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The

“I have Social Disease. I have to go out every night. If I stay home one night I start spreading rumours to my dogs.” –Andy Warhol

Press PUBLISHER Dan Mathers dan@thewcpress.com

ADVERTISING MANAGER Nick Vecchio nick@thewcpress.com GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Nazarena Luzzi Castro nazarenaluzzi.com CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Kate Chadwick kchadwick@thewcpress.com CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Amy Tucker amytuckerphotography.com Dan Balmer dan@localized-app.com

COLUMNISTS Becca Boyd bboyd@thewcpress.com Jamie Jones jjones@thewcpress.com Andrea Mason amason@thewcpress.com DJ Romeo romeo@thewcpress.com Rotary Club of West Chester rotary@thewcpress.com Chester County Historical Society cchs@thewcpress.com Published By... Mathers Productions 12 E Barnard Street West Chester, PA 19382 mathersproductions.com 610-344-3463 The WC Press is a monthly magazine distributed free of charge to more than 250 businesses. For a free digital subscription, visit thewcpress.com. For more information about specific distribution locations, visit thewcpress.com/distribution.

Worth

Noting

Our no-nonsense table of contents

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BARTENDER OF THE MONTH Brooks Blackler of Ram's Head Bar & Grill.

19

THE SCENE Inside the venues and vibes of West Chester’s live music landscape

33 THE MAKEOVER: A NIGHT OUT

Platinum Hair Salon preps for a night on the town

37 QUALITY OVER QUANTITY

The Craft Beverage Movement is Transforming the Bar Scene

53 WC DINING DIRECTORY

Answering the age-old question: what's for dinner.

65 PHOTO HUNT

Find the five differences between the two pictures and win!

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Letter

from the

Editor

Dan Mathers shares some personal insight into this month’s theme

When we set out to develop content for our monthly theme, I usually have a specific reader in mind. For our annual Summer Fun Guide, it’s my mom, who needs ideas to occupy my brothers during the long break. For last month’s food issue, it was my girlfriend, who can’t cooking without a recipe on the counter. This month, however, my business partner and I were the readers I had in mind. In my mid-twenties I lived on South Walnut with two of my college roommates from Penn State. We’d routinely walk around the corner to snag a slice from Riggtown, then pop into Jake’s for a $1 pitcher of Lite. I was never much of a smoker, but I’d always bum one or two in Jake’s because I figured, if I was gonna smell like smoke anyway, I could at least reap the benefits of a buzz. There was also a time when my business partner, account director Nick Vecchio, was more likely to go by the name Romeo. If a bar had DJ Romeo on the ones-and-twos, you knew it was going to be a party. I used to text him when I was a few beers deeper than necessary and let him know I wanted in on that party. Between songs, Nick would snag one of the bouncers and ask them to meet me out front so I could cut the line. I’d stop at the bar on my way to the dance floor, order a couple green tea shots, some vodka Red Bulls, and take the whole order to the DJ booth. These days Romeo has settled down with his Juliet, and they’ve welcomed a baby Montague to the world. He still DJs, but it’s mostly weddings, and the only green tea I drink is made by Lipton. A study published this past month in the Journal of Psychiatric Research showing that vodka Red Bull increased the “risk of fighting, violence, and risky behaviors,” convinced me to completely quit that particular mixer as well. So for this issue we set out to show there’s still a healthy nightlife scene in this town even after your college days are behind you. There are plenty of places to go dancing and without wondering if everyone else in the bar is using a fake ID, and Mike Lynch’s piece gives an excellent overview. There are also abundant options for avoiding the energy drink crowd, and Jesse Piersol’s piece on the culture of craft beer and cocktails should serve as your sherpa. Finally, with the proliferation of restaurant options in town, we thought it pertinent to simplify that scene for you, and our dining directory gives all the details that Google doesn’t (like, say, if there’s a kids menu, or parking), all in one place. I still drink more than I’m willing to admit to my doctor, but I’m more likely to order Bar Avalon’s Smoked Manhattan than a pitcher of Miller Lite. I’m still often in search of a dance floor, only I’m seeking something a little more “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough” than “Bump and Grind.” So, although we curated this issue with ourselves in mind, if even DJ Romeo and I are in need of a grown-up’s guide to having a good time, I’m confident this content will benefit everyone who wants more from a night out than getting blasted on a budget. —dan@thewcpress.com

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Bartender of the Month

PHOTO Dan Balmer INTERVIEW Dan Mathers

Brooks Blackler talks about how Ram's Head is able to cater to everyone, from foodies, to beer geeks, to people seeking a party. So, how long have you been at Ram’s Head? Two years this September. And what brought you here? I worked at Kildare’s before this, for about five years, and I was looking for a change. I didn’t want to be “in the biz” anymore. I tried to get out, but then it just pulled me back in. I was applying for a bartending position three months after “leaving the biz.” I couldn’t stay away. What’d you do in the interim? I was going through a life transition. I was in a serious relationship that didn’t work out, and I figured I’d try another road. I was

looking for an office job or something like that—a change of pace. I talked to some recruiters, and made it about 80% of the way through the process and realized I just didn’t want to do it. It wasn’t the job I needed to change—I love bartending. What is it you like about the job? The fast-paced environment, the hours, and the people. I like it when it’s really busy. I just kind of like the aggressiveness of the job, how it keeps you on your toes. I turn it into a game—how fast can I work. I want to provide really good service, but it’s always a challenge to bust out quality, accurate drinks as quickly as possible. What’s the best part of working at Ram’s Head? It’s a tight-knit staff. I don’t wanna sound cliche, but it’s family. Everybody hangs out together, drinks together. We’re a smaller staff and everyone is friends—a good chunk of us always go out together during the week. What about from the customer’s perspective? We definitely have the best nachos in town! That’s one thing people come in for—the food. It’s pub food, but it’s excellent and made

in-house. And we’ve got an awesome draft selection, and whiskey like Pappy Van Winkle. The drinks and the atmosphere bring in a slightly older crowd than the college kids, but the best thing is, we’re able to have this great restaurant environment, but also a totally separate party environment. How’s that? We’ve got an upstairs and a downstairs, which gives us a cool dynamic. Upstairs gets busy and can be packed, but it’s got a restaurant feel, with a relaxed crowd. Downstairs is more like the party scene. You can sort of pick your vibe. What’s the party vibe like? Well, as summer ends, we have our mug night starting this month. Last year it was a killer. Every Thursday you get $2.50 mixed drinks and $1.50 PBRs with a 12oz plastic mug. You excited for the end of summer? Things can be a bit slow over the summer. I’m ready for all the people to return to town, to meet new faces. Everything picks up again in West Chester come September. I’m ready for this town to come alive.

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Design Dilemmas Andrea Mason of Perceptions Interiors is a professional interior designer who wants to help you upgrade your space

We may live a third of our life in our bedrooms, but it is often the most overlooked area for redesign. This month I’m sharing some important tips to make your most lived-in space so great that you’ll want to spend even more time there. #1 MAKE YOUR BED: Your bed is a great place to start. The key to making a bed inviting is to implement layers. I’m not talking millions of pillows that you will have to take off just to put back on in the morning. I like the way a bed looks when you choose a pattern for either the sheet set and pillowcases or the duvet cover, or BOTH! A plush or textural throw pillow and throw blanket is a must for comfort and will add dimension and interest to your room. #2 CUE THE LIGHTS: Lighting is another element in a bedroom that cannot be forgotten. For overall lighting, try a flush-mount, chandelier, or fan light depending on how high your ceiling is. Task lighting should flank the bed and can either be table lamps, sconces, or even a hanging pendant. Don’t forget task lighting for an accent reading chair if space allows. Natural daylight is also something to consider when decorating. I will always ask clients if they want blackout shades and/or curtains in their bedrooms to help them sleep. #3 ROLL OUT THE RUGS: Rug size is a common mistake I see in bedrooms. For example, if you have a larger bed—let’s say a king—you need a 9’ x 12’ rug to go completely underneath the bed and the front 2 legs of your nightstands. This will allow the rug to peak out roughly 3’ on three sides of the bed. You want your feet to be able to cozy up to the rug when you step out of the bed and you want the possibility for a bench, positioned at the foot of your bed without hanging off the rug. Another option is to select two runners to flank the bed. Make sure that they are not underneath the bed or the nightstands. The runners need to be floating and span from the start of your nightstands to the end of the bed. #4 PAINT THE TOWN: Lighter colors tend to create a calmer, more relaxing ambiance, especially those derived from nature. My favorite neutrals are Benjamin Moore Gray Owl OC-52 and Benjamin Moore Simply White OC-117. My favorite blue and green are Benjamin Moore Lookout Point 1646 and Benjamin Moore Healing Aloe 1562. Pro Tip: Don’t be afraid to put your bed in front of a window. If you floor plan is limited, this could create the best flow. Choose a headboard that is on the lower side so that it will let in the most sunlight. Flank the bed with curtains to help frame the window and bed setting. I guarantee if you are not already getting great sleep, by implementing a new design you will feel a huge change. Sweet Dreams! —amason@thewcpress.com

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THE SCENE

a deep dive inside the venues and vibes of West Chester’s live music landscape STORY: MICHAEL LYNCH SEPTEMBER 2018 THEWCPRESS.COM

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Here’s an old joke I love: Q: What do you call a guy who hangs around musicians? A: The drummer. Since the late 1990s, you may have seen me throughout the borough “hanging around musicians” in any of the various live music establishments that have come and gone over the years. Like anyone else who has lived here during that time, I’ve witnessed a transformation in the landscape of West Chester’s nightlife. Yes, gone are the days of the smoke-filled jam sessions upstairs at Vincent’s, and the ear-ringing, sweaty, late-night awesomeness that was Rex’s Bar. Yet that doesn’t mean that the town’s music scene is dead. No way! In fact, I can confidently report to you that the pulse and hum of our beloved borough is very much alive and well. With all that said, however, there are some things that undoubtedly have changed around here, in all our lives. The last two decades have been a great

leveler, and let’s face the obvious: we’ve changed.

WaveRadio “...a powerful three-piece group that blends

Like you, I’m no longer in my twenties, and like you, when I go out for a beer and to see some live music, I don’t want to drink out of a plastic cup, or get that awkward emotion where you’re annoyed by a live band, but simultaneously embarrassed for them and feeling guilty for being annoyed. None of us have time for that anymore.

rock and wandering psychedelia to create live performances of epic proportions.”

Don’t let this college town make you feel old just yet. I’m here to help, to show you where the real hang is.

Split Rail Tavern

Since my weekend gig often keeps me out late nights up on Market, Gay, and High Streets, I thought I’d share with you some insights about the places where you can catch live shows, as well as the thoughts of the very musicians who are up in town playing those shows, sweating it out on stage night after night to endless requests of “play ‘Freebird!’” So, consider this a user’s guide to all things finger-snappin’, hand-clappin’, and floor-stompin’ around West Chester to (hopefully) help you make a series of well-informed deci-

© DAN GILLESPIE sions on your next jaunt into town... all before you make a handful of questionable choices at the end of that particular night. 15 N. Walnut Street

As the newest live music venue in West Chester, the Split Rail is a hip, upbeat gastropub that can make its patrons feel as though a piece of Philadelphia has been brought to the borough. The rustic charm of its steampunk industrial décor feels “now” and adds to a sense that you just might find your new favorite band (and cocktail) here. Vocalist Mary Kate McGetrick of the husband and wife duo MK&Col described Split Rail’s food and drinks as “off-thehook fantastic, which keeps us coming back, both to play and to hang out.” James

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SAVE UP TO 24% WHEN YOU ADVERTISE IN THE LAST THREE ISSUES OF THE YEAR OCTOBER Kid-Friendly

Information parents need to know, from when kids eat free to where you’ll find family-friendly fun.

NOVEMBER Animals

Our furry friends feature prominently, and we profile those pets and their industrious owners.

DECEMBER Holiday Shopping

Everything you need to know to find the best gifts while shopping locally this holiday season.

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THE WC PRESS VOICE OF THE BOROUGH


MK&COL “...talented husband-and-wife duo” © MARK TASSONI

Bar Avalon 116 E. Gay Street

McLaughlin, keyboardist of the West Chester-based indie-rock trio WaveRadio, suggested that there is more than meets the eye at the Split Rail. “Behind the fantastic choices on the menu for beer and beyond, lies a rock venue to be discovered,” he said. James went on further to describe the cavernous upstairs as having “ample dance floor space” where on any given night, the sound can be “ambient and acoustic, or edgy and raucous, with ownership and staff that are definitely music fans and all-around excellent folks.” Playing a dynamic mix of covers and original material, WaveRadio is a powerful three-piece group that blends rock and wandering psychedelia to create live performances of epic proportions. The band’s front man also plays a one-

parlorphonic trio “...a piano, drums and upright bass ensemble whose sets range from cocktail and jazz standards, to slick and unexpected renditions of more contemporary tunes” man show downstairs at Split Rail every Wednesday night. Yet this place is not strictly a rock joint. Owner Doug Huntley mentioned that the Split Rail plans to start showcasing resident DJs as well. “We want to spin an upbeat mix of new wave and old-school hip hop,” he said. Oh, and next time your in-laws are in town, avoid that uncomfortable silence by taking them to Split Rail’s Drag-Queen-Karaoke on Tuesday nights, or their monthly Saturday Drag Brunch. That way you’re certain to have something to talk about with them over the holidays.

Featuring live jazz and blues weekly, Bar Avalon may be considered the second coming of Vincent’s. Thoughtful lighting, prohibition-style cocktails, and small plates make this place a classycool date night spot, where musicians perform up-close-and-personal in a relaxed atmosphere. Something that you early birds may find appealing about seeing live music here is that set times typically run from 8-11pm. Vibraphonist Ben Green of Dub-C Swing commented how the dinner crowd will often spill into the main bar area once the music begins. “Most people who dine there will stay for another round to listen, and to interact with the music that we’re playing,” he said. Bassist Ehud Guy of The Parlorphonic Trio agreed, and noted that he is often entertained by the patrons’ unexpected reactions to his band’s music. “When they didn’t go out to dance, but they ended-up dancing, you know you moved them. That always feels good.”

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The Parlorphonic Trio (featured the second Saturday, monthly) is a piano, drums and upright bass ensemble whose sets range from cocktail and jazz standards, to slick and unexpected renditions of more contemporary tunes. Other regularly featured acts at Avalon include The Steve Guyer Blues Show every first Saturday (harmonica Chicago blues), Jeff Washington every third Friday (blues-guitar phenom), and Dub-C Swing (vibraphone-bass-saxophone trio).

Sprout Music Collective 130 E. Prescott Alley When you see a band at Sprout Music Collective, you’re watching them perform on the largest traditional barroom stage and lighting system in the borough. Sprout is a music club, where anyone can join at any time for five bucks, and it’s the only bar in town that is open until 3am. Having no windows or clocks inside can make Sprout feel like a cosmic vessel, and in combination with any selection of their specialty cocktails or extensive beer list, this venue can easily transcend space and time for its inhabitants.

In addition to the quintessential disco ball that spins seductively from the center of the dance floor, iconic imagery honoring rock and roll heroes of past and present adorn the walls. From trance and blue grass, to hip hop, funk and hard rock, Sprout offers an eclectic mix of all genres of live music and hosts an array of local, regional, and national touring acts monthly.

“ Having no windows or clocks inside can make Sprout feel like a cosmic vessel, and in combination with any selection of their specialty cocktails or extensive beer list, this venue can easily transcend space and time for its inhabitants.

afrobear “...AfroBear’s unique soul-rock approach... [is] more of a feeling... [they] use emotion rather than any one specific style .” © THERESA ZYGMONT fact that they pay so much attention to the sound and stage really heightens the experience for both the audience and the band.” Vocalist and pianist Amanda O’Donnell added, “It’s definitely the best nightlife scene for dancing and music lovers, and everyone has this mutual understanding that we can all be who we want to be without judgment.” Sidney describes AfroBear’s unique soul-rock approach as more of a feeling, and that he and his bandmates try to use emotion rather than any one specific style.

For all of you fledgling musicians out there looking to get your feet wet, Sprout also runs an open mic/jam session on Wednesday nights, so you can finally try out that song you’ve always wanted to play in front of your girlfriend’s best friend. Did I mention their incredible tapas and flatbreads?

Sidney Joseph—drummer and vocalist for AfroBear—is a big fan of the venue. “We love playing Sprout,” he said. “The

At Sprout, there is something for everyone’s tastes, musically and spiritually.

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john grecia “...he bangs out Elton John and Billy Joel covers on the piano.” © JOHN PLECENIK

Pietro’s Prime 125 Market Street

The beautiful exposed brick and rich hardwoods throughout Pietro’s Prime make this local gem feel like Cheers of West Chester. Here, you might expect to find post-happy hour professionals crowded around the bar on a Wednesday night, merrily singing along with John Grecia while he bangs out Elton John and Billy Joel covers on the piano. Pietro’s is the type of place to sip martinis at a high-top cocktail table with friends, or conspire with your lover off in the corner over a bourbon neat. Grecia referred to his regular gigs here as his cherished West Chester residency. “I always make sure to track and publish my set lists on social media just to have a record of the path traveled on a given night,” he said.

“ Somehow, [Pietro’s] still feels like a best-kept secret.. ”

onwa “...the punk-rock and hip-hop-informed reggae outfit...” © @ZOLADELPHIA

Bands usually play in an intimate fireplace nook in an area at the end of the bar, and Colin McGetrick of The Road Tapes characterized those nights. “They’re always cranking and buzzing with a great time,” he said.

featured regularly at Pietro’s. “We really enjoy playing for the crowd here,” Drew said. “It’s a diverse group, and when the dance floor fills in, people really cut loose with us.”

Along with song-writing partner Drew Nielands, The Road Tapes is an Americana Roots band that plays a mix of covers and original songs, and they’re

Another regular act at Pietro’s, bluesrock-and soul crooner Josh Komorowski, shares similar sentiments toward this venue. “The folks at Pietro’s always

make me feel like family, since the first night, and every time I perform there, even when I stop by to grab a drink and check out a band.” Perhaps John Grecia, who’s played at Pietro’s for nearly eleven years, captures the essence of this venue perfectly. “Somehow, it still feels like a best-kept secret,” he said.

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the sermon! “...an instrumental soul-jazz quartet... play on funky vintage instruments built long before any of the band members were born.” © KEVIN FRANCIS reformed three years ago to start playing again at (former Rex’s Bar owner) Donnie Moore’s Social. Gary mentioned that he always tries to bring a local act in to open. “Just like the bands that helped me out when I was getting my start,” he says.

The Social

the road Tapes 117 E. Gay Street “...an Americana Roots band that plays a mix of The Social has been a staple to West covers and original songs.” Chester’s music scene for many years. The main bar appears the length of a bowling lane and is situated in a room with twelve-foot high ceilings, giving the impression of a grand turn-of-thecentury parlor. Live music is separate from the bar area, as the stage lies in a cozy back room where the shared space between the performers and the audience is often an intimately blurred experience (especially after a few blueberry mojitos).

© MARK TASSONI At The Social, expect to run into Delaware-based Doctor Harmonica & Rocket 88, a high-energy, five-piece act that brings rockabilly, Chicago Blues, New Orleans funk and R&B to the venue monthly. Local legend Gary “Gar-I” Stuchell of the punk-rock and hip-hop-informed reggae outfit ONWA, plays here the second Saturday every month. ONWA stems back to the old days of Rex’s Bar, and the band

Rob Mastrippolito, guitarist for The Sermon!, enjoys Social Lounge’s great local vibe and pointed out how the venue seems to attract the who’s-who of the extremely talent-fertile West Chester music scene. The Sermon!—an instrumental soul-jazz quartet—have a devoted monthly following and play on funky vintage instruments built long before any of the band members were born. You can catch The Sermon! at Social Lounge on the first Saturday every month, and for a band that has been playing together for close to thirteen years, they are surely a splendid bunch of musicians… except of course, for the drummer.

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Near and Far

Jamie Jones of Whirlaway Travel explores some travel options abroad and highlights their local counterparts

Summer is over. Kids are back to school. Before you know it, the holidays will be upon us, and we’ll be busy visiting family, making cookies and attending school events. Reflecting on the past couple of months, our family had some amazing adventures, as well as some missed opportunities I regret not taking. As I was going through my kitchen this past weekend, I came across a few magazines that I hold on to every year for summer inspiration, one of them being June’s Summer Fun Guide published by this very magazine. As I took a final glance before tossing it in the recycle bin, I realized that on many of the days my kids complained of utter boredom, there was plenty more we could’ve done. One of the things we really waned to do but never got around to was a weekend camping trip. Well, I say “we” but I really mean “my husband and my kids” because I am not a camper by any means. My idea of camping is a hotel without a bellman. Since travel is usually about me and what I want, I obliged and had started researching local campgrounds. But, like a 5-star hotel suite with an incredible view, I found that availability of prime locations to pitch a tent is hard to come by when you don’t plan well in advance. Alas, we never made it camping this summer but there is always the fall when the weather is cooler and camp fires are enjoyable again. I have an arsenal of locations to choose from including Hibernia, Ridley Creek and KOA in Coatesville. Hopefully we will be able to escape to the woods one weekend this fall in between the Chili Cookoff, Restaurant Festival and my travel schedule. Speaking of tents, my all-time favorite camping experience was in the Okavango Delta in Botswana. The 1000th addition to the World UNESCO Heritage List, the Delta is a highly protected area that’s home to one of the greatest populations of wildlife in Africa. One of the most memorable moments was being awoken in the dark of the night by the guttural roar of a lion nearby, with only canvas between us. If you have never heard a lion roar outside of The Lion King, it is one of the most bone-chilling, goose bump-inducing sounds. A lion roars from the depths of its chest in a tone that is low and forewarning. I clutched my blanket up to my eyes that night, part terrified and part exhilarated to be in such close proximity to the king of the jungle. The next morning, on our game drive, we came across two young males, presumably the late night noisemakers. They continued roaring, vying for the territory of an elder male. Whether you prefer glamping or camping, it’s worth giving a shot to sleeping in a tent and disconnecting. Not having access to cellular service, prime time TV and wifi for social media scrolling is one of the most mind-freeing experiences we can give ourselves. You don’t need to go to Africa to disconnect, but if only for the chance to hear Mufasa roar in the wild, I highly recommend this once in a lifetime experience. —jjones@thewcpress.com

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The

Makeover: A Night Out

Platinum Hair Salon prepped their own designer, Tina, for a night on the town. PHOTO Dan Balmer INTERVIEW Dan Mathers When it came to styling a great look for a night out, we knew our very own hair design and makeup specialist Tina, whose love of the industry and passion for making people feel beautiful, was a perfect choice. Her hair was previously cut by Jackie, an artistic director at the salon, and colored by hair design artist Bekah. But, a night out needs all the touches, so Tina’s hair was prepped with a light oil to fight the frizz, and a volumizing mousse to fight gravity. It was then blown dry with a round brush on top to maximize volume, and finshed with a large barrel curling iron. For her makeup, we decided to apply an airbrush-look foundation, which was highlighted and contoured for a more polished appearance. Many brands of this type of foundation are available; the key is finding your match. A copper shimmer was used to highlight her eyes, and a subtle cat-eye look added for the liner on top. We used a deep coral lipstick to match her outfit. To complete her look, she accessorized with fun earrings, and a necklace from Stella and Dot, were she’s also a stylist. Of course, we know that sometimes it takes first-hand experience to get a look just right, so we encourage you to stop by Platinum and we’ll be more than happy to set you up for your next night out!

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Home

Becca Boyd shares tips on life and cooking on her blog at homebeccanomics.com

Beccanomics

Whether “night life” conjures images of dance offs and 2am pizza or nodding off to The Office reruns at 9pm because you’re getting up at 2am to feed the baby, these recipes will work for you. When there’s fun to be had, save your takeout money for drinks and make this Thai chicken dish instead. And, whether you’re combating a Sunday-morning upset tummy with a plate of carbs or sending your babies off on the school bus, this coffeecake gets the day started right. –bboyd@thewcpress.com Slow Cooked Thai Chicken - serves 4-6 1 c hot or medium salsa 2 1/2 lb boneless, skinless 1/4 c peanut butter chicken (breasts or thighs) Juice of 1 lime 1/2c roasted peanuts, chopped 1 tbsp tamari or soy sauce 1/4 c finely chopped cilantro 1 tbsp minced fresh ginger Rice, for serving 1 tbsp minced garlic 1. Whisk salsa, peanut butter, lime juice, tamarai/soy, ginger and garlic in crockpot until blended. Add chicken and toss to cover. 2. Set slow cooker on low for 6 hours. Meanwhile, cook rice. 4. Shred chicken and mix with sauce. Serve over rice. Sprinkle each serving with chopped peanuts and cilantro. Blueberry Coffee Cake - serves 12 1 1/2 c all purpose flour 2 large eggs 1/2 c white whole wheat flour Zest of 1 lemon (about 1 tsp) 2 tsp baking powder 1 3/4 c blueberries, divided 1 tsp cinnamon Topping 1/2 tsp baking soda 1/2 c all purpose flour 1/2 tsp salt 1/2 c packed brown sugar 12 tbsp unsalted butter, softened 1/2 c slivered almonds, roughly 1 c. sugar chopped 1 c sour cream or full-fat plain 1 tsp cinnamon Greek yogurt 3 tbsp butter, diced

1. Preheat oven to 375˚F. Whisk flours, baking powder, cinnamon, baking soda, and salt in a mixing bowl until combined. Set aside. 2. Cream butter with electric mixer on medium until creamy. Add sugar in a steady stream with mixer running. Turn speed to medium high and beat about three minutes or until light and fluffy. 3. Add eggs and sour cream/yogurt and beat until combined. 4. Add dry ingredients and beat on low until just combined. 5. Add zest and 1 c of blueberries and stir to combine (on lowest speed or by hand). 6. Spray a 9 in. springform pan with baking spray (butter and flour) or butter and flour. Add batter and spread to edges. 7. Combine topping ingredients in a small bowl. Cut in butter with fingertips, mashing butter lumps until evenly cut in. 8. Spread crumb topping onto batter. Top with remaining blueberries, scattering evenly. Bake for 65 minutes. 9. Let cool 15 minutes on wire rack and remove edge of pan. Let cool 15 minutes more before serving SEPTEMBER 2018 THEWCPRESS.COM

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NOW FEATURED AT:

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QUALITY OVER

QUANTITY How the Craft Beverage Movement i s Tr a n s f o r m i n g We s t C h e s t e r ’s Bar Scene

story Jesse Piersol SEPTEMBER 2018 THEWCPRESS.COM

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WHERE EDUCATION AND PLAY

GO HAND IN HAND

The YMCA brings out the best in your child Childcare and Early Learning

NOW ENROLLING for the 2018-2019 school year.

• Childcare (Infant to Pre-K) • Montessori Preschool (ages 2½-5 years) at the West Chester Area YMCA • State Licensed Kindergarten at the Oscar Lasko YMCA and Childcare Center

After School Care Program • After School Academy (Kindergarten-8th Grade) at the Oscar Lasko YMCA and Childcare Center The YMCA is a cause-driven charitable organization that provides financial assistance for those unable to pay the standard fees. Ask us for details.

Photos from the 2017 YMCA Fashion Show

www.ymcagbw.org/childcare WEST CHESTER AREA YMCA • 610-431-9622 • 605 Airport Road, West Chester OSCAR LASKO YMCA AND CHILDCARE CENTER • 610-696-9622 • 1 E. Chestnut Street, West Chester

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photo Dan Balmer

S

aloon 151 assistant general manager Ryan Dougherty is trying to mentally parse the recipe for making his signature watermelon moonshine, and he’s having difficulty. “My recipe is all about eyesight,” he says, so he resorts to quoting his mother, with whom he grew up cooking in their South Philly kitchen. “I have an Italian mother, and she always says to ‘make everything with love.’ So that’s what I do.”

Ryan’s variety of moonshine combines whole grain alcohol with fresh watermelon puree and a little bit of sugar, and then infuses in refrigeration for four or five days. Flavors such as apple pie and peach sweet tea have also been lighting up Saloon’s summer offerings. “It’s amazing how refreshing it is and how much you can do with it. People just fall in love with it,” he says. In the previous three weeks alone, Saloon has gone through 90 bottles of it, with sales outpacing even their house vodka. And that’s without any particular promotional effort. “Saloon doesn’t even put it on the menu,” he adds. “It’s just word of mouth and Facebook.”

“Making it with love” is an ethos that permeates not only the drinks that Ryan concocts at Saloon 151, but the entire craft beverage movement, from beer to cocktails and beyond. We talked with the owners and operators of some of West Chester’s favorite establishments for their take on how the craft beverage movement is taking over—and redefining—the town.

The Crowd When chef/owner John Brandt-Lee first opened up Bar Avalon’s Gay Street location five years ago, he served a mostly mature clientele. “Basic mixer drinks,” he recalls. “’Pour me a glass of wine,’ they’d say. They would only buy name brand if they wanted something expensive. Not a lot of boutique wines.” John notes that while the mature crowd is still here, their interests have shifted to showy cocktails involving fire and smoke, as well as his wine selections. A cabernet blend from Italy’s If You See Kay (say it out loud) brought in so many people that John made a request to the distributor to be the only

B A R AVA L O N SMOKED MANHATTAN

John Brandt-Lee says the Smoked Manhattan is so good that folks out dining with friends at other establishments make it a point to stop by after their meal for one of these drinks. Make It:

Smoke a serving glass and let it rest, upside down, filled with smoke. Combine the following ingredients in a separate glass with ice: • 3 oz. Dickel rye whiskey • 3/4 oz Antica vermouth • 3/4 oz Cynar bitters • Splash of amarena cherry juice Stir for about a minute. Strain into the smoke-filled glass.

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I t ’ s no t j ust the d ri nk s l i st tha t’s f a r re m o v e d f rom a ny o f th e o t h e r ba rs tha t ha v e ev e r sto o d a t 15 N Wa l nut S t— S p l i t Ra il Ta v ern’s i nt e ri o r ha s a m o d er n, i ndustri a l f a rm ho use f eel 

photo Dan Balmer

source for it in the area, so he could keep it in stock. He isn’t sure whether it’s Bar Avalon’s new incarnation on Gay Street (he’d originally opened as a BYOB in a different location 20 years ago), or maybe the changing landscape of the West Chester scene in general, but there is a different audience here now. “We see a younger demographic, and they really get into the flavor profile of the drinks,” he says. “They have more sophisticated palates for the layers that go into the cocktail.” Ryan agrees. “Overall, people go out more now to really enjoy cocktails and craft beers. It used to be more about volume, but it’s a good thing to have quality over quantity. Our typical regular these days is someone who comes in to order dinner or a bite to eat, and enjoy a craft beer and a whiskey.” “The bar scene has grown up,” confirms the head of Split Rail’s beverage program, James Mullally, with their most frequent customer today being a 37-yearold food and beverage connoisseur. “They’re post college, maybe a new parent or old parent, and not afraid to spend a little bit of their hard-earned money on quality things,” he relates. “People are informed now. Everyone checks the dates on beer. Everyone knows how to tell if the food was frozen or not.” Justin Dougherty, co-owner of Side Bar, has seen a shift not only in the customers themselves, but in the hours they visit. “Most of our regulars today are lunchtime/happy hour/early evening types. We’ve seen a shift in our busy times. It’s 8 to 9pm now, where it used to be 11 to 2am Friday and Saturday. It gets busier a little earlier, and dies off a little earlier.”

“THE PROHIBITION-ERA DRINKS ARE R E A L LY P O P U L A R R I G H T N O W . T H E Y ’ V E B E E N AROUND FOR YEARS, BUT NOW THEY’RE B E I N G D O N E R I G H T. ” – J O H N B R A N DT- L E E , B A R AVA L O N The craft movement is even impacting the town’s college student population. The staff at Saloon 151 has noticed that some of the 21 or 22-year-old students who used to come in looking for the cheapest beers are gravitating toward other options. “Instead of drinking seven Natty Lights for $1.50 a mug, they’ll drink two craft beers for the same price,” says Ryan. “We’ve seen our Natty sales decrease, while our craft numbers have increased.”

The same goes for Side Bar. “When we first opened, college students would walk in, take one look at our tap list, and walk right back out,” says Justin. “Now, they are more educated. That 21 or 22-year-old might have had an older brother or sister who was into craft beers. The younger demographic is more educated.” Pairing craft beverages with other activities is another growing niche, with outdoor events such as “Saloon Sundays

SEPTEMBER 2018 THEWCPRESS.COM

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photo Dan Balmer

“OVERALL, PEOPLE GO OUT MORE NOW TO R E A L LY E N J O Y C O C K T A I L S A N D C R A F T B E E R S . IT USED TO BE MORE ABOUT VOLUME, BUT I T ’ S A G O O D T H I N G T O H AV E Q U A L I T Y O V E R Q U A N T I T Y. ” – R Y A N D O U G H E R T Y, S A L O O N 1 5 1 on the Brandywine” attracting younger, more active imbibers. “My generation was stuck inside a dark, smoky bar,” Ryan reflects. “Now they don’t want to be stuck inside an office all day and then go inside to a bar. They love to enjoy a beer or cocktail outside, especially with music.”

The Offerings When Ryan first started tending bar, his most popular cocktails were vodka sodas, vodka cranberries, Malibu bay breezes, and Malibu sea breezes. “Now, competition has forced everyone to up their game,” he says. “That customer now wants a good selection of craft beers and fancier cocktails, so you have places putting time into their drink menus.” For Ryan’s part, he has taken

to infusing bourbon with blood orange tea leaves, and creating martinis with Philly’s own Stateside Urbancraft vodka. “We were the first bar in West Chester to pick it up. It has electrolytes in it, and it appeals to both college and non-college customers.” Ryan infuses it with fresh strawberries, lemon, and basil, and makes it into a martini with a little simple syrup. Another popular cocktail at Saloon is the El Fuego, consisting of tequila infused with pineapple and habanero peppers. “My parents grow the habaneros and basil in their little garden in South Philly,” Ryan says, “which adds to the local character.”

SALOON 151 WATERMELON OR HELL MOONSHINE

One of Ryan’s favorite drinks is combining his signature moonshine with a complementary beer. Here, he makes creative use of his watermelon moonshine. Make It:

Fill a pint glass entirely with ice, then pour in the following ingredients: • 1/2 pint saloon watermelon moonshine (handmade and infused in-house at Saloon 151) • 1/2 pint 21st Amendment Stir and serve cold

Over at Avalon, John also sees “old drinks done right” as a rising trend. “The Prohibition-era drinks are really popu-

SEPTEMBER 2018 THEWCPRESS.COM

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Wi t h bo urbo n b a rr el s a do rni ng t he w a ll s a nd o a k e v e r y w h e re, S a l o o n 151 m a k es thei r w h isk ey f o c us f ro nt a n d c enter 

lar right now. They’ve been around for years, but now they’re being done right. Prohibition drinks were all about taking unpalatable alcohol and making it palatable. When you’re making an old fashioned, for instance, you don’t need to waste your money on Whistle Pig. Save something that good for sipping.” Gin is another category getting a makeover at Bar Avalon. “We’re getting people off the Tanqueray and the Hendricks, and trying the new world gins, which are much more botanical in flavor,” explains John. “Take Uncle Val’s gin—it’s under-utilized but really brings out those aromatics.” Uncle Val’s features prominently in Avalon’s signature tangerine martini, shown off in a mix of tangerine, lemongrass, lemon, and burnt orange. Back at Split Rail, they’re finding an increased interest in old-world beers that are making an resurgence. “I’m European [James is from Ireland], so I have an affinity for European beers, but people here are finally open to trying things that are new here but that have been around forever,” says James. Brewery De Ranke is a family-owned brewery in Belgium that has been around since 1930. “They were the first brewery to dry hop their beers, long before the American beer game came along. They make a very classy blond ale, very dry. We have it here regularly. It’s killer.” Customers love local ingredients. And Side Bar loves their relationships with local manufacturers. “People want to support other people,” Justin says. “There are lots of friends in this business. Side Bar is great friends with Iron Hill, for example. Our bartenders are friends with Root Down Brewing Company in Phoenixville, which makes it easy to get product. Plus, buying local keeps as much money as possible right here in the community.”

“COMPETITION HAS FORCED EVERYONE TO U P T H E I R G A M E —T H AT C U S T O M E R WA N T S A GOOD SELECTION OF CRAFT BEERS AND FA N C I E R C O C K TA I L S , S O Y O U H AV E P L A C E S P U T T I N G T I M E I N TO T H E I R D R I N K M E N U S .” – R Y A N D O U G H E R T Y, S A L O O N 1 5 1 The current collaboration between West Chester’s Levante Brewing Company and Saloon 151 as another example of a local partnership. “Our two owners went down to Kentucky to the Knob Creek distillery to select a whiskey barrel,” Ryan says, “and Levante is using our whiskey barrel to make a beer.” “There’s a lot of focus on the local

scene,” James concurs. “There’s great beer everywhere, but quality is the only thing that will last. It’s all about personal relationships. You have relationships with these breweries.” Although John Brandt-Lee typically bypasses local for global, he does point to an underrated favorite: Penn Square vodka from Thistle Finch, a small dis-

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photo Dan Balmer

tillery in Lancaster. “That’s my go-to Philly-local spirit,” he says. “You don’t see it in a lot of bars. Everybody pushes for 5 Vodka, but I think Penn Square is actually a lot better. It’s reminiscent of Grey Goose—smooth, not a lot of burn.” It’s good to know that a world class spirit is as near as a neighboring county.

Evolution One of the reasons James moved to the U.S. from Ireland (spending 10 years in New York before moving to West Chester) was for the beer scene. “The beer scene in Philly is the best on the coast, and I’d argue the best overall in the U.S. It’s a very exciting place to be right now.”

This town has clearly become a hub for food and bev scene, and that competition in town compels businesses like Avalon to put more thought into craft cocktails. “Otherwise, people would just keep doing what they were doing for years,” John says. “If there’s something better around the corner, then the customer is going to go around the corner. It’s an amazing mix of college, young professionals, and empty nesters. And each genre has enough mass to support individual restaurants.” For the craft movement, the crew at Saloon thinks the best is still to come. “To be honest, we’re at the very beginning,” Ryan says. “I’ve seen some crazy stuff with simple syrup infusions—ginger, rosemary. People are just starting

“THE PROHIBITION-ERA DRINKS ARE R E A L LY P O P U L A R R I G H T N O W . T H E Y ’ V E B E E N AROUND FOR YEARS, BUT NOW THEY’RE B E I N G D O N E R I G H T. ” – J O H N B R A N DT- L E E , B A R AVA L O N

S P L I T R A I L TAV E R N MAINE BEER CO. “LUNCH” IPA

“Everything now is so hazy, but this beer is completely refined all the way. When everyone is over the haze craze, this beer will still be around,” says James Mullally. “We have a permanent line. Nowhere else, even in Philly, has that deal.” Flavors:

Intense hop flavors and aromas of tropical and citrus fruits and pine dominate. A subtle malt sweetness brings the beer into balance. 7% ABV

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“ W H E N W E F I R ST A P P L I E D FO R O U R LOA N S . . . T H E P E O P L E W H O G AV E U S T H E M O N E Y. . . T O L D U S , ‘ P E O P L E L I K E C O N S I S T E N C Y, ’ A N D W E TO L D T H E M T H E Y W E R E W RO N G ” – J U S T I N D O U G H E R T Y, S I D E B A R & R E S TA U R A N T to use essential oils. We’re going to be getting cocktails that aren’t just liquor based, too. I was in Denver, and bars there were using CBD (cannabidiol) oil as a mixer.” “We’re really giving the city a run for its money,” he continues. “This last year I was in a Philly competition, and it was good to put West Chester on the map. I blew away a good number of people. I grew up in the city, so I was fortunate to have a boatload of restaurants and bars right at my fingertips. But right here in West Chester, we have a variety of bars and restaurants, with a place to fit anybody. Sports bars like Jitters and Square Bar, high-end places like Mercato or Limoncello, and bars that fit both sides, like Saloon, Split Rail and Side Bar.” Justin agrees. “The town is evolving.

SIDE BAR & R E S TA U R A N T WRONG CROWD BEER COMPANY “STRAWBERRY MILKSHAKE IPA”

When we first applied for our loans to purchase the business, we explained what we were doing with craft beer, with our idea to rotate beers constantly. Well, the people who gave us the loan almost took the money back. They told us, ‘People like consistency, and the same thing.’ And we told them they were wrong— that era was over. The East Coast was not up to speed with what the West Coast was doing.”

From Bryn Mawr comes nanobrewery Wrong Crowd Beer. “With breweries this small,” says Justin Dougherty, “they don’t have their beers all the time. It takes them a couple months to do it again.”

Avalon saw much of the same. “On one end of town, you have people drinking beer,” John says. “In other areas, you’ll see an older group drinking a decent Manhattan made with good bourbon. You’ve got young professionals saying, ‘I don’t have to go to the city to get this kind of scene.’ It’s really the perfect storm in this town.”

Flavors: Brewed w/ lactose, oats and vanilla. Fermented on 2.5 pounds of strawberries per gallon and dry hopped with Huell Melon.

“It’s a milkshake-style beer. There’s a little bit of the strawberry, but then also the hops.”

8.4% ABV

SEPTEMBER 2018 THEWCPRESS.COM

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fall denim dl1961 premium denim bb dakota cupcakes & cashmere baily 44 sanctuary zadig & voltaire bella dahl free people

138 e gay street / west chester, pa 19380 / 610-692-7500

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Service above Self

Rotary Club of West Chester contibutes a monthly column exploring good works, good fun and local organizations that are making a difference.

On October 14th, downtown West Chester transforms into a chili mecca. The day begins before sunrise as 70 teams arrive, set up, and start dicing and simmering, attempting to win the coveted People’s Choice award at the 16th Annual West Chester Chili Cook-Off. At noon, the competition begins, and thousands converge on the streets, enjoying chili and over 50 vendors, a kid’s zone, music and a great atmosphere. For just $12, folks purchase a wristband that lets them try all the chili and vote for the winner. Church Farm School, back-to-back winners, is looking for a threepeat. This great community event is just a small part of the story. 100% of the proceeds raised at the chili cook-off go to fund the good works of The Rotary Club of West Chester, and a large portion of the monies raised get funneled right back into this community. This year at the cook-off, Rotary’s Community Philanthropic Committee will award grants to sixteen different non-profit organizations in Chester County. Causes benefiting from the cook-off are as diverse as the chili served. From youth services (Chester County’s Children Inc., Chester County Family Academy) and senior care (West Chester Senior Center, the Hickman) to homeless prevention and support (Friends Association, Safe Harbor). Thousands are helped thanks to the chili cook off. Other projects supported locally include Operation Warm Coats for Children, Stockings for Deployed Soldiers, and Soup for the Homeless. Each year the Rotary also awards scholarships to students in the West Chester Area School District. Recently the club entered into a partnership with the Community Warehouse Project, an organization that collects and distributes furniture and household goods to the recently homeless who are now in permanent housing. As impactful as Rotary is locally, its influence is felt around the globe. West Chester is just one of more than 35,000 clubs worldwide, comprising 1.2 million members. Collectively, Rotarians have helped nearly eradicated polio, embarked on clean water initiatives and promoted peace though exchange programs. The Rotary Club of West Chester has supported Hands Across the Sea, a literacy program in the Caribbean, and Rotoplast, which sends surgeons on mission trips to treat children with cleft palates. The club’s signature international project is CORS (Children’s Orthopedic Rehabilitation Strategies). In many countries where witchcraft is practiced, children with albinism are targeted for their limbs which are considered good luck. CORS brings those victims to the US for reconstructive surgery and prosthetic assistance. While the West Chester Chili Cook-Off supports so many great causes, it is also a great time. The membership of the Rotary Club of West Chester includes about 120 community and business leaders who take great pride in showing off the borough. Rotarians started planning this year’s cook-off about 15 minutes after last year’s event ended. The cook-off is one of the area’s premier events and provides a great economic boon to the downtown. To volunteer, enter a chili team, or buy wristbands for the event, go to the website: westchesterchilicookoff.com

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WC DINING DIRECTORY Everything you need to answer the age-old question: What’s for dinner tonight?

P


Celebrate 2 years with us!

Time to party! Celebrate and shop with us as we ring in our 2 year anniversary on September 15th & 16th . Discounts • Beers on Tap • Lite bites Gift with Purchase! 29 S High St, WC • phineas-gage.com • 484.266.7344

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FELLINI CAFE

DOLCE ZOLA

BLARNEY STONE

BARNABY'S

BAR AVALON

ARIANNA'S CAFE

ANDIARIO

Restaurant

2 Waterview Rd 484.999.8407 fellinicafeofwc.com

134 E Gay St 484.887.0760 dolcezola.com

1227 West Chester Pk 610.436.5222 wcblarneystone.com

15 S High St 610.696.1400 barnabyswestchester.com

116 E Gay St 610.436.4100 avalonrestaurant.net

323 E Gay St 610.696.2910 orderariannas.com

106 W Gay St 484.887.0919 andiario.com

Contact Info

B, L, D

L, D

L, D

L, D

L, D

L, D

B, L

D

No

Yes

No

No

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

No

Meals Kids Menu Regular Entertainment

Full Bar

No

BYOB

BYOB

Full Bar

Full Bar

Full Bar

BYOB

BYOB

Alcohol Options

Cajun Cuisine

Diner-style

Italian

Northern Italian

Irish Fare

American Pub

Small Plates

Brunch-style

Italian Influenced

Known For...

$10-28

$9-33

$9-23

$11-30

$10-18

$9-20

$10-26

$8-13

$19-34

No

No

No

No

No

Yes

Yes

No

No

Entree Pricing Patio

No

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

No

No

Yes

No

P

GRAMM'S KITCHEN

557 E Gay St 610.429.3903 grammskitchen.com

L, D

Parking

HIGH STREET CAFFE

322 S High St 610.696.7435 highstreetcaffe.com

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Meals Kids Menu Regular Entertainment

Alcohol Options

Known For...

Yes

Entree Pricing Patio

No

P Contact Info

$12-30

Parking

Restaurant

Housemade Beer

No

Full Bar

Yes

No

No

$9-23

Yes

Yes

Irish Fare

$11-39

No

L, D

Asian Fusion

Yes

No

IRON HILL

Full Bar

Modern American $11-16

Yes

No

3 W Gay St 610.738.9600 ironhillbrewery.com

Yes

Full Bar

$14-33

No

No

Yes

No

Full Bar

Classic Italian

$8-13

No

Yes

L, D

Yes

Yes

Full Bar

Tea Time

Yes

$2-8

18 W Gay St 610.431.0770 kildarespubwc.com L, D

Yes

No

BYOB

$8-14

No

Local Vibe

KILDARES IRISH PUB

123 N Church St 610.430.8980 koomarestaurants.com L, D

Yes

No

100% Vegan

No

Full Bar

KOOMA

158 W Gay St 610.701.9900 landmarkamericana.com

L, D

No

No

Creative Breakfast $5-14

No

LANDMARK

9 N Walnut St 610.436.6230 limoncellorestaurant.com

L

No

No

No

LIMONCELLO

28 W Market St 610.696.2102

Yes

No

L, D

LINCOLN ROOM

L, D

No

146 W Gay St 610.696.0427

LOVE AGAIN LOCAL

18 S Church St 484.266.7381 loveagainlocal.com

B, L

JITTER'S

MARKET STREET GRILL

6 Market St 610.429.5328 themarketstreetgrill.com

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PIETRO'S

PENN'S TABLE

NUDY'S

NICK'S ROAST BEEF

MERCATO

MAS

Restaurant

124 W Market St 484.760.6100 pietrosprime.com

100 W Gay St 610.696.0677 pennstablerestaurant.com

300 W Market St 610.696.4550 nudyscafes.com

1215 West Chester Pk 484.999.8721 nicksroastbeef.com

33 Market St 610.701.6326 mercatowc.com

102 E Market St 610.918.6280 masmexicali.com

Contact Info

L, D

L, D

B, L

B, L

L, D

L, D

L, D

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

No

Yes

Meals Kids Menu Regular Entertainment

Full Bar

Full Bar

Full Bar

Full Bar

No

No

Full Bar

Full Bar

Full Bar

Alcohol Options

Elevated Pub Fare

Casual American

Pub Grub

Steaks

Classic Breakfast

Italian American

Mexican Cantina

Known For...

$7-19

$9-16

$9-45

$3-14

Creative Breakfast $8-13

Sandwiches

$10-21

$13-33

$3-21

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Entree Pricing Patio

Yes

No

No

No

No

Yes

Yes

No

No

P

RAM'S HEAD

40 E Market St 484.631.0241 ramsheadbarandgrill.com

L, D

Yes

Parking

RESTAURANT 51

30 N Church St 484.887.8004 51westchester.com

L, D

$5-10

RIGHTEOUS TAP HOUSE

1548 Shadyside Rd 484.593.0850 righteoustaphouse.com

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SPLIT RAIL TAVERN

SPICY PIG

SPENCE

SIDE BAR

SALOON 151

RYAN'S

ROOTS CAFE

Restaurant

15 N Walnut St 484.999.8805 splitrailtavern.com

234 W Market St 484.887.0081 spicypigcafe.com

131 N High St 610.918.1272 spence.cafe

10 E Gay St 610.429.8297 sidebarandrestaurant.com

151 W Gay St 610.701.8489 saloon151.com

124 W Gay St 610.344.3934 ryans-pub.com

133 E Gay St 610.455.0100 rootscafewc.com

Contact Info

L, D

L, D

B, L, D

L, D

L, D

L, D

L, D

B, L, D

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Meals Kids Menu Regular Entertainment

Full Bar

Full Bar

Full Bar

BYOB

BYOB

Full Bar

Full Bar

Full Bar

Full Bar

Alcohol Options

Southern Inspired

Italian Tapas

Craft Beer

Quick Meals

Creative Seafood

Craft Beer

Barbecue

Irish Fare

Farm to Table

Known For...

$11-29

$16-33

$14-26

$4-18

$10-35

$10-27

$9-15

$9-23

$12-32

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Entree Pricing Patio

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

P

TECA

38 E Gay St 610.738.8244 tecarestaurants.com

L, D

Parking

THE SOCIAL

117 E Gay St 610.738.3948 thesocialwc.com

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History & Culture

Chester County Historical Society explores the local past and it’s influence on our lives today.

Where could you enjoy a lively night out in West Chester 175 years ago? In the early 19th century, the Eagle Hotel, also known as the Spread Eagle, was one of several public houses in town. It offered food, drink, and friendly company for both locals and travelers, who might also wish to rent rooms and stable horses and carriages. This advertisement from the West Chester Register & Examiner, published in June of 1840, describes the varied services of the hotel. Imagine enjoying a beer with friends and shopping for a second–hand vehicle at the same establishment! Samuel Guss, and those who owned the Eagle Hotel before and after him, frequently advertised the tavern in the newspapers as well–stocked with quality food, and, just as importantly, refreshing drink. The building is no longer standing, but for almost a century, travelers and locals enjoyed West Chester night life at the Eagle Hotel.

And, best of all, a lively night out isn’t a relic of the past. You can enjoy a spooky evening at the Chester County Historical Society on Saturday, October 27, 6:30–10:30pm for our first annual Halloween Ball fundraiser. Guests will enjoy a live auction, music, costume contest, great food, and an open bar “supplied with every refreshment required at a well conducted” party. Check our website and Facebook page to see when tickets go on sale. This clipping comes from the Lorraine Carstairs Pierce Inns and Taverns Collection at the Chester County Historical Society Library, one of many manuscript collections documenting local history. Our library contains over 750,000 items that bring to life the people, places, and events of Chester County history. —cchs@thewcpress.com

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Spot the five differences in this photo of some of our favorite beers available at Spaz Beverage, then send your answer to contests@thewcpress.com, and you’ve got a chance to win a Barnaby’s gift certificate. Congrats to July’s winner, local bar expert and nightlife guru Bill Dugan, who spotted the five difference in our food issue feast!

SEPTEMBER 2018 THEWCPRESS.COM

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September Playlist DJ Romeo curates a list of the tracks you’ll be enjoying all summer long. The following is a list of songs that will take over the radio stations in the next few months. You’ll soon know them by heart and play them ‘til they’re tired. But, good news: you can download them first and look like the cool musical genius to all of your friends. djromeo@thewcpress.com

www.djromeo.fm | @DJRomeo24

Marshmello ft. Bastille – “Happier” Calvin Harris ft. Sam Smith – “Promises” Nicki Minaj ft. Eminem & Labrinth – “Majesty” Cole Swindell – “All Of It” Janet Jackson ft. Daddy Yankee – “Made For Now” Portugal, The Man – “Tidal Wave” Charlie Puth – “The Way I Am” Anne-Marie – “2002” PRETTYMUCH – “Summer On You” Zedd ft. Elly Duhe – “Happy Now” Cheat Codes x Little Mix – “Only You” MO & Diplo – “Sun In Our Eyes” Ella Mai – “Boo’d Up” Bazzi ft. Camila Cabello – “Beautiful” Uncle Kracker – “Floatin’” Death Cab for Cutie – “Thank You For Today” Paul McCartney – “Fuh You” Jubel ft. NEIMY – “Dancing In The Moonlight” Eric Church – “Heart Like A Wheel” The Knocks ft. Method Man – “Goodbyes” Gryffin ft. Ell Duhe – “Tie Me Down” Tory Lanez ft. Bryson Tiller – “Keep In Touch” Jillian Jacqueline ft. Keith Urban – “If I Were You” Old Dominion – “Bad At Love” Disturbed – “Are You Ready” Jess Glynne – “All I Am” Nicki Minaj – “Barbie Dreams” Twenty One Pilots – “Levitate” Little Birds – “Know You Better” Quavo – “W O R K I N M E”

SEPTEMBER 2018 THEWCPRESS.COM

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OCTOBER 5, 2018 First Friday • 5pm - 9pm (rain or shine)

Art shows throughout downtown West Chester. Bring friends and make an evening of it!

www.GreaterWestChester.com

+ 3 0 One-N

ight-Only Art Shows

Greater West Chester Chamber of Commerce, 137 North High Street, West Chester, PA 19380 | 610.696.4046 | info@gwcc.org

www.GreaterWestChester.com

#WCGalleryWalk

@GreaterWestChester

@GWCC_PA

SEPTEMBER 2018 THEWCPRESS.COM

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The WC Press Nightlife Issue - September 2018  

Voice of the Borough

The WC Press Nightlife Issue - September 2018  

Voice of the Borough