Page 1


Certificate Bachelors Masters

0800 10 95 10 www.design.unitec.ac.nz

Contemporary Craft Graphic Design & Animation Interior Design Photography & Media Arts Product & Furniture Design Visual Arts


No. 1478502

04. THREADED editorial. fiona grieve

Applicant Name.

Fiona Grieve

POstal address.

p.o Box 79382

Place of Work.

Threaded

City of residence.

Auckland

Threaded Ed.

Ed.XI

Country of residence.

New Zealand

Editor Fiona Grieve DESIGN Kyra Bradcock Art Direction Kyra Bradcock Fiona Grieve 3D lead Lucas Milner 3D ARTIST Natasha Peppler creative contributors Dominique Rowe Louise Kellerman photography Brandon E Littlefield www.findbel.com Sam Hartnett Mike Heydon, Jet Productions GATEFOLD wallpaper Courtesy of PaperHands www.paperhands.co.nz

guest DESIGNERs Max Thompson Anita Ward Nick Baillie Podium SHOWCASE Volume One Mind Design T-world Area Design Lisa Reihana galleria Showcase Emma McEwen Kelsey Stankovich Kevin Tran Kirsten Roberts Limi Manu Thomas Le Bas Rosanne Croucher Solomon Mortimer Tinaz Karnhari Queenio (Huan Liu) proofing All About Words

No part of this publication can be copied or reproduced in any way/form or by electronic means without written permission from Threaded Media Limited .

ADVERTISING/Sponsorship info@threaded.co.nz SPONSORSHIP Unitec New Zealand Spicers Paper Limited SUBMISSIONS We welcome contributions for Ed.XII and submissions are now open for Galleria if you are an emerging creative HARD-COPY SUBSCRIPTIONS www.magmag.co.nz/threaded digital SUBSCRIPTIONS nz.zinio.com Special thanks To our mothers, partners, friends and whanau who support us PRODUCTION Threaded Media Limited PO Box 79 382 Royal Heights Waitakere 0656 Auckland, New Zealand


The l a A n o s i s t a o c n iation r e t n I of Threaded Cosmopolitans

T

“ABOVE ALL NATIONS IS HUMANITY”

hreaded XI is our first international edition and quite aptly the Cosmopolitan theme pays homage to the clubs and fraternities established to appreciate the advantages derived from a closer association between peoples of different nationalities. This edition draws reference from what began as a social club and positions this issue as a welcoming venue to showcase an eclectic programme of activities and practices within the liberal arts - at best deepening inter-cultural and international understanding of creative practitioners from around the world. We are open to new members and, in the playful spirit of this edition, our inside gatefold presents a combination of Kiwi cossie club and chic international names to furnish our clubhouse walls (note the contemporary wallpaper by PaperHands).

Following in the footprints of Cosmopolitan Club members in the early 1900s we invited five practitioners to reflect on their daily experimentation in international living and to actively participate in the pursuit of accelerating social and intellectual intercourse. Connections and intersections between creative practices influenced the line-up of quiet achievers in our Podium section. We met Brooklyn-based designer Matt Owens of Volume One a few years back at a Spark Conference in Hamilton, New Zealand and his artwork featured on the cover of Ed.3. As a member of Athletics Collective founded in 2004, Matt is involved in projects that shine a light on the power of collaboration. Although he is Hamilton based now, you may remember Alan Deare of Area Design from the Inhouse Design profile in Ed.6 not to mention numerous stunning projects for artists and creative institutions. As the master of housing devices, Alan had a hand in the art direction for our tenth edition and we figure that if we keep him close, his design sensibility might rub off on us. We always like to provide a platform that celebrates projects in alignment with Threaded and T-world magazine, founded by T-shirt connoisseur Eddie Zammit (also part of Grin Creative), will steal both your heart and your money. For the last three editions, we have tried to secure New Zealand artist Lisa Reihana but she is either ensconced in international projects or overrun with commitments. Persistence wore down resistance this time round and we have been lucky to include her. Kyra related to Holger Jacobs' (of London’s Mind Design) passion for craftsmanship and typography; Mind Design gently plays mind games with us in this issue, more of which can be viewed on their website. The theme for this edition is intended to provide fun for serious practitioners without losing sight of the Cosmopolitan motto “Above All Nations Is Humanity” which was remarkably symbolic of the idealism of the time and equally applicable today. Threaded Ed.XI - Worldly Wise the Cosmopolitan Issue - comes to you with three rebranded sections to offer the widest of intellectual hospitality and congenial companionship in an attractive gathering place.


06. THREADED pigeon-hole.

cubicle nelson Meeting in Stockholm ten years ago, Kim Brice and Kirati ‘Gap’ Thaisirisuk never thought they’d end up on the other side of the world opening a design store and gallery named Cubicle. Now based in Nelson, New Zealand, this jeweller and photographer have launched a gallery and shop where edge is the norm. Supporting experimental art and design, Kim and Gap welcome contemporary artists and jewellers to showcase their work at Cubicle. True to his Kiwi roots, Kim completed four years of study in Nelson and worked with Jens Hansen, the infamous creator of ‘the ring’ from The Lord of the Rings trilogy. He then received a Queen Elizabeth II Arts Council grant to study jewellery in Scandinavia. From Cubicle, Kim produces statement rings and jewellery while Gap, a photographer and graphic designer, runs his company, 4D, and exhibits his photographic work. Between a revolving cycle of exhibitions and Kim and Gap’s own creative pursuits, Cubicle, melds designer goods with a penchant for discerning art. In this Cubicle the lights are switched on, and Kim and Gap are home.

STOCKHOLM BERLIN

VANCOUVER

MILAN

BOSTON

STOCKHOLM BERLIN AUCKLAND

VANCOUVER

WHAT

MILAN

BOSTON

CreativeMornings is a free, monthly breakfast lecture series for creative types. Each event is free of charge, and includes a 20-minute talk, plus coffee!

WHY

creative mornings

CREATIVE MORNINGS IS A FREE, MONTHLY BREAKFAST LECTURE SERIES FOR CREATIVE TYPES

CreativeMornings was started by Tina Roth Eisenberg in September of 2008 out of the desire to create a casual, accessible event. Think of it as a local morning mini-conference and inspirational community boost before work: nothing fancy, just good people and a great talk (not to mention breakfast). We believe that we spend way AUGUST 2011

CREATIVEMORNINGS.COM

HELLO@CREATIVEMORNINGS.COM

too much time communicating virtually. It’s time to meet up in real life and have some real conversations.

WHO

AUCKLAND

Thousands of creative professionals attend CreativeMornings events around the globe every month. The individual chapters are run by volunteers who believe in the power of likeminded people getting together to meet, share and learn. These hosts all work in the creative industry and bring tremendous value to CreativeMornings. We couldn’t do it without them.

CREATIVE MORNINGS IS A FREE, MONTHLY

WHERE We currently have 17 chapters in the works around the world and are talking to numerous people elsewhere who are interested in bringing CreativeMornings to their cities. As of September 2011, slated chapters include: New York, Zurich, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Chicago, London, Berlin, Stockholm, Vancouver, Atlanta, Boston, Milan, Portland, Seattle, Budapest and recently, Auckland. www.creativemornings.com www.happybirthday.creativemornings.com www.cmauckland.tumblr.com/


pROJECT CONNECT Serena Stevenson, founder and director of multimedia (or ‘transmedia storytelling’) company Big VOICE is interested in pushing the boundaries into how we co-create to turn ideas into action and collectively send a message of human connection out there to the world. Just as her company name Big VOICE promises. Project CONNECT designed by Big VOICE emerged from a desire to commercially prove that content for collective branding, design and meaningful storytelling could be generated by creative intellectuals collaborating with public interaction on a ‘campaign’ design. With the goal to celebrate the world we live in through positive and emotive storytelling, Project CONNECT takes us on a conversational journey. At the event launch, guests viewed a large public projection by Unguarded Intersection encouraging them to experience it from an unexpected, transplanted perspective. Avante-pop musician, Stevie Starr collaborated with Big VOICE to transpose interviews spotlighting political, social issues with public generated imagery to bridge the traditional divide between performer and audience. Project CONNECT is a live story of human connection in the now, from collaborators who send in their contributions via the web and guests at the actual launch location: from old-fashioned oral storytelling by Eleni Papadopoulos to a Skype-based game of chat-roulette from Virtuo, or an immersive QR code experience by Virtuo and Transmedia NZ.

hello world As we have won 'Designer of the Year' at this year's New Zealand Magazine Publishers Awards and recently been nominated as a finalist in The Maggies Awards (don’t forget to vote for us at www.themaggies. co.nz) it is with great pleasure we inform you that Threaded Ed.XI will now be an international publication – yes it's true, we are now officially international!

“We use high-end digital technology, design and filmmaking. Presentation pieces were interwoven, much like chapters in a book or scenes in a film. Participants who came to the launch brought along their phones or communication devices, and something physical that represents connection for them – a photo, a card or a poem, and someone even brought in some tea cups, which became part of the story.” Project CONNECT encourages collaboration and provides a vehicle for participants to submit their thoughts, voices, images and text to the project via their Facebook site.

1. threaded: how does design connect to you? Photograph: Mark ryan

1.

2.

But it hasn’t stopped with the launch event. The public can still upload their voice on ‘what does connection mean to them’, on www.facebook.com/bigvoice.tv This along with the launch content will be collated to create a multimedia publication, physical and digital designed with Threaded Media. So watch this space www.projectconnect.me www.bigvoice.tv Serena Stevenson has a highly acclaimed history of working with large international and national commercial brands like Thai Airways, Air New Zealand, TVNZ and Telecom, and has worked in editorial photography. To see her feature film set in a remote conflict ridden part of the world visit www.rootsonthemove.org 2. stevie starr live performance Photograph: big voice 3. installation: cut collective and ink*horn Photograph: mark ryan

right. vote for threaded's ed.x cover (designed by: militia nz) www.themaggies.co.nz

Don't forget we are now available in digital format via the Zinio platform for only $5 per issue! With Zinio’s reader, you can zoom, interact and read Threaded Magazine anywhere, anytime on your PC, mac or iPad. nz.zinio.com www.threaded.co.nz

3.


08. THREADED pigeon-hole.

Part of an international tribe How as a nation do we build a sense of belonging? New Zealand’s hosting of the Rugby World Cup in 2011 has been thought-provoking for textile designer Margaret Lewis, stimulating her thinking around tribalism, gangs and that tricky notion of belonging. One of her garments ‘Wanna be in my gang?’ shown in the Colonial Collection section of Style Pasifika (international showcase of fashion and culture) is an exploration of belonging to a time, place and society. This idea made her think further about all of the people who have travelled to New Zealand, now home to over 163 first languages. Lewis acknowledges that people have sailed, motored and flown – ending up here by mistake or intention and may not have too many options about going back to where they came from. Are they pakeha [different] or could they be tangatawhenua [people of the land]?

Wanna be in my gang? offers a Kiwi way of belonging and a tribe that anyone can belong to. It is interpreted in 20 different languages on the garment’s front with the tribe’s name on the back: Ngati Aotearoa. Wanna be in my gang? fits perfectly with how Lewis’s design methodology, using found fabrics and handcrafted approaches [knitting, crochet, embroidery, tapestry], creates a style where craft meets couture. The craftwork is done by hand using skills that she should have learned from her nana (if at the time she had thought to listen, she says). Much of what she does now is learned from books and people of her nana’s generation who, she says, are “so generous with sharing their learning”. www.facebook.com/DML.where.craft.meets. couture

 Photography: Paul Garelja

JEMposium wellington Contemporary jewellery in New Zealand has a history of hosting significant international experts to run workshops and give presentations at conferences; JEMposium builds on this tradition. A social gathering, a formal meeting, a melting pot of insights and knowledge on jewellery practices and trends, JEMposium brings together artists, designers, collectors, curators and enthusiasts to attend a four-day event from the 10th to the 13th February 2012. Attending JEMposium are world-renowned experts who have redefined international traditional jewellery practices. The work and exploration of Ted Noten (NL), Manon van Kouswijk (NL/AUS), Karl Fritsch (FRG/NZ), Fabrizio Tridenti (IT), and Liesbeth den Besten (NL), continue to blur the boundaries between studio design, traditional craft practices and fine arts. Stepping away from the traditional symposium format, JEMposium’s keynote speakers will present their ideas through

PechaKucha 20x20 presentations and masterclass workshops. The works of Ted Noten and Karl Fritsch have both ventured into the realm of design and architecture. Both have been awarded with the prestigious and acclaimed international Francoise van den Bosch Prize. Ted Noten’s designs offer a critique on contemporary life and on the history of jewellery, as well as on the wider context of product design. Interestingly, his work relates equally to architecture. The underlying, recurring theme of his work is to challenge convention and processes of habituation, the familiar and the unusual. Karl Fritsch repositions the formulation of art and design with artist collaborators Francis Upritchard and furniture designer Martino Gamper. For these three practitioners, making and materials come first, and risk-taking is commonplace with transformations of the found, the new and the unknown. www.jemposium.co.nz

 GRANDMA'S BAG revisited, 2009 Atelier Ted Noten Photograph c/o: Atelier Ted Noten

 ring: silver, nails, 2010 Karl Fritsch


TYPO London is coming home This northern autumn, London will host a spectacular new annual design conference. From 20 to 22 October, TYPO London will bring together the crème de la crème of international design for an inspirational event that transcends the restraints of a typical trade conference. Some 1,000 typographers, designers and communication professionals from all over the world will have the opportunity to follow an eclectic and inspiring mix of talks by the most influential thinkers of these disciplines. TYPO London follows the successful imprint created by TYPO Berlin, which is in its 16th year running as Europe’s biggest and most successful design event. TYPO Berlin Conferences began in 1995 with a strong focus in typography. It has now developed into a broader platform exploring graphic design, digital media, advertisement, technology, culture, entertainment and business. TYPO London 2011 will build on this heritage, with a star-studded line-up of more than 40 international experts. Among the speakers who have confirmed their attendance is Michael B Johnson, who runs the Moving Pictures Group at Pixar Animation Studios and corporate design guru Erik Spiekermann. Also confirmed are bestseller author Adrian Shaughnessy (How To Be a Graphic Designer Without Losing Your Soul), Nat Hunter, who runs one of the UK’s most popular design studios, Airside, and designer Michael Bierut. Bierut began as Massimo Vignelli’s assistant and is now a leading partner at Pentagram in New York. He is classified as one of the most pre-eminent designers of our age. The service industries are strongly represented. Google Europe’s Creative Director Tom Uglow is confirmed. His team works on new ideas and global brand projects for Google and YouTube, such as Life in a Day, Chrome, Art Project, Play, the YouTube Symphony Orchestra, Street View and Android. Pamela Mead, Director of User Experience, Telefónica, R&D is complemented by an appearance from Jeff Faulkner, Creative Director for Xbox Next Generation, where he guides the vision for Xbox’s User Experience Design across Social Media, User Experience, Entertainment, Gesture and Voice Input, Information Design and Brand and Visual design.

Independent film-maker Gary Hustwit appears with influential Possible Worldwide Creative Director Dale Herigstad, the man who designed the UI experiential possibilities for the famous scene in Tom Cruise’s Minority Report.

1.

King_Bansah_TYPO ©Thorsten_Wulff

2.

Sketchnotes ©Eva-Lotta Lamm

3.

Neville Brody, 2010 Photo ©Akemi Kurosaka

1.

Two lesser-known speakers promise to be a highlight of the conference. Togbe Ngoryifia Céphas Kosi Bansah is King of Hohoe, Ghana; he works as a car mechanic in Ludwigshafen, Germany, and governs his people in the African Volta Region from there. As part of his bachelor thesis, German designer Julian Zimmermann created a corporate design for King Bansah. Their memorable joint presentation at TYPO Berlin last year brought many delegates to tears and garnered spontaneous standing ovations.

Our aim is for people to leave the event with strong talking points, controversies, new favourites and, most importantly, new perspectives and knowledge,

said Robin Richmond, adding:

TYPO London is beginning the journey of building equity and community, but there is huge goodwill towards our partner conference in Berlin. Groups come and meet up there almost on a yearly basis. I am convinced that TYPO London will also become an annual fixture in the city’s design agenda.

3.

2.


010. THREADED give-away.

analogue alluminations - An Art-making Collaboration In May 2011, Cut Collective and YOOBEE embarked on a collaborative project to develop a series of artworks for iPad 2 covers. These were launched at the new YOOBEE Britomart Store opening in September. The company likes to do things differently and has endeavoured to work with the creative community in a personalised way to facilitate real works of art in a digital world.

The core of the project was based around experimentation, with the exploration of processes and the application of new techniques central to this. With an eye to the digital world, they also shared updates of the process on a Tumblr blog and within the YOOBEE Community itself.

right.

 the process cut collective

below. the give-away limited edition ipad case

You can see the full creative process at www.analoguealluminations.tumblr.com/

This collaboration explored the boundaries between analogue knowledge and technological applications.

- Win LIMITED EDITION IPAD CASE $349.99 WWW.YOOBEE.COM

YOOBEE and the Cut Collective are giving away one Cut Collective YOOBEE Designer Range iPad 2 cover. Simply join the YOOBEE Community for free at www.yoobee.com and enter the following promo code: 1011THREADED to be in the draw to win (competition ends 29 Feb 2012). The YOOBEE Designer Range of iPad accessories is available throughout New Zealand and online.


start here

- The Process Central to the Cut Collective’s art-making philosophy is their hands-on approach. In this project, no less than five techniques were used by the Collective to create the end result. Firstly, a number of artworks was produced on 1,000 x 600mm aluminium panels and the designs of the iPad covers were derived from these. Both the art panels and the iPad covers themselves were made by a process of painting onto the raw aluminium before

anodising them, after which the paint is removed, revealing the raw aluminium underneath. They are then laser etched, stencilled and clear-coated to provide a high-gloss finish. The end result was an individual work of art on each cover and the full process was documented on a daily basis. www.analoguealluminations.tumblr.com/ www.cutcollective.co.nz


012. THREADED podium.

podium - Connections and intersections between creative practices influenced the line-up of quiet achievers in Podium XI -

019. 014.

025. 020.

—I T-world — T-world Mag

— TO ERR IS ONLY HUMAN — Volumeone

— Eddie Zammit —

— Matt Owens —

Full credit to Eddie Zammit, founder of T-world who offers us a sneak preview of the imminent release of their seventh issue, The New York edition, designed by Nick Rudenno of Nowhere Famous design studio. If you fancy a place where obsession is encouraged, look no further; T-world is completely focused on T-shirt culture. If you’re not already a T-shirt devotee, you soon will be. Welcome to the bible of the T-shirt world.

Welcome to Matt Owens’ multi-disciplinary approach to print, motion and digital media – paralleled by a multifaceted array of collaborative practices and both client and personal work. These spreads will encourage you to take the path less travelled, to be curiosity led and to consider the contribution creative thinking can have and how it can positively impact our lives.


Photos. Nicole Reed

No matter where you find yourself in the world, no matter which city or continent, there is one certainty… you will always find people wearing T-shirts. T-shirts are without a doubt the most universally popular item of clothing; their appeal crosses all divides of age, gender, nationality, race, and religion. They have earned a cult-like status, with billions of devotees worldwide, and the potential for billions more to become equally as obsessed with this ubiquitous medium.

— Playing Games — Mind Design

— MAKING BEAUTY — Digital Artist

— Holger Jacobs/Claire Huss Craig Sinnamon —

— Lisa Reihana — Ngāpuhi: Ngāti Hine, Ngāi Tu

COLEnsO COVER PROPOsAL for upcoming Random House release featuring image of Colenso by gavin Hurly

By being creative and innovative with the subject of T-shirts – across a broad spectrum of ideas – it is possible to place no limits on what the T-world brand is about, and the numerous XL opportunities this untapped global market presents.

LEFT:

COLEnsO COVER PROPOsAL for upcoming Random House release featuring image of Colenso by gavin Hurly LEFT:

The potential for T-world to grow beyond simply a journal is vast. We envisage T-world as a brand that has its roots in premium print media, but will also encompass internet and retail divisions and include T-shirt collaborations with established artists and labels, T-shirt art exhibitions, T-shirt art books, T-shirt documentaries, plus more.

The potential for T-world to grow beyond simply a journal is vast. We envisage T-world as a brand that has its roots in premium print media, but will also encompass internet and retail divisions and include T-shirt collaborations with established artists and labels, T-shirt art exhibitions, T-shirt art books, T-shirt documentaries, plus more.

BLACK MILK uV title to uncoated black case, hidden under the dust jacket

BLACK MILK uV title to uncoated black case, hidden under the dust jacket FAR LEFT:

For over eight years, T-world’s founder Eddie Zammit has added enormous value to the T-world brand with his extensive networking; developing strong relationships with literally thousands of individuals and companies, especially within the creative community. By building this network of contacts, Zammit has been able to create an invaluable asset for T-world, and at the same time help expand the wider community’s perceptions of what a T-shirt can be.

Out of Print

Perry Those sort of projects must get Mike quite Yep, and those things are as important … Ricky Powell Reason frustrating. every time I looked through Black Milk, it Recon invited to before document Douglas Reed Space So that came the Weeds project? Wright’s show does tell the story really well, and I know Rocksmith over a period from rehearsals through to the Yeah, well that’s pretty much how I work Koe Rodriguez Yeah, Weeds was floating around that time we’ve got the right images. There’s only one I had also found a wavey, Saturdays NYC and we hadperformances. a little bit of spare money in touring he shot it all on film quite a lot. I’ve just done a cover Scoutfor Vintagean T-shirts shot I wouldn’t have had in there, but um… SSUR budget – so we decided to do the hand inthe low light. I was going to say it’s focussed author who’s in the hawkes Bay and the lanky font that I thought Stüssy stitching with Meliors… got out-voted on that! But the glossy, full on the moment, but it’s almost unfocussed publishers in Auckland and I’m Supreme inHundreds hamilton. The Did you meet the Weeds girls through bleed images… you know with the dancers was absolutely perfect forWeSC inObjectspace? a way, a lot of movement and a gestural I’ve done several of those. But,Yellow yeah the Rat Bastard floating in a dark space, I think the narrativeour larrikin troubadour. As it Zoo York interpretation of–Douglas’s choreography biggest stick in the mud for “It’s Workspace was I met them at Inhouse, it was an Inhouse 10.Deep more than just a T-shirt!” – this is moves really well and there’s a good job. The Weeds projectVery was around forin the spirit of value that T-world and obsessions. much actually the Publishers, theythehad very set demonstrates… transpired, sam absolutely representation of the performance. a while – we worked out there was a bit T-worldI isproposed an examination into one of the Brodovitch’s Ballet Russe photographs from ideas and very unbending when of spare money to get Meliors in, so the hated it! world’s most vibrant, popular and influential books came down to themoody. Waikato and got the thirties. Very Somehow dance some materials and formatssubcultures that were So did John get you on board for Max – the a T-shirt. The niche hand stitched. One of the other things I is OF theCATALOGUEs only T-shirt journal in TOP LEFT: Apublication COLLECTIOn can be violent when caught in motion. I little outside of what they were imagining, gimblett’s Workspace? enjoyed about that publication was setting existence, andArt aims to bestudio the most in eminent for Karl in Chitham, Collection Curator I’ve done a few projects with John Savage, … and I’m my little hamilton. Or how it sits next to something else. went to the show and to be honest, it was Waikato university the bilingual text, running the translation particularly a typographic based cover voice on this exciting global phenomenon. Yep. John knew Max and identifi es his they don’t necessarily document work a photographer based just out of Auckland, Completely focused on their T-shirt culture concurrently on each page. Working out the very first contemporary dance show raw stock image. And they sort ofassociated projects must getis quite Yep, and those things are aswith important … and noThose and every aspect, T-world AnZAAE COnFEREnCE PROGRAMME the ratio, so the German flowed at the same Milk was one of them. photography that well.LEFT: and Black he was practice with the Zen aspects Photo taken at printers before binding a place where obsession is encouraged, that I’d ever been to … and ah, it was quite kinda fl ipped on that, they couldn’t get it. length as the English. frustrating. every time I looked through Black Milk, it entertainment is assured and the ofWright’s Max’s painting invited it to document Douglas show practice. Max had also an opening Soand I was trying to explain … FRInGE itinformation was hilarious is you fresh. I was actually when were talking Theeye Weeds publicationexperience reminded me, of … the Farwas a very does tell the really well, I know ABOVE:thinking, FEsTIVAL PROPOsAL worked with so I knew himstory a little over a periodwhich from rehearsals through toInhouse, the Yeah, inwell that’s pretty much how I work collaboration with illustrator, Far Away catalogue profound, disturbing performance was sothat outside they were With the imminent release of T-world’s about pitchwhat youDaron did for Max’s cover … that we’ve gotJohn the right images. really, There’sitonly one Parton as well. After doing Black Milk, basically touring performances. he shot it all on fi lm quite a lot. I’ve just donetourist a cover for an issue, Milton That’s right, thatme had afor folded cover.like Thata lars von Trier stayed with days, thinking. ‘What! image onseventh the cover ofGlaser’s of felt like that …souvenir cos itT-shirt was sums up shot documents I wouldn’t have had in there, butYvonnes’s um… nosort campaign turned produced this book which Max’s was another favourite actually,inquite an early low going light. Ito was BELOW: MAsTHEAD author who’s in the hawkes Bay and the thewell. feelings T-world has for the subject of movie. So there was always be going lots to say it’s focussed a photobook!?’ There was aas of DEVELOPMEnT sending based on a journal got out-voted on that! But the glossy, full forlot upcoming exhibition AREA job. Yeah, that’s where that connection space in New York over a period of several this nextin installment – I loveand NY. The iconic on the moment, but it’s almost unfocussed publishers Auckland I’m in hamilton. came with Bronwyn lloyd,design! I’m working of darkness in the photos of books and samples, bleed images… you know with the dancers city stock has been responsible for the birth of That job was quite a nutty one … Max in her a way, and a gestural Yup. thinking about I’ve done several of those. But, on a project at the moment with and a lot of movement visits. hip-hop, the rise Todd’s of graffiti as an art formyeah the swatches etc. We It’s were funny when you get clients fl oating in a dark space, I think the narrative Objectspace called, lugosi’s Children and infamous artists like Andy Warhol. In Because that book wasinterpretation largely based on had Italian publishers and they were pretty of Douglas’s choreography public and personal manifestations, with biggest stick in the mud for Workspace was that don’t understand your use of signifi ers. fact it was Warhol himself who inspired the moves really well and there’s a good It is very kinda cyclic though does – alland those photographs, where the designer fiVery t diffi cult to deal obsessions. much in the spirit of with. John actually went and seemingly naive doodles naming actually the theylikehad that aPublishers, single,and ordinary product a very set You haveher to dial back to the idea point where you connections – where you get your work from … representation of the performance. T-shirt (he used a Campbell’s Soup can) could into that sort of scenario? Cos that was theRusse photographs did a press pass Brodovitch’s Ballet fromin Milan and he was using obsessions along-side her when I proposed ideasadd and unbending generate the topic of art and conversation. lost them, but in thisjuxtaposed case, avery language Yeah, you work with people who you trust and same issue with Max gimblett’s Workspace a translation app to talk printers Very moody. Somehow dance nishedaswork. and formats that were a So to didthe John get youtoon board barrier for Maxinfithere who you’re familiar with and getthe alongthirties. with… wellsome … -materials Department yknow, to go with something is quite funny! That was for the for quite a difficult process, but not so! publication as well…which predominately explain what There was lots of canwas be violent when caughtwhich in motion. I he wanted. little outside of what or they were imagining, gimblett’s Workspace? And they pass your name onto other with no imagery or crafty sketches conference recently held here at WINTEC. publications you’ve been of doing for So what are your top 3 projects? photography. You were The alsoother talking about hand waving, yelling and screaming, ‘more people … Yeah, but it is that thing,went if you do togood the show and to beThat honest, it was whatever is doing in voguesome for thatsort demographic based cover particularly a typographic was quite a big project, the programme, one, Another universe, know, Yep. John knew Max Well andI’ve identifi esthis hisme….the work and it’s a relatively painless experience … at the moment – it’s just a very bold Isimple Rate things? just done curved edges … last rosa!, rosa!’ they theinvolved very first contemporary dance show with raw stock and no image. And they website, allless those bits and … pieces thatwere go withvery passionate Well, I was quite heavily with the execution of the idea of visual intelligence 026. 032. enrolment poster for unitec whichaspects isthat pretty one was a little bit challenging in some photography practice with the Zen Yeah, *lAuGhS* that’s the big thing isn’t it, conferences advocates for print on their own behalf. thathad I’d ever been to … and ah, it was… quite flipped on that, they couldn’t get it. beingkinda in the form of interrelated geometric sweet, it’s got this big hexagonal foil block selection of images. John if the client doesn’t walk away feeling like probably Yeah, it was all about the personal diary, respects, cos it had to fit, I mean obviously of Max’s painting also components. Yip, I had a couple of WINTEC interns that popspractice. open, like037. anMax adventhad calendar, 031. eye opening experience … it was a very So I was trying to explain they’re glad to have you out ofan their life …! hundreds of images and often photographers working materials and processes which were publications…isit was hilarious Yeah …onso thatme,project challenging it with Mihitainasounded Riesterer quite the 6so subject pathways. quite a biggest thing3? with those worked withrevealing Inhouse, I knew himIt’s athe little So 2 and profound, disturbing whichwhich was part of the really,and it was so outside what they were It is funny thatswamped with all the ins with and outs, who’s aones and Ninayour Richards, luscious,dealing crafty piece. metaphors for Max’s work get really which shouldperformance thesmall. literal and from end particularly … so you were the budgetWell –…itthey was really But we’re still as well. After doing Black Milk, John basically client and how clients are all connected to each would ‘What! have to be no any image number ofon the cover of package, andvon that was fun. The ANZAAE stayed with me for days, like a lars Trier thinking. So it’s not a whole campaign? go in.… Sometimes they’re thinking about physiological space occupies. We were with John was much based Auckland, but which documents other trying to do quite interesting things within produced this book Max’s thehe projects that I have done for you over that committee gavewho me pretty freeinreign. movie. Soisthere was alwaysThe going to be lots a photobook!?’ thethick last fewscreenprinted years *lAuGhS* There was a lot of sending first pitch went straightand through which It’sYork adealing component of it, which we’re working things like how great the shot because going toseveral have a nice travelling overseas then you were tiny budget. So, with the Another universe space in New over a period of Yeah, I had an Auckland client that put me in a way. At the end of the wassurprised me. and other A ManonMelting, which Basically when poems, you’re dealing at the moment. But is that’s a really brave oflight, darkness inday the Max design! photos ofSo!books and samples, stock forward for a project in hamilton, Kinda … just joking.and of the diffi culty going in low or something title, raw stock, corners with the with Max in New Yorkbrace and then youjob were the insert the fold-out poster, visits. That was quite a nutty onepublication, … Max rounded you usually yourself decision the Cliff Design and Visual Art keen for it not to be a deal breaker withwith thea committee, a collection of short stories byfrom Craig swatches etc.We It’swere funny when you get clients technical, and they’re Because not necessarily cover blunt cut toone thehalf book block. the publishers printers who and they that book wasinitially largelydealing based with on keeping typographic – it had all these had and Italian publishers were pretty publishers. But, you know, he was and lloyd Jones’s hand Me Down World that don’t understand your use of signifiers. thinking about how it photographs, will contribute to the hoping it would feel like one of Max’s works were based in Italy and … where does theitdesigner for fit Penguin. diffi parameters, but it still came out well and we did to deal with. Johnnew actually went and advocating for it to his credit, but when Pluscult others … Sam hunt’s You have to dial back to the point where you narrative of the book … into that sort of scenario? that wascover the was funny. some quite interesting things with the images, did aIpress pass in Milan and came down to it at the meeting in NewCos York did a little research andhe was using lost them, but in this case, add a language issue with Max gimblett’s andtothe way the images were cut together, and a translation appproduced to talk to the printers it fell over atsame the last minute. Poor John, he Workspace discovered these beautifully barrier in there as well … publication as well…which was predominately the of different types of stock. what hewhich wanted. There was lots had flown over to take the last lot of photos poetry booksexplain from the 70s were photography. You were also talking about doing some sort of hand waving,I yelling and screaming, ‘more and for the meeting … he rang from a bar strangely contemporary. was especially I think, with those parameters, it forces curved edges … lessMissen’s rosa!’ … absolutely they were very passionate afterwards and said he would sooner involved have enamored byrosa!, lindsay Well, I was quite heavily with the you to look at what areas you do have some advocates for print on their own behalf. had a certainselection part of his cut off funky cover for Time to Ride. It had a ofanatomy images. John had probably freedom, or some I think Yeah, control, it was alland about the with personal diary, with a rusty knife thanof to images have satand through magenta foil Yeah on a …red soft back, quite challenging hundreds often photographers those jobs, what I’ve been the were materials and enjoying processesiswhich so uncoated that project sounded all the screaming and double dealing. a trippyfrom metallic image.…The get really swamped with which ones with should freedom the typography. We work have and a the literal and for Max’s yournegative end particularly so you were dealing withmetaphors poems wherewith set John on a who mid-grey stockin Auckland, but go in.work Sometimes they’re thinking bit of fun … and you know, space we’re he alsooccupies. sort physiological We were was based You’ve been doing for Random House eh? about throughout. It inspiredoverseas my firstand pitch. I had things like how great the shot is because of subconsciously a series goingsetting to haveup a nice thickwhich screenprinted travelling then you were dealing also found a wavey, lanky fontYork thatand I thought Yep. And Penguin. theineditors has or something of theOne diffiof culty low light, is something title, that always happened with raw stock, rounded corners with the with Max in New then you were perfect larrikin and printersObjectspace contracted back to Random house,not shenecessarilywas absolutely technical, and they’re publications where … book block. We were cover blunt cut to the dealing withfor theour publishers who troubadour. As it transpired, Sam used to be atthinking Penguinabout and looked for how itme willup contribute to the hoping it would feel like one of Max’s works were based in Italy andabsolutely … It’s not subconscious. *LAugHS* hated it! a project recently, which has book been … good. narrative of the

And, yeah, I’ve had quite a long standing With a passion for craftsmanship connection with Penguin – I’ve been doing for them Jacobs, for nearly 10 years. and typography,books Holger it seems to be … particularly Craig SinnamonSo, and Claire Huss with the cover jobs … are they mostly fiction? Or is there a Yeah, it was all about the personal diary, mixture? usually withyou non-fiction publications will play mind games with materials and processes which were you do the whole publication? metaphors for Max’s work and the literalusing and letters, words, images, They’re mostly fiction for the covers witha physiological space he occupies. We were couple of exceptions going to have a nice thick screenprinted logos, forms and content inlike Peter Well’s book on William Colenso. title, raw stock, rounded corners with the this edition. Their spreads will cover blunt cut to the book block. We were So lately you’ve done … Lloyd Jones, Sam Hunt … hoping it would feel like one of Max’s works tease you straight to their Yep. Sam hunt’s new poetry book, Chords website and refreshing sections such as ‘views’ reinforce their presence as independent thinkers and designers. You were also talking about doing some sort of curved edges …

No Mas … and I’m in my little studio in hamilton. ONLY

In a global market that is quickly settling itself into lucrative niche markets, T-world has owned the T-shirt print media category since 2006 by being at the forefront of contemporary T-shirt culture. Proudly originating from Melbourne (Australia) and now distributed to over 30 countries globally, T-world is the bible of the T-shirt world; it’s the trusted authority for T-shirt enthusiasts and a reference for the thousands of labels and artists seeking T-shirt inspiration for this ‘must have’ fashion accessory.

FAR LEFT:

Or how it sits next to something else.

Photos. Nicole Reed

No matter where you find yourself in the world, no matter which city or continent, there is one certainty… you will always find people wearing T-shirts. T-shirts are without a doubt the most universally popular item of clothing; their appeal crosses all divides of age, gender, nationality, race, and religion. They have earned a cult-like status, with billions of devotees worldwide, and the potential for billions more to become equally as obsessed with this ubiquitous medium.

LEFT:

We had to … we basically printed these covers and we hand trimmed them, nicked and creased them, because the dye forms would have been too expensive for the project. I can’t remember what the edition was … it was 100, but … it was hand-folded and stitched together. The cover was designed to fold in on itself and hold together without any fastening. It’s a clever little design. But I’ve a putting few projects whendone we were it together with – it wasJohn Savage, ‘this is just madness’ … It was a really alike, photographer based just out of Auckland, rewarding project and it’s actually kind of a and Black Milk was one of little sweetie – one of my favourites.them. he was

sh

biggest stick in the mud for Workspace was actually the Publishers, they had very set ideas and very unbending when I proposed some materials and formats that were a little outside of what they were imagining, particularly a typographic based cover with raw stock and no image. And they kinda flipped on that, they couldn’t get it. So I was trying to explain … it was hilarious really, it was so outside what they were thinking. ‘What! no image on the cover of a photobook!?’ There was a lot of sending photos of books and samples, stock swatches etc. It’s funny when you get clients that don’t understand your use of signifiers. You have to dial back to the point where you lost them, but in this case, add a language barrier in there as well …

With the imminent release of T-world’s seventh issue, Milton Glaser’s tourist campaign turned souvenir T-shirt sums up the feelings T-world has for the subject of this next installment – I love NY. The iconic city has been responsible for the birth of hip-hop, the rise of graffiti as an art form and infamous artists like Andy Warhol. In fact it was Warhol himself who inspired the idea that a single, ordinary product like a T-shirt (he used a Campbell’s Soup can) could generate the topic of art and conversation.

It was so mad. I remember seeing you guys sitting in the garage … folding …

FAR LEFT:

I think it’s a bit like when music shifted from physical formats to digital and now people just download their music. But what’s happened is there are people actually putting more energy into creating interesting hese are based on the Objectspace idea of packaging because it is becoming a unique ng with the same format … proposition! Then there is the resurgence of older formats like vinyl, the lP cover and , but funnily, I did a publication for an stuff like that … I was even given a cassette ctspace exhibition recently, Eye Catch, as part of an entry to a gig not long ago! I h I sort of felt like that could have saw an article recently about an album that’s nged to your suite of publications. Even being produced that has a 12 inch record gh you didn’t like it! *lAuGhS* and sleeve, for each song on the album. So, een quite interesting with the Objectspace in some ways, it’s pushing the packaging – because now they’ve moved towards No matter where you find yourself in the expectations world, no matter which city or continent, further. This is similar to what online catalogues. They’ve also changed there is one certainty… you will always find people wearing T-shirts. T-shirts are without has been happening with books in the last 5 a doubt the most universally popular item of being an exclusive client with Inhouse and clothing; their appeal crosses all divides of or so years, say, particularly in the cultural age, gender, nationality, race, and religion. AREA to opening the doors to working They have earned a cult-like status, with andworldwide, design billions of devotees and thesector. Peoples expectations for billions more to become equally different designers. So, how do you feel aspotential obsessedof with this ubiquitousyou medium. will get for your money for an what In a global market that is quickly settling t that relationship? Just in terms of the itself into lucrative niche markets, T-world have significantly increased. average book owned the T-shirt print media category you’re still doing with them? Do you feel has since 2006 by being at the forefront of The wants to see something with contemporary T-shirtconsumer culture. Proudly originating from Melbourne (Australia) and ou get a lot of freedom? now distributed to over 30 countries globally, interesting binding, stocks or conceptual T-world is the bible of the T-shirt world; it’s the trusted authority for T-shirt enthusiasts features. A lot of that has to do with the y, Philip (Clarke) was one of the first and a reference for the thousands of labels and artists seeking T-shirt inspiration for quality and cheapness of manufacturing this ‘must have’ fashion accessory. ts that I had ever developed a great For over eight years, T-world’s founder more sophisticated publications now and Eddie Zammit has added enormous value ing relationship with – there was a to the T-world brand with his extensive networking;how developingprint strong relationships has to work harder to validate it’s f trust and openness to innnovation. with literally thousands of individuals and companies, especially within the creative gs have changed since, yknow, with community.existence. By building this network of contacts, Zammit has been able to create an invaluable asset for T-world, and at the same nancial down turn. One of the things time help expand the wider community’s We are sort of typical book buyers – we both t institutions haven’t been producing perceptions of what a T-shirt can be. like buying books – and we both like looking at any publications and Objectspace is an books, I’ve even noticed that myself…. mple of that. Publications have shifted I thought you were going to say, ‘and I’ve e and will continue to do so and we’ll even read books’ *lAuGhS* ably be exploring that more with the website – really embracing that – with *LAugHS* Sometimes I do. I actually just look technology. So, that all happened at the at the pictures. And the layout sometimes. time … budgets shrank, there was less umm, but the fact that I second guess buying hasis on material outcomes … less people something now, and it has to be something ding money on publications. amazing. hat’s a huge parameter for designers…. Yup, I’ve heard the argument as well … that the internet was going to effect our reading we’re really in the throws of a habits and kill print etc. But in a way it’s ficant paradigm shift in that respect, enabled us to search out more interesting and more things are moving online publications, from all over the world. here’s a lot of debate about digital cations and portable devices. Ironically So going back to what we talked about – books y of the apps mimic traditional features being objects. You’ve done a few jobs in the last e book. So yeah, to be involved in couple of years which really kinda play around thing traditionally object based – that is with book binding and hand-made books. Like potentially disappearing, is an interesting you were working with Meliors Simms on two . It’s something I think a lot about. projects. She did the Weeds catalogue and the of the Waikato Society of Arts. ally that’s quite an interesting point – when … and I’m in my little studioHistory in hamilton. ay it’s object based and then Objectspace Yeah, I saw her give a talk at Pecha Kucha ving away from it, becoming more one night down here and she was just an Those of into projects tive about what sort they turn an actualmust get quite absolute book freak. Yknow, she just loves cal publication. I think that’s kinda a shame, frustrating. them conceptually and the craft of making ike books, and I like flicking thru pages and them. A very clever lady and a clever artist seeing Yeah, the different paper stockspretty and sizes much how I work well that’s as well. She actually was working at the WSA what people do, with typography and the she caught wind of this project. And as it I’veandjust done a and cover for an hat thequite ink sits a onlot. the page all those turned out I knew the writer and we decided of things…. author who’s in the hawkesto Bay and the collaborate on the project, where we hand this book – there wasn’t much of a you sound like a … in Auckland andproduced publishers I’m in hamilton. as usual … S I’velikedone of those. budget But, yeah the * I sound a wannaseveral be designer…

BLACK MILK uV title to uncoated black case, hidden under the dust jacket

voice on this exciting global phenomenon. Completely focused on T-shirt culture and every associated aspect, T-world is a place where obsession is encouraged, entertainment is assured and the information is fresh.

COLEnsO COVER PROPOsAL for upcoming Random House release featuring image of Colenso by gavin Hurly

I

1. THREADED

T-world. I LovE T-woRLD

Christian Acker ALIFE Tony Arcabascio Ana Benaroya BKNY Boundless Claw Money Cookies-n-Cream Martha Cooper Cotton Candy Machine Dmote Ron English Milton Glaser Grotesk HIT+RUN jeffstaple Jeremyville Kid Zoom Kweenz Destroy “It’sAnthony more Lister than just a T-shirt!” – this is the MadeMe value that T-world demonstrates… Married to the MOB T-world is an examination into one of the Memes Methods NYC world’s most vibrant, popular and influential Mighty Healthy subcultures – the T-shirt. The niche Milkcrate Athletics publication Mishka is the only T-shirt journal in existence, aims to be the most eminent Morningand Breath

For over eight years, T-world’s founder Eddie Zammit has added enormous value to the T-world brand with his extensive networking; developing strong relationships with literally thousands of individuals and companies, especially within the creative community. By building this network of contacts, Zammit has been able to create an invaluable asset for T-world, and at the same time help expand the wider community’s perceptions of what a T-shirt can be.

rief. But I can work quite differently another client and the work can behave ifferent way. But it will definitely talk it’s predecessors

g g

++

In a global market that is quickly settling itself into lucrative niche markets, T-world has owned the T-shirt print media category since 2006 by being at the forefront of contemporary T-shirt culture. Proudly originating from Melbourne (Australia) and now distributed to over 30 countries globally, T-world is the bible of the T-shirt world; it’s the trusted authority for T-shirt enthusiasts and a reference for the thousands of labels and artists seeking T-shirt inspiration for this ‘must have’ fashion accessory.

By being creative and innovative with the subject of T-shirts – across a broad spectrum of ideas – it is possible to place no limits on what the T-world brand is about, and the The potential for T-world to grow beyond a journal is vast. We envisage T-world numerous XL opportunities this untapped simply as a brand that has its roots in premium print media, but will also encompass internet global market presents. and retail divisions and include T-shirt

in a way. At the end of the day Max was keen for it not to be a deal breaker with the publishers. But, you know, he was initially advocating for it to his credit, but when it came down to it at the meeting in New York it fell over at the last minute. Poor John, he had flown over to take the last lot of photos and for the meeting … he rang from a bar afterwards and said he would sooner have had a certain part of his anatomy cut off with a rusty knife than to have sat through all the screaming and double dealing.

— ON BOOKS, CLIENTS AND OTHER SUCH THINGS — Area Design

— Alan Deare/Karl Chitham—

Maybe semiconscious … From sculptural installations Karl Chitham, Art Collection * Completely conscious. steeped in mathematical* madness Curator at Waikato University, Okay, it’s quite conscious. Maybe that’s just to her first foray into tukutuku interviews Alan Deare, Director what happens when you do work for the patterns from video stillssame ofclient … you’re conscious of what’sand Tea Lady of Area Design, on happened before and you are who you I thinkvintage Yvonne was really well organized are … you can’t not be to some extent …dodging but I fabrics and gorgeous design suicide, living and she had a good sense of what she find I work with certain clients … where I just wanted … and you did as well, so very respect frocks, there isshe a was tacit with your most demanding client continue to for behave a certain way with that well prepared with all her files and content. client and the work that I produce ah … you and cultural histories at the and what it means to be a serial And I media guess with photographers, that is her know, feels like a series, it feels related. Even medium, they do have lovely big photos on though that might not be an explicit part of heart Reihana’s practice. publication designer. With a client supply where as of with Lisa other visual Artists, Whether you’re intrigued by the base strongly steeped within the Legends of the Camarillo White creative industries, Alan Deare Horse or a contemporary version is the master of thoughtfully of Maori Portraiture, you’re crafted solutions regardless of warmly invited into a personal scale or budget. account of practice. I want to talk about the work that you’ve being doing for me. We had the successful opening for Yvonne’s show last night … more than 5 people came. And that was kind of quite an easy publication. I don’t know why? It seemed to go a lot easier.

LAugHS

collaborations with established artists and labels, T-shirt art exhibitions, T-shirt art books, T-shirt documentaries, plus more.

By being creative and innovative with the subject of T-shirts – across a broad spectrum of ideas – it is possible to place no limits on what the T-world brand is about, and the numerous XL opportunities this untapped global market presents.

and other poems, A Man Melting, a collection of short stories by Cra and lloyd Jones’s hand Me Down W for Penguin. Plus others … Sam hu cover was funny. I did a little resea discovered these beautifully produ poetry books from the 70s which strangely contemporary. I was esp enamored by lindsay Missen’s abs funky cover for Time to Ride. It ha magenta foil on a red uncoated so with a trippy metallic negative ima poems where set on a mid-grey st You’ve been doing work for Random House eh? throughout. It inspired my first pit a way. At the has end of the day wasa wavey, lanky and other po alsoMax found font tha Yep. And Penguin. Oneinof the editors keen for it not to be a deal breaker with theperfect a collection was absolutely for our larro contracted back to Random house, she youfor know, he was initially and lloyd Joa troubadour. As it transpired, Sam used to be at Penguin publishers. and lookedBut, me up advocating it to his credit, but it! when it for Penguin. hated a project recently, which has beenfor good. came down to it at the meeting in New York cover was fu And, yeah, I’ve had quite a long standing I want to talk about thediscovered work that yo it fell over at the last minute. Poor John, he t connection with Penguin – I’ve been doing doing We had the successfu had fl10 own over to take the last lotfor of me. photos poetry book books for them for nearly years. forfrom Yvonne’s night … more and for the meeting … he rang a barshow last strangely co people came. And that enamored was kind ofby q So, it seems to be … particularly withand thesaid cover afterwards he would sooner have 038. easy publication. know cover why? jobs … are they mostly fihad ction? Or is there a certain partaof his anatomy cut off I don’tfunky to go lot easier. mixture? usually with non-fi publications 043. with ction a rusty knife than to have sata through magenta foil you do the whole publication? all the screaming and doubleI think dealing. withwell a trippy Yvonne was really orga poems wher and sheHouse had a eh? good sense of what They’re mostly fictionYou’ve for thebeen covers witha doing work for Random wanted … and you did throughout. as well, so sh couple of exceptions like Peter Well’s book a editors has with all also well prepared her fifound les and on William Colenso. Yep. And Penguin. One of the was absolute contracted back to RandomAnd house, she with photographers, I guess th So lately you’ve done …used Lloydto Jones, Hunt …and looked me up for be atSam Penguin medium, they do havetroubadour. lovely big p hated visual it! a project recently, which hassupply been good. where as with other Yep. Sam hunt’s new poetry book, Chords And, yeah, I’ve had quite a long standing I want to talk connection with Penguin – I’ve been doing doing for me. books for them for nearly 10 years. for Yvonne’s people came. So, it seems to be … particularly with the cover easy publicat jobs … are they mostly fiction? Or is there a to go a lot ea mixture? usually with non-fiction publications you do the whole publication? I think Yvonn and she had They’re mostly fiction for the covers witha wanted … and couple of exceptions like Peter Well’s book well prepare on William Colenso. And I guess w So lately you’ve done … Lloyd Jones, Sam Hunt … medium, the supply wher Yep. Sam hunt’s new poetry book, Chords


014. THREADED t-world mag. I

Christian Acker ALIFE Tony Arcabascio Ana Benaroya BKNY Boundless Claw Money Cookies-n-Cream Martha Cooper Cotton Candy Machine Dmote Ron English Milton Glaser Grotesk HIT+RUN jeffstaple Jeremyville Kid Zoom Kweenz Destroy Anthony Lister MadeMe Married to the MOB Memes Methods NYC Mighty Healthy Milkcrate Athletics Mishka Morning Breath

No Mas ONLY Out of Print Mike Perry Ricky Powell Reason Recon Reed Space Rocksmith Koe Rodriguez Saturdays NYC Scout Vintage T-shirts SSUR St端ssy Supreme The Hundreds WeSC Yellow Rat Bastard Zoo York 10.Deep

T-WORLD


Photos. Nicole Reed

“It’s more than just a T-shirt!” – this is the value that T-world demonstrates… T-world is an examination into one of the world’s most vibrant, popular and influential subcultures – the T-shirt. The niche publication is the only T-shirt journal in existence and aims to be the most eminent voice on this exciting global phenomenon. Completely focused on T-shirt culture and every associated aspect, T-world is a place where obsession is encouraged, entertainment is assured and the information is fresh. With the imminent release of T-world’s seventh issue, Milton Glaser’s tourist campaign turned souvenir T-shirt sums up the feelings T-world has for the subject of this next instalment – I love NY. The iconic city has been responsible for the birth of hip-hop, the rise of graffiti as an art form and infamous artists like Andy Warhol. In fact, it was Warhol himself who inspired the idea that a single, ordinary product like a T-shirt (he used a Campbell’s Soup can) could generate the topic of art and conversation.


No matter where you find yourself in the world, no matter which city or continent, there is one certainty… you will always find people wearing T-shirts. T-shirts are, without a doubt, the most universally popular item of clothing; their appeal crosses all divides of age, gender, nationality, race and religion. They have earned a cult-like status, with billions of devotees worldwide and the potential for billions more to become equally obsessed with this ubiquitous medium. In a global market that is quickly settling itself into lucrative niche markets, T-world has owned the T-shirt print media category since 2006 by being at the forefront of contemporary T-shirt culture. Proudly originating from Melbourne (Australia) and now distributed to over 30 countries globally, T-world is the bible of the T-shirt world; it’s the trusted authority for T-shirt enthusiasts and a reference for the thousands of labels and artists seeking T-shirt inspiration for this ‘must have’ fashion accessory. For over eight years, T-world’s founder Eddie Zammit has added enormous value to the T-world brand with his extensive networking; developing strong relationships with literally thousands of individuals and companies, especially within the creative community. By building this network of contacts, Zammit has been able to create an invaluable asset for T-world and, at the same time, help expand the wider community’s perceptions of what a T-shirt can be.


The potential for T-world to grow beyond simply a journal is vast. We envisage T-world as a brand that has its roots in premium print media, but it will also encompass internet and retail divisions and include T-shirt collaborations with established artists and labels, T-shirt art exhibitions, T-shirt art books, T-shirt documentaries, plus more. By being creative and innovative with the subject of T-shirts – across a broad spectrum of ideas – it is possible to place no limits on what the T-world brand is about, and on the numerous XL opportunities this untapped global market presents.


Nick Rudenno runs Nowhere Famous, a design studio known for its typography and its graphic design. Clients have included the likes of Movement, Semi-Permanent and, recently, T-world. Along with art direction by Zammit, Rudenno has been instrumental in providing the design of the New York issue. “Typography is an important aspect of any editorial design, but none more so than an entire publication,” Rudenno says. Zammit insists, “I chose Nowhere Famous to help rebrand the overall design. I wanted to evolve the brand from where it had started. The layout and typography is as much a comment on the evolving T-shirt graphics industry as it is about enabling T-world to have a single, unbiased voice. Content is very much king.” Heavily inspired by authentic and random signage shown throughout Manhattan stores and laundromats, Rudenno has carefully created the type with chaotic order throughout the 200-page, hardcover edition. “Essentially, we have used type styles from the city itself to help create a strong typography style that is interesting and clearly communicates to the audience.”


020. THREADED matt owens. TO ERR IS ONLY HUMAN

TO ERR IS ONLY HUMAN. EXPLORATIONS IN TYPE & IMAGE Matt Owens is the principal of Brooklyn-based studio Volumeone and a partner in the design collective Athletics. His work ranges from lettering and illustrated type to motion graphics, data visualisation and brand development. Always restless, Matt’s work reflects his never-ending curiosity for new visual forms and his interest in pushing himself in unexpected directions. When you decided to start Volumeone, were you working out of your house or a studio? Also, what struggles did you face? I started the idea of Volumeone in graduate school. I had always done self-published work and really got into doing my own projects during by first year at Cranbrook. Once I got out of school, I became frustrated with my full-time job and eventually went on my own so that I could do both client work and personal work. I think I still struggle with things. I still worry about being good enough and making enough money, wishing things came easier and all the rest. As a designer, I think you have to embrace change and evolution. Nothing is ever set in stone. If you do not adapt, the world will adapt around you for good or bad. What’s your creative process? Where do you find inspiration for your pieces? My creative process is pretty specific I think. I have been told that I am very logical with client work and I tend to listen well and deliver work that meets a client’s needs. On the negative side, I do not tend to develop crazy offbeat personal work for clients that I try to convince them is the way to go. I save that kind of work for my own projects. Occasionally clients want edgier work but not always. As for inspiration, I keep up with art and design and am a big fan of other designers’ and artists’ work. In many ways, I wish my own work came as easily as client work does. When I work for a client, I feel there is this shared liability so I think the pressure is less. For my own work, I am really hard on myself and get frustrated a lot.

What personal characteristics are necessary for success in graphic design?

How do you think the role of designer will evolve in the future?

One thing I say to kids is that your design is only as interesting as you are. Success is a very abstract concept. You could design graphics for cereal boxes and make good money but that might not be success for some people. You could have an amazing curated body of work that other designers love but also be broke. This could also be considered success to many. As long as you make work you feel reflects your aspirations and is a reflection of your true talent and creativity, then I think you should consider yourself successful. I, on the other hand, consider myself just lucky.

There is no telling what the future holds. I think our willingness to adapt to new developments (both creative and technological) will determine the future of design and the designer. Ultimately, art and design are facets of everything around us and it’s up to us to find our way and to contribute to the larger idea of what creative thinking can do and how it can positively impact our lives.

As long as you make work you feel reflects your aspirations and is a reflection of your true talent and creativity, then I think you should consider yourself successful. What makes your work recognisable; what do you think are your strong points? I have a few recognisable ways in which I work. My vector-based work is very strong and graphic while some of my other work is a photo and graphic combination. Compared to other designers, I feel that I do not have so much a signature style as a few signature ways of working. Ultimately I get bored with one style pretty quickly so I like to mix it up a bit. With that said, I think my strong point is that I try to make everything I do as good as it can be.

What is something fun you like to do outside of graphic design? Aside from hanging with my wife Amy and our baby girl Ida, I love music of course and have a database knowledge of American hard-core music from the late ’80s to the early 2000s. On the more mundane side, I love gardening, housework and busybody projects. I tend to gravitate toward things that might be repetitive or tedious to others. In work and in life, I think I tend to take the path less traveled. 1.

Zoo York. The Urbane Jungle. Transit. Collaboration with Mark Owens

2.

Zoo York. The Urbane Jungle. Souvenir. Collaboration with Mark Owens

3.

Road Less Traveled. Chapel Hill. Illustrative type

4.

Road Less Traveled. Asheville. Illustrative type


1.

3.

2.

4.


Friends of Type. Various logos and typographic explorations


1.

2.

3.

4.

4.

Go Play. ESPN, The Magazine

7.

2. So Young So Cold. Teen Angst. Poster series

5.

Barcelona. Show Us York Type

8-9. Meridians. Stickers. Booklet and Motion Piece Personal project

3.

6.

Lords of bushwick. Kings of Park Ozone. Illustrative type

1.

Over The Edge. Teen Angst. Poster series

Type & Image. Illustrative type

Hands of Time. Gap Red. T-shirt


6.

7. 5.

8.

9.


026. THREADED

m d m d m d mind mind design in in in

mind design. Playing games

WE ACTUALLY DON’T WORK HERE. WE JUST PLAY GAMES. GAMES WITH LETTERS, WORDS, IMAGES, LOGOS, FORMS AND CONTENT. MIND GAMES.

ORDNUNG UND SAUBERKEIT, 2008 BELOW

Stencil graffiti on the studio wall. The translation from German is ‘Order and Cleanliness’. OTO, 2010 Bottom

Design for an exhibition held at Parco Gallery in Tokyo, Japan. The theme of the exhibition was ‘Sound’ . It is a coincidence that the Japanese word for sound, ‘Oto’, looks like a face with two ears.


Belmacz POSTER, 2006 below

Belmacz is a London-based jewellery company. Every year we design a folded poster which features the current collection.

GAME OVER, 1999

Whistles Window, 1998 LEFT

SPLIT WORDS, 1997 ABOVE

Window installation for the fashion chain Whistles featuring abstract poems on blocks centred around the theme of fashion and individuality.um on left

From a series of abstract poems exploring the physicality of words and their meaning. m on left


Tom Dixon CatalOgue, 2009 Bottom

Belmacz Identity, 2011 BELOW AND RIGHT

A series of intitials designed for the 2009 Tom Dixon catalogue. Each letter illustrates an industrial production process relating to products shown in the catalogue section. The lettering is an ironic take on historical workers’ propaganda graphics.

The identity for this jewellery shop relates to the process in which precious materials are more and more refined and to their journey from a remote mine to the shop in London. It works across many different items and media. Every shape that has been cut out on one item re-appears again somewhere else. For example, a shape missing on a business card can re-appear on a carrier bag or somewhere in the shop interior.


NWS LOGO, 2008

Logo for a development to be built at the pier in Liverpool featuring shipping lines coming out from the letters.

Belmacz Collection POSTER, 2008

Belmacz poster featuring a short text by Kurt Schwitters laser-cut from acrylics and then photographed. Photography by Franck Allais.

CIRCUS Identity, 2010 above and right

Identity for a new club and restaurant with a burlesque theme and changing performances. Since the club interior features many mirrored surfaces, the design of the logo is based on the shape of a kaleidoscope. Beer mats used at the bar invite guests to play a surrealist game of connecting different bodies and heads.


NAIL JELLY, 2009 BELOW

Belmacz ChRISTMAS CARD, 2006 RIGHT

A3 screen print relating to the expression that something is ‘as difficult as trying to nail a jelly to a wall’. m on left

The past tense of the word ‘feel’ refers to the material it is printed on.

DR.INK MUG, 2011

Word game on a mug: an academic octopus suggests that the person should drink ink.m on left

TESCO BAGS,2009 RIGHT

Proposal for an eco bag in exactly the same proportions as those of the Tesco plastic bag. The printed slogan is the same strapline that Tesco uses under their logo but with various letters missing. Our message was if you shop less you do more for the environment. m on left


(S)CAR, 2009 BELOW CYCLING SHIRT, 2010 BOTTOM

Since fixed-gear bikes came into fashion, many creatives start looking like couriers. With this shirt, they can avoid confusion when turning up at a meeting. The text runs across like a bag shoulder strap and is set in Courier Sans, obviously not Courier.

FEED MY RIDE MUSETTE BAG, 2011

Progress Packaging asked 14 design studios to design a cycling musette bag. Our design refers to the early days of cycling when gentlemen were sporting often impressive moustaches.

MIND DESIGN is an independent London-based graphic design studio run by Holger Jacobs, Claire Huss and Craig Sinnamon. The studio focuses on integrated design which combines corporate identity, print, web and interior design, working for a wide range of clients across various sectors: from start-ups to established companies. Mind Design’s philosophy and approach are based on a passion for experiment, craftsmanship and the belief that content and form are inseparable. www.minddesign.co.uk


032. THREADED making beauty. lISA REIHANA

Rangimarie – Last Dance, 2011 q tHEATRE ENTRANCE Design: Lisa Reihana Photography: Sam Hartnett

MAKING BEAUTY


a STORY

Around 300 years ago, a Kaipara chieftainess arranged a marriage between her daughter Rangimarie and a descendant of Tamaki Makaurau. During the preparations at Maungakiekie Pa, Rangimarie's servant discovered a plot to kill the Kaipara people. Rangimarie was a renowned choreographer and the night before the marriage she performed a dance conveying the treacherous scheme in front

of both iwi. The unarmed Kaipara people escaped and for two weeks Rangimarie hid in a cave near King George Avenue in Epsom before returning to her people. Represented as the shimmering red diamond, Rangimarie takes centre stage weaving together the Kaipara and Tamaki iwi. The white niho taniwha [dragon's teeth] is a design used in raranga [weaving] and a fighting strategy referenced in kapa haka.


p. 30 p. 31

Ariane, 2008 Ruby, 2008

“I adore these portraits of my neices - Ruby is awesomeness personified, her true spirit, while Ariane reveals the princess that she is. Resisting the historic, the gothic and the darkness often associated with MÂŻori a portraiture, these works have an aura of lightness for the thoroughly modern Miss.â€?


p. 30-31

Zebra Strut, 1997 [Destroyed] 1,200 x 2,000

“From my first forays investigating tukutuku: these patterns were generated from video stills of vintage fabrics and gorgeous frocks I wore to K’Rd dance parties in the ’90s.”


p. 28-29

Rangimarie – Last Dance q tHEATRE ENTRANCE

A mathematically intensive work designed to a take t¯niko into the third dimension. The logistics were monumental in its 10,000 tetradecagon beads and 20,000 stirling silver crimps and 20,000 metal spacers and 2,000 metres of trace wire, requiring a communal effort where many hands made light work. Heartfelt shout-outs to the Reihanas, Shiree, Ruby and Georgia [you gals rock], Shivani, Tania, Malia, Judy, Jenny, Gary, James, Simon of Pip Chesire Architects and the Q theatre staff.

p. 32

CAMARILLO, 2009 PELT, 1,800 x 1,800

Website Camarillo White Horse Association:

In the year 1911/12, a brilliant white colt with brown eyes was born. As he frolicked at his mother’s side, it was unknown that he would become the foundation stallion for a breed of horse known as the Camarillo White Horse which, over the next 95 years, would create a family tradition, a new breed of horse and a legend as well.


p. 33

SABINO, 2009 PELT, 1,800 x 1,800

Wikipedia – the free encyclopedia:

Sabino is a group of white spotting patterns in horses that affect the skin and hair. In the strictest sense, ‘sabino’ refers to the white patterns produced by the Sabino 1 (SB1) gene, for which there is a DNA test.

a STORY

Inhabiting mountainous worlds, fauna are caught in moments of repose − their smooth limbs touched by chilly mists. These fleshy beings are devoid of sexuality, slipping between equine and game, centaurs and griffins. Like the engineered landforms, these creatures are at once local and extraterrestrial. A new day dawns as Camarillo gazes across the plains, Sabino bows to the setting sun.


038. THREADED area design. on books, clients and other such things

— SongS by —

Schubert•brahmS•SibeliuS•GrainGer & cantelOube SongS of the Auvergne

Ms von Otter was a model of vocal grace and subtlety… Carnegie has seldom felt so intimate. The New York Times


KC / AD

Karl Chitham and Alan Deare first started working together in 2005 when Karl began as programme co-ordinator at Objectspace on Ponsonby Road and Alan was the senior designer at Inhouse Design also in Ponsonby at the time. Over several years they, along with Objectspace director Philip Clarke, produced a series of innovative publications that garnered attention in the design community and won a few awards along the way. This interview was conducted following the opening night of Yvonne Todd’s Self-Medicating Exhibition at the Calder and Lawson Gallery, Academy of Performing Arts, Waikato University. Karl is currently the Art Collection Curator at the University. Did you find it hard shifting from Auckland to Hamilton and setting up your own practice?

something that you’ve carried on with since leaving Inhouse?

I actually did think that it was going to be design suicide – that it would be the end of anything interesting in my life after having worked in one of the best studios in Auckland and with some of the greatest people I have ever met … Y’know, that I’d just be doing business cards for plumbers…  It was good to have to face that possibility in a way… my reasons for shifting were for family, to be back down near my son and start a new life with my lovely new wife.

It’s definitely something I’ve always been interested in, along with doing work that hopefully has some sort of enduring quality or social significance .

Who is also your client? My most demanding client. Who pays the least… That’s a very common ratio – the highest demand for the least pay … I did think I would essentially drop off the design radar but the last 2½ years have been amazing in their own way. It didn’t start out so easy though… So easy? No, it was tough, the first 1½ years were tough – but I actually kicked off with some lovely projects – one of them was a photobook Black Milk for John Savage and Douglas Wright, the other one was Darren Glass’s, A Field Guide to Camera Species – which was a great project. I totally dig his work. The first two years were pretty challenging, just building up networks, paying the mortgage, while the recession was biting and design budgets were shrinking. I remember you doing lots of freebies or ‘lowbies’… Definitely. Just trying to make connections, keep busy, create opportunities, doing stuff for next to nothing. The strategy kinda paid off. Now I have lots of work paying next to nothing… *laughs* So is working for the art and creative industries

Hmmm. So what are some of the jobs lately that have pushed the buttons? I think down here I’ve enjoyed the ongoing work for a client and a friend of mine who has a hair studio in town called Fabrik – he just lets me kinda go for it and he’s always keen to try new things, you know, whatever I…  So have you done the complete branding for that? Yeah. That was one of my first jobs as AREA; I was involved in the look and collateral of the Studio. Ah, what else, down here? I’ve just done a cool little job that’s gone off to a 29th Biennial of Graphic Arts in Ljubljana, Slovenia, for Kim Paton, based around her successful Free store projects in Wellington and Auckland. So, this 6m-long display is basically documenting the project… it’s in some kind of castle somewhere. Must be a big room. Ah, I might have to Google that to make sure that it is true… *laughs* So is it more like a … storyboard? Or an explanation? It’s basically a documentation of the Free store event over the four or five weeks it was conducted in both cities. There are lovely photos taken of the project over that period spanning over the 6m billboard, along with another 3m billboard that has information graphics charting the wastage of food during the distribution process in New Zealand. This wastage was requested from all sorts of suppliers to stock the shelves of the Free store. It’s very simple but it’s kind of fun. What about Black Milk?

I’ve done a few projects with John Savage, a photographer based just out of Auckland, and Black Milk was one of them. He was invited to document Douglas Wright’s show over a period from rehearsals through to the touring performances. He shot it all on film in low light. I was going to say it’s focused on the moment, but it’s almost unfocused in a way: a lot of movement and a gestural interpretation of Douglas’s choreography and obsessions. Very much in the spirit of Brodovitch’s Ballet Russe photographs from the ’30s. Very moody. Somehow dance can be violent when caught in motion. I went to the show, and to be honest, it was the very first contemporary dance show that I’d ever been to… and, ah, it was quite an eye-opening experience… it was a very profound, disturbing performance which stayed with me for days, like a Lars von Trier movie. So there was always going to be lots of darkness in the design! Because that book was largely based on photographs, where does the designer fit into that sort of scenario? ’Cos that was the same issue with Max Gimblett’s Workspace publication as well… which was predominately photography. Well, I was quite heavily involved with the selection of images. John had probably hundreds of images and often photographers get really swamped with which ones should go in. Sometimes they’re thinking about things like how great the shot is because of the difficulty in low light, or something technical, and they’re not necessarily thinking about how it will contribute to the narrative of the book…  Or how it sits next to something else. Yep, and those things are as important …  every time I look through Black Milk, it does tell the story really well, and I know we’ve got the right images. There’s only one shot I wouldn’t have had in there, but um…got


outvoted on that! But the glossy, full-bleed images… you know with the dancers floating in a dark space; I think the narrative moves really well and there’s a good representation of the performance. So did John get you on board for Max Gimblett’s Workspace? Yep. John knew Max and identifies his photography practice with aspects of Max’s painting practice. Max had also worked with Inhouse, so I knew him a little as well. After doing Black Milk, John basically produced this book which documents Max’s space in New York over a period of several visits … Max had Italian publishers and they were pretty difficult to deal with. John actually went and did a press pass in Milan and he was using a translation app to talk to the printers to explain what he wanted. There was lots of hand waving, yelling and screaming, “more rosa! less rosa!”… they were very passionate advocates for their own print, something you wouldn’t see here. Are those sort of projects, where you are all in different cities, frustrating? Well that’s pretty much how I work, quite a lot. I’ve just done a cover for an author who’s in Hawke’s Bay and the publisher’s are in Auckland and I’m in Hamilton. Some of my clients, I have never met. But, yeah the biggest stick in the mud for Workspace was the publishers. They had very set ideas and were very unbending when I proposed certain materials and a format that were outside of what they were imagining. Particularly a typographic-based, blunt cut

cover with raw stock and no image. John and I were thinking about the personal diary, materials and processes which were metaphors for Max’s work and the literal and physiological space he occupies. Anyway, they kinda flipped on that; they didn’t get it. So I was trying to explain… it was so outside what they were thinking. “What! no image on the cover of a photobook!?” There was a lot of sending photos of books and samples, stock swatches, etc. It’s funny when your client doesn’t understand your use of signifiers. You have to dial the work back to the point where you lost them but, in this case, add a language barrier in there as well…  You’ve been doing work for Random House, eh? Yep; and Penguin. I’ve had quite a longstanding connection with Penguin – I’ve been doing books for them for nearly 10 years. Not that they would know who I was if I walked into their office. So, it seems to be… particularly with the cover jobs… are they mostly fiction? Or is there a mixture? Usually with non-fiction publications, you do the whole publication? They’re mostly fiction for the covers with a couple of exceptions like Peter Wells’s book on William Colenso. So lately you’ve done… Lloyd Jones, Sam Hunt… Yep. Sam Hunt’s new poetry book, Chords & other poems, A Man Melting, which is a collection of short stories by Craig Cliff and Lloyd Jones’s Hand Me Down World for Penguin. Plus others … Sam Hunt’s new cover was funny. I did some research and

discovered these beautifully produced poetry books from the ’70s. I was especially enamored by Lindsay Missen’s absolutely funky cover for Hunt’s Time to Ride. It had a magenta foil on a red uncoated soft back, with a trippy metallic negative image. It inspired my first pitch. I had also found a wavey, lanky font that I thought was absolutely perfect for our larrikin troubadour. As it transpired, Sam absolutely hated that period and any references to it! I want to talk about the work that you’ve been doing for me. We had the successful opening for Yvonne’s show last night… more than five people came. And that was kind of quite an easy publication. I don’t know why. It seemed to go a lot easier. I think Yvonne was really well organised and she had a good sense of what she wanted… and you did as well, so she was very well prepared with all her files and content. And I guess with photographers, that is her medium; they do have lovely big photos on supply. Whereas with other visual artists, they don’t necessarily document their work that well. I was actually thinking, when you were talking about that pitch you did for Max’s cover … that Yvonne’s sort of felt like that… ’cos it was based on a journal as well. Yup. We were thinking about Todd’s public and personal manifestations, with her schoolbook doodles juxtaposed alongside her finished work.


LEFT: Colenso cover proposal for upcoming Random House release featuring image of Colenso by Gavin Hurly

far left: BLACK MILK UV title to uncoated black case, hidden under the dust jacket

The other publications you’ve been doing for me… the last one, Another Universe, I know, that one was a little bit challenging in some respects, ’cos it had to fit. I mean obviously the biggest thing with those publications is the budget – it was really small. But we’re still trying to do quite interesting things within that tiny budget. So, with the Another Universe publication, the insert and the fold-out poster, keeping one-half typographic – it had all these parameters, but it still came out well and we did some quite interesting things with the images, and the way the images were cut together, and the different types of stock. I think, with those parameters, it forces you to look at what areas you do have freedom, or some control over, and I think, with those jobs, what I’ve been enjoying is the freedom with the typography. We have a bit of fun…  and, you know, we’re also sort of subconsciously setting up a series which is something that always happened with Objectspace publications where…  It’s not subconscious. *laughs* Maybe semiconscious…  *laughs* Completely conscious. Okay, it’s quite conscious. Maybe that’s just what happens when you do work for the same client… you’re conscious of what’s happened before and you are who you are… you can’t not be… but I find I work with certain clients… where I just continue to behave a certain way with that client and the work that I produce ah… you know, feels like a series, it feels related. Even though

people spending money on publications. ’Cos that’s a huge parameter for designers…

that might not be an explicit part of the brief. But I can work quite differently with another client and the work can behave in a different way. But it will definitely talk with its predecessors ’Cos these are based on the Objectspace idea of working with the same format… Yeah, but funnily, I did a publication for an Objectspace exhibition recently, Eye Catch, which I sort of felt like could have belonged to your suite of publications. Even though you didn’t like it! *laughs* It’s been quite interesting with the Objectspace jobs – because now they’ve moved towards being online catalogues. They’ve also changed from being an exclusive client with Inhouse and then AREA to opening the doors to working with different designers. So, how do you feel about that relationship? Just in terms of the work you’re still doing with them? Do you feel like you get a lot of freedom? Firstly, Philip (Clarke) was one of the first clients that I had ever developed a great working relationship with – there was a lot of trust and openness to innnovation. Things have been a little more restricted since, y’know, the financial downturn. One of the things is that institutions haven’t been producing so many publications and Objectspace is an example of that. Publications have shifted online and will continue to do so and we’ll probably be exploring that more with the new website – really embracing that. So, that all happened at the same time… budgets shrank, there was less emphasis on material outcomes… fewer

Well, we’re really in the throws of a significant shift in that respect; more and more things are moving online and there’s a lot of debate about digital publications and portable devices. Ironically many of the apps mimic traditional features of the book. So yeah, to be involved in something traditionally object based – that is also potentially disappearing – is an interesting thing. It’s something I think a lot about. Actually that’s quite an interesting point – when you say it’s object based and then Objectspace is moving away from it, becoming more selective about what they turn into an actual physical publication. I think that’s kinda a shame ’cos I like books, and I like flicking thru pages and I like seeing the different paper stocks and sizes and what people do with typography and the way that the ink sits on the page and all those sorts of things… Man, you sound like a…  *laughs* I sound like a wannabe designer… It’s a bit like when music shifted from physical formats to digital and now people just download their music. But what is also happening now is there are people actually putting more energy into creating interesting packaging because it is becoming a unique proposition! Then there is the resurgence of older formats like vinyl, the LP cover and stuff like that… I was even given a cassette as part of an entry to a gig not long ago! I saw an article recently about an album that’s being produced that has a 12-inch record and sleeve, for each song on the album. So, in some ways, it’s pushing the packaging expectations further. This is similar to what has been happening with books in the last five or so years, say, particularly in the cultural and design sector. People’s expectations of what they will get for their money for an average book have significantly increased. The consumer wants to see something with interesting binding,


stocks or conceptual features. A lot of that has to do with the quality and cheapness of manufacturing more-sophisticated publications now and how print has to work harder to validate it’s existence. We are sort of typical book-buyers – we both like buying books – and we both like looking at books; I’ve even noticed that myself… that I second guess buying a book now, and it has to be something amazing. Yup, we’ve all heard the argument that the internet was going to affect our reading habits and kill print, etc. But, in a way, it’s enabled us to search out more interesting publications, from all over the world. So going back to what we talked about – books being objects. You’ve done a few jobs in the last couple of years which really kinda play around with book-binding and handmade books. Like you were working with Meliors Simms on two projects. She did the Weeds catalogue and the History of the Waikato Society of Arts. Yeah, I saw her give a talk at PechaKucha one night down here and she was just an absolute book freak. Y’know, she just loves them conceptually and the craft of making them. A very clever lady and a clever artist as well. She actually was working at the WSA and she caught wind of this project. And as it turned out, I knew the writer and we decided to collaborate on the project, where we hand-produced this book…  It was so mad. I remember seeing you guys sitting in the garage… folding…  We had to… we basically printed these covers and we hand-trimmed them, nicked and creased them, because the dye forms would have been too expensive for the project. I can’t remember what the edition was… it was 100, but… it was hand-folded and stitched together. The cover was designed to fold in on itself and hold together without any fastening. It’s a clever little design. But when we were putting it together – it was like, ‘this is just madness’…  It was a really rewarding project and it’s actually kind of a little sweetie – one of my favourites. The cover that folds back in on itself reminds me a little bit of the Far Far Away catalogue. That’s right; that had a cover that folds out to reveal the concealed imagery. Yeah, that’s where the connection came with Bronwyn Lloyd; I’m working on a project at the moment with her and Objectspace called Lugosi’s Children. It is very kinda cyclic though – all those connections – where you get your work from… 

Yeah, you work with people who you trust and who you’re familiar with and get along with… And they pass your name onto other people… Yeah, but it is that thing, if you do good work and it’s a relatively painless experience…  Yeah, *laughs* that’s the big thing isn’t it: if the client doesn’t walk away feeling like they’re glad to have you out of their life or visa versa…! It is funny that with all the ins and outs: who’s a client and how clients are all connected to each other … Yeah, I had an Auckland client that put me forward for a project going on in Hamilton, which is quite funny!

So, what are your top three projects? Rate things? Well I’ve just done this enrolment poster for Unitec which is pretty sweet: it’s got this big hexagonal foil block that pops open, like an advent calendar, revealing the six subject pathways. It’s quite a luscious, crafty piece. A very bold, simple execution of the idea of visual intelligence being in the form of interrelated geometric components. So two and three? Well… they would have to be any number of the projects that I have done for you over the last few years. *laughs* Kinda … just joking. So!


Far LEFT:

Darren Glass Several spreads from A Field Guide to Camera Species

LEFT: ANZAAE CONFERENCE Dinner invite

ABOVE/Left: Eyecatch 8pp self covered publication for Objectspace below: A Collection of Catalogues for Karl Chitham, Art Collection Curator Waikato University


er! t t a m d e t n i It’s a pr

Visual Arts Architecture Library Fashion & Culture

AD SPACE TMMC The creative

www.magazineguide.co.nz

Magazine Guide is a magazine published on behalf of magazine and periodical publishers from New Zealand and around the world. magmag.co.nz


FREEpost 174 603 tmmc ltd. po box 91 549 auckland 1142


subscribe now to threaded magazine

by completing the form below and receive the next two editions direct to your door before they hit the shelves for only nz$30 incl.gst

T

D MAGAZI E D A E NE HR

Threaded is a collaborative design publication that establishes a creative platform to offer insights into best practice across the creative industries and bridge the gap between recognised and emerging practice.

This issue of threaded magazine is your cosmopolitan souvenir of new zealand. subscribe today online or by whatever means necessary and have each edition delivered straight to your door before it hits the shelves!

My details

Recipient

yes please! i want to subscribe to threaded magazine Name: Address: City/postcode: country: Email: phone: start subscription with ed. no

info: - magamag.co.nz/threaded

-

Payment info

I WANT TO gift a subscription of threaded magazine to: New Zealand subscription: NZ $30/yr international subscription: NZ $60/yr Name: total subscription cost: Address: Payment: cheque credit card Card type: City/postcode: card no: country: expiry date: _ _ /_ _ Email: Signature: start subscription with ed. no *The Magazine Marketing Company does not store your credit card data

Email: subs@magmag.co.nz

-

Freephone: 0800 624 634

-

Freepost 174602 tMmc ltd, po box 91 549, auckland 1142 

threaded magazine subscription

www.threaded.co.nz


We all know that magazine ads can look amazing but they also add the amazing – brand differentiation. As you can see, magazines add high quality attributes, like prestige, to a brand (and this doesn’t just apply to hardware). In a competitive market, brands that differentiate like this enhance brand equity* and increase sales. So add magazines to your media mix and be amazed at the difference.

*Brand Asset Valuator drives brand value (refer BAV global study 2010 at www.addmagazines.co.nz).


050. THREADED galleria.

galleria

- In ‘Galleria’, ten students and graduates have been selected from portfolio submissions to celebrate emerging practice 061. 050.

From the outset, Threaded has been committed to enriching a discourse between education and its relationship with the wider creative community. Our newly refurbished Exhibition Alley section ‘Galleria’ enables us to bridge the gap between education and best practice by profiling emerging practitioners across Australia and NEW ZEALAND and now, with the introduction of our first international issue, the globe.

Side-by-side, page-to-page – practitioners, artists, designers and students exhibit, are profiled, display their practice and reflect on the nature of what they do, through discussion, review, documentation and so on. In ‘Galleria’, ten students and graduates, selected from portfolio submissions, identify practice as the main template. Representation across a range of design and visual arts practices is sought and, as you can see, all submissions are accompanied by a personalised position statement

that contextualises interests and practice. The ‘call for submissions’ page continues to follow the thematic for each edition and we invite interns and designers to collaborate. When we caught up with illustrator Max Thompson, he was about to board a cattle barge up the Amazon River but, as an expat of Great Barrier Island (a five-hour boat ride north-east of Auckland, New Zealand), he obligingly designed our call for submissions page for Ed.XII.

— Please spread the word —


051. THREADED Max Thompson. call for submissions

call for

 ission m b s su

Our mission is to work together to create an exhibition section that focuses on showcasing a high standard of attitude and work. That means we need the good stuff from you!

Submissions are open to all students/ graduates engaged in creative practice. Your submission should capture the essence of you as a designer/artist and profile your ideas and artwork. We are taking submissions for Edition XII NOW. Send high-resolution (300dpi+) tiff or pdf format images along with a brief position statement outlining intent, ideas and context (written in third-person perspective) on a disc to: THREADED MEDIA LTD, PO BOX 79 382



ROYAL HEIGHTS, WAITAKERE AUCKLAND 0656, NEW ZEALAND

*Submission's close 02/03/12

Ed. xii


052. THREADED galleria.

Queenio (Huan Liu) queenio1987@gmail .com www.queenio-o.com

Queenio’s (Huan Liu) education in Illustration and Animation has enabled her to work as an illustrator and designer across and array of fields, from magazines to fashion, newspapers and advertising. Her clients have included: Cosmopolitan, Elle, FUCUS, Camel Cigarettes Ltd, TGGC France Garment Co. Ltd and international publications. Now based in Auckland, New Zealand, Queenio’s penchant for drawing and visual sensibility enable her to construct compositions that have a dreamy, surrealist tone, quiet enough to allow the viewer to consider meaning beyond the visual experience.


Emma McEwen emmamcewendesign@gmail .com

Emma McEwen’s work interrogates the relationship between people and space, in regards to time and the overlap between visible and invisible manifestations of memory, spirituality and science. These interests see her investigating the gaps produced between redevelopments and the historic structures that remain left behind by city planning. Her project, The Living Museum, considered the notions of reclamation and recollection specific to the Fort Street, Auckland City location, looking to enable the construction of public and private memory in an area at the brink of redevelopment. At present she is working on an on-site interior installation project located at the Musick Point Memorial Broadcasting Station. Here she proposes to investigate how the interior and exterior walls facilitate oscillatory radio transmission yet present a spatial boundary to the local community. Her work questions whether it is possible to transcend these boundaries through the spatial representation of these communication frequencies.


054. THREADED galleria.

Limi Manu pilimi.manu@live .com

Pilimilose (known as Limi) Manu’s practice covers many ‘concerns’, which he makes sense of through his art-making. Some of the concerns he investigates encompass cultural cringe, structure, literalism, gender and identity. These concerns, or rather, these searches for answers, are translated through a range of media which he uses to unpack culture and metaphorically represent this sense of unease and isolation he feels within his culture. The most evident of his concerns is his questioning of the cultural structure and how this ‘set’ structure has transformed and moulded the lives of first-generation New Zealand-born Pacific Island children. Through his wide-ranging materials, he reveals the concerns that he and many other teens and young adults face during their adolescent years as they start to mature and form their own opinions of cultural structure and compare their upbringings to those of others. Quite simply, he is deconstructing, simplifying and reconstructing traditional Tongan beliefs in order to make sense of their complexities.


Thomas Le Bas me@thomaslebas.co.nz

Since graduating, Thomas Le Bas has started teaching Typography, Information Design and Graphic Design for the Screen in Wellington. He is involved in a number of projects and motivated to employ visual language to communicate messages that promote cultural understanding and awareness. The Freedom of Speech Propaganda poster highlights the Chinese Internet censoring programme that has undermined freedom of speech in the country – Le Bas looks behind the ‘Great Firewall of China’. As the importance of the Internet grows, so too will the millions of users and this poster is a call to action for those seeking justice and respect for human rights in China.


056. THREADED galleria.

Kirsten Roberts kirsten_roberts@xtr a .co.nz

Kirsten Roberts’ research is looking at how postmodern discourses relating to interiority and discussed in interior design and architecture, can shape the context and content of a contemporary figurative painting practice. An ambition is to evolve ambiguous and geographically indeterminate spaces that are potentially neither inside nor outside, public nor private and that are constructed from two-dimensional images, in an unremitting state of emergence, keeping our view in a constant state of becoming. New Zealand modernist interiors, architecture and objects of the 1960s give regional resonance in the experimentation of potential and variable thresholds and boundaries of subject. An intensive focus on the interiority of the practice itself has resulted in a greater awareness of the construction of the paintings, the moments of artifice, the moments of ambivalence, the interplay of conscious and unconscious, the interstitial of knowledge and belief, and the realisation of what enables these moments to happen.


Kelsey Stankovich kmstankovich@gmail .com

A very hands‐on approach to making is what drives Kelsey Stankovich’s art practice. Obscure materials are specifically chosen and amalgamated together in a way that explores the formal concerns of painting. It is through this act that any references the materials may carry remain ungraspable. This activates an arena in which the viewer experiences the materials in a new way and, within this, a new kind of knowledge is gained. Stankovich’s practice deals with the idea of improvement in the way she transforms mundane materials into newer, better versions of themselves, which could also be related within a more personal context. In contrast to this idea, there is an ever‐present humour or wacky sensibility about the works. From this view, one could describe Stankovich’s works as visual enigmas – puzzling and inexplicable. The works propose a challenge in which the viewer is encouraged to reorientate and open up their thought processes.


058. THREADED galleria.

Tina z K arbhari Tina z .k arbhari@gmail .com

The inevitable development and transformation in today’s world is what drives the practice of upcoming photographer Tinaz Karbhari, as she aims to document her surroundings, in order to preserve her experience in this changing world. She is particularly interested in the notion of spirituality and uses religious objects from her religion, Zoroastrianism, to portray this idea. Karbhari’s work relies on viewer interaction as she invites the onlooker through the door-like shape which acts as the point of entry. This act reinforces her philosophical concerns as her practice is grounded by the profound theories of philosophers Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari. Her photographs seem to suggest that although objects are different from people, they still have distinctive spirits and this is present through the tenderness of the religious objects. In documenting these objects with such precision and care, Karbhari proposes that the viewer sees to feel the subjects, and through seeing, they revive them.


Kevin Tr an contac t@kevintr andesign.com www.kevintr andesign.com

The creative practice of Kevin Tran spans the modalities of abstract painting and graphic design. His interest in creating visual tension is paralleled with a desire to capture a sense of intricacy and precision in his painting, poster and logo projects. Whether it's raw gestural mark-making or confident employment of shapes and lines or bold typographic forms and constructions, Tran seeks to capture this balance of both gesture and refinement to produce work that excites viewers and provides multiple layers of meaning and interpretation.


++

060. THREADED galleria.

Solomon Mortimer m_o_r_t_i_m@hotmail .com

Roland Barthes had his punctum, Solomon Mortimer has his environment. Associating, discerning, projecting his identity into the people he engages on the street, forging a connection under no defined pretexts and documenting their encounter through a single frame of 120 film. The catch to his work is the visceral nature of the subjects he selects from the hundreds of unknown, unexplored individuals that cross his path daily. How does one dictate which to persue? Solomon looks for those catches, that little element that separates them from the rest and links them to his own psyche. “I work in the interpretation business. Processing the world in its raw undiluted form. Then I distil it, through my own filters of perceptions, understandings and relevances, to produce for the world a reflection of myself. As a series, these images explore aspects of subjective stereotyping, social conditioning and gender identities.�


Rosanne Croucher rosannecroucher@gmail .com

Rosanne Croucher’s realist paintings are inspired by instabilities in our environment and how this might progress in the coming years. Her work embodies these issues through representing home interiors containing trees and small creatures in strange places of restriction. This unusual combination of outdoor and indoor provides an opportunity to reexamine the ways we interact with our current environment. It also hints at a possible future in which nature will need to be increasingly artificialised and preserved in order to still exist. Utilising the context of the home is another strategy Croucher uses to bring layers of meaning into her work. The home commonly represents a personal space of refuge and comfort as well as a symbol of the self. Through her placement of nature indoors, she makes the familiar become uncanny in order to explore tensions around domestication, imprisonment, vulnerability and alienation.


talent to go... We deliver freelance, contract & permanent recruitment solutions to creative companies. Give us a call on 09 918 5010, email andrea@thelinkagency.co.nz

or visit www.thelinkagency.co.nz


064. THREADED directory.

Fed up with working from home? It’s time to get out there and seek your fortune. Increase your productivity, motivation, and networks. Say goodbye to the call of the fully-stocked fridge and say hello to social business. There is a better way to work – it’s called The BizDojo. www.bizdojo.com

A new way to work. Suite 205, Ironbank, 150 K Rd, Auckland 38 Vivian Street, Te Aro, Wellington, NZ www.bizdojo.com

Since inception in 2007 endemicworld.com has become one of New Zealand’s favourite online art and design stores. Come get some and have a FREE NZ shipping code on us: threado Exp. 1/12/11

Love beautiful things? You’ll heart Felt, New Zealand’s own online marketplace for handmade goods. Whether you’re shopping for quality handcrafted goods or looking to sell your creations, Felt is the place for you. www.felt.co.nz

Images for designers. Quality New Zealand photos for use in social media, brochures, ads, websites, posters, mags and books. www.mychillybin.co.nz

I will meet you for a hot chocolate, coffee and or smoothie. If we like each other - I will make the space you breathe in, sleep in, dance in - sexy, sustainable and stylish. call +64 21 159 5619 / twitter: @pinggord pinguinogordito.tumblr.com

I n n o v a t i o n + C r e a t i v i t y = VOICE

Big VOICE is a global creative hub passionate about positive inclusive VOICE. We create emotive multi-platform (transmedia) stories, engaging audiences in new ways. +64 217 49191 serena@bigvoice.tv www.bigvoice.tv

New Zealand’s largest range of quality art supplies, graphics materials, art and design books, and creative gifts. Expert advice and unbeatable value. Auckland, Hamilton, Wellington, Christchurch OR SHOP ONLINE AT

www.gordonharris.co.nz

The home of letterpress printing. A small specialist printing company combining traditional letterpress with offset and digital print. Personal service. Tradesman quality. Letterpress workshops. We are happy to work with your designs. www.designassembly.org.nz

*Background Photography: Brandon E. Littlefield

Tel +64 9 480 0218 www.gtoprinters.co.nz

3D Animation Digital Artist lucas@lucas3D.co.nz

Vapour Momenta Books is the pocket-sized publishing arm of Catherine Griffiths and Bruce Connew. View and collect their limited edition self-published artist books at www.vapourmomenta.com


Threaded Ed.11 'Worldy Wise, The Cosmopolitan Issue'  

The theme for this edition is intended to provide fun for serious practitioners without losing sight of the Cosmopolitan motto "Above All Na...

Threaded Ed.11 'Worldy Wise, The Cosmopolitan Issue'  

The theme for this edition is intended to provide fun for serious practitioners without losing sight of the Cosmopolitan motto "Above All Na...

Advertisement