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The Press

Of the people, by the people, for the people Publisher Dan Mathers Dan@thewcpress.com Advertising Manager Nick Vecchio Nick@thewcpress.com Copy Editor Kehan DeSousa kdesousa@thewcpress.com Contributing Editor Jesse Piersol jpiersol@thewcpress.com

Columnists Chelsea Durning cdurning@thewcpress.com DJ Romeo romeo@thewcpress.com Mimi Zaborowski mimizab@thewcpress.com Jennifer Ozgur jozgur@thewcpress.com Clare Haggerty chaggerty@thewcpress.com Editorial Interns Gabrielle Dallazia Kyle Neubeck

Graphic Designer Kevin Fenton cargocollective.com/kevinfentondesign Published By The WC Press Contributing Photographers 13 South Church Street Luke Darigan West Chester, PA 19382 lukedarigan.com thewcpress.com Adam Jones 610-344-3463 adamjjones.com Andrew Hutchins afhutchins.com

Photography Interns Paul Imburgia Annie Tennyson Rachel Crew Marketing Intern Gina Mattioni

The WC Press is a monthly magazine distributed free of charge to more than 250 area businesses. For a free digital subscription, visit thewcpress.com. For more information about specific distribution locations visit thewcpress.com/distribution.

Worth Noting...

Our no-nonsense table of contents 17. WC By the Numbers Our monthly poll infographic 19. Bartender of the Month Meet Kara Johnson of Barnaby’s 27. ART: Made in America The shop that sells only American 31. Proudly Made in WC The best factories of the borough 41. Makeover Avante on High styles a lovely lady 47. Owner of the Month Meet Matt Reed of America’s Pie 51. The Look Christine’s Consignment’s must-haves 59. Local Talent Radio Host Brynn McKenry of 1520WCHE 63. Games Photo Hunt and IconPop fo’ free JUly 2013 | thewcpress.com

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the wc press | voice of the borough


From the Editor...

Sometimes it’s better to be a mutt I used to say I was Irish. I didn’t say this out of any specific knowledge about my lineage, because I didn’t have any. I said it because people told me that my light skin, dark hair and blue eyes made me look Irish, and I’d heard my mom make a few comments about being Black Irish, whatever that meant. So, when people would ask me, “What are you?” I’d say, “I’m Irish.” I don’t say that anymore. Part of the reason I no longer claim to be Irish is because I finally bothered to find out a thing or two about where I come from. It turns out that, while there is some Irish in my ancestry, I’m no more Irish than I am about a dozen other European lineages. Sure, there’s the standard white people ancestry: English–check. French–check. German? Yeah, that too. But then there’s also the not-so-common ones mixed in there: Portuguese, Hungarian, even Cherokee. When my great aunt came to visit this year from California, we went through the family tree she’s assembling, and I found out I’ve got a good chunk of Eastern European DNA… which might explain my love of vodka. The other reason I no longer say I’m Irish also happens to come from Eastern Europe. About five minutes into every conversation my wife has with a new acquaintance, they catch on to her accent. The question of, “Where are you from?” inevitably arises. “Belarus,” she says. Nine times out of ten they say, “Where’s that?” and Tanya patiently explains. The explanation’s usually followed by a few seconds lost in thought, eyes turned towards the ceiling as they try to envision the map of Europe. Then they say, “Okay. I think I know where that is. I’m actually ***insert major European country here***.” Tanya is always polite. She smiles and says, “Oh really?” But, I know from experience that she’s really thinking, “No, you’re not. You’re American.” And, she’s right. We Americans are unique in the way that we hold on to our ancestry and proudly proclaim to be from anywhere but here. Still, more than half a million people apply to become American citizens each year. Are foreigners really the only ones who understand the value of being American? Being American-made is something we should take pride in, but for some reason our actions rarely match our rhetoric. Of the 100 people we polled for our WC by the Numbers feature this month [see page 17], only 13 said they always try to buy American. And, if they were honest, I think most of them would admit they were just trying to give the “right” answer, since they were sipping imported drinks, wearing imported clothes. Maybe this issue will give us all a bit of help in reforming those bad habits. Inside these pages you’ll find stories about West Chester factories producing products that are utilized world-wide. You’ll find out about stores that sell nothing but American-made goods. You’ll meet local business owners who couldn’t be more proud to proclaim themselves American. Nowadays, I’m one of them. When asked, “What are you?” I smile and say, “I’m American.” And while people often give me funny looks or assume that I didn’t understand the question and then try to clarify what was meant, in the end they always catch on: I’m American, and I’m pretty damn proud of that. -DM

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SUPER SUNDAY

Gay Street shut down for the borough’s biggest street festival. Live music, great food and vendors lining the streets make Super Sunday one of West Chester’s most popular events. photos by Paul Imburgia

Hannah Poles, Brent Porter

Randy Lyons

Lisa, Mike, Emily, Claire

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Antoine and Keñosha Skinner

6.2


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SUPER SUNDAY

Gay Street shut down for the borough’s biggest street festival. Live music, great food and vendors lining the streets make Super Sunday one of West Chester’s most popular events. photos by Paul Imburgia

Stephanie and Matt Rygler

Mason Porter

Billy Ronayne

Steve, Kathy, Abbey, Dale, Dale, Carol, Bill, Terri

Kristin York, Eileen Cannistraci, Maureen Weinberger, Janine Moody, Heidi Giangiulio

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Moritz Mueller, Abi Kelley

6.2


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SUPER SUNDAY photos Paul Imburgia

Gay Street shut down for the borough’s biggest street festival. Live music, great food and vendors lining the streets make Super Sunday one of West Chester’s most popular events. photos by Paul Imburgia

Karisma, Morgan

Waffatopia

Yvonne Singh, Gina Mangini, Kenneth Upshur, Drew Austin

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Roberto, Alyssa, Jim

Olivia and Madeline Raube

6.2


1227 West Chester Pk 610-436-5222

Celtic Clambake Every Wednesday

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Best Steak House In West Chester Live Music on Weekends, Patio Dining Fabulous Martinis, Seasonal Menu

125 W Market Street West Chester, PA 484.760.6100 ď ´ PietrosPrime.com pietrosprime.com/facebook

BROTHERS

PIZZA & PASTA

~THE ORIGINAL~ SINCE 1991

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610-431-1000 www.originalbrotherspizza.com

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WC BY THE NUMBERS: MADE IN AMERICA EDITION OUR MARKETING INTERN GINA MATTIONI GOT TO WORK AT A BARNABY’S THURSDAY NIGHT HAPPY HOUR AND POLLED 100 ATTENDANTS WITH THE FOLLOWING FIVE QUESTIONS...

HOW MANY GENERATIONS OF YOUR FAMILY HAVE BEEN BORN AMERICAN?

HOW OFTEN DO YOU BUY AMERICAN PRODUCTS? ALWAYS

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SOMETIMES

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47

I DON’T THINK ABOUT IT

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40

20 YEARS YOUR FAMILY HAS LIVED IN WEST CHESTER? 12 57 9

2

9

11 23 WHAT PART OF THE WORLD DOES YOUR FAMILY COME FROM? DO YOU HAVE A FRIEND OR FAMILY MEMBER IN THE US ARMED FORCES?

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FAVORITE AMERICAN FOOD STYLE

YES / 53%

NO / 47%

BARBECUE

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5

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CAJUN FAST FOOD SOUTHERN SOUTHWESTERN

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presented by High Street Caffe

Happy Hour

7 Days a Week creole fusion gourmet takeout takeout craft beer $35 prix-fixe menu Jazz on Tuesdays 322 s HigH street 610-696-7435

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the wc press | voice of the borough


Bartender of the Month Kara Johnson runs the show at Barnaby’s of America Story Kyle Neubeck Photo Luke Darigan Ruling the roost at Barnaby’s is a tough job. Handling both the mellow afternoon crowd and the chaotic Thursday night happy hour takes someone with patience and personality. Kara Johnson has plenty of both. A proud mother of two who says, “I don’t know what’s worse: teenagers or bar patrons,” Kara’s bubbly personality is noticeable immediately. Her approach to dealing with diverse crowds is what helps her stand out. Talking to Kara, she seems amazed that she gets paid for what she does. “People pay to attend the circus; I get paid to watch the show! Plus, I have a reality TV addiction and bartending is like being in a reality show.” It’s true. The crowds that haunt Barnaby’s often look like they’re plucked straight off your widescreen. From the raucous Jersey Shore types to the posh Real Housewives lookalikes, Kara’s bar could double as an open casting call. Regardless of the clientele, Kara’s focus on making the best of each shift helps her enjoy dealing with different responsibilities that come with each day. “Thursdays are definitely one of the crazier shifts,” says

Kara. “They are crazy packed, and I know everyone there since I am in charge of Happy hour. Sometimes my name is yelled a little too much!” Though Kara enjoys the madness Thursday night brings, she also likes the more subdued Sunday shift, where she gets to interact with her bartending peers. “Sundays are our ‘in the biz’ night. I get to have a great time and hang out with all the other bartenders in town while I work. We also have a Brent Christopher acoustic act on Sunday. He’s a lot of fun and has even made songs up about me!” Before her post at Barnaby’s, Kara got her feet wet at T.G.I. Friday’s, Longhorn Steakhouse, and P.F. Chang’s, building her bartending resume and gaining experience in behind-the-scenes work. All the while, she remained focused on West Chester as a destination down the line. Despite being happy at P.F. Chang’s for more than three years, Kara saw the opening of Barnaby’s as a great opportunity. As it would turn out, she was a perfect fit right here on High Street, where her experience and personality have made her an asset. “I only left because I heard Barnaby’s was opening, and I really wanted to get into the West Chester bar scene,” she confessed. “I am wild and crazy and knew that would

be the place for me… Today I bartend and do marketing stuff for Barnaby’s. I am in charge of our Thursday night Happy hour and our office parties. People can win free food and cheap drinks on us! I text and email hundreds of people... so basically all of West Chester has my phone number, which can get real interesting at times.” Having been at Barnaby’s since day one, Kara has watched as the bar has grown and feels a special type of pride. “Barnaby’s is one of the biggest and busiest bars in Dub C, and I am so happy to work there. There are a lot of great bars to go to in West Chester. Knowing that I can be the deciding factor in where patrons choose to go is a great feeling. I get paid to be my crazy, happy self and ensure everyone has a great time. Who wouldn’t want this job?” This passion and excitement for her job has not gone unnoticed by our community. At this year’s annual Bartender’s Ball, Kara fell just shy of the coveted Bartender of The Year award, finishing second in a race that came down to the wire. Asking her about the defeat drew a sarcastic, “Next question, please,” but she was quick to laugh and say that, “It was a great honor to be chosen and [have] hundreds of people vote for me.” Even in defeat Johnson’s personality shines through. Her hard work and charm make her a valuable commodity anywhere, but luckily for the borough, she makes Barnaby’s a fun place to visit. WCP

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THE LIBRARY’S 125th ANNIVERSARY PARTY

The Historic West Chester Public Library hosted a block party to celebrate 125 years of service to the community, complete with entertainment and a picnic on the lawn of one of the borough’s finest estates. photos by Annie Tennyson

6.8

Miss Pennsylvania Junior Teen Abigail Rule

Sophie and Charis Clara

Valentine Gomez, Summer Thompson, Harriet Laurin

Max Kneis, Carol Baker, Max Dobles, Laura Dobles, Angie Scherffel

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the wc press | voice of the borough

Carole Hamburger


Join us for FREE Services for the High Holidays MAKOM KADOSH: The Jewish Fellowship of Chester County

ROSH HASHANAH Wednesday September 4 Join us for veggie/dairy dinner at 6pm Evening service begins at 7pm Thursday September 5 10am

Engaging, inclusive Judaism for the 21st century

Temenos Retreat Center 1564 Telegraph Road West Chester, PA 19382

www.TheJFCC.com ď ł 484-947-6806

YOM KIPPUR

Rabbi Elyse Seidner-Joseph Looking for innovative, accessible Judaism? Come check us out BEFORE the High Holidays! 1st and 3rd Fridays of each month at 6:30pm Musical, casual services and veggie/dairy potluck dinner 685 Broad Run Road, West Chester, PA 19382

Kol Nidre Friday September 13 6:30pm Saturday September 14 10am Milestone Events 600 East Market Street West Chester, PA 19382

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THE LIBRARY’S 125th ANNIVERSARY PARTY

The Historic West Chester Public Library hosted a block party to celebrate 125 years of service to the community, complete with entertainment and a picnic on the lawn of one of the borough’s finest estates. photos by Annie Tennyson

Vocal Ease

Ryan Shupard

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Valerie Morel, Leon Morel-Meiche

Eric Knight

6.8


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the wc press | voice of the borough


The Makeshift Chef Chelsea Durning is a cook by trade, and she’s not shy about sharing her wisdom with our readers when people think of “American food” nowadays, they think of fried or fast food, but for me, the greatest thing about American food is that it draws from all different kinds of cultures–and what is even better is that it can be healthy and delicious! Here are a few classic “American” dishes. Mac and Cheese with Bacon 1 pint heavy cream; 4 cups elbow macaroni, cooked; 1 cup shredded cheddar; 3 pieces bacon, cooked and chopped; salt and pepper to taste In a sauce-pot, heat up the heavy cream. Add the macaroni, cheese, bacon, salt and pepper. Cook until cheese is completely melted. Cheeseburger 3 lbs. ground meat (typically at an 80/20 ratio, so there’s 80% meat and 20% fat. The more fat, the more tender the burger); 1 onion, small dice; 2 tbsp. garlic powder; 1 tbsp. oregano; ¾ cup bread crumbs; 2 eggs, whole; salt and pepper to taste In a large bowl, mix the ground meat, diced onion, garlic powder, oregano, bread crumbs, eggs, salt and pepper. Form into 8 patties, each weighing 6 oz. Heat grill on high. For medium rare, cook for about 3 minutes on each side; add 2 minutes on each side for medium, and an additional 2 minutes on each side over that for well-done. Before taking the burgers off the grill, place the cheese on top and cook for an extra 30 seconds. Toast the buns on the grill for about a minute. Place the cooked burger on the bottom bun. Layer on the lettuce, tomato, onion, and whatever condiments you wish. Key Lime Pie Surprise 2 lbs. cream cheese, room temperature; 8 oz. granulated sugar; 2 cups Key Lime juice; 1 qt. heavy cream, whipped until stiff; 1 lime, zested; ½ box Graham rackers, finely ground; 1 stick butter, melted; 1 pkg. strawberry-flavored Pop Rocks In a bowl mix the Graham cracker crumbs, melted butter and Pop Rocks. Form the crust into a pie shell. Don’t cook it! The pop rocks will melt and then there won’t be any surprise. In a large mixing bowl, cream together the cream cheese, sugar, and Key Lime juice. Carefully fold the whipped cream and zest into the cream cheese mixture. Smooth on top of the crust. You will want to make this the same day you want to serve it. If the Pop Rocks are exposed to air for any length of time, there will be less of a popping effect. cdurning@thewcpress.com

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SUNSET HILL HILL JEWELERS at Sunset Hill Gallery

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We strive to carry only jewelry made in the USA and custom-designed jewelry made by our team of Goldsmiths

The works of Harry Dunn showing through July and August

Extended Summer Hours  Open Tuesday–Saturday

23 N High St, West Chester  610-692-0374 www.harrydunngallery.com

23 N High St, West Chester  610-692-0374 www.sunsethilljewelers.com

the wc press | voice of the borough


Yes, art can be found in the brushstrokes of a Van Gogh or the splatters of a Pollock, but it can also be found in a jar of barbeque sauce and a sculpture of recycled forks. This simple fact is embodied by The 5 Senses, Karen Cavin’s gift shop and art gallery on Market Street. Cavin has been offering her unique collection of functional North American art to customers since May of 2005. Before that, she was a graphic designer for 30 years. And in between, she’s been trying her hand at nearly every kind of art. “I’ve done about everything in here except glassblowing,” she explains. Cavin’s passionate exploration of the art world has transformed her into a distinctive storeowner with an appreciation for creativity, quality and community. Throughout the last eight years, she’s amassed a collection of enviable, diverse art — everything from candles to jewelry to, yes, barbeque sauce. With such a wide range of products, The Five Senses wrangles in customers aged anywhere from eight to 80. Watching young children as they peer around the store is especially fulfilling for Cavin: “Every once in a while we get these kids who are awestruck by all the colors and shapes and stuff. There are some kids who are really attuned to art and it’s really fun to watch.” It’s hard to imagine anyone who wouldn’t be awestruck while browsing the shelves upon shelves of beautiful pieces. Although Cavin admits that the store is “space-challenged,” she has managed to create a layout in keeping with her artistic eye. Customers certainly aren’t turned off by the store’s square footage. If anything, it fosters an atmosphere of community within the space. As soon as you walk in, there’s an employee waiting to help with any questions. Cavin and her staff pride themselves on providing insight into the artists. Knowing the history behind a purchase creates a unique experience for customers that they can’t get at just any store in the mall. “We know the story. We know about every artist. That’s important,” Cavin says. She points to a display of spoons on the wall and proceeds to give me the scoop. Jonathan’s Spoons® are made about an hour north of West Chester up near Allentown. Jonathan’s wife

b

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erbiso

lly H y Mo

is also in the spoon business. Her product line, MoonSpoons®, can also be found on the shelves of The 5 Senses. Cavin further explains that Jonathan’s daughter, Hannah, has inherited the crafting gene; she creates wooden iPad and iPhone stands. “She thought that up on her own. Her parents are very proud of her,” Cavin says. It’s clear that Cavin relishes these close relationships with the artists she carries. Since many artists are local, they drop into the store frequently. For example, Pat Ackerman, a West Chester-based glassblower, comes every First Friday. “She’s become the artist-in-residence, she’s always here,” Cavin reveals. The Five Senses carries 20 Pennsylvania artists, of which about ten are from West Chester. The other artists are based all over North America, with the exception of one jewelry-maker, Paola Delgado, from Peru, producer of the Mujus line. Cavin was won over by the Mujus business model, and decided that the Peruvian tagua nut jewelry fit with the vibe of the store. It’s bold, it’s colorful, it’s renewable, and she knew her customers would love it. Of course, not every artist fits in The 5 Senses. “A lot of artists find me,” Cavin admits. “They don’t all fit in here. I try to give helpful advice about how to make their items more marketable.” While many businesses are all about take, Cavin truly finds comfort figuring out what she can give. On a trip down to an Atlanta-based artist’s studio, Cavin realized her role in promoting small, American businesses. She saw the artist’s small staff of about four or five people and it really hit home that she played a part in employing them. “I figure I put three to four hundred people to work in America,” she estimates. As one would expect, Cavin extends her business philosophy to 

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Karen Cavin is surrounded by American-made art in her shop, The 5 Senses photo Luke Darigan

the town of West Chester. “We’re all in this together,” she explains. “If there are people in town, we’re all busy. It’s our job to get the people in the store, but getting people in the town is sometimes the harder job. I think that when businesses complement each other instead of compete with each other, we are all more successful.” That’s why Cavin makes sure to keep her inventory unique. “I don’t want to sell anything that’s sold in West Chester proper,” she states. “I try really hard to do that. I’m friends with many of the other store owners in town and we refer people to each other. My whole thing is I don’t want to sell the same thing somebody else is selling a block away.” This practice ensures that shoppers coming to West Chester will have a wider selection of products and will be more likely to keep coming back. If you’re in the mood to marvel at a jar of barbeque sauce, or to pick up your mom a present that she’ll always remember, or to simply congratulate Cavin and her staff, Kathleen Vaughan and Reneé Guida, for making West Chester a more beautiful place, I’ll help you out: 133 W. Market Street. Head on over right now.

The Goods... Hoboken Eddie’s: Hoboken Eddie uses fresh, all-natural ingredients to whip up a wide array of sauces. He grows all of his own peppers and harvests 1,000 pounds of them a year. The 5 Senses is proud to carry the largest selection of Hoboken Eddie’s sauces

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the wc press | voice of the borough

in Southeastern Pennsylvania. Customers wanting to spice up their summer barbeques should look no further than Cavin’s corner shelf of Hoboken Eddie’s to find the perfect flavor. In addition to classic barbeque and hot sauces, I spotted a Habañero Mustard that looked absolutely delicious. Karen Cavin recommends the Spicy Thai Chili Sauce. Bob Deane Pottery: Bob Deane is a local potter from Media who even digs his clay up locally. He is The 5 Senses’ biggest consigned artist. “His stuff sells off the bottom shelf,” Cavin marvels. “There are no two pieces alike. Ever. You have to be that kind of person who doesn’t want matchy-matchy mugs and plates. They coordinate, but they don’t match. They’re not perfect. He’s really huge.” Not only can customers get a piece of Deane from The Five Senses, but they can also catch a glimpse of his creative process at the Market Street Block Party on July 7 demonstrating his craft for visitors. Barrick Design Candles: Rick Barrick’s candles, made in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, are the first thing customers see when they walk into The 5 Senses. The colorful orbs, made of a soy and beeswax blend, have a distinctive crackle pattern on them. The effect is so beautiful that some customers don’t even want to burn the candles; they simply use them for decoration in order to preserve their beauty. Of course, if you should choose to light them, Cavin assures that they burn cleanly for a really long time. Yardbirds: These recycled metal creatures are the most popular item in The Five Senses, according to Cavin. It’s easy to see

why — adorable cats, dogs, birds, and countless other creatures peek out from their places on the shelves, inviting customers to take them home to spruce up yards and interiors. Some Yardbirds have specific functions, like plant holders or key holders, while others’ only purpose is to be downright adorable. Spiritiles: Houston Llew is the Atlantabased artist behind Spiritiles. He screenprints melted glass onto copper tiles and then fires the tile in a kiln at 1,500 degrees. These are pieces that you have to see to believe. Cavin got them in the store about a year ago, but she wasn’t sure how well they would sell because of their $99 pricetag. Cavin quickly realized that she had nothing to worry about. Within a month, she had ordered the Spiritiles three times. “They have been very popular. They’re good for weddings. People give them to expectant parents because of the pictures and sayings that are on them…some of them can just make you tear up thinking about a person. They’re really cool and they’ve been doing really well.” Each batch of tiles is a limited edition, so you have to hurry into the store before your favorites get retired Beatriz Ball: This line of polished aluminum bowls and platters is one of most popular wedding gifts sold in The 5 Senses. The pieces are created entirely by hand from the beginning stages of sand casting, to the final polishing stages. The end result is a stunning, functional work of art that will make a memorable gift for any bride and groom on your list. WCP


The WC July.2013_Layout 1 6/12/13 5:47 PM Page 1

Funky Functional American Art

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• engagement • wedding • graduation • birthday • anniversary • hostess gifts

The

Senses

North American Handmade Functional Works of Art

West Market St.

Block Party

Sat. July 6

4:30 to 7:30

Crustacean War on West Market St.

Crabs vs. Lobsters??

Mon~Fri \ 10 am to 6 pm \\ Sat \ 10 am to 5 pm \\ Sun 12 to 4 pm Open Late Every 1st Friday & 3rd Thursday - Girls Night Out

133 West Market Street, West Chester, PA • 610.719.0170

www.the5senses.com

Talk to your neighbors, then talk to me. Nancy Ellis, Agent 1515 West Chester Pike West Chester, PA 19382 Bus: 610-692-4398 nancy@nancyellis.net

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JUly 2013 | thewcpress.com

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Get In. We’re going to Toby’s!

705-B Westtown Road | 610-430-1330 | tobysk9kamp.com

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the wc press | voice of the borough


proudly

made in WC By Jesse Piersol

Modern manufacturing

often has a tenuous bond with communities. On the one hand, local manufacturers enable communities to grow and prosper, with vibrant towns and cities springing up around them. On the other hand, these same manufacturers often build their legacies in industries that don’t historically make the best decisions for the environment. But local manufacturing makes us all better neighbors: residents have the power to make sure companies uphold high standards, and companies see their workers — and their bottom lines — benefit from being engaged, essential members of the community. Right here in West Chester are two companies that embody what it means to be “made in America.” From the pride they take in their finished products, to the measures they employ to keep their workers and community safe, to the connection they foster with their town, these companies are superstars just around the corner.

Schramm Drilling Rigs Schramm’s most famous product almost sat in the Smithsonian Institution next to the Hope Diamond. Almost, because Smithsonian curators changed their minds and decided they only wanted the original product, or an exact replica, and not the fivefoot, perfectly rendered scale model being planned by a local 3D printing firm. Hence, the problem: the 40 by 40-foot space available next to the storied gem couldn’t come close to accommodating the tractor trailer-sized T130XD drill rig responsible for the October 2010 rescue of 33 workers trapped in a collapsed mine in Chile.“The Smithsonian did end up putting the rescue capsule in there, though,” says Fred Slack, vice president of business development at Schramm. “And we were invited to the reception.” Nestled in a quiet neighborhood a block from Henderson High School, Schramm has been making the world’s finest drill rigs and air compressors right here in West Chester since 1917. A bold assertion, but everyone at Schramm backs it up. Thirty-seven year veteran John Hadfield tells a story about a Wisconsin client who purchased a Schramm model to replace a competitor’s 

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cable rig. While using it on site for the first time, Hadfield relates, “The client says to me, ‘I don’t know John — I’m used to being on site for a month, and at this rate, I can be done in a day.” Hadfield adds, “I hear that all the time. I tell them, that’s because you got rid of the yellow and now you’re pumping Schramm red.” Schramm’s hydraulic-based rigs perform oil, gas, geothermal, and water well drilling, as well as mineral exploration and mine rescue, in more than 80 countries, in conditions as disparate as those found in Iceland and India. Although their customers dot the globe, their equipment helps out closer to home as well, in projects like the geothermal drilling at West Chester University and the new Warner Hotel, plus residential water wells throughout the region. The headquarters and workshops are impeccable. In the main entrance, safety and quality commendations line the walls. Cheryl Zultewicz, marketing services coordinator, hands over a pair of safety goggles when we head outside to see where the giant rigs are assembled. “I’m sorry, but you’ll have to wear these,” she smiles apologetically. Schramm’s ability to maintain such rigorous quality and safety controls for manufacturing and client operation is uniquely tied to their ongoing presence in the United States. Second-generation employee Nick Little, who works in customer service, says, “I brought a box of hearing protection to customers in India. It’s easy to think ‘oh, they have their own hearing protection, since they just spent a couple of million dollars on a drill rig,’ but they often don’t have the same safety standards that we do.” His father, sales manager John Little, agrees. “We train our customers in the maintenance and safe operation of their new rigs.” Schramm’s commitment to their clients is world-class, but so is their commitment to the local community. Cheryl Zultewicz, a Henderson grad, recalls that Schramm was just down the road during her years at the school. “I didn’t know what they did, but I knew they did lots of things for our town and the school.” From the beginning, Schramm’s primary goal was to support communities, and indeed, employees talk about Schramm like a second home. John Hadfield works here because his father worked here. “When I was a kid, Dad would always come home with an oil smell about him, and I wanted that.” Everyone around the conference room table laughs, but we also get what he means on a visceral level. John shares a story about a time when he had his son and daughter at work with him on a weekend, as he was testing a rig on a tight deadline. “Dick Schramm comes over and asks me, can I take your daughter for awhile?” Hadfield’s daughter and the chairman were both left-handed. “The next thing we know, my daughter is up in Dick Schramm’s office and they’re coloring in a book together. Everybody said, “Only Hadfield could get the CEO to babysit his daughter while he’s working in the plant.” Dick Schramm, now in his late seventies, still comes in every day, and Hadfield’s son Justin is the third generation Hadfield to join Schramm. “I remember coming in during the summers as a kid with my Dad.” Hadfield the younger grew up and traveled the country before returning to the area to join Schramm’s accounting department. “There’s something about West Chester. It’s nice to find a company that focuses on family and relationships.” Ryan Bennett is a fourth-generation employee. His dad designed the Telemast system used in rigs like the new T500XD, powerful enough to drill 15,000+ feet into the likes of the Marcellus and Utica shale deposits. Fred Slack says, “It’s a huge 

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The factory floor at Schramm in 2000 when the company celebrated its 100th anniversary

A Schramm T500XD drilling rig


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THE ORIGINAL WAILERS JUly 2013 | thewcpress.com

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Sunday Brunch 11am-2pm ramsheadbarandgrill.com 40 East Market Street 484-631-0241

Try our breakfast burrito with tots (and a Bloody Mary) 34

the wc press | voice of the borough


compliment to Mom or Dad, to go into their career field. Here is someone who is doing that after four generations.” Ryan Bennett is more pragmatic: “I was living at home and needed money. My dad said to get a job at Schramm.” Today, Bennett has gone from a “wrench head” service technician to a regional sales manager responsible for nearly half of the United States. Schramm benefits the community beyond the drilling industry as well. Nick Little talks about how out-of-town clients enjoy West Chester. “When they come here for training, they can stay at the Warner Hotel right in town, and they love it. They can have any type of food they want by walking to a restaurant.” Fred Slack estimates, “We probably book more than 100 nights per year at the Warner. It’s a nice hotel that’s only one mile away from our plant. We’ve had vegetarian guests from India and China who were able to find meals at local restaurants after suffering for a week elsewhere with few options.” On May 23, Governor Corbett awarded Schramm the Export Impact Award for the southeast region, in which Schramm beat out other nominees such as Boeing, Exton’s Analytical Graphics, and Elite Sportswear, a Reading company that makes women’s gymnastics clothing. Schramm representatives didn’t know they’d won until they attended the awards ceremony at the Hershey Lodge. It was another feather in the cap for a factory turning out world-class equipment from an unassuming industrial complex framed by a flagpole and a sign that proudly proclaims how many days have gone by since a safety incident (161 on the day I visited). Out in the yard, I stand next to a brand new T130XD. It is a red, hydraulic incarnation of a Clydesdale: powerful, sleek, purpose-built. I’m in love. And it’s not just the beauty of a finely built machine that I admire — it is the passion behind the machine. It’s hard not to love a product whose lineage runs so deeply in the community it supports. The employees I interviewed spoke with a genuine reverence for their work and their company. That dedication is every bit as beautiful as the shiny red T130XD.

When I was a kid, Dad would always come home with an oil smell about him, and I wanted that.

Sartomer “Everybody in this town has something in their house that was manufactured with one of our products.” Kevin Corcoran, Sartomer’s safety director, relays a partial list. “Countertops, hardwood floors, milk cartons, shiny magazine covers, sunglasses, DVDs.” He taps the edge of my MacBook. “Your computer screen.” Jim Zawicki, marketing communications manager and borough resident since 1994, explains it another way. “The process is like baking a cake: a number of ingredients go into the final recipe. Sartomer makes key ingredients for those recipes.”

The Sartomer plant at 610 Bolmar Street

Since 1967, Sartomer’s sky-blue buildings on Bolmar Street have been churning out chemicals that, when added to other compounds, enhance the performance of the finished product. The hardwood floor varnish that’s dry a mere two hours after application? That rubbery miracle of modern science on sticky notes that allows you to affix them to windows, office doors, and the backs of your coworkers’ shirts without leaving a snail trail of adhesive? All of those magical properties are the result of Sartomer’s specialty chemicals. Take varnish, the kind that is used on ready-to-assemble furniture. Virtually all of Sartomer’s products allow the varnish to dry completely when it is passed under a beam of ultraviolet light. The furniture pieces can be packaged for shipment immediately, saving the manufacturer time, and saving employees from 

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exposure to traditional solvents that cure over a period of hours or days. Out in the warehouse, forklifts zip through the perfectly arranged collection of 55-gallon drums stacked on shelves six high. Special grooves in the floor, fitted with sensors, keep the forklifts on a precise track to avoid clipping any containers by accident. “As you can imagine,” says Ken Sweeney, director of photocure manufacturing, “knocking over one of those drums could be quite serious.” Living near a chemical plant would give many people pause. “Usually, when people see a chemical plant on TV, it’s on fire,” says Corcoran, who is also captain of West Chester’s Fame Fire Company, as well as former fire chief of the West Chester Fire Department. “It’s hard to be the safety director at this plant, though, and not have a smile on your face every day. Right now we’re in the middle of an audit, and I’m relaxed, because I know the only thing the auditors can do is suggest improvements. They won’t find any violations.” Corcoran knows a bit about safety. He spent ten years as a safety engineer for Wyeth Labs. “My big career move was to walk across the street from Wyeth to Sartomer,” he laughs. “I was really impressed with the level of detail in safety within the chemical industry versus the pharmaceutical industry.” Brian Raudenbush, production manager at the plant, agrees. Early in his career, Raudenbush was involved with assessments of different manufacturers around the country to check out their safety procedures. “I saw how they did things, and I knew how we did things. We

Volumetric flasks made with Sartomer products

West Chester’s strength lies in its diversity–diversity of people and diversity of economic engines. already had all the safety equipment. We had a firefighter/captain as our safety engineer. “ When the Arkema Group acquired Sartomer, their standards required that all plants put in oxygen sensors to monitor the building for potentially deadly chemical leaks. “Sartomer already had them,” Raudenbush says. In the broader community, Sartomer heads up a Community Advisory Panel (CAP) that meets several times a year to update community members about activities at the plant, as well as to answer questions. Sartomer also partners with local schools, including Drexel and West Chester University, to offer internships and shadowing programs that nurture future generations of chemical engineers. Another outreach effort is more concrete. At the West Chester Day Care Center just down the street, “Sometimes they’ll need a toilet fixed, or something like that,” says Raudenbush. “Our maintenance workers volunteer their time to take care of that for them. They sent us a plaque that all the kids signed, and we had it in our conference room.” Like Schramm, Sartomer considers their West Chester location ideal because of the access to roads and ports. Sweeney also notes that producing very precise mixtures of chemicals requires

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expertise that is most abundantly available in the United States. “That’s the limitation of producing in a lot of other countries, like China or Mexico. They often don’t have the highest quality raw materials needed for the high-end products we make.” Indeed, the presence of Schramm and Sartomer in a town like West Chester proves that American manufacturing is alive and well. Mayor Carolyn Comitta believes that “West Chester’s strength lies in its diversity–diversity of people and diversity of economic engines. Long-time manufacturers like Schramm and Sartomer offer long-term stability in terms of jobs and tax base. They invigorate our community through necessary business innovation over the decades. Local businesses, including manufacturers, can make a significant contribution to the community through their philanthropic efforts, including the volunteer efforts of their employees.” These two factories make it clear that keeping it local is a good choice for all of us. West Chester is a better place because of their presence. If more companies operated like Schramm and Sartomer, the world beyond West Chester would be a better place, too. WCP


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FLEA MARKET AND BIKE SALE

The Borough Municipal Building parking lot served as host to a flea market and bicycle sale that brought out treasure hunters and second-hand aficionados from all over West Chester. photos by Annie Tennyson

Toni Giordano, Carla DeMarco, Dotti Pinto, Liz Peck

Christine Petrini

Christine Petrini

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Anna-Sophia Kasehagen

Laurence Birkett, Natalia Thompson, Amber Birkett

Emma and Patty DiGiuseppe

Toni Giordano, Carla DeMarco, Dotti Pinto, Liz Peck

6.1


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M

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Makeover The newly opened Avanté on High Street takes a lucky lady from daytime casual to evening chic

photos Andrew Hutchins

A

lyssa had hair that was multiple colors due to lots of boxed color and at-home hair dyeing when she walked through the newly opened doors of Avanté on High. Her haircut was very choppy and uneven because she was attempting to grow out a bob she’d had cut some time ago. Avanté’s stylists started with the color, highlighting a few different shades to break up the blotches. They went with copper-red

tones to brighten up her face and give her hair some added dimension. The primary goal was to get rid of the choppiness and shape the hair as it grows in. Alyssa asked for a cute way to pin her bangs back while they grow out, so they utilized a single braid running just beyond her hair line. Now Alyssa’s color is consistent throughout, and she has a cut that is easy to maintain and will look stylish as she continues to grow itJUly out.2013 WCP | thewcpress.com

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UP ON THE ROOF

Great food, great music and a really great atmosphere made for another fantastic fundraising party for downtown West Chester on the roof of the Chestnut Street Parking Garage. photos by NIck Vecchio

Tish Boutique

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Lisa, Dan, Kim, Tau

Alyssa, Alyssa and Dave of Yori’s Bakery

Malcolm and Susan Johnstone, Tom and Ida McIntyre

The Limoncello Crew

the wc press | voice of the borough

6.8


All Baking Done on Premises 15 North Church Street ď‚Ą 610-344-9674

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UP ON THE ROOF

Great food, great music and a really great atmosphere made for another fantastic fundraising party for downtown West Chester on the roof of the Chestnut Street Parking Garage. photos by NIck Vecchio

Nikki, Morgan, James

Mary Kate Messner, Melissa Clair

Jon and Rose Manion

Jason, Stefanie

Carol Quigley, Maggie McIntosh, Jen Munro, Rose Manion

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6.8


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r e h n t Ow Mon e h t of

gan

ri zia oto a lla ph ke D w a Lu ervie lle D int brie Ga

Joey Sciarrino, Becky Sciarrino, Matt Reed, Carol Pike, Sam Gallagher

America’s Pie is a madhouse around lunchtime as loyal customers wait in line to get a slice of their favorite pizza. Bearing in mind that America’s Pie is a fairly new business, its popularity is quite surprising–but bite into a slice of their pizza, and it’ll all make sense. On a busy day, Matt Reed–the man behind America’s Pie–is most likely found in the kitchen, helping out where he is needed. Matt, who recently took over as sole proprietor of the pizza shop, says he owes his success to fresh ingredients, a personable staff, and going the extra mile to ensure customer satisfaction. How has business been since taking over American’s Pie on your own? It’s been good. I knew it was going to be hard; it’s a lot harder than I expected. There have been a lot of ups and downs, but business is fantastic. It’s been way busier than we ever expected–especially since we’re only 32 months in. It’s always a work in progress, though: we know we’re good . . . but we always want to be better. How did you come up with the idea for America’s Pie? Well we were going to do the cheesy Italian theme–but none of us were Italian. We are all American, though, so why not America’s Pie? Have you always wanted to own a pizza shop? Absolutely... or, at least, a restaurant of some type. What were you doing before America’s Pie? My family’s got a whole bunch of different pizza shops along Delaware County. What brought you into West Chester? We were actually looking at a place in Bloomsburg and needed equipment. This place, right here, was a pizza shop that was closed down and was selling the equipment. We came to look at the equipment and ended up signing a lease. It made more sense. It’s local so we could pull from people we knew to come help us.

What was the hardest part of opening a new business? I’ve always been a cook, I’ve always managed places, but I’ve never dealt with the taxes or the bookwork. After my partners left, I kind of learned on the fly and got good at it. America’s Pie was recently named Best Pizza by Main Line Today–why do you think you have been so successful? We take a lot of pride in everything we do. We use the best ingredients we can get. I don’t do anything half-assed–and a lot of the guys and girls I have working for me put their best foot forward and people see that. Tell me about the Wall of Fame/Shame. It’s a food competition. You get four Parmesan sandwiches and have to eat them in 1492 seconds (‘Columbus sailed the ocean blue’). It works out to be just under 25 minutes. It’s like four-and-a-half pounds of food. We’ve actually had a lot of people do it, though. We’ve had about seven people do it so far, and most of those who do are competitive eaters. Which of the walls do you think you’d be on? I would be shamed. Without a doubt. What’s your ideal pizza topping? The Margherita pizza. The fresh basil, the fresh olive oil... we put it on after so it hasn’t cooked in. And our sauce is awesome. We use grande fresh mozzarella and imported San Marzano tomatoes which we crush ourselves for the sauce. What’s your favorite specialty item on the menu? The Rysak. It’s like a chicken cheesesteak with bruschetta cooked in it. It has prosciutto, provolone, and the pesto mayo we make here. Anything with the pesto mayo is really good. What’s your favorite part of owning America’s Pie? We really try to get to know our customers and put names to the faces. Our customers also get to know us. We’re blessed. I’m proud and happy. It’s awesome. WCP

JUly 2013 | thewcpress.com

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the wc press | voice of the borough


Beyond Books & Booze Clare Haggerty is a WCU student who knows there’s much more to West Chester than drinking and studying I dropped my bags in my room when I got home for winter break and immediately started getting nervous. I wanted an internship for the summer, and my parents had drilled it in my head that I needed to start asking early. I realized that starting my search before the holidays had even passed was too eager, so I waited until the middle of January to start inquiring. If someone had told me two years ago that I would be harassing businessmen about their summer plans in January, I would have laughed. Yet, there I was–and my parents must have been right, because I had a summer internship secured by the time I went home again for spring break. I have been fortunate enough to get the cream of the crop when it comes to internships; I work for a successful web design and marketing company where everyone is passionate about their work, and I actually have meaningful responsibilities that have taught me a lot and helped me grow. But arguably the best part about my internship is that it’s paid, and that seems to be a rarity these days. I can’t help but think that forcing interns to do hard work while not paying them for their labors seems unjust. Interns often end up doing grunt work and get stuck with the things no one else wants to handle. But in this economy, we’re all so desperate for jobs to beef up our resumes that we’ll take what we can get. I even said to my parents that if my internship ended up being unpaid, I would still take it. In order to get another internship next summer, especially one more closely related to my field, I knew I needed to have some experience. But we’ve all heard the horror stories about unpaid internships. I have a friend who interned at a company which only had salaried employees and unpaid interns, and she swears she did twice as much work as the salaried employees. Even when she did her work, apparently it wasn’t good enough; she was regularly screamed at and demeaned publicly by her boss. On the other hand, I have another friend who held an internship for school credit, and she said it was wonderful. They let her pick her own assignments and only had her attend meetings if she was interested in the subject matter. Despite her positive experience, when I asked her if she ever felt cheated by not being paid, she sheepishly admitted, “Well, some money would definitely have been nice.” The other unfortunate thing about unpaid internships is that they often force interns to get a second job. Summer used to be a time to relax, go to the beach, spend time with friends, but so many of us now work 12 to 15-hour days that suddenly summer doesn’t much feel like summer anymore. Businesses are taking advantage of young people with a great work ethic, requiring them to perform the most menial tasks in the hopes that, if they work hard enough and prove themselves worthy, they’ll get a paid position in the future. Maybe my fellow students and I should consider taking the summer off. After all, with unemployment rates as they are, we just might be fighting for unpaid internships after we graduate, so why rush things? chaggerty@thewcpress.com

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The Look

Christine’s Consignment keeps you ahead of the fashion curve with two of this month’s best looks

photo ANDREW HUTCHINS story CHristine Hasen

Our model Casey is a resale shopper, and according to her, it’s the ultimate form of recycling. Buying resale produces a significantly smaller carbon footprint, plus she saves money. While Casey’s dress might have originally been created thousands of miles away, it likely made its way into the shop after someone in the community wore it and then consigned it. Consignment shopping is an economical and environmentally practical way to stay fashionable... and putting pieces on consignment is a great way to earn some extra cash. Summer is all about cool, casual and comfortable. The maxidress is in and should be a staple in the closets of all fashionistas. This navy and white tie-dye pattern is perfect for 4th of July picnics, strolling the beach, summer barbecues or just to throw on for an afternoon of shopping. Slip on a pair of cute wedge sandals and you are ready to go.

Blue Floral Blouse by Joie from Anthropologie $49

Navy Tie-dye Dress by Michael Kors $29

Gray Jeans by Seven for All Mankind $39

Demin Jacket by Joe’s $59

Platform Sandals by Coach $45

Cream Leather Handbag by Dooney & Bourke $34

Black Leather Handbag by Dolce & Gabbana $201 When it comes to demin, cuffed boyfriend jeans are a must! We’ve paired them with a light and airy sheer print blouse and patent leather platform sandals. You will reach for these pieces time and time again all summer–simply mix and match them with other favorites in your closet to create your look. WCP

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Children In Tow Jennifer Ozgur is a mother, wife and teacher who still finds time to get out and about with the family “Made in America.” The phrase fills my head with a variety of images: flags of red, white and blue; noisey parades down the main streets of small towns; propaganda posters from World War II with giant machinery parts, coveralls and Uncle Sam. I’ll admit it: I’m guilty of deferring to the stereotypical 1950’s version of the U. S. of A. Thinking of West Chester in relation to those three little letters, I see how diverse a town we have become over the past few generations. True, we have the typical old school barbershops and luncheonettes, but we also have tattoo parlors, hookah bars, bodegas and skate shops. Among this constantly evolving cultural soup, West Chester has a history of patriotic significance, captured for all posterity in the form of historical markers. You most likely have passed them hundreds of times, never glancing to read the contents or fully appreciate the richness of our little borough. With us now in the dead of summer, I propose going on an outing with your family for a Historical Marker Scavenger Hunt. Try going in two different vehicles, park in opposite ends of the borough and give your teams two hours to take pictures of the various plaques. I went onto The Historical Marker Data Base (www.hmdb.org.) and compiled the following list: 97th Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers Memorial Marker; Bank of Chester County; Chester County World War II Veterans Memorial; David Townsend House; Frederick Douglass; G. Raymond Rettew; General Lafayette; The Great Trail; Horace Pippin; Joseph T. Rothrock; Lincoln Biography; Marshall Square Park; Old Glory; Site of First School House in West Chester ; Tricentennial Tree; Turk’s Head Tavern; William Darlington; and The Woman’s Rights Convention of 1858. There were many more on the list (49 in total), but I weeded through them all to stay within the four walls of the borough proper (Ashbridge, Matlack, Rosedale and Bradford Avenues). If you go online with your team, you can plan an itinerary ahead of time to get a leg up on your competition. Or, if you are feeling adventurous, you could wing it that day to recreate your own “Amazing Race.” Loser buys the winner a round at D’Ascenzo’s. As you find the markers, take time to read the contents of the plaques with your children. As you do, you’ll come to discover more about West Chester with every site. Without giving away too much of the plot, there are references to botany, abolition, biology, art, conservation, music, rebellion, and the health and civil rights of all individuals. This is an excellent way to open up conversations with your family, sparking interest in a variety of topics. Knowing that West Chester embodies such a variety of elements once again makes me proud to be living in this great town, and I want to pass along that pride to my children. I want them to appreciate how lucky they are to call West Chester their home. I welcome any activity that fosters a good competition. A victorious gelato in July–how American is that!? jozgur@thewcpress.com

JUly 2013 | thewcpress.com

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“FURRY TALES”

The West Chester Studio for the Performing Arts and Uptown! Entertainment Alliance teamed up to produce a play (of the children, by children, for the children) at the Chester County Historical Society. photos by Annie Tennyson

Anna-Sophia Kasehagen

“Furry Tales” Directors Christine Fisher and Therese Walden-Murphy

Christine Petrini

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Laurence Birkett, Natalia Thompson, Amber Birkett

Emma and Patty DiGiuseppe

Toni Giordano, Carla DeMarco, Dotti Pinto, Liz Peck

6.2


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“BROTHER OUTSIDER”

Moody’s Analytics presented an abridged screening of “Brother Outsider,” an award-winning, educational documentary about the fascinating life of Bayard Rustin, at the Chester County Historical Society. photos by Annie Tennyson

6.3

Mark Gershman, Chris Lafakis

Christine Petrini

Walter Naegle, Bayard Rustin’s life partner

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Arnold Gibbs, Naseem Gibbs, Stephanie Gibbs, Hassan Singletary, Aakhir Trowery, Summer Gray

Bennett Singer, Director of “Brother Outsider”

Alexander Miron, Marisa DiNatale


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Local Talent

Brynn McKenry is the production manager at local AM radio station 1520WCHE and the host of The Brynn Project. Photo and Interview by Paul Imburgia So what’s your show about? The Brynn Project focuses on fashion, beauty, fitness and health; a lot of topics that are of more interest to women. I interview a variety of guests, from local to international. I would consider myself more of a talk show host than a DJ. When can listeners tune in? Wednesdays 12:15–1pm and Saturdays 12–1pm. I also post interviews up on WCHE’s podcast, and I have a separate podcast of my own that I post the full show on. How did you get started hosting your program? I was always interested in going into broadcasting. I actually studied television broadcasting in college, but I interned at a radio station down in Wilmington. That’s where my interest in radio developed. How has your program been received by the community? Once I did a giveaway, and it was actually surprising how

many people tried calling in to win. It was a cool way to see how many people were actually listening. I honestly don’t know if I have specific fans, but I hope I do! How did you start working for WCHE? I graduated college and was working part-time at another radio station and still looking for a full-time job when I got a random Facebook friend request. I thought it was someone I knew, but when I looked at their page it wasn’t who I thought it was. But, I saw that they worked for WCHE, a station that I’d never heard of. I messaged them and asked if I could use them as a recommendation, applied to WCHE and started part-time. So Facebook helped get me hired here. Are there other radio programs or people in your field that have inspired you in your own work? Yeah. I’ve actually interviewed a couple. They’re more on the national circuit, like Nancy O’Dell of Entertainment Tonight. She is someone who I definitely aspire to be like. I interviewed her and she was very easy to talk to. But usually when I listen to the radio, I listen more for music–which I know is ironic–but some of my favorite hosts are Ryan Seacrest and Elvis Duran. When they talk they focus more on the entertainment aspect rather

than just reporting and that’s similar to The Brynn Project. What are your thoughts on the future of radio? I think that local radio will be taking off a lot more than national or regional. With satellite radio and the internet, AM/FM radio might be a dying medium, but focusing on the local aspect will help keep popular radio alive. How about the popularity of FM versus AM? FM is a lot more popular, and I think people are more drawn to FM radio because it’s mostly music and has a broader range of content. For talk radio shows, though, people would rather tune in to AM. What is in store for The Brynn Project and WCHE? The station has already grown so much in the three years that I’ve been here. We have a variety of different shows and are constantly increasing the kinds of advertisers. We’ve also just started a new partnership with West Chester University. We began broadcasting their sporting events, and we are airing a program that is specific to the university called Ram Jam, which will be returning in the fall. I can tell by just being out in the community that people are recognizing the station more and more. WCP

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@ sa Fo lo ll nc ow he fo m ri ist ns ry an p d irin de g si st gn yl s es

Salon

A top-notch salon with a very real feel.

610-585-0102 salonchemistry.net You can find Salon Chemistry on Middle Alley between Walnut and Matlack Streets. Just head down Market Street and Salon Chemistry is in the lot to your left, behind the Salvation Army.

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the wc press | voice of the borough


In Pursuit of Food Mimi Zaborowski is determined to leave no dish un-eaten as she embarks upon her quest to become a foodie Some kids are picky eaters. I might have been the worst of them. I was often grossed out or completely turned off by common foods, especially meat. I even became a vegetarian for a good chunk of my life. But, with brothers and a sister in-law all working in the restaurant biz, I couldn’t stay sheltered forever. They forced me out of my veggie phase and pushed me to have a more open mind. They’ve taught me to appreciate the excitement of new tastes and have molded me into an avid food lover–maybe one day I’ll even be a foodie. Having taken such a long time away from sampling new foods, and with so many cultures in the world and so many varieties of cooking styles, there’s a pretty extensive list of foods I’ve never tried. On that list, probably right up near the top, are both Indian and Thai– mostly because they make me nervous. I’ve had this notion that I won’t like the spices, that the flavors will be too strong. But I decided that if I hope to become a foodie, there can be no holding back. I constantly walk by Spice Indian & Thai Bistro on Market Street, so that seemed the obvious choice for beginning my culinary adventure. On a Monday night my boyfriend Chris and I pulled up chairs out in front and sat down to peruse the menu. That’s when I got lost. While Spice’s menu is divided between Thai and Indian food, with the vegetarian dishes in a separate section altogether, my lack of knowledge about the cuisine of the subcontinent left me stumped. Lucky for me, Spice’s staff is anything but novice. Manager Melinda Zerweck was more than happy to share some pointers, and gave Chris and I some insightful suggestions about what to order. We started out with the Thai Treasure appetizer, an array of munchies like dumplings and crispy rolls accompanied by four different dipping sauces. The sauce flavors vary from sweet and tangy to full-on zesty, which makes for a fun start to the meal. I’m a lover of lamb and, in my opinion, Sriracha can do no wrong, so I went with the Lamb Vindaloo, a lamb and potato dish in a spicy garlic and chili sauce. Chris stuck with a more familiar Indian dish, Chicken Tikka Masala with a side of garlic naan, perfect for the dipping sauces that accompany each dish. When our food arrived in its decorative copper dishes, the sweet aroma filling my nose, I was excited to dig in. The meal was delicious. The lamb was tender, the garlic chili sauce thick and sweet, but the heat had me constantly reaching for my glass of water. Still, the tanginess of the ginger balances the heat, making for a full-bodied dish. We finished off the meal with a basket of warm Peshwari naan, a very light bread that has flavors reminiscent of a strudel. After seeing me sweat, Melinda returned to let me know that, in the future, Spice can cater to personal preferences. Now I know! I also know that Indian food is delicious, and that there’s a world of culinary diversity out there to explore. My years of picky eating deprived my palate of new experiences. From here on out I’ll be putting my taste buds on the line, sampling all that I can in my pursuit of becoming a foodie. mimizab@thewcpress.com

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Going on Vacation? Stop by Feminique and pick up your sexy summer vacation surprises. West Chester 1347 Wilmington Pike | 610-235-4200 | pjspub.com 62

the wc press | voice of the borough

104 North Church Street West Chester, PA 19380 (610) 551-3262 feminiqueshop.com


Name That American Icon

Below you’ll find eight icons representing eight iconic Americans. Some are pretty straightforward, some a bit more obscure. Think you can name them all? If so, email your answers to contests@thewcpress.com for your chance to win prizes.

When you’re short on time and the sun is shinin’, You just can’t beat Wally’s Weiner World.

n’ i k in

“T

t s ” e s u r o ’ i y c i –Scott Vassel e l h

a e W d

! y l l

a.k.a. Wally

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the wc press | voice of the borough


We are proud to offer up a print version of everyone’s favorite bar game... and you won’t have to pay 50 cents. You can actually WIN money. Compare the two photos at right. They may look the same, but there are seven subtle differences between the two. Find those seven differences and identify the items that have been changed. Then send an email to contests@thewcpress.com listing those items. You’ll be entered to win a $25 gift card to a local business. Winners will be chosen at random, and their name will be posted to Facebook along with the solution at the end of the month. So make sure to like us and follow along if you want to play. Enjoy!

What’s more American than being the biggest? Hop up to West Chester’s longest bar at Landmark Americana and spot the seven differences.

Facebook.com/thewcpress

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

JUly 2013 | thewcpress.com

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610.696.6880 | Optimal Massage.com Benefits of Massage Therapy:

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While your experience at Optimal Massage will be relaxing, it is designed to improve your muscular health.

We don’t just want you to feel better; we want you to be healthier. Mention this Ad and receive a 60-minute massage for $60 66

the wc press | voice of the borough


American Music DJ Romeo curates a list of American-made music that’s perfect for your Independence Day celebration. Every country has its patriotic songs. The songs that are mandatory before sporting events, that are sung a political rallies, that are recited by elementary school choruses. But, those songs are of no interest to me. What’s a DJ going to do with “America the Beautiful?” I’m looking for music that gets people going, music they want to sing out loud. And, America supplies plenty of that. With recordings from Kanye West to Tom Petty, from Simon and Garfunkel to 2 Live Crew, there are plenty of patriotic songs out there that will also get the party going at your Independence Day barbeque. So, fire up the grill, crack open a cold Bud Light, call over some friends and crank this patriotic playlist.

Bruce Springsteen – “Born in the USA” Macklemore – “American” James Brown – “Living in America” Toby Keith – “Courtesy of the Red White and Blue” Kid Rock – “American Badass” Estelle W/ Kanye West – “American Boy” Don Mclean – “American Pie” Brad Paisley – “America Saturday Night” Lenny Kravitz – “American Woman” Madonna – “American Life” Eminem – “White America” John Mellencamp – “R.O.C.K. in the USA” Kim Wilde – “Kids in America” Tom Petty – “American Girl” 2 Live Crew – “Banned in the USA” Simon and Garfunkel – “America” Lana Del Rey – “National Anthem” Kanye West And Jay Z – “Made In America” Miley Cyrus – “Party in the USA” Neil Diamond – “America” Green Day – “American Idiot” Romeo@thewcpress.com

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SWINGIN’ SUMMER THURSDAY

It might have rained, but that didn’t stop the people of West Chester from enjoying the street festival that takes over Gay Street every month. We’ll see you there this month on July 11! photos by Annie Tennyson

Jules, Kelsey, Allie, Ashley, Kaitlin, Neena and Katie from The Men’s Loft at Avante on High

Sara Halali of Feminique

Ed, JB, Sal, Dave

Sarah, Joe, Abbey

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Anna-Sophia Kasehagen

the wc press | voice of the borough

Bob and Mary Kay McCann

6.6


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SWINGIN’ SUMMER THURSDAY

It might have rained, but that didn’t stop the people of West Chester from enjoying the street festival that takes over Gay Street every month. We’ll see you there this month on July 11! photos by Annie Tennyson

Stephanie Wientjes, Julie Adamovich

Amanda and Matt Wolf

Ali Abuvayya, Colin McGroary

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the wc press | voice of the borough

@production13

Fuzzy

Robert and Mr. Waldron with Rebecca, Abigail, Taylor, TJ,

6.6


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Profile for The WC Press

The WC Press - Made in America - July 2013  

Voice of the Borough

The WC Press - Made in America - July 2013  

Voice of the Borough