sometimes

Itchy eyes

Rarely

Usually

Sneezing

Usually

Usually

Sore throat

Usually

Rarely

Runny nose

Usually

Usually

Stuffy nose

Usually

Usually

Fever

Rarely

Never Source: MayoClinic.com

34 www.thriveswla.com

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2017


Meet the Newest Member of our Physician Team,

Brett Goodwin, MD Cardiologist

Imperial Health is proud to welcome Brett Goodwin, MD, to our medical staff. Dr. Goodwin is board certified in Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Disease, and Adult Echocardiography. He is board eligible in Nuclear Cardiology and Interventional Cardiology. Originally from Southwest Louisiana, Dr. Goodwin earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science with a Certificate in Health Policy from Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. He returned to Louisiana to attend Tulane University in New Orleans, where he earned a Medical Degree from Tulane University School of Medicine and a Masters in Business Administration from the Tulane Freeman School of Business. Dr. Goodwin completed an Internal Medicine Residency at Duke University and a Cardiology Fellowship at The Texas Heart Institute at St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital in Houston, Texas. Dr. Goodwin is a member of the American College of Physicians and the American College of Cardiology. He is joining Drs. Turner, DePuy, Mulhearn, Gilmore, Fastabend, LeBeau and Foster in the Cardiology Department at Imperial Health. Dr. Goodwin is now accepting new patients. To schedule an appointment with Dr. Goodwin, call (337) 436-3813.

www.imperialhealth.com

600 Dr. Michael DeBakey Dr. | Lake Charles

Now

Taking Appointments! The Eye Clinic

proudly welcomes Marcy Hanudel, MD

Dr. Hanudel is originally from New Iberia, Louisiana. She earned a Bachelor of Science degree in biological sciences from Louisiana State University, and a Medical Degree from Louisiana State University Health Sciences CenterShreveport. She completed her internship in Internal Medicine at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center-Shreveport and residency in Ophthalmology at University Health Shreveport. Dr. Hanudel is a member of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. Appointments are now available with Dr. Hanudel at The Eye Clinic offices in Lake Charles, Sulphur, Moss Bluff and Jennings.

Call (337) 478-3810 or 1-800-826-5223.

Ophthalmologist

www.TheEyeClinic.net July 2017

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

35


Home & Family

36 www.thriveswla.com

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2017


t’s that time of year again – Back-toSchool! It’s an exciting time of year with mixed emotions – bittersweet nostalgia over the end of summer break, and the excitement and anticipation of the coming school year. The first month or two of school can be a hectic demanding period of transition for both students and parents, as everyone settles into a new routine. Read this special Back-to-School section for tips to make your transition as smooth and stress-free as possible.

get focused on

Summer Fun Optics Unlimited at The Eye Clinic has the styles kids want, and the quality parents are looking for in children’s eyewear. Beat the back-to-school rush and schedule your child’s eye exam this summer at one of The Eye Clinic’s six convenient locations. We’re making it easy with these special offers:

routine eye exams 65 Kid’s eyewear packages $ starting at just 49

$

for kids

This offer is available on routine vision exams* for school-aged children at all locations of The Eye Clinic through September 30, 2017. *Contact lens exams and fittings require additional fees.

Lake Charles • DeRidder • Sulphur • Jennings • Moss Bluff | (800) 826-5223 • www.theeyeclinic.net July 2017

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

37


Home & Family | Back to the Books

Meet the

Teachers School Open House by Lauren Atterbery Cesar

It’s nearly back to school time and you’ll soon receive notice about the annual School Open House. Open House is a perfect opportunity for you to meet your child’s teachers and administrators and become familiar with school policies and procedures. You may also be able to tour your child’s classrooms and get a feel for the daily routine. Before you go, be prepared in order to make the most of your visit. Sherri Shetler of Prien Lake Elementary wants parents to know, “With today’s technology, there are numerous ways to stay informed about your student’s academic progress at any time.” When going to your child’s Open House, have all the information you will need to stay up-to-date with your child’s development all year.

Be on time and bring a notebook. Make every effort to arrive on time so you don’t miss important information and as a courtesy to the teachers. Bring a pen and notebook to record important information you will need all year long. Teachers’ email addresses. Most teachers are unable to make phone calls during the day. However, most teachers have a computer on their desk, and can answer emails quickly and easily throughout the day. Teachers’ Remind Account Access. Most teachers have Remind Accounts which will text and email information about what is happening in the classroom and at school all year long directly to your phone and email address. It’s simple to sign up and receive updates all year. Verify that your contact information is up to date. If your information is not in the system, you won’t receive call-outs with important information, and teachers will be unable to contact you regarding your child. How often does your child’s teacher update their Blackboard site? Some teachers may rely more heavily on Remind, and only update their Blackboard sites periodically. Some teachers use only Blackboard or other school-approved websites. When do school newsletters come out? Often schools send out weekly or monthly newsletters to help you stay informed of school events and student successes. How do I access my child’s grades online? Calcasieu Parish public schools utilize a program called A+ Grades, and some private schools use programs like RenWeb to access grades and other information about student progress in real time. This gives you fingertip access to your child’s growth any time you want. Visit jcampus.cpsb.org/progress/

38 www.thriveswla.com

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2017


Daphne Letlow, PharmD Brittany Brown, PharmD 1st Ave. Location Lake St. Location

When your child is sick, there is nothing worse than having to wait a long time to have your prescription filled. You won't have to wait long when you use the Children's Pharmacy! • Specialize in Children’s Medications • Fill Prescriptions From Any Doctor

• Most Insurance Prescription Plans and Louisiana Medicaid Accepted

• Competitively Priced on Both Prescription and Over-TheCounter Medications

• Flavoring Available for Liquid Medications

• Prescription Filled While You Wait

2 LAKE CHARLES LOCATIONS! 2903 1st Avenue

(337) 474-5492 Monday – Friday: 8am-Noon & 1-5pm

July 2017

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

4111 Lake Street with Drive-Thru

(337) 502-4873 Monday-Friday: 8am-Noon & 1-5pm

www.thriveswla.com

39


Home & Family | Back to the Books

Surviving s r e s i a r d n u F l o o h Sc

by Lauren Atterbery Cesar

No sooner does school start than you get that lime-green fundraiser paper coming home with your student and a handful of school call-outs to let you know it’s that time again — school fundraiser time. From cookie dough and wrapping paper to t-shirts and car washes, raising money for your child’s school can be overwhelming. There are often incentives attached to selling a certain number of items and you may dread telling your little one that, no, they are not going to get that slime-slappy hand and a limited-edition Moana key chain this year because you still haven’t won the lottery. It can feel like a lot of pressure, especially if your child is in a club or sport. Before the helpless feeling of having three children required to become professional door-to-door salesmen sets in, take these steps to feel empowered through the process, and relieve some of the stress of school fundraising.

40 www.thriveswla.com

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2017


Decide which fundraiser is right for you.

Consider tax breaks and transparency.

It isn’t always about the money.

There will likely be multiple fundraisers for your child’s school throughout the year, so ask up-front what they will be, and what each fundraiser will benefit. Some parents have no problem supporting every single fundraiser, while other parents struggle to make ends meet. If you are somewhere in between, consider the fundraisers carefully. If your child participates in band or cheerleading, you may have required sport or club-specific fundraisers that you want to spend your time and energy on. If not, you may ask which fundraiser specifically benefits purchasing technology or learning materials for students, and make your decision on which one to support accordingly.

Public school fundraisers can often be taxdeductible. Many PTA and PTO organizations are set up as non-profit organizations, so remember to get a receipt from the school for your tax credit. Also, sometimes a school uses a third-party vendor for items to sell and gets a percentage of the sales back. If they get 20% back from the sales your child makes, and your child is required to sell $100 worth of items, perhaps you can ask the school if you can simply write them a $20 check. Owen Clanton, principal of F.K. White Middle School explains, “Fundraising through the school is an exceptional way to donate money. It provides a safe, transparent, and secure platform. We are thankful that we have strict guidelines that we abide by when fundraising because it really takes the burden off everyone involved.”

There are many parents out there who simply cannot spend the money and don’t feel comfortable asking others to buy things for a school fundraiser. There are always other ways to support your child’s school. Clanton also reminds parents, “If you’re able to, please consider donating your time, talents, and treasures when the schools are asking. Our school comes alive with help from parents and the community, it’s not just about money. It may be picking up trash or rebuilding some benches. Parents and community are a crucial part of schools.”

They Were Looking For: • • • •

2 stories 4 Bedrooms 3 Bathrooms 2-car garage

• • • •

Wood floors Granite counter tops Master suite Walk-in closets

• • • •

Fenced-in back yard Outdoor kitchen Large family room Nearby schools

One Week Later. . .

We Had Their Key.

e Bessett

c.

Realty, In

Each office independently owned and operated.

century21-bessette.com | 3025 Lake Street, Lake Charles | 474-2185 July 2017

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

We have the keys you need. www.thriveswla.com

41


Home & Family | Back to the Books

Time-Saving Tips for your Morning Routine

by Sylvia Ney

Whether it’s because you’re a night owl, have multiple kids arguing in the house, or your family simply struggles with organization, mornings can be a time of great frustration and strife. If you’re tired of the sun-up frenzy, try these simple tips to help make your morning routine less stressful.

42 www.thriveswla.com

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2017


Skip the Snooze Button – It’s tempting to hit the snooze button when the alarm goes off in the morning. You crave those extra few minutes, but scientists claim it does more harm than good. The folks at ASAP Science explain that while you might think hitting snooze will give you a chance to finish your natural sleep cycle and wake up feeling rested, that’s not what happens. After you hit snooze and drift off, your brain starts its sleep cycle all over again. When the alarm goes off a second time, you’re likely at an even deeper, earlier part of your sleep cycle, which results in you feeling even worse than you did the first time. If you regularly wake up feeling groggy, ASAP Science explains the trouble may be that your alarm is going off at the wrong part of your sleep cycle. Try setting your alarm a few minutes later (or getting up a little earlier) and sticking to a regular sleep schedule to get a nice rhythm going.

Quick Breakfasts – Say no to cooking in the mornings when you have to be out of the house by a specific time. Cold cereal, granola bars, fruit, yogurt, and toast are generally faster and healthier choices. Plus, many of these options can be eaten in the car if you’re in a big hurry. If you must have the hot pastries, meats, and eggs, consider making them beforehand and storing in the refrigerator. They will be easy to set on a plate in the microwave or in the oven to heat while you dress.

Shower Time – Consider taking your shower in the evening before heading to bed. Some doctors claim the heat relaxes you into a deeper and more comfortable sleep. If you suffer from night sweats, or just need the shower to wake up in the morning, try speeding up the process with a timer. It’s too tempting to linger in the warm spray. A streamlined process can help you wake up more fully.

Caffeine Injection – If you must have your morning coffee before ANYTHING else can happen, consider a machine with a built-in timer. Prep the machine each night before heading to bed so that you can save time, wake to the smell of your favorite freshly brewed blend, and get that caffeine fix even quicker.

Nightly Routine – If you can spend some time each night choosing your outfit, jewelry, and any needed materials for the next day and have it all set out ready to go, you can eliminate unnecessary searching and indecision in the morning. This goes for both you and the kids.

Everything in its Place – Get organized and create a permanent place for everything you’ll need each day including keys, umbrellas, jackets, purses, wallets, etc. Make it a habit to put things there in the evening so you’ll always know where your necessities are located and you won’t lose valuable time searching for things you need to get out the door.

Even if you are a morning person, a more zen-like routine can have you out the door in a flash with minimal fuss. Everyone can benefit from planning ahead and preparing for whatever the day might bring. Implementing these six tips can help improve the ease of your morning, mind, and mood.

TXT + DRV = safetycouncilswla.org July 2017

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

43


Home & Family | Back to the Books

g n i l g g u JAfter-School Activities by Lauren Atterbery Cesar

All parents want their children to be wellrounded little people who are involved in after-school sports and activities, and all parents would also like to keep their sanity intact between the hours of 3:05 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. At times, it may feel like you cannot have both. This rings especially true when one child has dance at 3:30 p.m. and at the same time, across town, another child has baseball practice, and a third child must be collected from Chess Club practice around 4:00. However, there are some sanity-saving tips that will allow you to show your face at church on Sunday without the shame of knowing you may or may not have cut the priest off in traffic one too many times on your way to gymnastics.

44 www.thriveswla.com

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2017


Make a family calendar. Once a week, hold a family meeting and have each member let you know where they need to be that week and write it on the family calendar. Place the calendar where everyone can see it. Planning ahead will help you avoid disaster. If you have children who have access to electronic devices, make use of Google Calendar or a calendar that you can all share and see at any given time.

Rely on others. There are going to be times when, as much as you would like to, you simply cannot be in two places at once. Other parents feel your pain. Make arrangements with another trusted parent who has a child in the same activity as yours and carpool. It may work out that they can drop the kiddos off if you can pick them up. If you have a partner who can share some of the burden of dropping off or picking up, speak up and let them know you need their help. You might also be fortunate enough to have family members locally who can lend a hand when things get tough.

Reassess your child’s interest and have an honest conversation. You might be struggling every week to make sure Amanda gets to softball practice, while in reality, Amanda hasn’t enjoyed playing softball in two years. Talk to your children about their changing interests and plan accordingly. Be honest with your child if you’re struggling to get them to three different sports and a club all in the same season. It may be time for them to make choices about what they are most interested in, which can open a great discussion about priorities.

Plan Your Meals Ahead. One of the hardest parts of afterschool activities is coming home and cooking a healthy dinner. It can be so tempting to run through the drive-through after a late practice or game, but this doesn’t do your health or budget any favors. Freeze crock-pot meals ahead of time and prepare them in the mornings, or plan simple things that can be cooked quickly when you get home from activities.

SummeR SpecialS MONDAY FUN DAY:

UNLIMITED THURSDAY:

TWOSDAY DUO:

FRIDAY NIGHT FARIENDZY:

Jump 3 Hours for $15!

Follow these tips to make juggling after-school activities more manageable, and be assured, your children may not remember every practice or every club meeting, but they will remember how you made sacrifices which allowed them to participate.

Jump All Day for a $20!

Bring a Friend and Purchase Two Jump Times to Get One 30% OFF!

16 and Under Jump From 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. for $17.95!

WEAR IT WEDNESDAY:

Wear Your Altitude Apparel and Get $3 OFF of 1 Hour, $6 OFF of 2 Hour or $9 OFF of 3 Hour Jumps!

3009 Gerstner Memorial Hwy Lake Charles, LA 70601 • (337) 602-6650 July 2017

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

45


Home & Family | Back to the Books

Back to School

Vaccinations Protecting our Children from Diseases

by Angie Kay Dilmore

You’ve bought their school supplies and uniforms, started re-establishing a bedtime routine, and packed the pantry with lunchbox staples. Anything left on your back-to-school to-do list? Possibly. Children entering Pre-school and 6th grade require proof of current vaccinations to be admitted to school. For children entering pre-school, Louisiana law requires two doses of MMR, three doses of Hepatitis B, two of Varicella, and booster doses of DTaP and Polio vaccines on or after the 4th birthday and prior to school entry. According to the Center for Disease Control, Louisiana had a 96.8% vaccination rate for kindergarten children in 2016, among the states with the highest vaccination rates in the country. (High five, Louisiana!) Dr. Albert Richert, pediatrician at The Pediatric Center, Lake Charles, says most children get their immunizations as part of their routine well child visits starting at age two months. “Immunizations are usually given at the two, four, six,

twelve, and eighteen months visits. The next set of immunizations is given at four years of age. So people who follow the recommended schedule have everything they need for school by that four year visit.” Sixth graders (11-12 years of age) are required one Tdap, two VAR, two MMR, three HBV, and one MCV. Dr. Richert says a child that is up to date will have already had all but meningitis (MCV) and a tetanus booster (Tdap). Usually, children need proof of a tetanus shot in order to play sports and other activities. Pediatricians rarely see children with illnesses such as polio, diphtheria, and measles these days. “Serious infectious diseases in children are dramatically less common than any other time in history, and it is because of vaccines,” says Dr. Richert. “Now pediatricians are able to focus on things like preventive care, developmental problems, and chronic conditions such as asthma and allergies.” Providing a child with vaccines is not

Vaccination Glossary MMR DTaP Tdap VAR HBV MCV

46 www.thriveswla.com

measles, mumps, and rubella diphtheria, tetanus, and whooping cough (pertussis) a booster of the above vaccine varicella, aka chickenpox hepatitis B meningococcal diseases

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2017


only about protecting that child from particular illnesses. According to Dr. Richert, sometimes the primary benefit of a vaccine is to protect others. For example, protection against Rubella is included in the MMR vaccine. When Rubella was a common childhood infection, it was almost always a very mild infection from which a child would recover in a matter of days. However, if a pregnant woman contracted Rubella, the effects on the developing fetus could be catastrophic. Many cases led to miscarriage or stillbirth. Babies who survived might suffer from hearing loss, heart defects, or eye cataracts. “Since the introduction of the vaccine, children are no longer getting this disease and spreading it to pregnant woman, and the rate of birth defects due to Rubella is currently very low,� adds Dr. Richert. Vaccination is one of the best ways parents can protect their children from potentially harmful, even lifethreatening diseases. Though not required, Dr. Richert also recommends yearly flu shots for school age children.

July 2017

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

47


Home & Family | Back to the Books

W

W

DeWanna’s Closet Drop-Off at Thrive Office Now Enrolling 2 Years through 8th Grade

Insta

803 North Division Street Lake Charles, LA 70601 337-433-5246 www.episcopaldayschool.org

10

Great Reasons to be a

family

at Bishop Noland Episcopal Day School

Academic Excellence Safe, Nurturing Environment Competitive Athletics

48 www.thriveswla.com

Global Citizenship Outstanding Technology Program Vibrant Fine Arts Program Successful, Confident Graduates Individual Attention Spiritual Growth Leadership

DeWanna Tarver started her organization, DaWanna’s Closet, last year to help needy children in Calcasieu Parish with new school uniforms. Thrive magazine supports her efforts this month by providing a drop-off box in their office lobby. If you would like to make a donation, please bring new school uniform apparel (used clothing not accepted) to the office at 4845 Iles Rd., Lake Charles. Monetary donations are also welcome and can be given to the office receptionist. For more information, see her Facebook page, @DeWannasCloset.

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2017


When it comes to total relaxation,

Water Works.

Take your yard from ORDINARY to OASIS. You don’t have to travel to enjoy the sounds and scenes of relaxing cool, flowing water. You can bring the enjoyment of water right into your own yard with ponds and other water features. The possibilites are endless! Let us create a custom water retreat to complete your landscape design. Landscaping made simple for your home. July 2017

LANDSCAPE MANAGEMENT SERVICES, INC.

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

5005 Cobra Road in Lake Charles (337) 478-3836 M-F: 7am – 4pm Sat: 8am – 2pm (Seasonal Hours)

landscapemanagement.org www.thriveswla.com

49


Home & Family

Little Free Pantry

Promoting a Healthier Southwest Louisiana

by Bailey Castille

An initiative that began in Fayetteville, Arkansas to help relieve food insecurities in local Arkansas neighborhoods, the Little Free Pantry project has spread to many states across the United States. Now, the Little Free Pantry project has taken root in Louisiana, a movement that started in New Orleans and will come soon to neighborhoods in Southwest Louisiana. Introduced to Lake Charles by the Lake Charles Happy Hour Rotary Club, the Little Free Pantry (LFP) allows members of the community to contribute food, toiletries, and other dry goods and hygiene-related products via neighborhood Little Free Pantry boxes. The mission behind LFP, in the words of Brian Pitre, a member of the Lake Charles Happy Hour Rotary Club and a pioneer of the project, is “to provide small, lowrisk items for free, 24-hours-a-day to anyone who may need them.” The Little Free Pantry allows one person to give back while allowing another to receive help, all on a local voluntary basis. The Lake Charles Happy Hour Rotary Club, according to Pitre, “has dedicated its entire club and all of its subcommittees to facilitating this project” because they recognize LFP’s potential and the benefits that LFP would bring to this community. The 50 www.thriveswla.com

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

project’s official sponsor for the first Pantry box is the Partnership for a Healthier Southwest Louisiana, a partnership that exists to “encourage, educate, and empower our communities through programs like LFP to promote and develop a healthier Southwest Louisiana.” The first Little Free Pantry in Southwest Louisiana will be installed and begin serving members of the community this summer. This LFP will operate as a pantry and a library, offering old and new books in addition to pantry items and hygene products, and will be located on Division Street in Lake Charles, across from Episcopal Day School (EDS). Future locations for LFPs in the area are still being determined. If you or someone you know is interested in helping maintain the supply of goods in the pantry, donating books to the library portion, or sponsoring future LFPs in the community, you can obtain more information about such opportunities by contacting the Lake Charles Happy Hour Rotary Club via Facebook at www.facebook.com/ LakeCharlesHappyHourRotary. For more information on the Little Free Pantry project around the country and to find or sponsor an LFP in a neighborhood near you, visit LittleFreePantry.org. July 2017


Give Your Baby a

Special Beginning Every story has a beginning. For your baby’s birth, choose the hospital focused on patient safety, with a history of high patient satisfaction. The hospital recognized for creating an exceptional birthing experience with skin-to-skin contact immediately after birth, breastfeeding education, physicians and a certified nurse midwife you know and trust, ready to give guidance and support. Choose West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital for your baby’s beginning.

Ben Darby, MD, FACOG, OB/GYN Scott Bergstedt, MD, FACOG, OB/GYN Allison Hansen, WHNP, CNM

July 2017

701 Cypress Street, Sulphur

wcch.com

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

51


Money & Career

Legal Roundup

Types of Law Practices • New Laws You Need to Know • Ask an Attorney Q&A

52 www.thriveswla.com

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2017


Making It Legal: Navigating Today’s Common Areas of Law Practices

by Victoria Hartley-Ellender

F

or many, hiring an attorney is a new, unfamiliar, and once-ina-lifetime experience. Whether

it’s your first time venturing into the legal world or you’ve had some past experience, the process of seeking legal counsel to meet a specific need can be overwhelming. Law practices are divided into several overlapping categories that collectively form a representative framework for society’s civil justice system. From business and personal injury to bankruptcy and real estate law to family and divorce cases, each lawyer has a defined niche that offers a refined skillset to potential clients. Here are six areas of the most common types of law practice.

Continued...

July 2017

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

53


Money & Career | Legal Roundup Nonprofit Nonprofit attorneys provide services for clients who cannot afford to pay for legal services. Locally, the Southwest Louisiana Law Center has provided legal services to economically disadvantaged citizens for the past fifty years. The center operates on a sliding scale for cases of family law, including custody child access disputes, child support, use and occupancy of home and car, spousal support, community and domestic violence, intra-family adoption, name changes, and successions; as well as landlord tenant disputes and expungement cases. Mark Judson, executive director of the Law Center, said the organization continually seeks new and innovative ways to serve clients and close the justice gap in society. “At the Southwest Louisiana Law Center, we have a core belief that in order to have a healthy and functioning society, all citizens must be able to access the civil justice system. We work every day to ensure that as many citizens as possible can gain access to the civil justice system.”

Personal Injury If you have suffered an injury and feel that another party is responsible, a personal injury attorney may be able to help you. Personal injury attorneys represent clients who have sustained either physical or emotional injuries when another party was responsible. Common situations that require a personal injury attorney include botched surgeries, work related injuries, traffic accidents, air pollution, and falling in public places. Personal injury attorneys usually charge based on contingency, which means the client pays nothing up front, and the attorney takes a percentage if the case wins.

Family and Divorce The five basic areas of family law are divorce, child support, custody, spousal support, and community property partitions. Other issues that fall within the category are interdicting elderly people who can no longer care for themselves, name changes, and emancipation cases. Lee Boyer, attorney at Stockwell Sievert Law Firm, has been practicing family law in Southwest Louisiana since 1985. Over the years, Boyer has observed an improvement in family law practices as processes have been streamlined making it easier for families to resolve issues more efficiently. “Working in family law is very rewarding because I am able to help people through what is usually a very difficult time in their lives,” said Boyer.

54 www.thriveswla.com

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2017


Property and Real Estate Property and real estate lawyers provide a valuable service for clients who are purchasing homes and property. The lawyer is typically retained to perform a title examination, which ensures that a title is clear and there are no liens or judgments against the property. They also review the buy/sell agreement to ensure fairness for all parties. Transactional real estate attorneys are typically well versed and up-to-date in current laws pertaining to property and zoning restrictions. Real estate attorneys also defend clients in litigation over property rights when a buy/sell agreement is violated or when a tenant or landlord breaks a law.

We are all you need Immigration

• Family Law & Divorce • Personal Injury • General Civil Law

The process of bringing a family member, employee, or friend to the United States from another country can be very complicated and involves many applications and filings with multiple government agencies. Hiring an immigration attorney who has expertise in local, state, and federal immigration procedures can streamline the process for businesses and individuals who are attempting to immigrate to and from the United States. Many businesses seek the help of immigration attorneys since they oftentimes hire and relocate employees from outside the U.S.

• Mediation • Criminal Defense • Contract Disputes

940 Ryan Street • Lake Charles, LA 70601 (337) 433-5297 • bradguillorylaw.com

Business Whether it’s for a small business starting out or a large corporate merger, business transactions often require the assistance of a business attorney. When it comes to business, the general rule is, “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure,” and consulting a reliable attorney is crucial for businesses of all shapes and sizes. In addition, retaining a business attorney can make a business more successful, stable, and profitable. A good business attorney will provide vital assistance in nearly every component of business including hiring compliance, copyright and trademark advice, business incorporation, and lawsuits/liability issues.

Butch Ferdinandsen

CFP®, CLU®, ChFC®, CRPS, CRPC Investment Advisor Representative Ferdinandsen Financial Group is a marketing name. Securities and Investment Advisory services offered throughout Woodbury Financial Services, Inc., member FINRA/SPIC.

July 2017

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

55


Money & Career | Legal Roundup

2017 Legislative Session Review: A mixed bag at best, a potential debacle in the making by Deborah Hacker Serra

Before ending June 8, the Louisiana legislature failed to pass a budget that was to have gone into place July 1, the first time this happened in nearly twenty years. This resulted in a second session that began with a whimper as legislators headed home for the weekend to try to clear the air and put aside the rancor that permeated the ill-fated regular session. Perhaps home cooking and familiar surroundings were the answers because legislators returned, finally passing the $28+ billion budget. Detailed here are some of the highlights of this year’s session.

56 www.thriveswla.com

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

Prison Reform Much was made ahead of the regular session about the Governor’s efforts at legislative prison and sentencing reform. Even his most ardent supporters were skeptical that the Governor’s reforms would make it through both houses. However, ten bills have been signed into law in an attempt to rid the state of its dubious title of ‘World’s Incarceration Capital.’ Sentences will be shortened and parole will be more easily granted for non-violent crimes such as drug possession, car theft, and simple theft. First time offenders with drug addictions may not be sentenced to prison, instead being remanded to treatment programs. Sentences may be shortened for those already in prison for these non-violent crimes. The legislation is aimed at reducing the state prison population by 10% over ten years, with a projected savings to the state of $262 million. Programs designed to rehabilitate offenders and support victims will be funded by 70% of these savings. Representative Stephen Dwight’s (Lake Charles) bill improves the victim notification system which will allow people to receive notification about an offenders’ release or parole hearings in a more efficient manner. Life without parole for juveniles will no longer be available with the exception of first-degree murder cases. Child support payments will be suspended for people who have been jailed more than six months unless they have others means to pay the support. And food stamps and welfare will be available for drug offenders returning home from prison.

Mental Illness Unfortunately those with mental illness, at times, find themselves in the prison system through misunderstandings, miscommunication, and the inability to access the resources that can help them navigate in society. The budget proposed by both the House and the Senate included cuts to services for children and adults with mental illness. Access to medication was not affected in either proposal but daytime programs and assistance were cut as were services to people too stable for hospitalization but in need of psychiatric and psychological services.

July 2017


Higher Education Actual good news in the higher education category, TOPS is fully funded for the coming school year. Although funding will be uncertain in the 2018-2019 funding cycle, parents and students have at least one more year to experience the benefit of TOPS. Universities themselves are fully funded for the first time in a decade through 2018. In an interesting move, a new law goes into effect this Fall prohibiting public postsecondary educational institutions from asking about the criminal history of the applicant, with a few exceptions. A college or university may ask about criminal history after the admission process has been completed. This would include questions on forms dealing with funds and scholarships, as well as housing.

Taxes Never a popular subject, as the adage goes, ‘death and taxes are inevitable.’ However, there was a strong effort to increase gasoline taxes at the pump. The funds would have addressed infrastructure and other needs throughout the state. A Louisiana chapter of a national anti-tax group, Americans for Prosperity, organized an effort that resulted in legislators receiving calls and emails urging them to vote against the gas tax and several others taxes. The gas tax was removed from consideration and the other taxes never made it to the floor. This move merely delays the inevitable. Taxes or alternative means of funding must be addressed in upcoming special sessions. Funds have been set aside in current legislation whereby agencies will hold back $60 million for use if mid-year projections are not realized. Louisiana has experienced mid-year deficits over the past nine years. And this projection guessing game has been at the heart of the many vitriolic disagreements between the House and the Senate. Although a date has not been set for the next special session, taxes and funding will be at the heart of every discussion.

education will be incorporated into the public school curriculum statewide. This is an effort to instill environmental stewardship in our youngest citizens, thus promoting a cleaner state.

Solar For those of you who thought you were cut out of the solar state tax credit payments, there is hope. You will receive some money over the next three years. If you bought and installed your system two years ago and did not receive the promised credit, it should be coming.

Show Me the Money In the coming weeks much will be made of the ‘fiscal cliff.’ Temporary sales taxes expire June 30, 2018 which will leave a deficit estimated to be no less than $1.3 billion. Yes, that’s billion with a ‘b.’ The House leadership indicates lawmakers will be more comfortable considering taxes closer to the June 30 expiration date and when it’s clearer if other revenue sources have realized their potential. The Senate appears more amenable to tax

discussions but at their political peril. One veteran lawmaker remarked that when he was in the midst of making a difficult legislative decision, he would look at the back rows of the House and all he saw were lobbyists and special interest advocates. He wanted to see his constituents being actively involved and supporting or providing input to his efforts. Although we could all comment that it’s difficult to get to Baton Rouge even if we knew when votes were taking place, we can call, email, and snail mail our Representatives and Senators. This is the active part of the democracy we so zealously guard. But in order for it to work, we need to do our part. These are not easy times in Baton Rouge, and decisions being made in the coming months will have both short and long-term consequences affecting us for years to come. In a bit of irony, Lake Charles and Southwest Louisiana are realizing prosperity the rest of the state can only dream of. Yet, the tough budget decisions that must be made for the good of all could have a cooling effect on our corner of the state, as well.

Ashley Foret Dees L L C

IMMIGRATION LAWYER Lake Charles 343 Broad Street (337) 214-0354 Houston 1020 Studewood Street (855) 464-6580

A Cleaner State House Bill 111 passed with no rancor and little debate other than positive words of encouragement. On a collaborative effort by Keep Louisiana Beautiful, the state chapter associated with Keep America Beautiful, the principles of litter

afdees.com July 2017

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

57


Money & Career | Legal Roundup

Q

Q&A

Ask an Attorney

A

You asked, and we responded. Here are answers to several questions commonly asked of lawyers.

Q A

Are handwritten wills legal in the State of Louisiana? If so, do they need to be witnessed and notarized? Yes, a handwritten will, also known as an olographic testament, is valid in Louisiana as long as the document meets certain requirements of form and substance. Louisiana Civil Code Article 1574 gives the requirements for a valid olographic will. The article provides that the will must be “entirely written, dated, and signed in the handwriting of the testator.” (The testator is simply the person making the will.) The day, month, and year must be reasonably ascertainable from the document. Also, the language of the document must be absolutely clear that the writer intends for that particular piece of paper in question to be his or her will. In addition, the testator’s signature should be at the very bottom of document, with no other writing after the signature of the testator. An olographic testament does not have to be witnessed and notarized at the time it is written and signed. But when it is time for the will to be probated, two credible witnesses will have to testify before a judge, or execute a sworn affidavit, that the will in question was entirely written, dated and signed in the testator’s handwriting. Brad Guillory, Law Office of Brad Guillory

I was hurt at my workplace and was in rehab for three months. Now workman’s comp won’t pay me. What recourse do I have? If you are injured during the course and scope of employment, you may be entitled to certain benefits under the Louisiana Workers’ Compensation Act. Those benefits include medical treatment for your injuries and periodic payments for lost time from work if you are disabled as a result of your injuries. If you are injured at your workplace, you should contact an attorney experienced in the area of Workers’ Compensation for advice as soon as possible. Jason Bell, Cox, Cox, Filo Camel & Wilson, LLC Continued on page 60...

58 www.thriveswla.com

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2017


13,300 Number of Law Library Patrons since 1998

50 Years in business

96

89,988 Number of family members affected since 1967

225,000

Number of manhours documented since 1967

22,497 19,905 Number of cases opened since 1967

Number of cases closed since 1967

Number of KPLC “Legal Corner� Broadcasts since 2015

$18,750,000

$56,250,000

Cost @ Law Center for all cases since 1967 at current market value

Number of Interns and Volunteers since 1967

Cost @ private attorney for all cases since 1967 at current market value

1011 Lakeshore Dr #402 | Lake Charles | 70601 (337) 436-3308 | swla-law-center.com July 2017

500 300

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

Number of Volunteer Attorneys since 1967

www.thriveswla.com

59


Money & Career | Legal Roundup

Q

Q A

A I was injured in a car accident and neither I nor the other driver has insurance. What should I do? Unfortunately, there is not much you can do. Louisiana law requires every vehicle to carry a minimum of $15,000 per person, $30,000 total per accident insurance coverage. If a vehicle is not insured, the driver may be cited with failure to provide proof of insurance, a misdemeanor offense. Additionally, Louisiana has a “no pay, no play” law, which means that a person who is injured by the fault of another cannot recover the first $15,000 of damages if they have no insurance. So, assume that your damages total $20,000; an injured person in this situation could only recover $5,000. However, damages are only part of the equation. With no insurance, you would have to go after the person who caused the accident, personally, meaning that you have to get a judgment and collect on that judgment, which is a very expensive process that oftentimes results in no one collecting anything. The rule to take away from this scenario is that you must have a minimum of $15,000/$30,000 of liability insurance. I would encourage you to speak with your insurance agent about getting uninsured/ underinsured motorist coverage to protect yourself in the event the person who injures you does not have any insurance or enough insurance. It’s inexpensive and is probably some of the best insurance you can buy to protect yourself. Matthew McGlathery, Hoffoss DeVall

60 www.thriveswla.com

I’m considering divorcing my spouse due to infidelity. What exactly does “No Fault Divorce” mean? Louisiana law provides that the parties to the marriage can get divorced based on the following: A. Living separate and apart for either 180 or 365 days depending on whether minor children are involved. B. Adultery. C. Commission of a felony and sentencing to death or hard labor.

Q

D. Physical or sexual abuse. E. Issuance of a protective order or injunction based on abuse. Only the first ground for divorce is considered to be a “No Fault Divorce,” which is just living separate and apart for the required time period. Typically, it requires more work to obtain a fault based divorce because of the burden of proof and not being able to get the divorce solely based on affidavits. The only real advantage to a fault based divorce, other than potentially being able to have the judgment of divorce rendered sooner, is that the fault would be a bar to permanent spousal support. Lee Boyer, Stockwell Sievert Law Firm

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

A

I have a child who is a U.S. citizen, but I am not. How can I obtain legal status in the United States? Under the current immigration laws of the United States, U.S. citizens who are 21 years of age or older may petition for their foreignborn parents to obtain lawful permanent resident status (green cards). However, doing so does not necessarily mean that the foreignborn parent will be granted such status. Each case is fact-specific and will depend on numerous factors including, but not limited to: the current location of the foreign-born parent; the current immigration status of the foreign-born parent; how many times the foreign-born parent entered the United States without lawful status; the dates on which the foreign-born parent entered the United States; and the amount of time that the foreign-born parent may have been unlawfully present in the United States, if any. Due to the complexity of these cases and immigration law as a whole, U.S. citizens wishing to obtain legal status for their foreign-born parents should first consult with an experienced immigration attorney. Jeb Richard, Ashley Foret Dees Law Office

July 2017


Q A

July 2017

My spouse and I are facing divorce and we have three young children. How is Child Support calculated? Child support is a continuing obligation of both parents, even after a separation or divorce. Although every case is determined based on its particular facts and circumstances, the basic premise is that children are entitled to share in the current income of both parents and should not be the economic victims of a divorce or out-of-wedlock birth. Typically, either parent will file a request for child support in the divorce proceeding via a petition. However, child support can be requested at any time and does not have to necessarily be requested in conjunction with the divorce proceeding. Nevertheless, it’s always best to request child support along with the divorce petition because any judgment awarding child support will be retroactive to the date of judicial demand (aka the date of filing the divorce petition/request for support). The basic child support guidelines are set out in LA R.S. 9:315. These guidelines set forth the formula that courts use to calculate child support. The court will use certain variables including, but not limited to: the relative income of the parties, the number of children involved, child care costs, the health insurance premiums for the child(ren), and any legitimate extra-ordinary expenses – medical or otherwise. Each party’s share of the total obligation is then calculated by plugging these variables into the formula that is set forth in the guidelines. While each case is determined by its own unique facts and circumstances, generally, the party that earns the most income will pay a larger share of the total obligation. However, a court can deviate from the child support guidelines in certain circumstances if the application of the guidelines would not be in the best interest of the child or would be inequitable to the parties. Child support is also contingent on custody. For example, a court may adjust a child support award downward to reflect time spent by the child living in the home of the payor. Basically, the more custody that a parent exercises, the less support they may have to owe to the other party. Generally, the party without legal custody or the non-domiciliary party will owe his/her total support obligation to the custodial or domiciliary party. An award of child support may be modified if the circumstances of the child(ren) or of either parent materially change. Alyson Vamvoras Antoon, Antoon Law Firm

As a full-service law firm, we are pleased to offer domestic mediation services along with our family and divorce law practice. Please contact us for more information.

Lee W. Boyer • Kathleen T. Deanda

337 436-9491 | www.ssvcs.com One Lakeside Plaza, 127 W. Broad Street, Lake Charles Attorney Advertising: Prior Results Do Not Guarantee A Similar Outcome

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

61


Money & Career

Coupling your Finances Tips for Talking Money in a Relationship by Felicite Toney

Finances may not be romantic, but it’s an important topic to discuss with your partner if you’re in a serious relationship or considering taking steps toward a serious relationship. One of the biggest financial mistakes couples can make is hiding financial information from one another. A 2016 survey by the American Psychological Association reported money as a top cause for stress among Americans. But financial discussions with your partner don’t have to be stressful. Below are stressfree tips to help you and your partner achieve and maintain financial success and stability. Talk openly and honestly about your finances, and make discussion of finances a priority. This includes talking about financial goals, long term and short term. Consider the big items you want to buy or debt you want to pay off.

62 www.thriveswla.com

If you struggle with saving money, your partner may be able to help you achieve financial goals. Talk to your partner about spending habits and keep track of future transactions with a budget. Be sure to evaluate the value of purchases and always look for ways to save money. In addition to discussing finances, you should both be managing any shared accounts or responsibilities. Experts advise against situations where only one of you understands the finances. It’s important that you both know where money is being spent. Regardless of whether you’re sharing a bank account with your partner or not, discussing finances is essential for a healthy and long lasting relationship. Discuss banking options. Decide if you want to open a joint account, maintain separate personal accounts, or both. Don’t feel obligated to share an account if you’re

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

married. You can each have your own account in addition to one that is shared. This allows for each of you to manage personal spending while sharing joint responsibilities, like household expenses. But if you and your partner plan on merging bank accounts, be sure to discuss a budget. Use a budget. Whether you’re budgeting your own bank account or a shared account with your partner, a budget can ease stress and allow you to make smart financial decisions. In addition, a budget can act as a visual aid for your spending habits and allow you to see where your money is going. Keeping track of spending habits doesn’t have to be time consuming. There are budgeting apps available to download on your smartphone for quick and easy access to your finances.

July 2017


Don’t ignore your finances. If you share a bank account with your partner, you both need to be aware of financial situations. In addition, it’s important to know your credit score. Knowing your credit score can help you set and achieve financial goals. Keeping track of your credit score doesn’t have to be stressful. Many credit card companies offer a free monthly credit score report with statements, and the IRS offers one free credit report a year. Keep track of this score along side your budget. Establish a Solid Credit Rating. Lisa Johnson, Vice President and Mortgage Loan Department Manager at JD Bank, recommends young couples establish a strong credit rating, especially if they plan to buy a home in the near future. She says the best way to build credit is to carry one installment loan, such as a credit union loan; an auto loan; and revolving debt, such as a credit card. “Having these three items will help establish a decent credit score. Each account needs at least twelve months history. Do everything you can to make payments on a timely basis. Also, do not create any new debt just prior to applying for a mortgage or during the mortgage application process.” Make smart investments for your future. When planning and saving for your financial future, it is suggested by experts to save at least 10% of each paycheck. If you’re interested in investing some of your savings, be sure to discuss investment options and risks with your partner, especially if you’re sharing bank accounts. If one of you isn’t interested in investing due to possible risks, compromise and invest a portion of the money.

July 2017

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

63


Money & Career

CITGO Provides Elementary ts ec oj Pr g in er ne gi En t en ud St ith w s ol ho Sc As part of the CITGO STEM Talent Pipeline Program, CITGO has partnered with the Calcasieu Parish School Board (CPSB) and McNeese State University to bring Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) education to young minds through a handson learning experience called Engineering is Elementary (EiE). This spring, several local elementary schools participated in the program and hosted showcase events for students to demonstrate their projects to teachers, parents, CITGO representatives, and school board members. Tomeu Vadell, CITGO Vice President and General Manager Lake Charles Refinery and Interim Vice President Refining, said EiE is a great program that practically introduces students to the world of engineering. “Education is the beginning of knowledge

and Engineering is Elementary is a great STEM Education tool to inspire students to pursue careers in industry. This program is leading the workforce of the future,” he said. CPSB Superintendent Karl Bruchhaus said the school board values EiE and the partnership of CITGO. “We are very grateful for the Engineering is Elementary program and for the relationships that this partnership has established. This program provides opportunities for students to learn concepts, generate ideas, and solve problems that are very relevant in our own working community. We thank CITGO and McNeese State University for helping us foster a spirit of excitement in our students as they look towards their futures,” Bruchhaus said. The participating elementary schools with funding by CITGO for their EiE programs are: DeQuincy, Gillis, Dolby, W.T. Henning, M.J.

Kaufman, Moss Bluff, Nelson, Prien Lake, St. John, Vincent Settlement, Vinton and Western Heights. Elementary schools participating with funding by the Calcasieu Parish School Board include: Barbe, Brentwood, College Oaks, Combre/Fondel, E.K. Key, Fairview, Henry Heights, J.F. Kennedy, Oak Park, Pearl Watson, Ralph Wilson and T.H. Watkins. The following schools hosted events this spring: E.K. Key Elementary – The third grade EiE project was Bubble Bonanza. During this learning experience, students created a stage show about bubbles for an amusement park. The students explored how bubbles behave and investigated the properties of different materials while building bubble wands. The fourth graders learned that monsoon rains can cause severe flooding that cut people off from important supplies. Students engineered

All Systems GROW. Be a Part of It! The Alliance for Positive Growth is an organization of professionals in the fields of real estate, development, construction and all other interested parties working together to protect property rights and promote strong, beneficial growth in Southwest Louisiana.

To learn more, visit: APGrowth.org 64 www.thriveswla.com

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2017


“Aid Drop Packages” for their project that can be dropped from an aircraft, protect the items inside, and are easy to find once they reach the ground. Fifth graders participated in a project called The Sky’s the Limit where students learned that scientists and engineers often study harsh environments on Earth to understand environments they might encounter in space. Students explored aeronautical engineering by designing models of flying technologies that help NASA collect aerial photographs. T.H. Watkins Elementary – Fifth graders made rockets and launchers. They demonstrated the construction and flying power of the rockets and competed in which rockets flew the farthest. Fourth graders created earthquake-proof buildings out of construction paper, rubber bands and plastic rollers. The third graders demonstrated bubble blowers. They determined that no matter what shape the blower was or the materials used, the bubbles were always round. Western Heights Elementary – The third grade Engineering Club at Western Heights Elementary had a Bubble Bonanza where they showed off their student-constructed bubble blowers. Each student explained what materials were used to create their blowers and demonstrated their bubble-blowing abilities as part of the showcase. Moss Bluff Elementary ­– The students engineered a tower while being introduced to the Engineering Design Process as a problem solving tool. Students then experimented with different materials to find out which materials created the best bubble wand. At the end of the unit, each student demonstrated their bubble wand and explained what they learned about the Engineering Design Process. About EiE Engineering is Elementary (EiE) is provided by the National Center for Technological Literacy (NCTL) and the Museum of Science in Boston and “increases students” technological literacy and the educator’s ability to teach engineering and technology related subjects while providing ageappropriate, engaging, and thoughtprovoking challenges to the participants. July 2017

The American account gives you the freedom to do your banking any time and anywhere duty calls, and includes:

Lakeside Bank proudly offers The American account to all law enforcement officers, fire fighters, active duty military, members of the National Guard & Reserve, military veterans and their family members.

• Free checking • Free online banking, mobile banking and estatements • Free bill pay • Just $50 to open • No minimum balance and no monthly fees • Free first order of The American checks • Free debit card – with no-fee access to any ATM in the country • 25 basis point decrease on any consumer loan offered by Lakeside Bank ** • Free Lakeside Bank patriotic gift • Free telephone banking access to a live local banker • Overdraft protection with RediReserve ** • Identity theft protection available • Free 24/7 Real-time fraud monitoring with SecurLOCK

The sacrifice of those who work to serve and protect our communities and our country is immeasurable. We at Lakeside thank you for your courage and willingness to put others first. The American account is our humble way of recognizing and honoring your dedicated service.

Lakeside stands united with those who serve. Call or stop by any of our locations to learn more about The American account.

** Credit approval required

Main Office

(337) 474-3766

4735 Nelson Road Oak Park

(337) 502-4314

Join the Migration to Lakeside.

2132 Oak Park Blvd. Westlake

(337) 502-4144

2203 Sampson Street Sulphur

Coming Soon!

The Way Banking Should Be

Maplewood Drive

LakesideBanking.com Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

65


Money & Career Where you go to stay in the know! TownePlace Suites Opens

For more information or reservations, call the TownePlace Suites at (337) 477-5824.

Crying Eagle Brewery Launches Louisiana Lager Prien Lake Hospitality has opened two Marriott hotels in the last ten months. In the foreground is Courtyard by Marriott, which opened in August 2016, and next to it is TownePlace Suites Hotel, which opened June 13, 2017.

Prien Lake Hospitality and InterMountain Management are proud to announce the opening of the TownPlace Suites, at 2985 L’Auberge Boulevard in Lake Charles. The 120-room all-suite hotel is located a short drive from the L’Auberge and Golden Nugget Casinos, and features a stylish custom design, with local art throughout. Each spacious suite offers fully-equipped kitchens, contemporary furnishings, and amenities designed for today’s business and leisure travelers. General Manager Randy Geren, Director of Sales Oraneka Guidry, and Assistant General Manager Alexa Braquet bring a combined 46 years of hospitality experience to the team. This is the second Marriott property in Lake Charles in less than a year to be opened by W. Brent Lumpkin, local commercial real estate developer and hotel owner. The TownePlace Suites joins its sister property, the 110room Courtyard by Marriott, which opened in August of 2016. Lumpkin’s ownership group, including James H. Boyer and Lee W. Boyer of Lake Charles, partnered with InterMountain Management, one of the premier hotel management companies in the country.

66 www.thriveswla.com

Crying Eagle Brewing Company in Lake Charles proudly announces its newest beer, Louisiana Lager. Louisiana Lager is brewed using Louisiana rice from local rice mills, and it represents Crying Eagle’s ambitious growth into new markets and new flavors. The lager is now available in retail stores, bars and restaurants in Lake Charles where consumers can also find the brewery’s three other popular beers—The Chuck, Ready To Mingle and Calcasieu Common. For more information, visit www.cryingeagle.com.

Central School Welcomes Village Music School The Arts and Humanities Council of SWLA are excited to announce that Village Music School is a new tenant of Central School. Village Music School furnishes the Lake Charles music scene by transforming their students into creative instruments of music. Their unique programs offer an incredible life experience and are provided to students of all ages. The Village Music School also gives students the opportunity to perform live as openers for major bands or a solo gig at a local venue. They offer private lessons and summer programs such as Universal Music Camp, Tiny Tunes Adventure Time, Guitar Camp, Piano Camp, Voice Camp, Youth Media Course, and

a six-week Ukulele Course. The Arts and Humanities Council of SWLA functions as an umbrella organization to over sixty nonprofit arts organizations and countless artists and co-ops throughout the five parish region. For more information regarding our cultural organizations or how to become a tenant at Central School please contact (337)439-2787.

Bill’s Bar & Burger Now Open at Golden Nugget Lake Charles Landry’s opens its first B.R. Guest Restaurant since acquiring the brand in December 2016 - Bill’s Bar & Burger is now open at Golden Nugget Lake Charles. Located on the casino’s private beach, Bill’s Bar & Burger is the first B.R. Guest concept to open on the Gulf Coast. Bill’s Bar & Burger serves homage to burger and shake lovers, families, and tourists alike since July 2009. Bill’s Bar & Burger’s famous location at Rockefeller Center in New York City is the biggest standalone burger joint in the country. Bill’s Bar & Burger opens daily at 11am. Hours of operation

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

will vary seasonally. Bill’s Bar & Burger is easily accessible from the outside parking lot with direct access doors out from the property. For more information, please call (337)508-4115 or visit www.billsbarandburger.com.

Big Day for Southwest Louisiana Youth Sports In a unanimous vote, the Louisiana High School Athletic Association (LHSAA) agreed to award the Louisiana High School State Baseball Championships to the Sulphur area for another two years. Additionally, LHSAA voted to continue hosting 48 teams under the current tournament format for the Boys Basketball State Championship at the Burton Complex in Lake Charles for two more years. The Calcasieu Parish Police Jury, Burton Complex and the CVB presented the bid for the basketball championships being held March 5-10, 2018 and March 4-9, 2019. Sulphur Parks & Recreation along with the Lake Charles/Southwest Louisiana Convention & Visitors Bureau (CVB) presented the bid for the baseball tournaments being held May 9-12, 2018 and May 8-11,2019. For more information, contact the Lake Charles/Southwest Louisiana Convention & Visitors Bureau at (337) 436-9588 or (800) 456-SWLA, or visit www.visitlakecharles.org.

July 2017


IndustryInsider

Straight Answers to Your Questions on Industry and the Environment

Q:

How safe is it to work at an industrial plant?

A:

Safety is the priority at every industrial plant.

Because of the safety mindset within the plant, an employee’s risk of injury decreases significantly once he or she enters the plant. Before any job begins, multiple safety checks occur and continue throughout the job, daily. If anything seems unsafe, employees have the right and responsibility to stop the job. If an incident should occur, highly skilled and specialized emergency response teams are in place onsite and are ready to work with area first responders. Safety is our culture, and it’s built into every job we do. The goal is to protect ourselves, our co-workers, our families and our community, because this is our home too.

Greg Satterfield

senior safety engineer with area industry

Visit www.laia.com to learn more and submit your question about local industry and the environment. July 2017

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

67


McNeese Foundation Receives Donation from First Federal Bank of Louisiana First Federal Bank of Louisiana has donated $5,000 to McNeese State University through the McNeese Foundation for the First Federal Bank of Louisiana Scholarship. On hand for the donation are, from left, Charles V. Timpa, president and CEO of First Federal Bank, Leslie Harless, vice president and marketing director of First Federal Bank, and Angela Queenan, McNeese Foundation board member.

McNeese’s KBYS Hosts School of Rock Program McNeese State University’s radio station KBYS 88.3 FM offers a popular weekly rock ‘n’ roll program called “School of Rock” at 11am. on Saturdays.

68 www.thriveswla.com

The weekly radio show - hosted by Dr. Ray Miles, McNeese history professor and director of the Doré School of Graduate Studies, and Dr. Jeff Lemke, professor of music - is focused on bringing music appreciation and education to a wide audience. Miles stresses that the show is meant to be both informative and fun. Repeat broadcasts of the show are available at 4pm. on Sundays and 11pm on Wednesdays. Visit www.kbys.fm for this broadcast and other scheduled programming.

McNeese Nursing BSN Program Receives Continuing Accreditation The McNeese State University College of Nursing and Health Professions’ baccalaureate nursing degree program has been granted continuing accreditation by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) following an extensive review process that culminated with a campus site visit last fall by CCNE evaluators. The CCNE - the accrediting body of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing – officially accredited McNeese’s baccalaureate

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

nursing program at its spring meeting in April and the accreditation runs through 2027. Both McNeese’s Bachelor of Science and Master of Science degrees in nursing are accredited by CCNE. More information about the CCNE is available at www.ccneaccreditation.org. For more information about nursing programs in the McNeese College of Nursing and Health Professions, call (337) 475-5820.

Annual Kicker Kutie Summer Dance Camp will be held July 1721 at McNeese State University. The camp is open to girls entering grades K-6. Cost is $170 per camper by June 30 and $180 beginning July 1. The camp will be held from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. in the McNeese Recreational Complex. This summer camp offers instruction in various dance styles, tumbling, etiquette, modeling and crafts taught by current and former Cowgirl Kickers Dance Team members. On the final day of camp, family and friends are invited to attend a showcase where campers will show off what they’ve learned. To register, go to www.active.com and search for Kicker Kutie Dance Camp. For more information, contact Paige Caldwell at Kevin_paigecaldwell@yahoo.com or at 337-540-6392.

July 2017


Mark Your Calendar! Arts & Crabs Fest Tickets on Sale July 7 The Arts Council of SWLA has announced the Arts & Crabs Fest 2017 tickets will go on sale Friday, July 7 at 8am. A limited number of early bird tickets are priced at $30, so buy early. Presented annually in partnership with the Lake Charles/SWLA Convention & Visitors Bureau, this signature culinary event will take place on August 19, 5pm-8pm, at the Burton Coliseum. Arts & Crabs Fest is a homegrown Southwest Louisiana festival celebrating the ties between seafood and culture – our region’s greatest national assets. Festivalgoers sample from an extensive crab and seafood dish tasting, featuring local chefs preparing a unique dish representative of their cuisine’s styles. Louisiana craft brew samples are offered as complementary pairings. Tickets will be available at artsandcrabsfest2017.eventbrite. com, and credit card purchases are accepted at the Arts Council office in Central School at 809 Kirby Street, Monday through Friday, 9am-5pm. For details, visit www.artscouncilswla.org or call (337) 439-2787.

Ainsley’s Angel Roll With The Wind Sunset 5K Scheduled Ainsley’s Angels of America’s 4th Annual, Roll With the Wind, Sunset 5k and Virtual Race will be held on July 29 in Lake Charles. This will also be the finish for the Ainsley’s Angels Power To Push mission Rolling Down the Mighty Mississippi. July 2017

The road race is a familyfriendly event welcoming all members of the community to run, walk and roll. For more information or to sign up, visit www.ainsleysangels.org.

Pink Crusade Breast Cancer Support Group Meeting Scheduled On July 13, West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital (WCCH) will hold its monthly “Pink Crusade” Breast Cancer Support Group meeting. The meeting will be held at 6pm in the WCCH Board Room, near the Cypress Street entrance of the hospital. July’s program will include a celebration of birthdays. The WCCH Pink Crusade Breast Cancer Support Group meets the second Thursday of each month at 6pm. in the WCCH Board Room. Attendees will be provided with answers to common questions surrounding breast cancer and will receive support through every aspect of their disease. There is no charge to attend these monthly meetings. Refreshments will be served. For more information, call (337) 528-7320.

Cooking Demonstration to Provide Tips on Easy and Healthy Dishes Learn tips for cooking quick and healthy dishes at a free cooking demonstration on July 18, at 11am. at West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital’s Cafeteria Conference Room, located at 701 Cypress Street in Sulphur. Samples will be provided. To register, call (337) 527-4261 or email flandry@wcch.com.

Court Appointed Special Advocates to Hold Volunteer Training Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA), a division of Family & Youth Counseling Agency Inc. (Family & Youth) will host volunteer training beginning July 8 at 9am to 4pm at Family & Youth, 220 Louie Street in Lake Charles. Training will continue July 15, 22, and 29 from 9am-4pm on each day. Volunteers must attend all four training days. To find out more, contact courtney@fyca.org or call (337)436-9533. Potential volunteers from Allen or Jefferson Davis Parishes can contact judy@ fyca.org or call (337)824-8036.

Cajun Music & Food Festival Southeast Tourism Society Top 20 Event The Southeast Tourism Society (STS) recently honored the Cajun Music & Food Festival as a 2017 Top 20 Event for the month of July. This year’s festival will be held Friday – Saturday, July 14-15, at Burton Coliseum, 7001 Gulf Hwy., in Lake Charles. A Cajun French mass will be held at 8 a.m. at the Cajun French Music Association (CFMA) building, 3481 E. Prien Lake Road on Sunday, July 16. The festival aims to preserve the Cajun traditions and heritage

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

through music, dancing and food! Additionally, visitors can enjoy arts and crafts booths, raffles and games. Festival hours are 4-11pm Friday and 9am11pm Saturday. Admission is $8 and kids 12 and under are free. For more information, contact the Lake Charles/Southwest Louisiana Convention and Visitors Bureau at (337) 436-9588, or visit www.visitlakecharles.org.

The annual New Orleans Red Dress Run takes place August 12 in Crescent Park. This French Quarter event is the annual fundraiser for the Hash House Harriers, a selfproclaimed drinking club with a running problem, who have donated over a million dollars to local charities. Registration includes great food, awesome music, and a whole lot of beer! Go to http://nolareddress. com for more information and registration. The New Orleans Hotel Collection, with six hotels to choose from, has partnered with Red Dress Run and offers discounts to Red Dress Run participants. See their website for more information. http://www. neworleanshotelcollection.com/ red-dress-run.

www.thriveswla.com

69


Style & Beauty

How to Achieve the

“No Makeup” Makeup Look by Emily Alford

It sounds pretty contradictory to put on make-up so you can look like you’re not wearing make-up. However, one of summer’s hottest trends is a freshscrubbed, flawless face. And though most of us aren’t blessed with a naturally photo-ready complexion, there are plenty of inexpensive cosmetics that can help achieve a youthful, barefaced look. Here are a few essentials for achieving the perfect “no make-up” make-up.

Start with a clean slate The best way to beat the dulling oils that can build up on skin in sweltering temperatures is actually to use a cleansing oil. In the kitchen, it’s common knowledge that oil and water don’t mix, but we somehow forget that when washing our faces. Cleansing oils, packed with antioxidants and vitamins, dissolve complexion-dimming oils for skin that’s soft and glowing.

Don’t forget to prime Make sure you follow your cleansing oil with a moisturizer containing SPF to protect against sun damage, and then protect your pores with primer. Primers (which come in cream or gel form) are full of siliconebased polymers that smooth the skin’s surface, ensuring an even application of foundation and locking it in place.

Everything starts with a good foundation Foundation is the true hero of the natural look. In the summertime, you want to avoid anything too heavy, since 90-plus degree temperatures might have you melting on the walk to your car. Instead, opt for a tinted CC (or color correcting) cream. These ultralight creams even out skin tone without layering product, so you’ll look like you rolled out of bed with clear, even skin. But CC creams can only do so much. For skin issues besides redness or sun spots, try a lightweight concealer one to two shades lighter than natural skin tone. For under-eye circles, dab three small spots of concealer beneath eyes on top of CC cream. Blend with a sponge. For blemishes, dab one small dot of concealer right on top of the swollen area and blend completely with a sponge. It seems normal to finish a summertime foundation look with a sweep of pressed powder to soak up oil, but in high 70 www.thriveswla.com

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2017


humidity, powder can actually cause makeup to get blotchy. You’re better off blotting oil throughout the day with blotting papers or even tissue.

Keep it creamy For the same reason that powder foundations don’t work in the summer, powder eyeshadows and blushes can also start to melt and run, resulting in unappealing splotches. To keep your makeup fresh-looking and even, opt for cream eye shadows and blushes. Choose a cream shadow about two or three shades darker than your skin and apply it all over the eyelid, from lash to brow, blending at the edges. Apply a sweep of highlighter to the brow bone for contrast. It’s important not to go too dark with a cream blush, since they’re highly pigmented. Instead, pick a color that looks close to the color your cheeks flush after exercise or on a cold day. To apply cream blush, dab a small amount on the apples of cheeks and use fingers to blend along cheekbone toward temples.

Highlight Your Look The key to no makeup makeup is looking dewy and fresh. Amplify that look with an iridescent or bronze-tinted highlighter (usually sold in powder or cream form). Just sweep a tiny bit of the product along brow bones, the topmost parts of cheekbones, and the bridge of the nose — any place the sun would naturally highlight. The finished look is a can’t-quite-put-your-finger-on-it shimmer that will have people asking if you’ve just gotten back from a spa. Summertime is all about enjoyment, and who wants to waste these fun-filled days hunched over a makeup mirror? Just a few key products can keep you looking radiant without taking up too many precious minutes of your vacation days.

Let

Beautiful Skin Shine all Summer Long Rejuvenating treatments and products from the Aesthetic Center can help restore and protect healthier, younger looking skin. We offer: • Cosmetic Injections: - Botox - Juvederm - Volbella - Voluma - Vollure - Belotero - Sculptra - Kybella

• • • • • • •

Chemical Peels Microdermabrasion Targeted Skin Care Treatments Eyelid Surgery Latisse for Eyelash Growth PCA Skincare Products Jane Iredale Mineral Make-up

Call 310-1070 for more information or to schedule your appointment. Treatments are provided under the medical direction of facial cosmetic specialist, Mark Crawford, MD.

facehealth.net • 310-1070 • 1747 Imperial Blvd. July 2017

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

71


Style

& Beauty

What’s a Clothing Subscription Box? (And Should You Try One?) No one really likes being in a department store dressing room under florescent lighting, hoping a garment will fit because there’s no sales associate in sight. Needing the next size up can result in an embarrassing, halfdressed shuffle across an entire department only to discover the next size is out of stock. But until recently, perusing a department store seemed like a necessary evil for updating a wardrobe. Now, subscription clothing services offer shoppers a better way. For a monthly fee (which can usually be applied to the cost of the clothes), personal shoppers will handselect subscribers’ best outfit options and

by Emily Alford

ship them direct to the front door. Returns are free, which means your living room can become your dressing room. Sounds great, right?

Picking the right box for you Because a fee, usually $20-$40, is applied to clothes should you decide to buy, picking a service that’s right for you could save you money. First of all, it’s important to decide what sort of clothing you’re in the market for. So far, no one subscription service fits work, casual, and activewear needs. Read on for some services to choose from: Stitch Fix – Work and weekend-wear with personal shoppers who try to nail your style. Dia&Co – Work and weekend-wear that focuses on sizes 14 and up. Le Tote – More refined brand-name clothing at deep discounts and maternity wear. Fabletics – Tailors its athleticwear to your personal fitness activities.

Men can join the fun, too One of the best things about subscription boxes is that many are tailored to letting men experiment with new styles in the comfort of their own homes. Giant stores can be overwhelming, but men’s subscription services are all about helping men discover their personal style and offering plenty of options. To name a few: Bombfell gives users a quiz to help them decide on their first box The Trendy Butler – Simply sends a box every month for a flat fee with an option to return. Wantable Men’s Fitness - Sends a curated monthly box of 5-7 items. Get specific And if all those services aren’t enough, you can make your boxes super-specific, depending on your style fetish. Sock Club - Offers colorful, hand-knitted American cotton socks each for $12 a month. Splendies - Sends three pairs of underwear each month for a reasonable $14. 72 www.thriveswla.com

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2017


Pack a spray bottle filled with mineral water to cool your skin when it becomes dehydrated.

Pack Your Bag for

a Day at the Beach!

Cover-ups dress you in style and add a layer of comfort when you stroll the shoreline, the boardwalk, or head to the beach bar. And you’ll need flip flops for padding through the sand. If the sea floor near the shore is rough and rocky, wear sturdier water sandals. What better way to wile away the hours than by reading a good book?

by Angie Kay Dilmore

Got a day at the beach planned? Start your adventure preparations by packing a beach bag with everything you’ll need to enjoy the surf, sand, and sun.

Take into consideration the bag itself. Beach bags come in a variety of styles and materials – the classic straw bag, heavy canvas, sturdy totes, and insulated bags to keep your drinks and snacks cool. Try to find a bag that is waterproof, won’t mind the sand, and is roomy enough to hold all your essentials.

If you enjoy tunes at the beach, pack a waterproof radio.

And if, after all that, you still have room in that big beach bag, pack a few fun beach toys – plastic shovel and pail, a water pistol, a A wide-brimmed hat will further Lips and eyes must also be shield your face and neck, and protected, so pack some lip balm frisbee. Even grownups enjoy building sand castles! cut back on the harsh glare. with SPF and sun glasses.

Botox

Don’t forget the sun block! The SPF of your sunscreen tells you how long it should take before those UVB rays get through and start burning your skin. If your unprotected skin normally starts reddening in 20 minutes, for example, applying SPF 15 should protect you for 15 times longer, or about five hours. SPF 30 should be sufficient for most beach-goers. Apply it 30 minutes before you get out in the sun.

July 2017

Voluma

Enhance Your

Beauty

Look your best this summer!

Even if you have a lounge chair to relax on as you listen to the waves crashing on the shore, you’ll want to have a beach blanket and/or beach towel to stretch out on the warm sand or wrap up in if the breeze is cool. Playing in the water and soaking up the sun can build a mighty thirst and appetite, so pack plenty of water and snacks. Rather than tote a dozen plastic water bottles, try filling a large thermos or liquid-dispensing cooler and refill your reusable water bottle.

Juvederm

Dr. Bridget Loehn offers a range of cosmetic injections including Botox, Juvederm and Voluma to help smooth away fine lines and wrinkles. Call today to book your appointment.

Dr. Bridget Loehn Thrive Magazine for Better Living

ENT & Allergy Specialist 1747 Imperial Blvd., Lake Charles (inside CFO) | (337) 419-1960

www.thriveswla.com

73


!

Solutions for Life

from Solutions Counseling & EAP by Keri Forbess-McCorquodale, MS, LPC, LMFT, CEAP

What’s Your EQ – Part 2 “Anyone can become angry – that is easy. But to be angry with the right person, to the right degree, at the right time, for the right purpose and in the right way – that is not easy.” - Aristotle Last month we began discussing the Emotional Intelligence Quotient, or EQ. If you’ve ever had an awkward social interaction, then you have experienced a lack of EQ. If you’ve ever felt “off your game”, re-grouped, and got it back together, then you had a high EQ moment. The definition of Emotional Intelligence is comprised of three basic components: identifying and managing your emotions, identifying the emotions of others, and figuring out how to effectively interact with others. EQ focuses on four areas: self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, and relationship management. Self-Awareness was covered last month. This is the ability to identify what you are feeling and knowing how those feelings direct your behavior. Your homework was to begin identifying your feelings as specifically as possible so broad feeling categories (such as anger, sadness, happiness) are rarely used. By figuring out exactly how you are feeling, you increase the likelihood of appropriately responding. Now, on to the second area of developing your EQ: Self-Management. This is basically another term for “self-control.” It’s the ability to use the self-awareness of emotions to help you be flexible and positively direct your behavior. In other words, after you have identified how you are feeling, you then decide what positive/healthy thing you are going to do about it. If you are upset about something, what are you going to do? Will you punch a hole in the wall, or go for a run to get the adrenaline

74 www.thriveswla.com

out? Will you yell at the person you are frustrated with, or calmly say “This isn’t working for me.”? If you are feeling sad and lonely, will you consume a mood altering substance, or will you reach out to a friend and make some plans? So, how do you get better at SelfManagement?

could happen? Picture that very thing happening. Then, picture yourself after the worst case scenario – yes, it was tough, but you’re still standing. I was working with someone not long ago who has social anxiety and wanted to work on that. What follows is our dialogue.

1. Identify your feelings. This goes back to the Self-Awareness discussion from last month. When you are feeling “off” in some way, you must ask yourself, “OK, what’s going on with me?” Maybe that overall sense of dread is you feeling nervous about a difficult discussion you have to have today. Maybe you are feeling anxious about a presentation you have to give. You need to figure it out. If you choose to ignore that feeling in the pit of your stomach, then there is no way you are going to be able to deal with things more effectively.

Me: “What’s the worst thing that could happen to you in public?”

2. Determine the underlying cause. Now that you’ve acknowledged what you are feeling, here comes the most difficult step. You must be brutally honest with yourself and figure out what is driving these feelings. Honestly, most “underlying causes” can be connected back to fear in some way. Fear of rejection, fear of angering someone else, fear of not knowing how things will turn out. Asking yourself, “What scares me the most about this situation?” is often a helpful start.

Me: “And then?”

3. Take action. Now it’s time to break out of that unhealthy thinking. Whatever you are worried/anxious/fearful about, I want you to think about the worst case scenario. What’s the worst thing that

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

Her: “I could have a panic attack.” Me: “OK, what happens after you have the panic attack?” Her: “I never thought about that. I guess I would feel embarrassed and leave as quickly as I could.” Me: “And after that?” Her: “I would probably go home, make some coffee and think about what happened.” Her: “Probably watch some TV while I was still thinking about it, then eventually I would go to bed.” Exactly. It would not be the end of the world. Bad things happen to all of us. And we have the ability to imagine even worse things happening. Being able to picture yourself after the bad thing happens is of utmost importance. Start tuning into yourself, and begin asking yourself the hard questions. As you get better at Self-Awareness and Self-Management, the other two areas of Emotional Intelligence are going to be a breeze!

July 2017


July 2017

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

www.thriveswla.com

75


76 www.thriveswla.com

Thrive Magazine for Better Living

July 2017

Thrive Magazine July 2017 Issue  

July 2017 Issue of Thrive Magazine

Thrive Magazine July 2017 Issue  

July 2017 Issue of Thrive Magazine

Advertisement