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Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Serving the Hub of the North since 1960

Volume 58 • Issue 07

Deputy mayor talks snow removal services at latest chamber meeting BY KYLE DARBYSON KYLE@THOMPSONCITIZEN.NET

DIXIE SWIM CLUB RETURNS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT PAGE 2

FESTIVAL OF ARTS REGISTRATION DEADLINE SOON ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT PAGE 5

NORWAY HOUSE COPS SEIZE DRUGS NEWS - PAGE 5

SAFEWAY UNION SEEKING STRIKE MANDATE NEWS - PAGE 10

Over the last couple months, the topic of snow removal has become a contentious topic for local Thompsonites, with heated discussions taking place at city council meetings and on social media sites. While the back-andforth on display at the Feb. 7 Thompson Chamber of Commerce meeting was much more cordial, several local business owners and community representatives still wanted to know why the city has been so slow to react to the record snowfall that has blanketed the Hub of the North. Even though Wednesday’s meeting didn’t feature an official guest speaker, deputy mayor Colleen Smook talked with chamber members for around 40 minutes, laying out why, by her own admission, the public works department is constantly trying to play catch-up in this area. Outside of some sporadic equipment breakdowns and the fact that public works is constantly called away to fix other problems like water main breaks, Smook said that the core of this issue boils down to low morale. “Our problem is people don’t want to work, to be perfectly truthful,” she said. “Some days, in order to get five to six people we’re making 15 phone calls to try and get enough people to run the equipment. We can’t even call in contractors until we prove we’ve exhausted all resources with the union.” Smook said this situation is made worse by the fact that large snowfalls have happened so close together in December and January, which hasn’t given the department a chance to recover and deal

Thompson Citizen photo by Kyle Darbyson. City workers clear snow at the Burntwood Trailer Court Feb. 12. with all the snow properly. Danielle Adams, representing Churchill-Keewatinook Aski MP Niki Ashton at the meeting, said that this low morale is understandable considering that these employees are overworked and constantly have to contend with nonconstructive feedback through certain Facebook groups. “Even though you’ve done five 16-hour days … you’re being told you’re lazy, you’re being told you’re useless, you’re being told to ‘get off your butt and get a real job.’ These are comments I’m seeing on Thompson Talk,” said Adams. However, Volker Beckmann of Spirit Way Inc. suggested that the city could use social media platforms to establish better relations with the public. More specifically, he said the city should be doing a better job of letting the people know how, when and where snow removal

services are being conducted, which could be accomplished through adopting a more comprehensive, transparent social media strategy. “It seems to me that there is a better education process required and that is, obviously, through social media and other vehicles,” said Beckmann. Chamber president Rajinder Thethy said workers could also project a more positive image more directly by making sure that city vehicles are not parked outside of Robin’s Donuts or McDonald’s for long periods of time. Smook said that both solutions are being worked on currently, and reiterated the fact that the city is willing to take suggestions and criticism as long as it is constructive. “When I first started council three-and-a-half years ago now, we were basically told that you sort of ignore these posts, and I am dead against

that,” she said. “To me, we have to address these posts, especially if they’re inaccurate or even if they are accurate.” In the meantime, Smook encourages any-

body with complaints about snow removal to contact public works via social media, email at koversky@thompson. ca or by phone at 204-677-7970.

2018 POINT-IN-TIME COUNT VOLUNTEER RECRUITMENT

The Canadian Mental Health Association Thompson in afúliation with the Thompson Community Advisory Board on Homelessness are seeking community support and recruitment in order to undertake this count. Should you be interested in volunteering, please contact: Darren Fulford @ 204-677-6057 or email: housing@cmhathompson.ca with “Volunteers” in the subject line. The Point-in-Time count will be held on: Tuesday, March 13, 2018 - Evening and Wednesday, March 14, 2018 from 7:00 am to 1:00 pm. Training will be provided at Best western on: March 2 @ 11:30 am till 1:00 pm. Lunch will be provided at the venue. For more information, please visit the HPS Website: www.esdc.gc.ca/eng/communities/homelessness/point_in_time.shtml

Faculty of Social Work

WE SELL • ELECTRONICS HELIUM • FRAMES BALLOONS! • LINEN • CARDS WE ARE THE PARTY LOOK FOR “GREAT CANADIAN DOLLAR STORE - THOMPSON” ON FACEBOOK! SPECIALISTS OF THE NORTH! MON - THU: 9 am - 9 pm • FRIDAY: 9 am - 10 pm • SATURDAY: 9 am - 9 pm • SUNDAY: 10 am - 6 pm • HOUSEWARE • TOYS • CRAFT • STATIONERY


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www.thompsoncitizen.net

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Arts & Entertainment

Thompson Playhouse bringing The Dixie Swim Club back to the stage BY KYLE DARBYSON KYLE@THOMPSONCITIZEN.NET

After roughly six years, the Thompson Playhouse is resurrecting a fan favourite production to help bring a little laughter and warmth to an otherwise cold and dreary winter. Written by Jessie Jones, Nicholas Hope and Jamie Wooten, The Dixie Swim Club tells the story of five women with wildly different personalities, who gather together at a beachside cottage every August to relive their glory days of being part of a collegiate swim team. Taking place over the course of several decades, the narrative allows the lives of these friends to unfold in great detail, as the group deals with the kind of pitfalls and setbacks that pop up when one has to juggle parenting, marriage, aging and professional

pursuits. Despite the fact that this story is set in the American south, cast member Robyn Foley said this play really struck a chord with northern audiences the last time it was performed at the Letkemann Theatre back in November 2011. In fact, it left such a big impression that the people behind the Manitoba Winter Games requested this play specifically to help raise money for their big upcoming sporting event. “There will be moments where the crowd will definitely laugh and they will definitely tear up,” said Foley, who portrays the bubbly and optimistic character Jeri. “This play offers a little bit of something for everyone and I think that’s why it’s such a fan favourite.” Foley went on to say

February 17, Karl Laubman of UCN will be presenting on

Land ecology and stewardship from an Aboriginal perspective 10 a.m. to noon on Saturday, February 17 at the Boreal Discovery Centre. Tea and bannock will be served. Fee is $20 per person. Register through bcarlson@ucn.ca

Thompson Citizen photo by Kyle Darbyson The cast of The Dixie Swim Club runs through their lines during a rehearsal at the Letkemann Theatre on Feb. 7. From left to right: Robyn Foley, Angela Wolfe, Shannon Ethier, Amanda Fulton and Serena Puranen. that the play is worth seeing even if someone is familiar with their 2011 performance, since this 2018 production has been injected with a number of new cast members that throw the story in a completely different light. “They put their own spin, their own interpretations on characters, and newer and different relationships have been built,” she said. “This one is a different play with a different vibe to it, and I think the crowd will be pleasantly surprised with all the little changes that have happened.” This upcoming production of The Dixie Swim Club also represents an important milestone for Donna Wilson, since the 2011 production marked her first turn as a stage director.

FIRST

HURRY! ENDS FEB 28TH.

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Today, Wilson is much more confident in her abilities to work with actors and knows how to get the best performance out of them. “My approach is different than a lot of directors,” she said. “I let the actors take the characters how they see it and then when we get to the last couple weeks of rehearsal I’ll try and tweak a few things.” This method was on full display during the cast’s Feb. 7 rehearsal at the Letkemann Theatre, where the five cast members ran through their lines while Wilson offered tips and advice from the audience. Once the rehearsal wrapped up later that evening, several members of the cast briefly chatted with the Thompson Cit-

izen about their expectations for the upcoming show. Despite being a veteran performer, Shannon Ethier, who plays the levelheaded, former swim team captain Sheree, said she still gets a little anxious before a big show. “I traditionally get really nervous 10–20 minutes before we go on stage. But once I say a few words and realize everything hasn’t completely fallen out of my head, then it’s OK after that.” In his role as producer, Wally Itson is fully confident in the cast’s ability to pull together a compelling production, since they’ve been rehearsing since the spring and are fully committed to their performances. “It’s well done and we’re fortunate to have a

number of good actors in the community that enjoy doing this.” This year’s performance of The Dixie Swim Club is set to take place Feb. 23 at the Letkemann Theatre at 7 p.m., and will be followed up by a matinee performance at 2 p.m. the following day. Half the funds from these two performances will go towards the Manitoba Winter Games, while the remaining half will be picked up by the Thompson Playhouse. Tickets are available for purchase at the Quality Inn and Suites, both Gas Bar Co-op locations and through the Manitoba Winter Games. For more ticket information, please contact Donna Wilson at donnajoywilson@gmail.com.

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Wednesday, February 14, 2018

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News

Province raises public school funding 0.5 per cent for 2018-19 school year BY IAN GRAHAM EDITOR@THOMPSONCITIZEN.NET

Public school funding will go up 0.5 per cent to $1.323 billion in the 2018-19 school year, an increase of $6.6 million from the 2017-18 funding level of about $1.316 billion, Education and Training Minister Ian Wishart announced Feb. 8. School divisions were directed to limit any local property education tax increases to two per cent and the government also reduced existing administrative cost caps by 15 per cent effective July 1 of this year. Those costs include boards of trustees, superintendents’ and secretary-treasurers’ departments budgets, which the province says have increased by $5.6 million or nine per cent in the past three years. “We continue to provide significant funding to give students the best education possible while we carefully steer Manitoba back onto a responsible fiscal track,” said Wishart in a press release. “When school divisions create their budgets for the year

ahead, we expect them to manage their expenditures accordingly. This means making decisions that best suit students’ needs, and consider the impact on local ratepayers and Manitoba taxpayers.” NDP education critic Matt Wiebe said in a statement emailed to media that the budget increase was the lowest in 18 years and doesn’t even keep pace with enrolment growth. “What the government announced today is a de facto cut in the schools and classrooms that we rely on to educate the future leaders of our province,” said Wiebe, calling the announcement evidence that Premier Brian Pallister’s government is only focused on the bottom line. The reduction in the administration costs cap likely won’t impact the School District of Mystery Lake (SDML) much, said secretary-treasurer Kelly Knott in an email to the Thompson Citizen. The limit for northern divisions was five per cent and will drop to 4.25 per cent in 2018-19. At the

AUTOMATED COLLECTION MON

FEB/MAR 2018

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3 4 5 1 2 19 20 21 22 23 x 3 4 5 1 26 27 28 1 2 2 3 4 5 1 5 6 7 8 9 2 3 4 5 1 • 1 Westwood • 2 Burntwood • 3 Riverside/Deerwood • 4 Eastwood • 5 Juniper/Southwood/BTC The automated carts must be placed along your curb no later than 8 am on the day of scheduled pickup AT LEAST one metre apart from other cart/objects. No Parking on residential streets between the hours of 8 am and 4:30 pm during Garbage/Recycle days for that area. Example: if it is Westwood’s Garbage/Recycle day there is to be no parking on the residential streets in the Westwood Area. This is to aid in the safety for both the residents of Thompson as well as City crews. Vehicles found parked on the streets will be ticketed.

THOMPSON RECYCLING CENTRE The Thompson Recycling Centre is looking for individuals interested in serving on the TRC Board of Directors. Experience in waste management, environmental or financial fields and/or grant writing would be an asset, but not necessary. Expressions of interest can be sent to thompsonrecycleboard@gmail.com.

For more information applicants can call Jeff Fountain at 204-307-3276.

end of last school year, the budget for administration costs was 4.18 per cent of the total and for the 2017-18 school year it is projected to be 4.39 per cent. The government also announced that it intends to change collective bargaining to a provincewide system, rather than having all of the 38 districts negotiate with their local teachers’ associations individually. “We want to put teachers back in the classroom, where they want to be and where students need them most, instead of being at the bargaining table,” said Wishart. “We want to give trustees more time to focus on the quality of learning for students and free up resources currently tied up by negotiations.” Wiebe said “heavyhanded changes to the collective bargaining process are disrespectful.” Manitoba Teachers’ Society president Norm Gould, who was in Thompson for a regional meeting Feb. 6, said on the society’s website that a 0.5 per cent increase was equivalent to a 1.5

per cent funding drop because it lags behind the pace of inflation. “This is a huge disappointment, a 1.5 percent cut,” said Gould. “Teachers are facing large increases in student enrolment, a growing influx of refugee and newcomer students, chronic – and I mean chronic – child poverty and more special needs kids than ever, and this is what government thinks our students are worth? This is the lowest funding in decades and sits at less than a third of the rate of inflation. It’s definitely not a proud moment for this government.” Wishart said the Progressive Conservative government’s Public Services Sustainability Act, which has been passed but not yet proclaimed, with its three- to fouryear wage freeze for public sector employees, will help school divisions maintain services while keeping property tax increases down. The Manitoba Teachers Society is challenging the Public Services Sustainability Act in court, saying it infringes on teachers’ col-

lective bargaining rights. The education minister said limiting administrative costs further protects front line services and that school divisions should have no trouble complying. “Budgets show all divisions were below their respective caps in the past three years, and many spent well below the limit on administration,” said Wishart. The government plans to phase out Tax Incentive Grants (TIG), which assisted school divisions that held the line on taxes, over the next six years, but says it will ensure divisions receive no less than 98 per cent of last year’s operating and TIG support combined. Wiebe contended that phasing out TIGs “will leave a $61 million hold in the budgets of school divisions at the end of six years.” SDML teachers have one of the best contracts in the province. Class 5 teachers earned a minimum of $64,033 and a maximum of $99,435 as of this year, both the highest in the province, with the maximum more

than $3,000 higher than in the second-ranked division in Flin Flon. They can also accumulate a maximum of 200 sick days (the second-best division in Manitoba allows up to 145 days) and receive three days of personal leave days per year, compared to two or fewer in the other 37 school divisions. They also get 15 family medical leave days per year, more than twice as many as in Turtle Mountain, where the maximum is seven. Certified substitute teachers in Thompson receive $205.07 per day, while in Winnipeg the rate is $196.65. There were 235 full-time equivalent teaching positions in Thompson as of Sept. 2017 and the fulltime student enrolment was 2,991, for a studentto-teacher ratio of 12.7, lower than in 30 of the 38 school divisions. SDML’s public budget meeting for next school year will be Feb. 26 at 7 p.m. at the school board office. School divisions have to submit their 2018-19 budgets to the province by March 10, Gould said.

CITY OF THOMPSON UNDER THE AUTHORITY OF THE PLANNING ACT NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING: ZONING BY-LAW AMENDMENT – 1962-2018 On the date, time and location shown below, a PUBLIC HEARING will be held to receive representations from any persons who wish to make them in respect to the following matter: APPLICATION: ZONING BY-LAW AMENDMENT City of Thompson Zoning By-Law 1891-2012 Location: Council Chambers, City Hall 226 Mystery Lake Road, Thompson, MB. DATE & TIME: February 26, 2018 at 7:00 p.m. OWNER/APPLICANT: City of Thompson PROPOSAL: To amend as follows: THAT Use Class Definitions Section 6.1.113. (pg. 90) “Data Centres and Server Farms means a structure that is intended for data computation services and activities” added as a definition; THAT “Data Centres and Server Farms” be added as a “Permitted Use” in the Industrial Light Zone (IL; Section 3.15, Pg. 44), in Figure 56 “Principal Uses” (between “Crematorium” & “Fleet Services”); THAT “Data Centres and Server Farms” as a “Permitted Use” in the Industrial Heavy Zone (IH; Section 3.16, Pg. 47), in Figure 60 “Principal Uses” (between “Crematorium” & “Fleet Services”); AREA AFFECTED: Industrial Light Zone (IL) and Industrial Heavy Zone (IH) FOR INFORMATION Anthony McInnis, Director of Development Services CONTACT: City of Thompson 204-677-7922 amcinnis@thompson.ca City Hall, 226 Mystery Lake Road, Thompson, MB A copy of the above noted proposal and supporting material may be inspected at location noted above during normal office hours, Monday to Friday. Copies may be made and extracts taken therefrom, upon request.

THE CITY OF THOMPSON REMINDS RESIDENTS THAT

SCHOOL ZONE SPEED LIMITS ARE NOW IN EFFECT! Speed in school zones is limited to 30km/hour in designated areas between 8 am and 5 pm from Monday to Friday. Designated school zones are present in front of all elementary schools in Thompson.


Opinion Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Thompson Citizen 141 Commercial Place, Box 887 Thompson, Manitoba R8N 1T1 Phone: 677-4534 • Fax 677-3681 e-mail: generalmanager@thompsoncitizen.net

www.thompsoncitizen.net

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Letters to the Editor

An incorrect and misleading letter To the Editor: This letter to the editor is to address incorrect information, presented in a misleading and inflammatory manner, on two long-term not-for-profit organizations – Men are Part of the Solution (MAPS) and the Thompson Regional Humane Society (TRHS). The letter, titled “So, you want to be the next mayor or a councillor?” (published Feb. 7 in the Thompson Citizen) by Mr. Mark Matiasek writes “And funding Men Are Part of the Solution (MAPS) and the humane society that Mr. Sawh is connected to have added to municipal expenses at a time when city employees were not to be paid for 10 days.” My interpretation of what Mr. Matiasek wrote is that the City of Thompson (the city) recently funded MAPS and the TRHS, and these commitments are putting additional burden on the city’s finances and are part of the reason why the city is asking their employees to take 10 unpaid work days. For the record, MAPS has never been nor is it currently funded by the city. MAPS provides fee for service to earn its revenue. Its audited statements outline these revenue sources and are provided at its annual general meeting that is open to the public. MAPS provides counselling services for men with anger and stress issues, with a focus on domestic violence on a service delivery contract with the Province of Manitoba. For an individual like myself that experienced and witnessed violence in the home as a child, I am very passionate about the mandate of MAPS. It also provides transitional housing, in an alcohol- and drug-free environment, to men who are recovering from addiction issues. The clients pay for their own rent or it is paid through the province’s social assistance program. Once again, for an individual like myself who lost one of his parents from their alcohol addictions, I am very proud to be associated with this organization. MAPS also manages the debris cleanup program for Manitoba Hydro in the summer time as it allows for men at the transitional housing to get some work experience and earn some income. Hydro fully pays for this by releasing the funds, as outlined in its contract with MAPS, to the city, who in turn forward the payment to MAPS for its service. The city is paid an administration fee and actually earns money from administrating the Hydro funds. The payments that the TRHS gets from the city is based on a long-term fee-for-service contract for services it provides to the Animal Control Program (ACP) that has been in place since 2006. It is not a grant or a subsidy. Prior to 2006, the city operated its own pound and was at times euthanizing over 100 unwanted cats and dogs a year. The pound was a substandard facility, where many animals caught deadly diseases like parvo, and was in need of costly upgrades. Rather than spending money for upgrades to the pound, the city decided to rent out space at the TRHS’s building to house animals picked up by the ACP. It later expanded its contract to also pay for cleaning services for the city’s kennels that they rent as well as for care and supervision of animals brought in under the ACP. This partnership has resulted in a superior services for these animals with annual euthanasia rates averaging less than five a year due to greater exposure for adoption or relocation to “no kill” shelters. This has resulted in well over 1,000 animals under the ACP not having to be euthanized. Public organizations like MAPS and the TRHS should be criticized if they are not transparent, accountable or not fulfilling their mandate. In this case, the criticism was based on incorrect information, written in an attempt to make a political statement by trying to tie them to, and by taking advantage of, unfortunate events occurring in our city. It is unfair, it is offensive, it is inflammatory, and insults not only these organizations but their staff, their volunteer boards that govern them, and the volunteers that provides countless hours in their name. Mr. Matiasek had also written in his letter that, “All voters must do their homework…” This is excellent advice that he should also take before he writes another letter. Oswald Sawh President, Men Are Part of the Solution Board chair, Thompson Regional Humane Society

Editorial

Lower funding, limits on tax increases a tough combination school district

A

s bad as it is to be the City of Thompson when it comes to the matter of grant-in-lieu negotiations, such as they are, with Vale, it must be even worse to be the School District of Mystery Lake. Sure, the share of property tax and grantin-lieu funding that they have been receiving for the past dozen or so years only accounts for about 20 per cent of their annual revenues, with the remaining 80 per cent coming from the provincial government, but they are subject to all sorts of uncertainty and strictures from both the province and the city, which must make budget-building that much more of a hassle. For more than a decade, the school district has received about 28 per cent of the grant-in-lieu, which was $6 million total per year for the past

five years and slightly higher for several years before that. But with Vale having decided, on account of the scaling back of operations in Thompson this year, that it would be reducing the amount it pays instead of property taxes by 20 per cent this year, which means that, if the pie was split between the city, school district and the Local Government District (LGD) of Mystery Lake the same way as it has been recently, SDML’s funding revenues would go down by a little less than one per cent this year. Since overall school funding announced by the provincial government Feb. 8 is going up 0.5 per cent, some of that decrease will be mitigated. But they would still have had less money than before. Thing is, as Mayor Dennis Fenske pointed out during a council meeting last month, it’s

up to the city to decide how much of the grantin-lieu funding goes to them and how much to the LGD and school district and it wouldn’t be unreasonable to surmise, since he found it necessary to mention it, that the school district might be getting a smaller percentage, which would equate to a greater drop in revenues, not only this year, but in subsequent years when, even if the percentage split remained the same, SDML would be receiving only half of what it did in 2017. At the same time, the province will be phasing out Tax Incentive Grants over the next six years, which represented more than $1 million of revenue for SDML in the 201617 school year. Any way you slice it, the school district is likely to have less money in coming years, when it may also have to deal with declin-

ing enrolment and associated funding drops. The school district does have the ability to levy taxes on properties in Thompson to help make up the difference in what it receives from the province and its share of the grantin-lieu and the actual operating budget, but all school divisions have been asked to limit any such increases to two per cent or less for the 2018-19 school year. So, between revenues going down and the ability to increase revenues being limited, SDML has some tough choices to make in the future, which is probably why trustee Ryan Land brought up the idea of reducing the number of board members at a recent meeting. Exactly how tough the decisions will be for the next school year won’t be known until the board’s public budget presentation on Feb. 26.

Your Thompson Citizen News Team

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Page 5

Arts&Entertainment

Festival of the Arts gearing up for 52nd year in Thompson BY KYLE DARBYSON KYLE@THOMPSONCITIZEN.NET

Throughout the months of April and May, one of Thompson’s oldest annual events will return to provide young artists with a large platform to showcase their imagination and creativity. Just like in previous years, the organizers of the Thompson Festival of the Arts are going out of their way to highlight as many artistic disciplines as they can in 2018, including dance, visual arts, piano/ strings/instrumental and vocal/choral/speech. According to event organizer Terry-Lyn Gagnon, last year’s festival featured around 400 students and they expect that number to grow this upcoming spring. Not only do these participants get a chance to win awards and scholarships, but the festival will also feature a number of professional artists who will serve as judges and provide invaluable insight for this new generation of creators. This year’s line-up of adjudicators features an impressive list of local talent, including nature photographer Hugh Fraser and violinist Steven

Tsitsos, who has produced two albums and performed at sold-out recitals in North America and Europe. Despite the pedigree of these adjudicators, Gagnon said this mentoring process aims to be as accessible as possible, especially to those who might just be starting out in their individual discipline. “It’s a good starter point,” she said. “If the kid has never danced or done something like that, it’s still low-key enough that they’re just not just thrown to the wolves.” Gagnon has witnessed this kind of constructive critique first-hand, since her daughter Hannah has been dancing in the Festival of the Arts for the last eight years. “It’s like any dance recital we go to, but it’s another avenue for her to develop her skills, to be told by somebody different what she could improve on.” The 2018 Thompson Festival of the Arts is set kick-off with a showcase of piano/strings/instrumentals on April 5–6, and will be followed up by events for dance (April 6–7), vocal/choral/speech (May 2–4) and finally visual arts

Thompson Citizen photo by Kyle Darbyson Last year’s visual arts showcase for the Thompson Festival of the Arts featured over 200 pieces of artwork from local students. (May 14–18). The winners from each category will be revealed at a highlights concert May 29, where they will

get the chance to showoff their craft in front of a larger audience. Registration for this year’s event is taking

place Feb. 24 at School District of Mystery Lake headquarters on 408 Thompson Drive. For more information

Cops find wanted man carrying drugs outside Norway House bar Norway House RCMP seized cocaine and marijuana from a 23-yearold man outside a bar Feb. 2. Officers arriving at the bar to do a foot patrol just before midnight saw a man wanted by police when they got out of their vehicle. He was placed under arrest and officers found 21 grams of crack cocaine, four grams of cocaine and 28 grams of marijuana during their subsequent search. Malcolm William McLeod of Norway House remains in custody and faces numerous drug-related and other Criminal Code charges.

on this year’s Thompson Festival of the Arts, please contact Jolene Brown at jbrown@mysterynet. mb.ca.

If your second fridge or freezer is over 15 years old and working, it’s time to retire it. HELP HE LP THE EN ENVI VIRO VI RONM RO NMEN NM ENT EN T Keeping appliances out of landfills.

SAVE SA VE MON ONEY EY Save up to $100 PER YEAR and get $50 for each one we collect!

SAVE TIME All you have to do is make the call.

FRKE-UEP Thompson Citizen photo courtesy of RCMP Norway House RCMP seized cocaine and marijuana from a man outside a bar Feb. 2.

PIC

UL A H L L ’ E W ! IT AWAY

Register online for your FREE pick-up today.

Advertise today! Call 204-677-453 4

RETIREMYFRIDGE.CA or call 1-8-555-FRIDGE (1-855-537-4343) Some conditions apply. Available in accessible formats upon request.

*Manitoba Hydro is a licensee of the Trademark and Official Mark.


Page 6

www.thompsoncitizen.net

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

News

Ten Thousand Villages donates to Wapanohk breakfast program A cheque for $1,535 was recently presented to the Wapanohk breakfast program on behalf of the Ten Thousand Villages Festival Sale. This annual sale, featuring fair trade items from other countries, was hosted by the Lutheran-United Church in November 2017. The sale of these items provides a fair, stable income for the crafters. Sale co-ordinators Kate Roth and Greg Pelchat were joined by former Thompsonites Dale and Bea Shantz to run the sale from Nov. 13-18. The cheque represents 10 per cent of the sale’s profits which are donated back to the host community with special preference to youth and children. Wapanohk Community School principal Kathleen Kelson, left, is shown accepting the cheque from Heather Todd, council chair at Lutheran-United Church. They are joined by a group of children enjoying one of the many hearty, healthy breakfasts provided by the breakfast program. Thank you to the community for continuing to support Ten Thousand Villages! Thompson Citizen photo courtesy of Heather Todd

Say it in living colour

DRIVE INTO THE NEW YEAR BONUS EVENT

The world isn’t black and white, so

WHY IS YOUR AD? 2018 TERRAIN

2018 ACADIA

2018 SIERRA 1500

EXTENDED TO FEBRUARY 28

2018 GMC TERRAIN SLE FWD

$

159 @ 0.9

% FOR

BI-WEEKLY

LEASE RATE

48 MONTHS

2018 GMC SIERRA 1500 DOUBLE CAB ELEVATION EDITION

$

195 @ 2.5

% FOR

BI-WEEKLY

LEASE RATE

48 MONTHS

2018 GMC ACADIA SLE-1 AWD

$

189 @ 0.9

% FOR

BI-WEEKLY

LEASE RATE

48 MONTHS

WITH $1,850 DOWN PAYMENT. BASED ON A LEASE PURCHASE PRICE OF $30,740† (INCLUDES FREIGHT, PDI, $1,500 COMBINED LEASE CASH*)

WITH $4,100 DOWN PAYMENT. BASED ON A LEASE PURCHASE PRICE OF $41,450† (INCLUDES FREIGHT, PDI, $2,000 COMBINED LEASE CASH*)

WITH $3,150 DOWN PAYMENT. BASED ON A LEASE PURCHASE PRICE OF $37,440† (INCLUDES FREIGHT, PDI, $1,500 COMBINED LEASE CASH*)

• STANDARD 9-SPEED AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION

• 20-INCH BLACK PAINTED ALUMINUM WHEELS

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• KEYLESS OPEN AND START

• NEXT GEN GMC INFOTAINMENT SYSTEM3 WITH 4 USB PORTS4

• AUTOTRACTM TRANSFER CASE (4WD MODELS)

• ONSTAR® 4G LTE WITH BUILT-IN WI-FI® HOTSPOT2 (3GB/3-MONTH TRIAL) + ONSTAR® BASIC PLAN5 FOR 5 YEARS

N HTSA 5-St ar O ve rall Ve hic l e S c o re1

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AVAILABLE ONSTAR ® 4G LTE WITH BUILT-IN WI-FI ® HOTSPOT 2 (3 GB/3 MONTH TRIAL)

GMCOFFERS.CA

ON NOW AT YOUR PRAIRIE GMC DEALERS. GMCOffers.ca 1-800-GM-DRIVE. GMC is a brand of General Motors of Canada. Offers apply to the purchase of a 2018 GMC Terrain SLE FWD, Sierra 1500 Double Cab Elevation Edition and Acadia SLE-1 AWD equipped as described. Offers apply to qualified retail customers in the Prairie GMC Dealer Marketing Association area only on select vehicles delivered from February 1 to February 28, 2018. * Limited time lease offer valid to eligible lessees in Canada who obtained credit approval and enter into a lease agreement with GM Financial, and who accept delivery from February 1 – February 28, 2018 of a select new or demonstrator 2018 MY GMC vehicle. 2018 MY vehicle not eligible for this offer is Canyon 2SA. Total Lease Value consists of $1,500 manufacturer-to-dealer New Year Lease Bonus (tax-exclusive), the GM Card Application Bonus (tax-inclusive), and may include manufacturer-to-dealer lease cash (tax exclusive) (“Lease Cash”). Lease Cash applies to select vehicles and value depends on model purchased: $1,500 on new 2018 Acadia, Terrain; $2,000 on new 2018 Sierra LD Double Cab. GM Card Application Bonus applies to individuals who apply for a Scotiabank® GM® Visa* Card or current Scotiabank® GM® Visa* Cardholders. GM Card Application Bonus credit value depends on model purchased: $500 GM Card Bonus on new 2018 Terrain; $750 GM Card Bonus on new 2018 Acadia; $1,000 GM Card Bonus on new 2018 Sierra LD. As part of the transaction, dealer may request documentation and contact General Motors of Canada Company (GM Canada) to verify eligibility. This offer may not be redeemed for cash and may not be combined with certain other consumer incentives. Conditions and limitations apply. Void where prohibited. See Dealer for full program details. GM Canada reserves the right to amend or terminate offers for any reason in whole or in part at any time without prior notice. † Lease based on suggested retail price of $30,740/$41,450/$37,440 includes $0/$500/$0 manufacturer-to-dealer lease cash (tax exclusive) and a manufacturer-to-dealer $1,500 New Year Lease Bonus (tax exclusive) towards the lease for an eligible new 2018 GMC Terrain SLE FWD/Sierra 1500 Double Cab Elevation Edition/Acadia SLE-1 AWD at participating dealers. Bi-weekly payment is $159/$195/$189 for 48 months at 0.9%/2.5%/0.9% interest rate on approved credit to qualified retail customers by GM Financial. $1,850/$4,100/$3,150 down payment is required. Total obligation is $18,314/$24,356/$22,782 plus applicable taxes. Taxes, license, insurance, registration and applicable fees, levies, duties and, except in Quebec, dealer fees (all of which may vary by dealer and region) are extra. Option to purchase at lease end is $13,218/$19,967/$15,576. See dealer for details. Discounts vary by model. Dealer may sell for less. Limited time offer which may not be combined with certain other offers. General Motors of Canada Company may modify, extend or terminate offers in whole or in part at any time without notice. Conditions and limitations apply. Offers may not be redeemed for cash and may not combined with certain other consumer incentives. ®Registered trademark of The Bank of Nova Scotia. 1 U.S. Government 5-Star Safety Ratings are part of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s (NHTSA’s) New Car Assessment Program (www.SaferCar.gov). 2 Visit onstar.ca for coverage maps, details and system limitations. Services and capabilities vary by model and conditions as well as geographical and technical restrictions. Terms and conditions apply. OnStar ® acts as a link to existing emergency service providers. Not all vehicles may transmit all crash data. After the trial period, an active OnStar ® service plan is required. OnStar ® 4G LTE: Services and connectivity vary by model and conditions as well as geographical and technical restrictions. Requires active OnStar ® service and data plan. Data plans provided by AT&T or its local service provider. Accessory Power must be active to use the Wi-Fi® hotspot. 3 Full functionality requires compatible Bluetooth and smartphone, and USB connectivity for some devices. 4 Not compatible with all devices. 5 The OnStar ® Basic Plan is available on eligible new and pre-owned vehicles equipped with OnStar ® 4G LTE hardware for 5 years or the remaining term. The Basic Plan is transferable to subsequent owners for the remaining term. It includes the monthly Diagnostics Report emails (capabilities vary by model), Dealer Maintenance Notification, access to select vehicle mobile app features and more. Your vehicle must have been compatible with the vehicle’s mobile app prior to the OnStar ® 4G LTE hardware upgrade, if applicable. This plan does not include emergency, security or navigation services. These and other services require a paid or Add-On Plan. Visit onstar.ca for vehicle availability, coverage maps, details and system limitations. Available 4G LTE with Wi-Fi® hotspot requires WPA2-compatible mobile device and data plan. Data plans are provided by AT&T TM or its local service provider. 6 Whichever comes first. Limit of four complimentary Lube-Oil-Filter services in total. Fluid top-offs, inspections, tire rotations, wheel alignments and balancing etc., are not covered. Conditions and limitations apply. See your dealer for details. 7 Whichever comes first, fully transferable. Conditions and limitations apply. See dealer for complete details.

CALL US 204 677-4534

Small

ads work you’re reading one now!


Wednesday, February 14, 2018

www.thompsoncitizen.net

Page 7

Sports

Mixed bonspiel winners

Mortgage Sale Ad The building and land known as 203 Wolf Street, Thompson MB as described in Certificate of Title No. 2448490/3 will be sold at an auction, by licensed auctioneer, on Tuesday, the 6th day of March, 2018 at 10:00 am at 31 Elk Bay, Thompson MB. The vendor is informed that the property consists of side split design house, approx 1620 SF, built in 1972, 4 bedrooms, 1 4-pc bathroom, living room, kitchen, dining room, family room, lot 60 x 125 ft. Prior Encumbrances: Caveats 33795N/3, 33796N/3, 41071N/3 Taxes: Paid to December 31, 2016 (2017 arrears approx $7 in Nov 2017) Terms: Deposit of $47,000.00 in form of bank draft, certified cheque and/or cash and the balance according to conditions to be announced at the sale payable to Pitblado LLP. Reserve Bid to be announced prior to the auction sale. Please note the property is sold “as is where is” in accordance with Auction Sale Conditions. Contact: PITBLADO LLP, Barristers/Solicitors 2500 - 360 Main Street, Winnipeg, MB R3C 4H6 Attn: Donna Riedel for Robert B. Giesbrecht Phone: (204) 956-0560

1-BEDROOM STARTING AT $940 2-BEDROOM STARTING AT $1100 • Onsite security 7 days a week • Fully equipped fitness room • Smart card onsite laundry • All utilities included

CALL 204-939-0205 OR 204-677-9880 forestviewleasing2017@gmail.com

2017 4295*

$

Thompson Citizen photos courtesy of the Burntwood Curling Club The Burntwood Curling Club’s mixed open bonspiel was held Jan. 26-27. The team of Sam Antila, Courtney Reeves, Alex Sutherland and Pam Antila (top left) defeated Kevin Parsons’s team in the final to win the A event, while the B event title went to Lyle Saskowski, Donna Chene, Steve Allen and Laurel Saskowski (top right), who defeated Darwin Graham’s team in the final. Grant Brown, Tami Bodnaryk, Guy Bodnaryk and Kamry Brown (bottom left) won the C event with a win over Troy Miller’s foursome in the final, while Aaron Watt, Natalie Dias, Tim Ryan and Leanne Regehr (bottom right)beat Jennifer Thackeray’s team to win the D even final. Twelve teams in total competed in the bonspiel, which began Friday evening and wrapped up the next night, with a post-bonspiel banquet featuring entertainment by Vancouver comedian Brett Martin. The Burntwood Curling Club’s ladies’ bonspiel is coming up Feb. 23-25 and the men’s bonspiel will be held March 16-18.

Babies Did you welcome a new bundle of joy in 2017?

If you became a proud parent, grandparent, uncle or aunt send us a picture and a few details (max 50 words) and we will publish them for all to see!

IN FULL COLOUR

This special feature will be published on February 21 or 23. Deadline to submit materials is February 14 by 3:00 pm

Call 204-677-4534

or email classified@thompsoncitizen.net

Welcome to our world ANNA LISA SMITH! Born October 4, 2017. We are so blessed to have you in our lives! Love and hugs and kisses, Mommy and Daddy


Page 8

www.thompsoncitizen.net

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Sports

45

Thompson RCMP Drug Tip Line 204-677-6995

Celebra

ting 45 years

LIMA Janitorial s e r v i c e

l i m i t e d

“Complete Janitorial & Carpet Cleaning Professionals” • Property Management Services • Air Purifiers, Dehumidifiers, Blowers & Ozonators • IICRC Restoration Certified

204-677-4327

King Miners win three straight to advance to midget AA finals BY IAN GRAHAM EDITOR@THOMPSONCITIZEN.NET

The midget AA Thompson King Miners will have a chance to settle once and for all whether they or the Cross Lake Islanders are the number one team in the league later this month after knocking off the Norway House North Stars in three straight games to advance to the league finals. Cross Lake beat Norway House in the final regular season game to edge Thompson by one point in league standings and earn a bye to the best-of-fi ve fi nals series, which begins Feb. 23 in Cross Lake. The King Miners secured their berth in that series by outscoring the North Stars 6-0 in the final period of game three of their best-offive playoff series Feb. 11 at the C.A. Nesbitt Arena in Thompson, winning 9-3. Chase Gurniak notched the deciding goal with just under five minutes left in Sunday’s game. Drayden Spence

then completed a hat trick 12 seconds later for a two-goal lead. Thompson scored four more times in the last 2:01 of the game, with Kale Mayor getting one and Brendan McKay scoring a natural hat trick in just over 30 seconds with the outcome already decided. Spence had opened the scoring with two goals in the first five minutes of the opening frame, but the North Stars’ Ronald Muskego matched him with back-to-back goals late in the first period. Gurniak’s first goal of the game made it 3-2 in the second period but Kashtin Ducharme tied it up again. Edward McLeod stopped 24 shots in net for Norway House while Skylar Szocs only had to make 10 saves to secure the win for the King Miners. Game two was closer, with the King Miners prevailing 5-2 on the strength of two goals by Harley Horning and one each by Gurniak, Mayor and Spence. Ri-

Thompson Citizen photo by Ian Graham Drayden Spence scored seven goals in three games, including two hat tricks, as the midget AA Thompson King Miners beat the Norway House North Stars three games to none in a best-of-five playoff series. Thompson advances to the league playoff finals against Cross Lake Islanders later this month. chard Ducharme and Henry Muchikekwanape had the goals for the North Stars, who were outshot 32-30 and got 27 saves from McLeod,

with Szocs stopping 28 in Thompson’s net. The series opened Friday with a 7-1 King Miners win. Spence had a hat trick in that

game as well, with Thompson’s other goals coming from Gurniak, Horning, Cody Hale and Murphy Krentz. Norway House actually outshot

Thompson in the game, but Szocs stopped 35 shots compared to 19 for McLeod. Muchikekwanape had the only goal for the North Stars.

Northstars close road schedule with three big losses BY IAN GRAHAM EDITOR@THOMPSONCITIZEN.NET

The Norman Northstars will be glad that the road portion of their 2017-18 Manitoba AAA Midget Hockey League season is over now, after having been outscored 33-2 in three away games Feb. 9-11. Mikey Baron had the only goal for the Northstars in a 20-1 loss to the Winnipeg Wild Feb. 9, but by the time he notched it at almost exactly the midway point of the first period, his team was already behind by four goals. The Wild added four more goals before the first intermission, five in the second period and seven in the third to hand the Northstars their most lopsided defeat of the season. Seven Winnipeg players had multiple goals in the game, including Kyle Bettens and Mitchell Joss with hat tricks

and Tristan Thompson, Zachary Falck, Reese Belton, Eric Fawkes and Luc Benedictson with two each. Matthew Shatsky, Jackson Klewchuk, Marco Esteves and Mikol Sartor all added singles. Northstars’ netminder Braedin Melsted, pulled with more than three minutes left in the opening frame after allowing seven goals, was tagged with the loss while Keian Weseeen stopped 41 of 54 shots in relief. Shots in the game were 74-19 for the Wild, who managed more shots in each period than the Northstars did in the entire game. The Northstars’ defence got better the following day, but their offence didn’t as they lost 6-0 to the Central Plains Capitals. Logan Calder had a hat trick for the Caps, with Joe Courrier adding a pair

Mikey Baron, seen here at home against the Eastman Selects Feb. 2, was one of two Norman Northstars to score a goal during the team’s last road trip of the season Feb. 9-11. Thompson Citizen photo by Kyle Darbyson

and Reilly Funk the other. Melsted made 57 saves for the Northstars, who were outshot 63-19.

WINNIPEG

VS THRASHERS

The Northstars’ final road game of the season was a 7-1 loss to the Interlake Lightning Feb. 11. Mitchell Reid’s second

NORMAN

period goal, scored with his team already trailing 3-0, was the bright spot for the Northstars, who were outshot 44-27

and got 33 saves from Weseen, who played all but 2:27 of the game. Keenan McPherson, with two goals, and Dylan Fontaine, Eric Krywy, Marcus Dewey and Dan Paseschnikoff and Corey Soorsma, with one apiece, were the goal scorers for the Lightning. The Northstars are back at home for the second-last home weekend of the season this Friday and Saturday, when they’ll take on the Winnipeg Thrashers

Saturday night game is minor hockey night. All youth wearing a hockey jersey get into the game for free.

NORTHSTARS SUPPORT MUNN CUP 2018. NORTHSTARS FRIDAY, FEB 16, 7:30 PM C.A. NESBITT ARENA SATURDAY, FEB 17, 7:30 PM


Wednesday, February 14, 2018

www.thompsoncitizen.net

Page 9

CLASSIFIED@THOMPSONCITIZEN.NET

KEITH G. COLLINS LTD.

7 SELKIRK main floor office area 1990 sq ft, will sub-divide. 79 Selkirk lower level office area, 4112 sq ft. J.B Johnston Ventures Limited, call 204-679-0915 39-TFN-nb OFFICE SPACE FOR LEASE 500-5000 sq ft available. Cameron/Hoe building 83 Churchill Drive. Contact Joe Aniceto. 204-679-0490 or Neil Cameron 306477-5668. 20-tfn-nb

Pursuant to subsection 367(7) of The Municipal Act, notice is hereby given that unless the tax arrears for the designated year and costs in respect of the hereinafter described properties are paid in full to the Municipality prior to the commencement of the auction, the Municipality will on the 14th day of March, 2018, at the hour of 9:00 AM, at City of Thompson, 226 Mystery Lake Road, Thompson, MB, proceed to sell by public auction the following described properties: Roll Number

Licensed Insolvency Trustee Phone 944-0187 1-800-263-0070 46a-e-tfnb

502 • APT/TOWNHOUSE FOR RENT 1 & 2 bedroom apartments available immediately

AT THOMPSON AND BEING PARCEL A PLAN 5562 PLTO (N DIV) EXC ALL MINES, MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN 78-3 WPM - 60 COMMERCIAL PLACE

L -$247,400 B -$51,500

$120,525.17

359800

AT THOMPSON AND BEING LOT 37 BLOCK 1 PLAN 33681 PLTO IN 78-3 WPM EXC ALL MINES, MINERALS AND OTHER RESERVATIONS AS CONTAINED IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT - 1112 WOLF STREET

L -$16,600 B -$11,000

$15,239.83

361550

AT THOMPSON AND BEING LOT 2 BLOCK 3 PLAN 33681 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN 78-3 WPM - 1264 PIPE ROAD

L -$21,900

$17,902.69

361700

LOT 5 BLOCK 3 PLAN 33681 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN 78-3 WPM - 1261 PIPE ROAD

L -$20,600 B -$85,200

$18,259.11

362500

AT THOMPSON AND BEING LOT 21 BLOCK 3 PLAN 33681 PLTO IN 78-3 WPM EXC ALL MINES, MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT - 1245 PIPE ROAD

L -$21,500 B -$32,300

$16,634.40

364250

AT THOMPSON AND BEING LOT 56 BLOCK 3 PLAN 33681 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN 78-3 WPM - 1210 OSPWAGON DRIVE

L -$21,400

$22,047.74

366450

AT THOMPSON AND BEING LOT 36 BLOCK 4 PLAN 33681 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN 78-3 WPM - 1292 PIPE ROAD

L -$20,500 B -$7,000

$19,796.80

368700

AT THOMPSON AND BEING LOT 19 BLOCK 5 PLAN 33681 PLTO IN 78-3 WPM EXC ALL MINES MINERALS AND OTHER RESERVATIONS AS CONTAINED IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT - 1183 OSPWAGON DRIVE

L -$16,400 B -$18,100

$19,112.06

phone 204-677-5758 or fax 204-677-5803

Church Services in Thompson

ST. JAMES ANGLICAN 10 Caribou 677-4652 11 am Sundays ST. JOSEPH UKRAINIAN CATHOLIC 340 Juniper Drive 778-7547 ST. LAWRENCE ROMAN CATHOLIC Fr Shantha Gandamalla and Fr Guna Sekhar 114 Cree R. 677-0160 Sat. 6:30 pm & Sun. 10 am THOMPSON PENTECOSTAL Pastor Dan Murphy Youth Pastor Colton Murphy Children’s Pastor Karen O’Gilvie 126 Goldeye 677-3435 thompsonchurch.ca Sunday school 9:45 am, coffee time at 10:40 am Church Service at 11:00 am ST. ANDREWS PRESBYTERIAN 249 Thompson Drive 204-677-2799 Pastor Murat Kuntel Regular Hours: 11 am Church service CHRISTIAN CENTRE FELLOWSHIP 328 Thompson Dr. N. 677-4457 Sun. School 9:45 am • service 11 am FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 456 Westwood Dr. S. Ph. 778-8037 service @ 11 am LUTHERAN - UNITED CHURCH OF THOMPSON Congregations worship at 52 Caribou Rd. at 10:30 am Sundays. Phone 204-677-4495

LIVING WATER CHURCH Pastor Archie McKay Ph: 677-2469 Sunday services @ 7:00pm. LIGHT OF THE NORTH CHURCH 32 Nelson Road GATEWAY BIBLE BAPTIST CHURCH Pastor Chris Lowe 159 Cree Rd 204-677-3000 Sunday school 10:00 am AM Service at 11, PM Service at 7 Prayer meeting - Wednesday 7 pm THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS everyone welcome Sundays at 10 AM 83 Copper Rd For more information, church tours or home visits call the missionaries at 204-939-4382 or visit Mormon.org THE SALVATION ARMY Thompson Corps (Church) 305 Thompson Dr. - 204-677-3658 Worship services every Sunday at 11 am BURNTWOOD BAPTIST CHURCH 39 Beaver Crescent Thompson MB R8N 1C5 204-778-4494 Pastor Lee Pickett Sunday morning service 11:15 a.m Sunday evening service 7:00 p.m Wednesday prayer meeting 7:00 p.m

Faculty of Social Work

Northern Social Work Program The University of Manitoba, Faculty of Social Work at Thompson is now accepting applications for the Northern Social Work Program. The deadline for submitting applications is March 1, 2018. The program is scheduled to begin September 2018. Students may complete the Northern Social Work Program as a full-time or part-time student.

Amount of Arrears & Costs for Which Property May be Offered for Sale

Assessed Value

5808

9 - 35 Ashberry Place For applications

Description

OR PHONE 204-677-4534

LET OUR FAMILY HELP YOUR FAMILY Understand the options available to assist with your financial situation (Arrangements with Creditors or Bankruptcy) FREE CONSULTATION

NEED TO ADVERTISE?

STRUGGLING WITH DEBT?

NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION SALE OF LANDS FOR ARREARS OF TAXES CITY OF THOMPSON

510 • RETAIL/ OFFICE SPACE

CLASSIFIED@THOMPSONCITIZEN.NET

201 • SERVICES

The tax sale is subject to the following terms and conditions with respect to each property: • The purchaser of the property will be responsible for any property taxes not yet due. • The Municipality may exercise its right to set a reserve bid in the amount of the arrears and costs. • If the purchaser intends to bid by proxy, a letter of authorization form must be presented prior to the start of the auction. • The Municipality makes no representations or warranties whatsoever concerning the properties being sold. • The successful purchaser must, at the time of the sale, make payment in cash, certi¿ed cheque or bank draft to the City of Thompson as follows: i) The full purchase price if it is $10,000 or less; OR ii) If the purchase price is greater than $10,000, the purchaser must provide a non-refundable deposit in the amount of $10,000 and the balance of the purchase price must be paid within 20 days of the sale. • The risk for the property lies with the purchaser immediately following the auction. • The purchaser is responsible for obtaining vacant possession. • If the property is non-residential property, the purchaser must pay GST to the Municipality or, if a GST registrant, provide a GST Declaration. • The purchaser will be responsible for registering the transfer of title in the land titles of¿ce, including the registration costs.

Dated this 2nd day of February, 2018. Managed by: Jenny Krentz Chief Financial Of¿cer City of Thompson Phone: (204) 677-7934 Fax: (204) 677-7936

Need to fill a

JOB?

The program provides post-secondary education for Residents of Northern Manitoba, in particular those who have not had the opportunity due to economic and cultural reasons, lack of formal education, linguistic barriers or residence in remote areas. Relocation to Thompson will be required. Individuals can apply either under ACCESS or EXTERNAL categories. The ACCESS category is for mature students, 21 years or over, who have under 30 credit hours of university level courses. The EXTERNAL category is for regular students who have 30 credit hours or more of university level courses and are in good academic standing. For both categories, applicants must have resided in Northern Manitoba for 6 months or more prior to the application deadline or have been a long term resident of the North. For information or applications contact the Faculty of Social Work at Thompson at 204-677-1450 or No Charge Dial 1-866237-5509 or visit http://umanitoba.ca/faculties/social_work/ programs/northern/591.html

ADVERTISE with us

Call 204-677-4534


Page 10

www.thompsoncitizen.net

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Careers University College of the North (UCN) is committed to building a workforce that is representative of the populations we serve. Applications are invited from individuals who have a demonstrated interest and ability to work with Aboriginal learners and mature students. Preference will be given to Aboriginal candidates.

INDIGENOUS CURRICULUM SPECIALIST Classification: Curriculum Consultant Full-Time Regular Position Thompson or The Pas, Manitoba Competition No: 18-014 Closing Date: February 26, 2018; or until filled Please visit our website for more detailed information about UCN and this employment opportunity. At http://www.ucn.ca, select “UCN Careers”, and select from the list of positions to view. Thank you for your interest in UCN.

FOSTER CARE WORKER Thompson (866) 677.6450

(Cross Lake Office) Nikan Awasisak Agency Inc. is seeking (1) full time permanent Foster Care Worker at our Cross Lake office. A satisfactory Criminal Record Check and Child Abuse Registry Check are conditions of employment.

Post Secondary Counsellor Full Time Position Purpose of position: Under the supervision of the Director of Education & Training, the Post-Secondary Counsellor will assist in the implementation and delivery of an effective student counselling and support program.

Qualifications:

Under the direction and supervision of the Foster Care Coordinator, the foster care worker will perform a full range of professional foster care activities for the agency including phone intakes, recruitment activities, orientation, training, home assessments, foster home licensing, places of safety, and support services to foster homes and foster parents

BY IAN GRAHAM

• •

• • • • • • •

University degree in education, social work or arts preferred. Successful experience in working with Aboriginal students in a counselling, social work or teaching capacity. Ability to counsel students at the Post-secondary level related to academic planning, financial, social, and personal counselling, etc. Ability to work independently Knowledge of the purpose and structure of Keewatin Tribal Council Student Services. Knowledge of the Post Secondary program under INAC (Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada). Ability to speak Cree or Dene is an asset Valid Drivers license for the Province of Manitoba Willingness to travel in Northern Manitoba Experience with computers

• • • • •

• • • • • •

A detailed resume, including at least three references, with written permission to contact the references and your latest immediate supervisor should be submitted to: Lisa Beardy, Office Manager Keewatin Tribal Council 23 Nickel Road Thompson, Manitoba R8N 0Y4 Fax No.: 677-0256 Email address: lbeardy@ktc.ca

Closing date for applications: Wednesday, February 21, 2018 at 4:00 pm. Under no circumstances will late applications be considered. For further information or a full job description, contact Aggie Weenusk, Director of Education & Training, or Lisa Beardy, Office Manager. We would like to thank those that apply but only those selected for interviews will be contacted.

EDITOR@THOMPSONCITIZEN.NET

Qualifications:

• •

Union says Sobey’s planning to close some Manitoba Safeways

Bachelor of Social Work Degree or Post-secondary degree in related field; Minimum two years direct experience in the field of Child and Family Services along with additional experience in the area of foster care; Knowledge of the Manitoba Child & Family Act; Knowledge Licensing Standards and Authorities Act; Knowledge of all other relevant Legislation; Self-motivated; Knowledge and understanding of First Nation traditional values and beliefs pertaining to families and children; Ability to speak Cree considered an asset; Knowledge of resources and collateral services available Must be proficient at Microsoft word, Excel, Power Point, etc ; Must have good oral and written communication skills; Must have a valid class 5 driver’s license and own vehicle; Must pass Child Abuse Registry Check and Criminal Record Check.

Responsibilities: • •

• • • • •

To recruit, Select, train and support foster families; To provide temporary and long-term placements for children as directed by the Child & Family Services Act and Program Standards Manual; Empowers children and families to develop to their fullest potential; Functions as an effective team member; Advocate for families and children; Referrals to other resources as needed; Network with external/internal collaterals

Your cover letter and résumé must clearly indicate how you meet the qualifications. Please submit three references at time of application. Salary: Based on qualifications Deadline for Applications: Wednesday, February 28, 2018 @ 4:00 p.m. Apply to:

Or for more information contact:

Advertisement # NAA103 Attention: Hiring Committee Gloria McKay, Human Resources Coordinator Nikan Awasisak Agency Inc. P.O. Box 388 Cross Lake, MB. R0B 0J0

Olivia Scatch, Foster Care Coordinator Fax: 204-676-4799 Email: oscatch@nikanaa.ca Phone: 204-676-4411

We thank all who apply and advise that only those selected for further consideration will be contacted.

United Food and Commercial Workers (IUFCW) Local 832, the company that represents more than 2,000 Manitoba Safeway employees, says chain owner Sobey’s refuses to negotiate and has told them it plans to shut down stores in Manitoba, though how many depends on the contract that workers agree to. “We had the first day at the [bargaining] table on Jan. 15 and the company tabled pretty massive concessions that would have drastic impact on all of our members working at Safeway,” said UFCW Local 832 president Jeff Traeger. “They then broke off bargaining for three weeks totally and came back to the table this week and told us they weren’t willing to change their position or really even have discussions. They stated that there would be stores closing in Manitoba and that how many of those stores depended on what kind of contract they could get with us so we kind of feel as though it’s like bargaining with a gun to your head.” The union broke off negotiations with Sobey’s Feb. 8 and are scheduling meetings with members in Thompson, Winnipeg, Selkirk, Dauphin, Brandon and Neepawa before the end of February to ask for a strike mandate. “We got to the point where we were just staring at each other across the table because they simply said they’re not willing to move on their original proposals and those proposals affect everything from wages and benefits, vacation, premiums, you name it, it’s all on the table,” said Traeger. “They tend to believe that we’re not speaking on behalf of all the membership until we’ve

gone to them for a vote.” The contract expires March 17 and talks are scheduled with the company from March 5 up until the 17. “We’re hoping that we can get a deal there but if you look at what they done in B.C., in B.C. they announced right before they were going to the bargaining table that they were closing 10 stores and that they would reopen five of them as a new banner provided they got the deal they wanted to so this seems to be becoming their M.O. is that they go to the table with very, very big asks and say that if we don’t agree to it that they’re going to close down stores.” Traeger says the tone is different than during the last round of contract negotiations in 2014, right at the time that Sobey’s bought the Safeway chain. “The sale actually happened while we were at the table so it really was like continuing to bargain with the old Canada Safeway company,” Traeger said. “We did seek a strike mandate. We received a 97 per cent strike vote in 2014 and we were able to reach an agreement that was a strong agreement, fair and balanced, and worked for both parties and we’ve been working under that agreement for the last four years. The Thompson Citizen contacted Sobey’s seeking information about the potential for store closures but had not received any information from the company as of press time. A spokesperson for the company told other media outlets that examining the viability of store locations is standard practice at bargaining meetings and that Sobey’s is seeking a deal that works for everyone.


Wednesday, February 14, 2018

www.thompsoncitizen.net

Page 11

Careers

Make a Difference in Federal Elections

Be a Returning Officer Your opportunity to serve democracy in the riding of Churchill– Keewatinook Aski The work of a returning officer is challenging and rewarding. If you’re a leader with management experience and knowledge of your community, this may be the job for you.

Announcer Operator (English Services) - THO00012 Job Family Programming (TV-Radio-Web) Primary Location Thompson Position Language Requirement English Only Language Skill Levels (Reading / Writing / Speaking) Status of Employment Contract Work schedule(s) Full-time Description

As a returning officer, you will plan and manage federal elections in your riding during a ten-year appointment. You will represent Elections Canada and be on the front line for electors and candidates. The hours of work vary between elections, but increase significantly in the year leading up to an election. To qualify as a returning officer, you must be a Canadian citizen, at least 18 years old, and live in the federal riding where you’re applying to work. To find out more about the role of a returning officer and how to apply, go to elections.ca and click on Employment or call 1-800-463-6868. The online application will be available February 16 to March 9, 2018.

What it’s like working at CBC/Radio-Canada At CBC/Radio-Canada, we’re all about creating content that informs, entertains and connects Canadians on multiple platforms and from coast to coast to coast. Want to be part of all this, and think you have the ability and drive to keep pace with this exciting, ever-changing industry? Then we hope you’ll consider this posting, check out our job-listings, and explore the possibilities of working with us. Whether it be in front of the camera, on mic, online or or behind the scenes, you would be joining a team that thrives on making the connections and telling the stories that are important to Canadians. This is an amazing opportunity at CBC Manitoba. This is your chance to join our team as our next great Announcer/Operator based in Thompson, Manitoba. If you are passionate about everything that makes Northern Manitoba what it is -- its people and its neighbourhoods, its culture and its sports, its politics and its business -- then this might be the perfect job for you. Please note that this is a one year, full time contract. What You Need to Bring:

Elections Canada is an independent body set up by Parliament to conduct federal elections, by-elections and referendums.

WORK WITH US & GROW A CAREER Glacier Media Group is growing. Check our job board regularly for the latest openings: www.glaciermedia.ca/careers

This is a development opportunity. Here are some of the traits we’re looking for you to have (or that you can convince us that you’ve got deep down inside of you and we can develop): • you are passionate about your community. • have a deep understanding of Thompson and the North. • you have a deep knowledge of the Indigenous and/ or a visible minority community in Thompson. • you’re a creative storyteller. • have a warm and confident style with people. • a strong interviewer in a live format. • you’re a critical thinker. • ability to work independently. Qualifications Who Should Apply Applications from across Canada are welcome, but you’re going to have to make a case for why you are passionate about Thompson. A diverse workforce is important to us, so we encourage Indigenous people, women, members of visible minorities and people living with disabilities to apply. Please include a link in your application letting us know what you sound like. It could be an interview you have done, or tell us your favourite story. Give us a sense of what you sound like and how you are when you talk to people. Candidates may be subject to skills and knowledge testing. CBC/Radio-Canada is committed to being a leader in reflecting our country’s diversity. That’s because we can only create and tell the stories that connect Canadians, by having a workforce that mirrors the ever-changing makeup of our country. That’s why we, as an employer, value equal opportunity and nurture an inclusive workplace where our individual differences are not only recognized and valued, but also extend to and pervade all the services we provide as Canada’s public broadcaster. For more information, visit the Talent and Diversity section of our website. If you have accommodation needs at this stage of the recruitment process, please inform us as soon as possible by sending an e-mail to recruitment@cbc.ca. If this sounds interesting, please apply online! We thank all applicants for their interest, but only candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.


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www.thompsoncitizen.net

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

RESOURCE GUIDE MDP

W. RICHARD WHIDDEN, Q.C. Barrister and Solicitor

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Tax preparation services

Burntwood Plaza 33 Selkirk Ave. Ph: 677-4574 • Fax: 778-6622

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D.R. Knight Law OfÂżce Direct: (204) 948-0406 202-900 Harrow St. E. Bus: (204) 948-0400 Winnipeg, Manitoba Fax: (204) 948-0401 R3M 3Y7 Richard.Whidden@knightlaw.ca

125 Commercial Place Thompson MB Phone 677 0277 Fax 677 0276

Insurance Store Ph: 677-9991 • Fax: 778-5145

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THIS SPOT CAN BE YOURS! Call the Thompson Citizen

(204) 677-4534 (ext. 1) or email

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N.C. Crossroad Lanes

10 Pin & 5 Pin Bowling • Glow Bowling Sports Bar • Strikers Lounge Homemade Pizza • VLTs • Video Games Computerized Scoring • Birthday Parties Twoonie Tuesdays • Closed Sundays + Holidays 2nd Floor North Centre Mall - 677-4415 Nick Di Virgilio, Proprietor

Including wolf, polar bear and wildlife related souvenirs. FIND US... N55 43’38.61 W97 52’18.45. Or ďŹ rst left as you enter, or last right as you leave ompson - 216 Hayes Rd. Pete & Ray are just two old farts with big hearts who will gladly look after you. OPEN DAILY 8 am - 9 pm. Ph/Fx 204 778 6819

February 14 2018  
February 14 2018  
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