TM Spring 2019

Page 1

VOLUME 16, ISSUE 1

SPRING 2019 $3.95

GRATEFUL

EARLY RETIREMENT FOR THE MURRAYS LEADS TO A REWARDING (AND UNORTHODOX) NEW CAREER

BIKES and PRESERVING BREWS historic VEHICLES THE NEW POWER PAIRING

AT THE THOMASVILLE HISTORY CENTER



Local Doctors. Local Procedures. Local Rehabilitation.

We’ve Got Your Back. The demands of life are hard enough without back pain. So when you finally seek relief, you don’t want to travel to get the relief you need. From diagnosis to treatment, and through recovery to rehab, Archbold’s surgical and nonsurgical treatment options can help relieve your pain, returning you to a life renewed. Right here at home.

Musculoskeletal Services at Archbold • • • •

Orthopedic Surgery and Neurosurgery Total Joint Replacement Surgery Sports Medicine Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation

For more information on how you can access our musculoskeletal services, visit www.archbold.org.


“You r s uc c e s s is ou r s u c e s s ” — STEPHEN H. CHENEY I CEO

M AGA Z I N E The first and finest in the Red Hills Region

FOUNDER

John D. “Jack” Kelly | March 15, 1932 - July 8, 2015

“He spent his life giving back to the community he loved!” A bank’s success is never an idea alone. Thomasville National Bank’s success lies in our community of customers, in their character, in their loyal response. They value trust: the handshake agreement.

• PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER Christy Layfield| crlayfield@gmail.com

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Lauren Vann | Adele Creative Marketing & Design

They are proud of Thomasville:

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

its families, traditions, and prosperity.

Teresa Williams

ADVERTISING SALES Laura Pike | Belynda Reneau

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Lindsay Penticuff | Denise Purvis Stephanie Rice | Kimberly Hand | Johnny Barnes Chuck Bowen | Annie B. Jones | Anne MCcudden This is what banking should be. For you. About you.

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Christy Layfield | Caprice Kelly Bowman

STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS Jennifer Taylor | Rynn and Kate Photography 301 NORTH BROAD STREET TNBANK.COM

I

I

229.226.3300

MEMBER FDIC

DISTRIBUTION Scott Layfield | Cindy Scoggin | Glen Scoggin


CONTENTS

Cover photo taken by Jennifer Taylor of Rynn & Kate Photography

FEATURE STORY

Grateful Hill Farm An early retirement turns into a magical farm experience for the Murray family. Page 39

9

16

49

30

HUBS AND HOPS’ unique blend of bikes and brews

FOUNTAIN OF LIFE shares its new mission of hope and ministry in Thomasville

CATERER JB CRUMBS divulges his go-to recipe for a cold Sunday evening

STEPHANIE RICE reveals how to reduce your toxic load this Spring with simple lifestyle changes

21

55

25

51

THOMASVILLE HISTORY CENTER gives us an inside look at its donated preserved vehicles

THE BOOKSHELF proprietress Annie B. Jones shares her guide to the season’s best reads

BO BOWEN reaches new heights as a celebrated entertainment lawyer in Savannah

KIMBERLY HAND gives us an inside look at how she mixes patterns in interior design

OUTDOOR GUIDE & BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT

LOCAL HISTORY

INSPIRATIONAL

ANNIE READS

SPRING RECIPE

NATIVE SON

FITNESS & HEALTH

MIXING PATTERNS

5

THOMASVILLEMAGAZINE.COM | SPRING 2019


FROM THE EDITOR

I planted myself as the owner of this magazine three years ago but have felt neither I nor the publication under my direction has blossomed to our fullest potential yet. This revitalized spring issue is the opening of these long-tended blooms. I met Lauren Adele of Adele Creative sometime last year. Let’s say she was the watering can, my miracle grow if you will. I was a struggling, exhausted mama of three ready to give up this venture. Then she listened, she saw my vision and inspired me to take the step. I knew the magazine needed to bloom to its fullest potential. Thank you, Lauren, for helping nurture my idea into a fully-realized relaunch.

One of the most exciting changes to the magazine is the opening up of content writing to area connoisseurs, experts or novices in each field we feature. If you have a passion for decorating and want to share tips, let us know. If you are aware of an area business worthy of being spotlighted, send us the information. I can’t promise all submissions will be selected, but I can vow to give each one the attention deserved. I look forward to publishing these pieces each quarter.

BLOOM WHERE YOU ARE PLANTED

What you will see and read in the pages of this issue represents my vision for a fresh spin on the classic magazine our readers enjoy. There are various changes to the layout. One of the most noticeable changes is an adjustment to the logo; we’ve dropped the word “magazine” from the masthead and added a quail image as a nod to our area’s rich hunting history. Another alteration is the type of content. Yes, favorites like the fitness column and recipes are still here; however, there are new features such as interior design tips, reading recommendations and a “Were You Spotted?” segment that publishes submitted photos of residents about town.

There is one other thing I’m genuinely thrilled to share with everyone. Our area is one strong in faith. I have felt this love for God in our community and been inspired to bring the sentiment together into a volume anyone can pick up and experience. The first issue of “Forgiven,” the faith-based Christian magazine I’ve wanted to build for years, is set to launch this April. It will be a free publication that will feature testimonials, event information, offering sponsorships for businesses to expand and connect with their customers like never before. Its pages will be filled with the ministering words of Christians who seek to spread God’s love and bring others to saving faith in Jesus Christ. I look forward to this new year and all the growth it will bring. Again, I welcome story ideas, submissions and comments. I’d love to hear from you. Please send them to crlayfield@gmail.com. With Love,

6

CHRISTY LAYFIELD PRESIDENT, PUBLISHER & EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

THOMASVILLEMAGAZINE.COM | SPRING 2019


powerful marketing STRATEGY • BRANDING • WEBSITES • DIGITAL MARKETING

From bestselling authors to state associations to small businesses, our clients trust us to communicate with local audiences. We regularly achieve engagement levels up to 90% higher than the average for them. Call us to see what we can do for you. 229.200.6684 | Design@AdeleCreative.com WWW.ADELECREATIVE.COM Follow new projects, reviews and more on our Facebook & Instagram pages


WITH ITS

CLAY CANOPIED ROADS

THE RED HILLS AREA IS SOME BIKE RIDERS’ DREAM COME TRUE


OUTDOOR GUIDE & BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT

BIKES

AND

BREWS

H U B S & H OPS O N EXPLO R I NG T HE R ED HI L L S

BY DENISE PURVIS | PHOTOS BY CHRISTY LAYFIELD and HUBS AND HOPS

9

THOMASVILLEMAGAZINE.COM | SPRING 2019


POST-RIDE

OFFROAD BREW GUIDE

TapRoomHOURS

Hubs and Hops has become a hot-spot, and not just for bike enthusiasts. Their tap room, located in Thomasville’s historic downtown corridor, serves as a backdrop for live music, game nights and gatherings during First Friday events.

TAP ROOM HOURS

LOCATION & SOCIAL

Tuesday & Wednesday: 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Visit Hubs and Hops at 227 West Jackson Street

Thursday: 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.

in Thomasville. Or visit HubsandHops.com. For

Friday & Saturday: 10 a.m. to Close

more information, call (229) 236-1890, visit Face-

BIKE SHOP HOURS

book or email Info@HubsandHops.com.

Tuesday to Saturday: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Partnering with you on your investment of a lifetime. 315 Kern Street Ph: 229.236.7355 F: 229.236.7325 avenuesrep.com


FORGET ABOUT MICKEY AND MINNIE OR PEAS AND CARROTS. THERE’S A NEW POWER COUPLE ON THE SCENE. Thanks to Hubs and Hops, your new favorite pairing is bikes and craft brews. Beer and bike riding go hand in hand, and it is not uncommon for many bike shops to have a small bar located inside, explains Hubs and Hops co-owner JoAnne Maltese. The trend for a bike shop to also serve craft beer or coffee is becoming popular in the west. Craft beer is a great post-ride reward. Hubs and Hobs has done something incredibly unique. They have brought a sense of awareness about biking to the Thomasville community and have managed to also provide a local hangout for craft beer aficionados and casual brew lovers alike. Maltese describes the tap room as a “Cheers” atmosphere. Sitting there on a post-ride Saturday afternoon, I can see it. There are chummy bicyclists seated at the bar and planning lunch at a local restaurant, a couple sitting at the couch,

and curious shoppers drifting in and out. The tap room has a distinct hoppy odor, but pleasantly so, and a beer menu that can put many places to shame. When Maltese’s co-owner, Roger Hawkes (pictured at right), was shopping for a home in Thomasville, he casually mentioned his idea of having a bike shop and tap room combo. It just so happened that the former home of Bacchus was available, and it was the eventual perfect location for Hubs and Hops. Their backyard even overlooks the beginning of the Thomasville bike trailhead that will eventually connect Thomasville’s parks. Maltese and Hawkes met many years ago while working for the Tallahassee Police Department (TPD). 11

THOMASVILLEMAGAZINE.COM | SPRING 2019


Outdoor Guide / Business Spotlight She and Hawkes have been working and biking together for many years, so this partnership in Hubs and Hops was a no-brainer and coincided with Maltese’s retirement from the TPD.

The beauty of riding on Thomas County’s well-maintained clay roads is it’s safer and gives you the picturesque view of plantations and rolling farm country.

Maltese, a Tallahassee resident, says Thomasville is the perfect home for Hubs and Hops. With the hundreds of miles of canopied clay roads, it is a clay road rider’s dream. The goal for Hubs and Hops is to make Thomasville the hub of clay road cycling in the Southeast, much in the same way that cyclists think of Asheville, North Carolina, as the mecca of East Coast mountain biking.

Hubs and Hops was approached by the Thomas University GIS Department to produce maps and navigation to the more than 300 miles of clay roads in Thomas County. The result is a series of maps available in hard copy and downloads.

Clay riding has become a safer alternative to pavement riding for many cyclists. Distracted driving has become increasingly prevalent with the advent of advanced cellular technology. The best way to avoid the dangers of overcrowded roads with distracted drivers is to stay off the pavement.

If you are itching to hop on your bike and go on a group ride, they have many opportunities. If you don’t own a bike, they have rentals available for $50 for a full day and $30 for a half-day. You do not have to be a biking expert to join in on the weekly Saturday morning rides that start at Hubs and Hops, Maltese tells me. Either she or Hawkes accompanies the less experienced riders to help them learn how to properly change gears while navigating the country roads. Knowing when to appropriately shift gears is half the battle of riding, Maltese explains. Group rides generally last between 1.5 and three hours. Riders meet at 8 a.m. on the back porch of Hubs and Hops and return there at the ride’s conclusion.

This and next page: inside the Hubs and Hops taproom.



Outdoor Guide / Business Spotlight

Also, they offer a quarterly overnight backpacking trip. The three previous trips were a success. The extended ride option is 65 miles there and 80 miles back from Adel. The shorter option leaves from Pavo and is 25 miles there and back. The group camps at a special area at Reed Bingham State Park. During the winter months, they have a Tuesday night trainer session. If you don’t have a trainer, Hubs and Hops has four available for you to prop your bike on and spin away. After the time change, the Tuesday night trainer session changes to a Tuesday/Thursday night ride. An upcoming ride event is the Thomasville Clay Road Classic and Due South Concert April 12-13. The registration caps at 300 riders, so be sure to save your spot at Eventbrite.com. For $35, you get a Friday night pre-ride dinner, drinks, live music and a cycling presentation at the Biscuit Company, Saturday breakfast, ride, post-ride meal and event T-shirt. For $50, you get the $35 perks plus a Hubs and Hops coupon and ticket to Due South. All proceeds from this event support the Thomasville University Athletics program and a potential future cycling program.

Deb Phillips

ASSOCIATE BROKER, GRI, CRS Mobile: (229)221-4613 Email: debphillips@ftrealty.com

422 Remington Avenue • P.O. Box 1196 Thomasville, Georgia 31799 (229)226-6515 • FAX (229)228-7548 Web: www.FTRealty.com

14

THOMASVILLEMAGAZINE.COM | SPRING 2019

If you are still a little wary of bike riding, there’s always something to do at the tap room. Sometimes you want to go where everyone knows your name, and they’re still glad you came. Patrons are always welcome to try the specially curated beer and wine selections. There are 10 (mostly local) brews on tap that are updated immediately on the Untappd app (and online at hubsandhops.com). Other activities of interest include: • • • •

Live music hosted at least monthly Tuesday-Friday happy hour from 3-6 p.m. Thursday game nights First Friday celebrations overlooking the cityowned amphitheater • Holiday parties • An upcoming Mardi Gras themed first-anniversary celebration TM



I JUST WANT

TO HELP PEOPLE

- JIMMY MOORE, FOUNDER


A DREAM COME TRUE THOMASVILLE MAN OPENS HOMELESS SHELTER BY CHRISTY LAYFIELD


Our prayer is to encourage them and help them get back on their feet - Rebecca Graham, vice president of Fountain of Life Rescue Mission

Jimmy Moore recently opened a facility in Thomas County that is a dream come true for him: a homeless shelter for men and women.

Later, Moore says the plan is to add services and programs that will further assist these individuals with overcoming homelessness and poverty.

“I just want to help people,” Moore, founder of Fountain of Life Rescue Mission, said.

“Unfortunately, we won’t be able to house children at this time,” mission vice president Rebecca Graham said. “But we are thankful, and we do support other missions – such as Halcyon Home – that serve in those capacities.”

Thomas County is home to approximately 260 homeless people, which is a high number for a South Georgia community like Thomasville, Moore said. The mission’s temporary home is 428 N. Hansell St. in Thomasville next to the Halcyon Home Store. Currently, the shelter is only open at night. It houses 20 men and women ages 18 and older who are homeless. It provides lodging for individuals seeking a comfortable place to sleep each evening. 18

THOMASVILLEMAGAZINE.COM | SPRING 2019

Graham helped Moore come up with the shelter’s name. “I knew that the name needed a scriptural meaning because God gave this vision to Jimmy and He would provide a name,” she said. “God led me to Psalm 36:9, in which David wrote, ‘For with you is the fountain of life; in your light, do we see light.’


Inspirational “The meaning of this is so much deeper than it appears on the surface. Through God alone is life created and perfected, and only in Him can we have the glory of life, which is ‘the light’ referred to in this scripture.” The shelter’s mission will also be to share the gospel with those who may feel hopeless as a result of their homelessness and let them know there is hope, Graham adds. “Our prayer is to encourage them and help them get back on their feet,” she said.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Chris Marsh • Ginny McBride • Lee Waller Adam Graham • Rebecca Graham Jason Wilson • Holly Hurst • Dywane Vares Dominic Ford • Jim Falconer

“We are simply putting a shelter over their head and hope to eventually have a chance to show them the love of Jesus through that.” The shelter is led by a board of directors who come together regularly and pray for support of the mission. The temporary space is rent-free, but they are working to purchase land to build a permanent, much larger shelter soon. “Support has come locally and beyond to get us where we are now, but we are still in need of financial support, as we will be moving into a permanent shelter as soon as possible,” concludes Graham. TM

CONTACT & MORE INFO Fountain of Life Rescue Mission P.O. Box 6522 Thomasville, GA 31799 www.facebook.com/fountainofliferescue

Albany|Athens|Atlanta|Macon www.pellicanoconstruction.com

W. Rob McCormack, DMD

19

THOMASVILLEMAGAZINE.COM | SPRING 2019



LOCAL HISTORY

Preserving Historic Vehicles A G L I M PSE AT TH E TH OM A SV I L L E HI STO RY CENT ER ’S D O NAT ED I T EMS

Behind the Scenes with the THOMASVILLE HISTORY CENTER’S EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR BY ANNE MCCUDDEN

21

THOMASVILLEMAGAZINE.COM | SPRING 2019


Local History In many cases, museums have farm equipment, vehicles and large pieces of machinery. They must decide whether they will keep them running or maintain them as display pieces. In our case, the three cars are operational; the fire truck is not. The decision of whether to preserve a collection item as a working piece of machinery comes down to many factors. These include how safe is it to operate, are there readily available mechanics and repair people who can fix it if something goes wrong, will it better address our educational and programming goals if it’s in working order, and most important of all, do we have space to store it safely and securely? Many museums use these types of collection pieces to tell the story of a specific era, person or event. In the example of the fire truck, it was used by the city’s fire department from 1916 until 1955.

22

THOMASVILLEMAGAZINE.COM | SPRING 2019

It was the first “new” fire truck the city purchased and was donated to the center in 1972. In 2017, we were able to allocate funding for full cosmetic restoration of the truck due in part to donations made in honor of our longtime board member Russell R. “Russ” Jinright Jr. Thanks to his family’s passion for history and Russ’ desire to see the truck brought back to life. The reason we chose to keep the truck inoperable is mostly due to safety issues. Even an experienced driver could have difficulty safely operating a vehicle its size and weight. We think it’s better to leave the firefighting to the professionals! The two Model Ts and the 1936 Ford will soon be operational. They will allow us to tell different stories from Thomasville’s past.


The “Blue Bomb” (as it was referred to) was owned by Miss Fannie Chisholm, who drove the car well into the 1960s. The 1923 Model T was in operation at Merryway Plantation and was donated to us by its original owner, which is a rare occurrence. The 1936 Ford is an excellent example of the DeLuxe style convertible with a rumble seat. Both Arcadia and Millpond plantations used this vehicle. We are excited about being able to use all three operational vehicles in parades, in city and county activities, and as part of summer camps and our community programming. With only a small three bay garage to store items like these, we are currently at our max capacity and cannot accept more donations. We are blessed to have these wonderful vehicles donated to us. We will maintain what we have and use them as much as we can to tell the history of Thomas County. TM

Sharon D.M.D. Sharon K. K. Patrick Patrick D.M.D. Laura Ridley Francisco GarciaD.M.D. D.M.D. 303 W. Hansell Street

GENERAL, COSMETIC ADVANCED DENTISTRY General, Cosmetic & & Advanced Dentistry Bleaching •• Implants Bleaching Implants••Crowns Crowns• Bridges • Bridges Dentures ••TMJ TMJ Treatments Treatments Dentures Treatments• •Root RootCanal Canal Treatments

M, W, Th, F: 8 AM - 5 PM Tuesday: 1 PM - 8 PM

229.227.1447

961342

www.aconfidentsmile.com

M, W, Th, F: 8 AM - 5 PM Tuesday: 1 PM - 8 PM 303 W. Hansell Street

229.227.1447

www.aconfidentsmile.com

23

THOMASVILLEMAGAZINE.COM | SPRING 2019


We love Smiles! CALL US TODAY! 229-226-2386 Dr. Marlin S. Johnson DMD Dr. Jodi M. Cox Davalos, DMD WE LOVE OUR PATIENTS!

215 Constitution Ave | Thomasville, GA

ThomasvillePediatricDentistry.com

Call Us Today!

229.226.2386

May 31, 2019 and June 1, 2019 Thomasville Municipal Auditorium


LOCAL PROFILES

A Salute to Bo

SAVANNAH’S PR ESTI GE M AGA ZI N E “ SO UTH ” F E AT U R E S LO C A L C O LU M N I ST C H U C K B OW E N ’ S SO N O N T HE C OVER!

Raising Bo

INTRODUCTION BY CHUCK BOWEN | PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF THE BOWEN FAMILY

25

THOMASVILLEMAGAZINE.COM | SPRING 2019



Local Profiles “The Queen of New Orleans” and I have brought a “bunch of young’uns” into the world – five, to be exact. Our two boys politely allowed their three sisters to enter first then stormed in like a hurricane on steroids. They’re all 24-carat “doers.” Leslie is a dance teacher and much-in-demand choreographer. Lisa is a hair stylist and successful shop owner. Lari was an eleven-year assistant to the director of Washington’s Folger Shakespeare Library but is currently the executive assistant to the CEO of Goodwill Southeast Georgia. Bo, the subject of this little epistle, is an outstanding attorney in Savannah. We should add that, on graduating from Mercer University, he surprised everyone by achieving summa cum laude ranking in two majors, psychology and political science. Brad, his younger brother, is pastor of a megachurch in Moultrie.

Bo is in this spotlight due to his having appeared on the cover of “SOUTH,” Savannah’s prestige magazine. Read on.

- CHUCK BOWEN, proud father of Bo

Are Mom and Dad proud of their offspring? You betcha!

If Bo were to pat you on the back, you’d list it on your resume.

This profile originally appeared in SOUTH’s June-July 2018 edition. It is reprinted here with permission.

When we caught up with Bo in his penthouse office at The Bowen Law Group, he was starting out at his panoramic view of Savannah lost deep in thought. He had just returned from Washington, D.C, where he had delivered a keynote speech to hundreds of government employees on the crucially of maintaining personal integrity.

It was a rare quiet moment for Savannah’s preeminent corporate and entertainment attorney. Over the past month, Bo had been at the center of a whirlwind of activity, representing clients in over 20 court hearings, negotiating with Hollywood producers in Los Angeles, mediating an investment dispute in New York City...

27

THOMASVILLEMAGAZINE.COM | SPRING 2019


Auto Life Home Business

Stephen Gainous 117 W. Jefferson St. Thomasville, GA 31792 229.226.7656 A Comprehensive Multi-Specialty Pain Relief Center that has Interventional Pain Mangement, Physical Therapy, Chiropractic Care and Massage Therapy all under one roof.

229.226.1035 Thomasville 229.377.1392 Cairo 229.416.4457 Bainbridge www.southgaspineandjoint.com

Dream big. Act smart. Live bold. LOANS FOR LAND & LIVING

SWGAFarmCredit.com Easy, personal financing for land, farms and homes

Allen Corbin NMLS 775580

ACorbin@SWGAFarmCredit.com 229.220.1291


Local Profiles and entertaining a parade of celebrities filming movies in Savannah.

and earned him nicknames such as “giant killer” and “dragon slayer.”

All the while, he still finds time to fulfill all the legal needs of each of his clients, which range from small local businesses to large multinational corporations. When asked if it’s true he can draft corporate resolutions, investment contracts, and partnership agreements in his sleep, Bo cracks a sly smile and responds, “In fairness, there’s really no other way do it.”

Bo came to the conclusion early in his career that being a later is not much fun, so he started The Bowen Law Group with the modestly stated ambition of completely changing the way law is practiced. By all accounts, he has succeeded.

It’s that quick wit that has helped catapult Bo to the top of his profession. Clients love him because he’s confident, fast, and entirely entertaining. According to Bob Cesca, a national political commentator, writer, and radio host. Bob had hired lawyers all over the country but had never met one like Bo. “From the first moment I met him, it felt like we had been lifelong friends. When I reached out to Bo, I was very upset over a legal issue that had been plaguing me for months. He instantly made me laugh, but he also made me feel calm, safe, and protected,” said Bob. “And then he literally picked up his phone and resolved the entire case with one all.” Bo takes great pride in righting wrongs, no matter the opponent. So lest you believe his ready smile and quick laugh are in any way representative of his skill, a few minutes in the courtroom will quickly disabuse you of that notion. He is a highly skilled and ruthless psychopathic assassin, metaphorically speaking. His fearlessness and success in the courtroom against all foes, no matter how powerful or seemingly invincible, has inspired fierce loyalty from his clients

When asked how he would describe Bo, Bob Cesca thought for a moment. “Bo combines the swagger and charm of George Clooney with the quick with of Mark Twain and the legal ability of Perry Mason.” Bob finally responded. “I’ll put it this way: Bo is the lawyer that God would have invented if He had thought at all a good ideas.” TM

Hampton Inn of Thomasville

29

THOMASVILLEMAGAZINE.COM | SPRING 2019


Reduce Your Toxic Load BY STEPHANIE RICE of FAB FIT LIFE LLC

DID YOU KNOW the average baby is born with more than 400 known toxins in his/her umbilical cord? More than 200 of them are neurotoxins, defined by the Merriam-Webster dictionary as a poisonous substance that acts on the nervous system and disrupts the normal Stephanie Rice

function of nerve cells. The other half can damage growth and devel-

B.S. Exercise Science, Jacksonville University

opment.

ASCM, Certified Personal Trainer ACE, Weight Management Specialist

We all know lead is a dangerous toxin and should be avoided at all

fitfablifetraining@gmail.com

cost. BPA (in plastics) is said to mimic estrogen, therefore disrupting

www.fitfablife.biz

body functions such as cell repair, thyroid, energy levels and fertili-

www.fitfablife.blogspot.com

LOWER YOUR

STRESS

30

LEVEL

ty. We don’t want that. There’s also that delicious fried chicken and french fries. Did you know these cause your body to be toxic, too? Here’s the kicker, these examples are just a drop in the bucket when it comes to toxins we are exposed to daily. Where are toxins hiding? Here is a quick list:

• heavy metals

• beauty products

• pesticides/fertilizers

• food/environment

• medications

• body – bacteria, hormones, candida, metabolic

• emotional/spiritual – stress, anxiety, anger, jealousy, etc.

THOMASVILLEMAGAZINE.COM | SPRING 2019


Health Do you ever experience bloating, gas, muscle aches, fatigue, joint pain, headaches, sleep issues, skin issues or anxiety? These are all sure signs you are toxic. If you are overweight at all, your body is toxic. These chemicals are stored in fat cells. If you have been failing at losing weight and can’t figure out why, it is probably because your fat cells are full of toxins and weight loss is impaired.

1. Parabens (ex. sodium benzoate) ~ leads to endocrine disruption and hormonal imbalances, also a known carcinogen. Found in, but not limited to, deodorant, lotion and soap.

Before getting into how to’s, we need to cover some of the dangerous substances. Look and learn about all these and then eliminate them from your daily routine immediately.

3. 4-Methylbenzylidene/4. MBC ~ mimics estrogen. Found in sunscreen.

2. Phthalates/Plastic ~ endocrine disruptor, insulin resistance, carcinogen, early puberty. Found in liquid body care – including perfume – and plastic.

4. Petrochemicals (PEG) ~ can cause spontaneous abortion. Found in cosmetics. There are many more hazardous chemicals and toxins than these. Please do your research and look at the ingredients in your skincare and cleaning supplies. Now for the good news. From lifestyle to home care changes, there are some easy and simple ways to reduce your toxic load.

FREE entertainment and information! We’re more than just great books! We offer everything from Computers to Audio Books and programs for all ages! Stop by and find out what brings hundreds of people through our door every day!

Thomasville - Boston - Coolidge - Meigs - Ochlocknee – Pavo www.tcpls.org @ThomasCountyPublicLibrarySystem #TCPLS (229) 225-5252

31

THOMASVILLEMAGAZINE.COM | SPRING 2019


Swap your household cleaning products for ones that do not contain any of the above ingredients. Simply cleaning with vinegar and baking soda is your best and safest bet. There are also some great companies like Mrs. Meyers and Method if you do not want to make your own. Swap out skincare and beauty products with ones that do not contain any of these dangerous ingredients. You can make lotions with oils like jojoba, coconut or pumpkin. Essential oils pair great with these. Many companies offer clean skincare products. Some great ones are Beautycounter, 100% Pure, Shea Moisture and Schmidt’s Deodorant. Be aware of the food you put in your mouth. Eliminate those that cause inflammation, such as dairy, gluten and sugar. Make sure your diet consists of at least 70 percent vegetables. Add healing spices into your diet. Turmeric, ginger and cinnamon are great for inflammation. Get your blood and lymphatic system pumping by moving daily. It does not matter what you do. Just exercise in ways you enjoy. The idea is to get your core body temperature up! Lower your stress levels by meditating, doing yoga, coloring, journaling, knitting or deep breathing. Get plenty of water. You should be drinking at least half your body weight in ounces of water every single day. If you are a big caffeine drinker or athlete, you need to be drinking even more. Swap your plastic for glass or stainless-steel containers. If you choose to use plastic, do not heat your food in a microwave using the plastic. TM


EXERCISE IN WAYS

YOU ENJOY!

THE IDEA IS TO GET YOUR CORE TEMPERATURE UP


REHAB SUCCESS

FLORENCE MCMILLAN

“When I was admitted to Camellia Gardens, I had been in the hospital over 30 days. Because of such a long hospitalization, I experienced severe weakness and was unable to care for myself. Thanks to the expertise and loving care of the CNAs, nurses and therapists, I regained my strength and reached my goal of returning home!”

–– Florence McMillan, received short-term therapy at Camellia Gardens of Life Care.

229.226.0076

804 S. Broad Street Thomasville, GA 31792 CamelliaGardensOfLifeCare.com


NEW YEAR NEW ROOM PART OF YOUR HOME. PART OF YOUR LIFE.

TILE

. GRANITE . MARBLE . QUARTZ . WOOD . CARPET . LUXURY PLANKS

SELLERSTILES.COM



Newest wedding and event venue opening February 2019, in Dixie, Georgia, convenient to surrounding areas from Thomasville to Valdosta, up to Moultrie and down to Monticello, Florida.

the dedicated design team will handle all details for any vision in creating your

As we complete construction and improvements, we are focused on a goal to create a stunning venue with inclusive amenities for all of your needs, at an affordable price! The dedicated design team will manage all the details. A charming farmhouse awaits with spacious porches overlooking pecan orchard, rolling pastures and a pond that’s sure to provide the perfect backdrop. Call us today to make an appointment to tour our wedding venue and receive pricing on the all inclusive packages.

229.977.0194


It’s Just Like Coming Home

We carry many famous brands including Bradington-Young,Bernhardt, Cresent, Fairreld Chair, Hekman, Hooker, Kincaid, Lexington, Massoud, Stanley, Fine Furniture Designs, Wesley Hall, Luxurious Jamison Bedding & Smith Brothers

Healthcare Solutions and Claims Administration facilitated with exceptional service! Plan/Benefit Design | Benefit Counseling | Cost Analysis Self Funded Plans | Reinsurance | Claims Administration

Taylor Benefit Resource

164 Commercial Drive | Thomasville, Georgia 31757 229.225.9943 Toll Free 888.352.5246 www.tbrpa.com


FEATURE STORY

Grateful Hill Farm

EA RLY R E T I R E M E N T F OR TH E M U R R AYS LEAD S TO A SUCCESSFUL (AND UNO RT HO D OX) NE W CA REER

If you have a desire to do something completely crazy like this, it’s totally worth it. - ALLISON MURRAY

BY LINDSAY FIELD PENTICUFF | PHOTOS BY RYNN & KATE PHOTOGRAPHY

Every morning for nearly two years now, Nick and Allison Murray — along with their daughter and son — wake up to something they talked about doing upon retiring but didn’t quite anticipate making a living out of it so early in their lives.

They own 36 dairy goats and produce fresh chevre that’s distributed to several local restaurants and shops in Thomas County and north Florida.

39

THOMASVILLEMAGAZINE.COM | SPRING 2019


Feature Story “I was on track to retire early after working in corporate America,” says Nick, who was a chief financial officer at Senior Life Insurance Co. in Thomasville. “We thought and talked about having goats on our land in Brooks County, and we’d piddle with making cheese while we traveled.” But retirement came a little earlier than expected for the family. “While rocking along in my corporate career and having kids, growing and maturing, it became obvious that my career path was causing discontent at home,” Nick said. 40

THOMASVILLEMAGAZINE.COM | SPRING 2019

“It was difficult to have that high pressure of a job and be a pluggedin father and husband when I came home.” After much discussion — and lots of research — Nick and Allison, a former school teacher, decided to take the plunge with their farm and try making a living out of raising dairy goats and producing goat cheese. They cleared their land in Brooks County and began building a barn where they could one day care for their new animals.


“I read some dairy goat textbooks and did a lot of research,” Nick said. “I also met a goat farmer and cheesemaker who lives south of Atlanta, and she was very friendly and encouraged us, and let me work on her farm and learn from her. In addition, Allison did her own research and studied at Sterling College in Vermont (an undergraduate college of environmental stewardship) under a natural cheese-making guru. We started to build our knowledge and collect the information we needed to put this plan together.” Farming wasn’t exactly new to either Murray. Allison moved to Thomasville at age 12 but spent time on her grandmother’s farm in Madison, Florida. “I have very fond memories of growing up and spending my summers on the farm, but I never thought that I would be living this life,” she said. “I love it, but I never dreamed I would be here.”

Nick was raised in Brooks County and is the grandson and nephew of farmers. “I was drawn to leave the farm as a child and go to the big city,” he said. “But growing up on farms has helped us because we each learned that we have some connections that could really help us get started.” Their farmland is adjacent to Nick’s grandparents. He purchased it in 1997 with his cousin, not knowing that he’d ever actually use it as a farm. “It’s a beautiful piece of land, and the proximity is perfect for my family,” he says. “I planted pine trees on it, not knowing God would steer us to it and we’d be living on it one day.” The property is approximately 30 minutes from their home in Thomasville, where they still live at least half the week.

41

THOMASVILLEMAGAZINE.COM | SPRING 2019



THRILLING IT IS

WHAT SURPRISED ME THE MOST IS HOW

TO JUMP IN AND RISK EVERYTHING

- Allison Murray


Feature Story “We stay in a camper on the farm three nights a week on cheese-making nights,” says Allison. “We make cheese every other day, and that requires early mornings, so we all decided that we wanted to stay together. We didn’t want Nick to sleep out here and the kids and I to stay home. We decided this was going to be a team effort.” Their children, 10-year-old Aubrey and 5-yearold Nate, are homeschooled and have loved the new lifestyle. “They have transitioned better than Mom and Dad,” Allison said with a laugh. “They are so resilient and they just kind of go with the flow. It’s been a year of a lot of changes for them, but they really love being at the farm.” Since spending more time on the farm, she adds that her children’s priorities have shifted, too, because they don’t have a TV or even a living room. “We literally sleep in the camper, and the rest of the time we are outside playing, swinging or running around,” she said. “It’s really been beautiful to watch them be kids, no video games or electronics.”

Nick agrees, saying they have very tiring days and nights, and live most of the time out of a suitcase, but it’s been worth it for their family. He believes it also helps their children realize how important it is to be confident in their life direction. “We don’t have any doubt that even if it fails, it’s a journey we were supposed to take and we will be all right, and we will survive,” he said. They can say the same for anyone who may just be considering a new career path. “What has surprised me the most is how thrilling it is to jump in and risk everything,” Allison said. “We had a really secure retirement plan, and we totally cashed it in to fund this idea and this passion. It was really, really scary, but it’s been exciting to create something with my husband that we can show our kids.”

As far as what they might recommend to other parents who are considering significant life changes like the one they made in recent years that could impact children, Allison’s advice is similar to what she’d tell a new mom: “Go with your gut, follow it and trust it,” she said. “Once we decided to do this, I felt a peace, in spite of all the unknowns. You can always go back to a corporate desk job. But, if you have a desire to do something completely crazy like this, it’s totally worth it.”

Getting you back to the things you LOVE! Chronic Pain • Spine Pain Pelvic Health • Vertigo, Scoliosis • and more

(229) 228-9019 • 511 Gordon Ave. • Thomasville • www.thriveptfit.com

44

THOMASVILLEMAGAZINE.COM | SPRING 2019

PLEASE READ

We cannot and will not accept responsibility for errors or omissions not noted on this proof.




Feature Story

Nick says the name came from the property being located on a hill and for a feeling they have each day knowing they are doing something they love. “The farm has cultivated gratitude in Nick and me,” Allison adds. “It’s really given us a new perspective on life.” They’ve both been pleased with the success of the farm so far, too. “From the beginning, there seemed to be interest in this, and I think part of that groundwork was laid by Sweet Grass Dairy,” Allison said. “They have been so supportive. I don’t know if things would have gone this well in anywhere but Thomasville. It is amazing for entrepreneurs. The people are just really supportive of new ventures like this.” They began selling their fresh goat chevre in September 2018, when Liam’s of Thomasville started adding it to their ingredients. Shortly thereafter, Relish Thomasville began selling their cheese. Sweet Cacao Chocolates now uses their product in sweet treats like goat cheese and fig truffles.

“We grow our own cultures and use organic, natural rennet,” Allison explains. “We believe it gives the cheese a richer, milder flavor that is closer to the land we are farming on because the animals eat the natural flora that grows here. We are very proud of the product we make because we have put so much effort into a high-quality cheese that is as close to preserved milk as you’re going to get.” But getting to that level of satisfaction hasn’t been easy. “It’s been a pretty steep learning curve for both of us,” Allison said. “My strengths are very different from Nick’s. He is very analytical and just has a really good head on his shoulders as far as the numbers. He can look at a problem, pick it apart and figure out how to solve it. I don’t work like that.” She suggests leaning on your partner for support and realizing that the strengths of differences can still build a productive business. “It’s been a fun adventure,” Allison said. “It’s also been scary, and there have been some really bad days, but overall the good days outweigh the bad days, and the benefits outweigh the risks.” TM

The cheese itself is different from cheese produced in big markets, in that they process their cheese the old-fashioned way.

Grateful Hill Farm What started with 20 Saanen goats — one of two main kinds of dairy goats — has grown to 36. And, what began as land filled with pine trees is now Grateful Hill Farm.

We don’t have any doubt that even if it fails, it’s a journey we were supposed to take. - Nick Murray


WE ALL KNOW

LIVING IN SOUTH GEORGIA

WE WILL HAVE ANOTHER COLD SNAP


SPRING RECIPE

Nothing Left But Crumbs ONE OF O UR R E GI ON ’ S FAVOR I TE C ATE R E R S SHAR ES HI S CHO I CE R ECI PE FO R A CO L D SUNDAY EVENING

BY JOHNNY BARNES | JB CRUMBS CATERING

This time of year, I start getting antsy with spring fever and hoping that spring is here; that another cold spell won’t come and interrupt such nice weather. But living in South Georgia, we all know we will have another cold snap and maybe get to

light a fire in the fireplace one more time. This makes me think of some good ole comfort food like potato and fennel soup paired with a salad. It makes an easy Sunday night supper. 49

THOMASVILLEMAGAZINE.COM | SPRING 2019


POTATO & FENNEL SOUP Servings: 8 4 pounds of potatoes (quartered) 2 tablespoons of olive oil 1 ½ tablespoons of minced garlic Salt to taste (about 1 ½ tablespoons) Black pepper to taste (about 2 teaspoons) 2 large chopped onions or 4 small ones 2 pounds of chopped fennel 3 quarts of chicken broth 1 cup heavy cream (optional) Sauté the onions, fennel and garlic with olive oil, salt and pepper until translucent. This should take about 12 minutes on medium heat. Put the potatoes in a stockpot with the chicken broth, sautéed onions, fennel and garlic. Boil for about an hour. Add the heavy cream and cook a few more minutes. Then, in small batches, put the soup in a food processor to smooth it out. You can make it as smooth or as chunky as you prefer. Pour it back into the pot. Add salt and pepper by taste. Heat it back up. Serve hot. TM


AT HOME

Mixing Patterns

K I M B E R LY H A N D R E V EAL S HOW TO MI X I T UP I N YO UR SPACE

BY KIMBERLY HAND | HandMeTheDecor.com | PHOTOS BY CAPRICE KELLY BOWMAN

When you start thinking about what patterns will work best for your home, there are a few design hacks or go to “rules” I like to keep in mind. Yes, I’m a mom, so having rules is important...even in decorating spaces!

51

THOMASVILLEMAGAZINE.COM | SPRING 2019


MIXING PATTERNS

RULE #1

RULE #3

It’s hard to narrow down the best pattern for your space at times, so why not mix a few? Try and pick an odd number of patterns.

It’s so important to even and anchor your space when it comes to patterns. I’ve figured this out the hard way, so of course, I’m going to share one of my lessons learned. Anchor your pattern by having two of the same pattern on, let’s say, your sofa. Yes, you are going to have multiple patterns in your space, but it’s key to make the designs all tie together in a smooth way. For instance, if you do a striped or buffalo check curtain as a pattern, then you wouldn’t want to use a striped or buffalo checkered pillow right by the curtains. Instead, you could use a floral pillow that pulls the color(s) from your curtains.

Think about the size of your space. If it’s a larger space, I say three is a good number. Having three patterns in your space allows it to stand out enough without making your space look like an Easter egg. If you have a smaller area, it’s usually a good idea to not go with more than two patterns. You can always use solids with patterns.

RULE #2 COLOR SCHEMES

Pick patterns complimentary of each other, but don’t blend too much. Are you asking yourself the question, “How do I do that?” Don’t worry. I’m going to help you!

Your next pattern should pull colors from your “hero” one, but on a smaller scale. I tend to pick a pattern that has two or three colors (keeping in mind the colors come from your “hero” pattern). Your third pattern will be the smallest of your patterns. There are times I will go with a muted pattern utilizing my “hero” colors on a tiny scale. Use solids along with your patterns and provide separation of them.

Now that you have some of my pattern mixing hacks, I hope you see your space with a new outlook. You can do it! And remember to have fun with your space. Don’t be scared to push the envelope. Spice up your space! It represents you. TM

S IN WEL IATE LN C O

S ES

I like to pick a “hero” pattern that will encompass all the colors I want to utilize in my space. This pattern is normally the bigger and bolder pattern, hence why I like to call it the “hero” pattern.

UTILIZE & EVEN OUT

AS S

NUMBER OF PATTERNS

At Redwood Gait Farm, L.L.C. Specializing in Helping Children, Adolescents, Couples and Families with Adjustment Issues, Anxiety, Depression, Pain, Stress Disorders, and Communication Problems. We Provide a Full Range of Psychological Services.

Catherine B. howell, Ph.D. Licensed Psychologist, GA1947

229.228.5192 7363 Hall Road (7 miles North of Wal-Mart)

52

THOMASVILLEMAGAZINE.COM | SPRING 2019



southwest georgia protocol school

Social skills never go out of style. In a connected and globalized society, we believe that knowing how to behave appropriately provides opportunities for advancement both socially and in business. We teach children and adults social and business skills that provide career advancement.

Southern Leaders Etiquette Program (teaches children ages 8-18) • Dining skills • Social dance • First impressions and conversation skills • Electronic etiquette and more Corporate Etiquette Training for businesses • Customer Service skills • Personal interaction and telephone skills • Dressing for success We can design a program specifically for the needs of your business!

Visit us online at www.sowegaprotocol.com Celebrating

WE TAKE THE

OUT OF ACCIDENTS

100% CUSTOMER SATISFACTION IS OUR GOAL

FOREIGN & DOMESTIC

Call us today for a

FREE QUOTE

229.226.2077

800-874-6634

Insurance Work Welcome

11615 US Hwy 319 N Thomasville GA 31757

THOMASVILLEMAGAZINE.COM | SPRING 2019

Protection You Can Trust Service You Can Depend On

Residential, Business, Government & New Construction Installations Intrusion Systems Fire Alarm Systems and Inspections Access Control Systems Video Survelliance Campus Security 24-Hour Monitoring Mobile & Online Alert and System Monitoring

Body & Paint Work • Frame Straightening

FREE ESTIMATES

54

65 Years

Florida Office

Georgia Office

1974 Commonwealth Ln Tallahassee, FL 32303

206 Plantation Oak Drive Thomasville, GA 31792

(850) 224-7900

(229) 226-4826

Visit us online at gafl-alarms.com

FL LIC. #EF0000115 | GA LIC. #LVU001628


FROM THE BOOKSHELF

Annie’s Fave Reads

TH E PRO PR I E T R E SS OF TH OM A SV I L L E ’ S I ND EPEND ENT BO O KSTO R E SHAR ES HER SPR I NG PICKS

BY ANNIE B. JONES | Owner of the Bookshelf

If winter is perfect for cozying up with books in front of a warm fire, then Southern springs are made for reading on your front porch swing or sitting on a picnic blanket at the park. As our skies fill with the perfect shade of blue, we slowly ease out of hibernation, but that doesn’t mean we leave our books behind.

Instead, we bring them with us to the beach and to the ballpark, which means we need stories we can pick up and put down, books that can capture our attention even as our calendars fill back up with obligation. Not sure where to start? Here are some titles I think you can safely pack in your bag this spring > 55

THOMASVILLEMAGAZINE.COM | SPRING 2019


NO HAPPY ENDINGS (March 26) By Nora McInerny Essay collections are great for restless readers; they’ve got that “pick ‘em up when you can” kind of practicality to them. Nora McInerny’s new memoir is so good you won’t want to put it down. She writes with eloquence and humor about moving forward after a loss (McInerny lost her husband, her father and her unborn child in one awful year), and she reminds readers that joy and tragedy often go hand in hand. 56

THE ELEPHANT IN THE ROOM (out now) By Tommy Tomlinson I read this book at the start of the year, but I haven’t been able to get it out of my mind. Tommy Tomlinson is a journalist from North Carolina who often writes about sports and music. His memoir, then, is a departure from his typical subjects. In “The Elephant in the Room,” he chronicles his struggles with overeating, detailing how he’s learned to navigate the world as an obese man living in America. The result is a memoir that’s immensely personal but also eye-opening, humorous and tragic. Tomlinson’s prose calls to mind the great Southern storytelling of Rick Bragg — high praise but true.

THOMASVILLEMAGAZINE.COM | SPRING 2019


BOOKSHELF

RECOMMENDATIONS

BEYOND THE POINT (April 2) By Claire Gibson Historical fiction fans will be thrilled with this debut novel by writer and journalist Claire Gibson. In “Beyond the Point,” Gibson captures the heart and spirit of where she grew up: the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. Her three protagonists are fierce and fiery West Point cadets, and as the novel opens, the three women face the aftermath of 9/11. The book serves as a coming-of-age for the three women, but it’s also a powerful testament to female friendship and holding tight to the people we love in a changing world. THE CARE & FEEDING OF RAVENOUSLY HUNGRY GIRLS (out now) By Anissa Gray Fans of Tayari Jones’ “An American Marriage” (last year’s Oprah selection) will enjoy this debut novel by CNN correspondent Anissa Gray. The Butler sisters have stuck together through the very worst of circumstances, but as the book opens, they face something unthinkable: Their eldest sister, and de facto matriarch, is serving time in prison. Now Viola and Lillian have their sister’s daughters to raise, plus a family reputation to redeem in a broken community. This tale would make a great book club selection this spring.

More Picks > 57

THOMASVILLEMAGAZINE.COM | SPRING 2019


DAISY JONES & THE SIX (out now) By Taylor Jenkins Reid Did you adore Lady Gaga’s performance in “A Star Is Born?” What about Kate Hudson’s Oscar-winning turn in “Almost Famous?” “Daisy Jones & The Six” is reminiscent of both, and in all the best ways. The book serves as an oral history of a fictional-but-you’ll-wonder-if-it’s-

real seventies rock band, chronicling their highs and their inevitably crushing lows. Taylor Jenkins Reid has become a go-to author for me. I find her books to be well-written but also compulsively readable, making them easy to recommend. This one is no different.

MY SISTER, THE SERIAL KILLER (out now) By Oyinkan Braithwaite “My Sister, the Serial Killer” is clever and irreverent and tonguein-cheek, and author Oyinkan Braithwaite manages to pack a punch in a pretty slim volume. She turns the thriller/suspense genre on its head by identifying the killer on the very first page; instead of trying to solve a twisted whodunit, readers are left to grapple with the repercussions of Korede’s murderous sister. I can’t imagine a better book to throw in your beach bag over spring break. TM

58

THOMASVILLEMAGAZINE.COM | SPRING 2019


DOWNTOWN MERCHANTS

The Don’t Miss Places E N J OY M O R E OF D OWN TOWN TH OM ASV I L L E W HEN YO U SHO P LO CAL

DON’T MISS THESE STORES > 59

THOMASVILLEMAGAZINE.COM | SPRING 2019


MERCHANTS

DOWNTOWN

M

Jr, Misses and Plus Size Apparel and Accessories

M

a passion for fashion and a cure for cancer 108 N. Broad St.

229.236.7465 TUES - SAT 10am-5:30pm

Flourish of Thomasville 216 S. Broad St. Downtown Thomasville

60

CBD oils and balms

Essential Oils

Items to encourage healthier lifestyles

THOMASVILLEMAGAZINE.COM | SPRING 2019

Telephone: 229-236-5111 Like and follow us


A SOUTHERN LIFESTYLE CO.

Serving omasville for 12 years

61

THOMASVILLEMAGAZINE.COM | SPRING 2019


What's important to you? Let's talk. Erik von Hellens, CFP®, AAMS® Financial Advisor .

124 E Jackson St Thomasville, GA 31792 229-225-9393

MKT-5894F-A-A1

www.edwardjones.com

Downtown Thomasville • 8am to 6pm

62

THOMASVILLEMAGAZINE.COM | SPRING 2019


AROUND TOWN

Were You Spotted? SNA PSH OTS OF L I FE I N T HE R ED HI L L S R EGI O N

LAURA PIKE AND LARRY DAVIS RING THE BELL AT HISTORIC GOOD SHEPHERD CHURCH

Submit your photos Send your photo and a description to crlayfield@gmail.com

63

THOMASVILLEMAGAZINE.COM | SPRING 2019


ThomasvilleThomas County Father Daughter Dance Photos courtesy of Photography by D.J.

JOE LESEUR AND HIS DAUGHTER

FRANK MITCHELL AND HIS DAUGHTER

DEXTER JONES AND HIS DAUGHTERS 64

THOMASVILLEMAGAZINE.COM | SPRING 2019


EMPLOYEES OF THOMASVILLE PHYSICAL THERAPY LINE UP AT THE FIRST OPTION CARE ANNUAL 5K/RUN WALK photography by Maura Marchant MEMBERS OF THOMASVILLE HIGH SCHOOL NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY SERVE AT SECOND HARVEST

A UNICORN READS HER BOOK

HILLARY GAU LTNEY AND MEGHAN RID ENOUR


Calendar OF Events MARCH • APRIL • MAY • JUNE

This calendar runs as submitted by Thomasville Mainstreet and Visitors Center.


March2019 March 12, 2019 TEF Concert Series – Scharoun Ensemble Berlin The eight-member ensemble of wind and string artists from the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra celebrates the rich musical heritage of the past and the exciting music of today. March 13-15, 2019 Explore the Deep Blue Seas Have you ever wanted to visit the Georgia Aquarium but simply have not found the time to make it? Then stop by the library and visit right in your hometown! Explore and visit with the animals of the sea through virtual reality stations. Learn all about the African Penguin and see a real penguin egg! Don’t forget to stop in on March 13th at 1.00pm and learn about the effects climate change has inflicted on these creatures livelihoods and small changes you can make to help reduce your impact. March 15, 2019 Farmers Daughter Vineyard & Tasting Room Presents Smith acoustic set by house musician Robert Willis! Come enjoy some award winning wine and bring your tribe! For more information contact Whitney Hines at (229)403-4958

April2019 April 1-25, 2019 WORKING LIKE A DOG: A Loan Exhibition from the Genesee Museum at Pebble Hill Plantation An important exhibition of paintings, prints and sculpture, from the 17th through the 20th centuries, entitled “Working Like A Dog,” will be on view at Pebble Hill Plantation Museum, located in Thomasville, GA, November 2, 2018 – April 29, 2019. Works by some of the most celebrated American and British sporting, animal and wildlife artists in history will be represented in the exhibition -- Henry Alken Sr., Frank Wootton, Maud Earl, H.B Chalon, James Hardy Jr., Francis Barlow, and Gustav Muss Arnolt. The exhibition will be on loan from the historic Genesee Museum in Mumford, New York and celebrates man’s best friend -- dogs of all shapes, sizes and breeds -- at work and play -- hunting, retrieving, herding, racing and guarding through paintings, prints and sculpture. Pebble Hill Plantation Museum is regarded as one of the nation’s premiere galleries of Sporting Art.

March 23, 2019 Hands & Hearts for Horses 7th Annual Hoedown Come join us Friday, March 22nd for a fun filled and boot stomping evening to benefit Hands & Hearts for Horses’ therapeutic horseback riding programs for individuals with special needs. This event will feature smooth sounds from Chip Tanner and the Remedy as well as finger lickin’ BBQ from Smokin’ Temptations. This year, we’re bringing this annual event back to our facility on Lower Cairo Road! Come out and meet our horses, riders and see our beautiful facility! Event proceeds benefit the programs and participants of Hands & Hearts for Horses year-round equine-assisted therapy programs. For more info or to sponsor a table please visit our website at www.handsandheartsforhorses.com or at Susie at 229-551-0086. March 23, 2019 Another Night of Bluegrass Beginning at 7:30 pm, The award winning Larry Stephenson Band has been entertaining audiences for 30 years including their numerous performances on the Grand Ole Opry, RFD-TV and headlining festivals and concerts all across the US and Canada. The group is led by Virginia Country Music Hall of Fame member and 5-time Society for The Preservation of Bluegrass Music in America (SPBGMA) Male Vocalist of the year. They also inducted Stephenson into their Hall Of Greats in 2018. With numerous IBMA and SPBGMA nominations and awards, Larry records on his own label, Whysper Dream Music. To purchase tickets call (229) 228-7977 or visit the Thomasville Visitor’s Center! March 28, 2019 TEF Concert Series: Catherine Russell One of jazz’s most celebrated vocalists, an incandescent performer … with a vast and varied book of salty blues, swooning ballads, pre-World War II pop tunes and vintage R&B. The concert starts at 7:30pm at the Thomasville Center for the Arts, 600 East Washington Street, Thomasville, Ga. For tickets or more info, visit: www.tefconcerts.com

April2019 The Loan Exhibition from the Genesee Museum is the second in a new program of exhibitions that Pebble Hill Plantation has hosted from associated museum and art institutions in the United States. For more information contact Jenna Doleh at (212) 829-0002 or jd@sharpthink.com

67

THOMASVILLEMAGAZINE.COM | SPRING 2019


CALENDAR April 1-8, 2019 Calligrapher Lizzie Jones @ Grassroots Coffee Co. Thomasville Center for the Arts PRESENTS: Lizzie Jones, Calligrapher Calligrapher, Lizzie Jones, aims to break out of digital routines and communicate in a more meaningful way by putting pen to paper. Exhibition January 10-April 8 at Grassroots Coffee. For more information contact dtaylor@thomasvillearts.org April 5, 2019 First Friday Sip ‘N’ Stroll FREE ADMISSION & FUN FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY! Time: 6-10 pm --What is First Friday Sip & Stroll? It’s a great night to come Downtown and sip, stroll, shop, dine, and listen to some great music. Participating shops and restaurants will be open late, and our concert featuring the Billy Rigsby Band will be held from 8-10 pm at The Ritz Amphitheater (131 South Stevens Street). This gives you time to shop and dine before the concert. For more information, call (229) 228-7977. April 5, 2019 Farmers Daughter Vineyard & Tasting Room Presents Smith acoustic set by house musician Robert Willis! Come enjoy some award winning wine and bring your tribe! For more information contact Whitney Hines at (229)403-4958 April 5, 2019 Enlightening Bites: History of the Rose Show Bring your lunch and enjoy this stimulating series of lectures on subjects of interest in your area. This month, we will be welcoming Thomasville’s Tom Faircloth. Tom has been an active member of the community since moving back home in 1965. He was the president of the Thomasville Jaycees for over two decades and produced the Miss Thomasville Pageant for the same length of time. He served as the Rose Show chair for four years and spent a decade as mayor/mayor pro temp on the Thomasville City Council. Tom will be enlightening us on the rich and ever evolving history of the Georgia famous Thomasville Rose Show. Learn about its humble beginnings and how it grew to the size it is today. Complimentary refreshments and drinks will be offered, but we highly encourage you to bring and enjoy your lunch.

68

THOMASVILLEMAGAZINE.COM | SPRING 2019

April 11, 2019 Rhythm & Roots 7-10 pm Check out DUESOUTHMUSIC.ORG for more information April 12-14, 2019 Thomasville Landmarks Georgia Trust Ramble Thomasville was once known as the “Winter Resort of the South,” hosting America’s wealthiest families in the late 19th century. Enjoy a rare opportunity to experience its rich history and southern hospitality. Rambles feature exclusive tours and social events in historic properties not usually open to the public. Tours of historic homes and buildings are self-guided, and guests provide their own transportation. Maps and programs are provided at packet pick-up. Catered meals are offered as part of registration packages; however, there are tour-only (no meals) options as well. These trips attract hundreds of participants per Ramble and are offered two weekends each year (fall and spring). Recent Rambles have included Marietta, the Golden Isles, Athens and Americus. For more information, contact the Trust’s Special Events Department at 404-885-7812 or SpecialEvents@GeorgiaTrust.org. **Times are subject to change. Event occurs rain or shine. April 13, 2019 TEF presents Peter and the Wolf The glorious musical composition of “Peter and the Wolf” by Sergei Prokofiev will be performed on flute, oboe, clarinet, horn and bassoon by Quintastic, with story narration by Dr. Karl Barton. Part of TEF’s Family Series, in conjunction with the Thomasville Center for the Arts, this fun family performance is free for students and children under 18; accompanying adult tickets are $10. For more information contact (229) 226-7404 April 13, 2019 Due South A production of Thomasville Center for the Arts, DUE SOUTH weaves together the richness of sights, sounds and tastes of the South to create an engaging tapestry of artistic expression – enriching, inspiring and connecting us to our shared heritage. Save the Date for the 8th annual DUE SOUTH on April 13, 2019 in Thomasville, GA. DUESOUTHMUSIC.ORG


April 19, 2019 Farmers Daughter Vineyard & Tasting Room Presents Smith acoustic set by house musician Robert Willis! Come enjoy some award winning wine and bring your tribe! For more information contact Whitney Hines at (229)403-4958 April 20, 2019 YMCA Rose City Walk EARLY REGISTRATION: $21 by April 6th LATE REGISTRATION: $24 after April 6th NO RACE DAY REGISTRATION // For more information call (229) 226-3446 April 20, 2019 Pebble Hill Plantation Easter Egg Hunt Pebble Hill is hosting it’s annual Easter Egg Hunt on the grounds. This fun event is $5 per person and is for ages 2 yrs old - 2nd grade. Dress in your Easter outfit and bring your basket. There will be refreshment, and games and activities. Pre-registration by March 24th is required by calling 229-226-2344 or email lcurtis@ pebblehill.com.

April 25-27, 2019 Thomasville’s 98th Annual Rose Show & Festival Times and locations vary, Downtown Thomasville, GA - We’re celebrating 98 years! This three-day event is held in beautiful historic Downtown Thomasville and has been a southwest Georgia tradition since the 1920s! What started in 1921 as a display in Neel’s Department Store organized with only $25 (won by a group of garden club ladies who won 1st place in the state fair for their display of locally grown vegetables and fruits) has now grown to a 3-day festival with over 25,000 visitors! Join us for all the fun and festivities! Enjoy roses, roses and more roses, plus four flower shows, a children’s parade, a larger and more exciting Rose Parade, a street dance featuring the Swingin’ Medallions, fireworks, fantastic food, a car and truck show and family friendly activities in Paradise Park. We’re pulling out all the stops to make this year the best Rose Show and Festival yet! For more info and a complete listing of events and locations, click here. Also included in the Rose Show and Festival weekend activities are the Rose City 10K Run, Walk & One-Mile Run (for information call 229.226.9878 or visit www. ymca-thomasville.org) and the Rose City Golf Classic (for information call 229.225.4333 or visit www.countryoaksgolfcourse.org). Info: Thomasville Main Street, 229-228-7977, For a detailed listing of each event, visit the Rose Show and Festival tab on our website at http://thomasvillega.com/attractions/festivals/thomasville-rose-show-festival

April 27, 2019 YMCA Rose City Run and One Mile Run ROSE CITY 10K RUN April 27, 2019 at 8:00 A.M. EARLY REGISTRATION: $21.00 by April 13th LATE REGISTRATION: $24.00 after April 13th RACE DAY REGISTRATION FROM 6:30-7:30 in the Big Oak Park ROSE CITY ONE MILE RUN (12 years and under) April 27, 2019 at 9:30 A.M. EARLY REGISTRATION: $12.00 by April 13th LATE REGISTRATION: $15.00 after April 13th. For more information call (229) 226-3446

May2019 May 3, 2019 Enlightening Bites: Welcome to Thomasville Bring your lunch and enjoy this stimulating series of lectures on subjects of interest in your area. This month (the finally lecture in our 2018-2019 season), we will be welcoming Preservation Programs Manager Sophia Latz of Thomasville Landmarks. Sophia is a Double Dawg, holding a BA in History and a Master of Historic Preservation from the University of Georgia. A native Thomasvillian, she was inspired to pursue preservation after countless drives down Dawson Street and hours spend on downtown’s brick streets. “Welcome to Thomasville” As Main Street says, we’re “a historically modern and culturally vibrant place where people live, work and play.” We park on the historic cobblestone bricks, shop in the historic downtown, and live in historic houses. Thomasville is historic. So how has Thomasville benefited from the label “historic,” and how, exactly, has historic preservation impacted our town? Complimentary refreshments and drinks will be offered, but we highly encourage you to bring and enjoy your lunch. May 3, 2019 First Friday FREE ADMISSION & FUN FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY! Time: 6-10 pm --What is First Friday Sip & Stroll? It’s a great night to come Downtown and sip, stroll, shop, dine, and listen to some great music. Participating shops and restaurants will be open late, and our concert will be held from 8-10 pm at The Ritz Amphitheater (131 South Stevens Street) featuring the Bay Kings Band! This gives you time to shop and dine before the concert. For more information, call (229) 228-7977.

69

THOMASVILLEMAGAZINE.COM | SPRING 2019


June2019 June 7, 2019 First Friday Sip ‘N’ Stroll FREE ADMISSION & FUN FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY! Time: 6-10 pm --What is First Friday Sip & Stroll? It’s a great night to come Downtown and sip, stroll, shop, dine, and listen to some great music. Participating shops and restaurants will be open late, and our concert will be held from 8-10 pm at The Ritz Amphitheater (131 South Stevens Street) featuring Grains of Sand! This gives you time to shop and dine before the concert. For more information, call (229) 228-7977. Band to be announced soon.

June 14, 2019 Thomasville Rose Queen Pageant The Thomasville Rose Queen Pageant presented by the Junior Service League of Thomasville is a staple on local calendars as we celebrate and crown a young lady as the reigning Queen, and ambassador to our sweet City. More details and applications available soon at jslthomasville.com, and on Facebook @ jslthomasville. For more information please email tjslpresident@gmail.com.

June 7, 2019 Farmers Daughter Vineyard & Tasting Room Presents Smith acoustic set by house musician Robert Willis! Come enjoy some award winning wine and bring your tribe! For more information contact Whitney Hines at (229)403-4958.

70

THOMASVILLEMAGAZINE.COM | SPRING 2019

The first and finest in the Red Hills Region


Here. For you. At Synovus, we truly understand what matters to you; that’s why we’re doing all we can to help you grow. Not just a bank, we’re your neighbors and friends. People from here who understand here. And we’re here. For you. 1-888-SYNOVUS | synovus.com

Synovus Bank, Member FDIC.


229.226.6074 | southernpinessl.com

Thomasville’s premier senior living community with a designated and secure memory care neighborhood led by certified dementia practitioners.